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Once-Secret ACTA Copyright Treaty Approved By EU

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the three-strikes-you-suck dept.

Privacy 255

itwbennett writes "By a vote of 331 to 294, the EU Parliament has approved the controversial and once-secret Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). According to an ITworld article, 'the most controversial paragraph in the final text leaves the door open for countries to introduce the so-called three-strikes rule. This would cut Internet users off if they download copyright material as national authorities would be able to order ISPs to disclose personal information about customers.... The proposed agreement would also place sanctions against any device or software that is marketed as a means of circumventing access controls such as encryption or scrambling that are designed to prevent copying. It also requires legal measures against knowingly using such technology.'"

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Cool! (4, Insightful)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336060)

Awesome! This just means higher adoption of encryption and more bodies on darknets!

Works for me, and, I suspect, most others here too.

Re:Cool! (5, Funny)

asvravi (1236558) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336138)

Strike one.

Re:Cool! (2, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336250)

I wish they'd use bowling instead of baseball for the number of strikes.

"Hey dude! I scored 300 with my ISP! I'm going to the library!"

Re:Cool! (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336316)

Using baseball analogies seems so out of touch. Even Americans as a whole don't really care that much about baseball anymore. Maybe yellow cards or fouls would be more appropriate.

Re:Cool! (4, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336348)

I wish that it was more like Golf.

Then if I didn't like that download I could call it a Mulligan, and if the ISP tells me I've got a Bogey all I have to do is get a Birdie next month and I'll make Par.

Then the Legalese can get extra convoluted.

Re:Cool! (5, Informative)

tenchikaibyaku (1847212) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336296)

Although I hold no real hope that ACTA will be shot down, the summary is - as far as I can see - at best misleading.
Quoting from Christian Engstroms blog [wordpress.com] :

This was a defeat, but it is far from the final word on the issue. The resolution has no formal effect at all, but is merely an expression of how the Parliament feels.

Re:Cool! (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336462)

so why does the slashdot link claim it passed? It has no weight currently, so it's not even really approved.

Re:Cool! (2, Funny)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336636)

Slashdot isn't staffed with people who understand the political structure of the EU?

Re:Cool! (1)

celle (906675) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337124)

"...people who understand..."

You mean slashdot is staffed by people, you can't tell by the summaries.

Once again (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336304)

A government demonstrates that it puts the interests of the rich above the interests of the many, even when the results mean plenty of injustice for the many.

Humans are not competent to govern themselves on a national level.

Re:Cool! (5, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336308)

Awesome! This just means higher adoption of encryption and more bodies on darknets!

The problem is you can't hide the data. The bit is either there, or it isn't. It's on or it's not. All you can do is apply statistical and mathematical formula and methods to the data in an attempt to obscure or distort the information to the point that it is no longer useful to anyone other than the intended recipient(s). And almost every method we have of creating plausible deniability is being hunted down by governments around the world. If they want it to stop, they just pass a law saying "If you can't give us the keys, methods, etc., used to mask, alter, obscure, etc., your data, we can simply throw you in jail."

In other words, the mere act of creating privacy between two entities will itself become a crime. That is the next step after ACTA. And it's already being planned.

Re:Cool! (4, Informative)

emkyooess (1551693) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336408)

Planned? Hasn't it happened in the UK?

Re:Cool! (1)

morcego (260031) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336508)

Yes, you can hide the data. Good enough encryption is indistinguishable from random noise.

There are several tools around that make that possible, and even more on the way.
 

Re:Cool! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336510)

How is this insightful? Have you ever heard of hiding data? If I'm sending you pictures where the least significant bit of each pixel is one bit in an encrypted file, how do you even know to look there? If I'm sending log files where the fifth bit of every line timestamped with a date that corresponds to an integer number, whose sum of its digits in hex is evenly divisible by 3.... you see where this is going.

Not to mention various encodings that aren't encryption, binary representations of data structures, etc. How do you know what is encryption and what is not?

Re:Cool! (3, Interesting)

Leynos (172919) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336724)

Trouble is, that's a lot of pictures you're going to have to send to embed a useful payload. Maybe you could set up something like a 1080p webcam looking out of your window so you have a constant stream of plausible signal in which to hide your "noise."

Re:Cool! (2, Funny)

teachknowlegy (1003477) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336554)

No worries, as by the time the law gets that far we can have quantum encryption, where the encryption may or may not be present at exactly the same time.

Re:Cool! (1)

gknoy (899301) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337028)

His point was, they can know that you're doing heavy traffic, but if your traffic is encrypted, they have to figure out whether you're sharing Batman or acting as a Linux mirror, or perhaps just VPNing into work and uploading lots of research data, or even mirroring the latest WoW patches. Even traffic analysis, which can reveal that you're sharing data with a thousand other hosts rather than primarily one or two (as one might in the case of a VPN), has a hard time distinguishing between infringing uses and non-infringing.

Re:Cool! (2, Informative)

kvezach (1199717) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337032)

Even if they take encryption away, there's always chaffing and winnowing. If you have a signature scheme and a naturally noisy channel, you can simply sign some packets with a valid signature and some with an invalid one - using realistic distortion of the valid signature - and communicate data that way. This would look little different from a channel where you're actually trying to communicate but where line noise is randomly corrupting your packets.

Re:Cool! (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336486)

most smart folks have been using encryption from day one and, what do ya know? they also never saw a single lawsuit threat or settlement letter, etc.

Re:Cool! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336638)

Awesome! This just means higher adoption of encryption and more bodies on darknets!
Works for me, and, I suspect, most others here too.

Terrorist!

Re:Cool! (3, Interesting)

julioody (867484) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336752)

"Gee, this guy is using encryption. We'll have to leave him alone then".

Or

"He's using encryption, so he must be a terrorist. Ship him to Gitmo".

Pick the one you think it's more likely.

Re:Cool! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34337056)

More likely in the short term or long term?

In the short term they'll be left alone, but if things continue as they are the gitmo option starts to look more likely.

It's time... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336134)

... to go kill some lobbyists.

Re:It's time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336342)

I heard they copyrighted an image of Muhammad.

No, lobbyists are but an instrument (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336704)

The people you want are the officers of MPAA/RIAA and their "constituent members." For bonus points, get their lawyers too. Unfortunately it would be illegal to do this. So don't try this at home kids...

Re:It's time... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336990)

Terrorism is modded "insightful"?

So when are they coming for us? (2, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336140)

So when will the cops nab me for watching DVDs I pay for or rent then play using libdvdcss?

Re:So when are they coming for us? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336186)

when you use your CC to pay you will automatically be deducted the value of the item * random n where n is somewhere between 1000 and 1000000

Re:So when are they coming for us? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336204)

They won't. They'll nab you for child pornography that appears on your desk an hour before the dawn raid.

Re:So when are they coming for us? (1)

gknoy (899301) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337052)

All the more reason to practice good network security, with lots of logs of traffic, so you can prove that you didn't download it, or that the intrusion came from elsewhere. OF course, good luck being able to find an expert witness who can back that up. Scary.

Old school? (2)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336144)

Guess this means I'll have to start buying CP'd things off the street and in person like days of old?

Re:Old school? (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336354)

I guess the key difference there is that you are going to start buying.

If it wasn't so easy to mass pirate, I would suggest that the black market street prices like in the old days might make a closer to actual value price point that the record and movie companies could shoot for and avoid piracy almost entirely.

How many moviez can you fit in my thumb drive? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336700)

The difference between free (as in beer) and the black market is probably going to be in the dimes per G's range. You walk into an unassuming kiosk or a shady hole-in-the-wall and hand over your microportable mass storage device and say, "Fill 'er up, mate"? In a few years, with advances in storage and transfer speeds, it'll probably be no different than free.

Re:Old school? (3, Insightful)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336848)

"I guess the key difference there is that you are going to start buying."

Good luck with that. Until my country's copyright law will be amended, I am still entitled to make copies of whatever non-DRM'd copyrighted work I want for my sole personal use. Not even ACTA changes anything about that - I would simply face harsher punishments for things I am already *not* allowed to do.

Re:Old school? (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336952)

Guess this means I'll have to start buying CP'd things off the street and in person like days of old?

Please read the above sentence I was replying to.

Then consider what I wrote again.

Good! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336158)

From there to banning FOSS, the slope is slippery...

Banning FOSS? Can't happen soon enough (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336206)

Good riddance to bad rubbish.

BTW the upcoming days will be hilarious listening to the yourapeeins whining about this. Hopefully all the eurotrash slashdotters get their internet connections cut off soon enough. Yes, yes, I know it was really "linux distros and public domain music/movies" you were torrenting not the latest Hollywood movie and Miley Cyrus CD *wink* *wink*

Re:Banning FOSS? Can't happen soon enough (3, Informative)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336644)

Yes, yes, I know it was really "linux distros and public domain music/movies" you were torrenting not the latest Hollywood movie and Miley Cyrus CD *wink* *wink*

I am 105% certain that when I pipe the latest Debian DVD into my sound card, it will sound much better than the latest Miley Cyrus CD.

Re:Banning FOSS? Can't happen soon enough (3, Funny)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336774)

A fan of datacore, are we?

Re:Good! (1)

mug funky (910186) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336588)

these are two different slopes. you can't slide from one to the other unless you're M.C. Escher.

I'm a little surpised (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336170)

I thought they weren't going to bother with it on account of not getting the geographical designators. Freedom on the internet may be dead, but at least my Kraft Parmesan cheese doesn't have to be renamed.

I'm torn on this (2, Insightful)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336172)

On the one hand I'm angry that it seems like they are cracking down on filesharers and have left open this "expansion slot" to fill in with whatever they want later. On the other hand, I'm even more angry that they are going to start cracking down on CD bootleggers. These people perform a great service for many poor kids who don't have a computer to download files or $15 bucks to buy from the store. These kids would end up stealing and getting into much worse trouble if it weren't for the ability to buy from bootleggers for pennies on the dollar.

By restricting the free flow of information, these cartels have created an artificial scarcity. They exploit this scarcity and the ones who suffer are the poor kids. I can't believe we are agreeing to such heinous terms.

Re:I'm torn on this (1, Insightful)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336442)

I'm even more angry that they are going to start cracking down on CD bootleggers. These people perform a great service for many poor kids who don't have a computer to download files or $15 bucks to buy from the store. These kids would end up stealing and getting into much worse trouble if it weren't for the ability to buy from bootleggers for pennies on the dollar.

Those kids could, you know, just not have a copy of the music. I don't know where this divine right to have stuff comes from.

Out of curiosity, when it comes to material goods, would you describe yourself as a capitalist? Because, absent artificial scarcity, how else can an author or programmer make money?

Re:I'm torn on this (4, Insightful)

alexborges (313924) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336532)

Whats "material" cost of music? Most of the cost comes from a distribution method that has been obsoleted in the digital age. This law only tries to impose limitations on a better and less costly way to get digital "wares", to save the ass of a distribution bussiness that is simply not needed anymore: music labels, cable companies, tv channels.

We should have ONE link, the internet, and content providers, both independent and from label and shit, competing together: THATS HOW CAPITALISM WORKS.

Protecting unnecesary monopolies with law is both plain stupid and a plain robbery from the people. We are supposed to do "as if", the internet wasnt there with regards to digitalizable content. But it is there. And digital content can travel through the net. That is "bad" for the distribution monopoly and they thus bought politicians to FUCK US ALL IN ALL OF THE WORLD.

THAT SUCKS.

Re:I'm torn on this (1)

mug funky (910186) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336658)

if i had mod points...

this is true. laws were never passed to give back jobs to all those people who were obsoleted by machines. i wonder why when the same thing happens to companies that laws are passed to protect obsolescence.

the future of distribution is in value-adds. not everyone will want a nice glossy boxset, or a laser etched cover image, or a little toy with their DVD/BD, but some people will.

the only way for economies of abundance and economies of scarcity to coexist while selling the same product is for the scarcity side to provide something that cannot be downloaded or copied easily. and that is physical objects.

the next big risk for distribution is when star trek style replicators become practical.

Re:I'm torn on this (1)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336922)

Laws were never passed to give back jobs to people obsoleted by machines because the owners of the machines were the same kind of industry mobsters who are now buying laws to restrict what you can or cannot do with your machines. Internet activism will never reach any result, witness the fiasco with the TSA scanner boycott. The only resort is violence: whether you like it or not, the 9/11 hijackers succeeded in changing the US from an international powerhouse into a whimpering, hysterical mob scared out of its wits.

Re:I'm torn on this (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337110)

None of this stuff just appears from nowhere. It requires musicians, producers, directors, actors, artists, developers and lots of other technical and administrative people to get it made in the first place. Should they all work for free just to keep cheapskates like you happy?

Re:I'm torn on this (1)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336536)

I am, above all, a humanitarian. If a small gesture on my part can have a large impact on someone else, I will willingly and without hesitation give my time and money.

I have received so much in this life. There are so many things I am truly blessed with. How can I not give back freely?

Some repay me with thanks. Others with donations. Others are inspired to pass along this gift of giving to others. And most of all, that is my most favorite repayment. To see a life that I've touched turn and become another brilliant point of light shining down, illuminating humanity.

Re:I'm torn on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336860)

To see a life that I've touched turn and become another brilliant point of light shining down, illuminating humanity.

(emphasis mine)

Sir, I have been accused of having a large ego, but I humbly defer to your hubris. At the very least, this was a Freudian slip.

Re:I'm torn on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336974)

Some repay me with thanks. Others with donations. Others are inspired to pass along this gift of giving to others. And most of all, that is my most favorite repayment. To see a life that I've touched turn and become another brilliant point of light shining down, illuminating humanity.

Thank you.

Re:I'm torn on this (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336570)

Those kids could, you know, just not have a copy of the music. I don't know where this divine right to have stuff comes from.

The fine arts are traditionally considered vital to a society, so much so that most first-world countries massively subsidize production of music and films. Some music labels stay afloat purely through subsidies or patronage even if they don't sell many CDs, and if the bills are already paid to the creators, it's hard to say that people copying CDs are depriving them of a livelihood.

Re:I'm torn on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336692)

Those kids could, you know, just not have a copy of the music. I don't know where this divine right to have stuff comes from.

Human nature. People see that others have things, and they want these things as well. Whit physical objects there's no real problem because only on person can have the object at one time, as such it's possible to protect and horde the object. However with an idea it's fundamentally different, the idea can be copied millions of times over with little overhead. As such it effectively cost nothing to duplicate and give ideas out. This mean that most people can't see a just reason not to share ideas and information, and if some one tries to artificially limit they are seen as the villain, because they are causing duress where there was originally none.

It's not a hard concept.

Out of curiosity, when it comes to material goods, would you describe yourself as a capitalist? Because, absent artificial scarcity, how else can an author or programmer make money?

They could start by billing by the hour to code a particular app, or they could do a first sale, where they produce a product then look for someone to buy it initially. There are many options out there, YOUR failure to find them shouldn't be my problem.

Capitalism gives you the right to sell what ever you want, it does not grant you the right to make money or the right to own ideas (which are fundamentally unownable). Locking down ideas will hurt the economy and us in the long run.

Re:I'm torn on this (3, Insightful)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336746)

Those kids could, you know, just not have a copy of the music. I don't know where this divine right to have stuff comes from.

Stopping someone from doing something that doesn't affect others is generally what needs a justification. The scarcity is what we are creating, so that is what needs something to back it up.

Because, absent artificial scarcity, how else can an author or programmer make money?

Several viable methods are available for authors to get money, and many would do things for the love of doing them, for fame, or because it enables other revenue streams. We had books and music before the Statute of Anne, after all.

Re:I'm torn on this (1)

RocketRabbit (830691) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336756)

Yeah, those poor poor kids, unable to play pirated games, watch pirated movies, and listen to pirated music.

The correct thing to do here is to eschew commercial media entirely. Libraries are free, and they are the proper place to go if you need a book.

A law that has been passed... (1)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336176)

... with no consultation of the people, and by an institution that many of us already consider to be nowhere near democratically accountable enough.

Do they expect us to follow it?

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336224)

Do they expect us to follow it?

Because you're going to do anything beyond whining about it in your parent's basement?

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336326)

Ignore it? Tell them to go fuck themselves? Vote for anti-EU parties? etc.

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336338)

So basically you will do what amounts to nothing.

Re:A law that has been passed... (4, Informative)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336662)

They still riot in the streets against perceived injustice in Europe.

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336648)

Vote for anti-EU parties?

Just because of a single bad law passed by Congress, would you recommend people vote for parties seeking to undo the Constitution and return the nation to the Articles of Confederation or a band of independent states? While everyone has a few complaints about this or that feature of the EU, support for disbanding it is very low except for a tiny, but loud, minority. That's particularly true among the young, who have gotten used to things like Eramus, EVS, a single currency and not having to change money every 200 km, the freedom to go work in some other European country that tickles their fancy, no more internal passport checks, etc.

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336934)

"The freedom to be unemployed in some other European country..." FTFY.

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

transfatfree (1920462) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337002)

people retain the right to vote for political parties while being objectively ignorant.

they will fight for this right.

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

cobrausn (1915176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336248)

Of course they do, peasant. Mind your betters.

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

Jackie_Chan_Fan (730745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336318)

Comply or Die...

Government says so.

But in CrazyWorld corporations are people (1)

bledri (1283728) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336324)

... with no consultation of the people, and by an institution that many of us already consider to be nowhere near democratically accountable enough.

Do they expect us to follow it?

According to Unequal Protection by Thom Hartmann [amazon.com] , we've been putting up with it for decades in the US. And now that the SCOTUS says money == speech and corporations == people, we're totally screwed.

riasing to a higher plane (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336924)

No worries, citizen! You can upgrade your status by incorporation for a low fee [legalzoom.com] . Then you too, can enjoy all of the rights, with none of the responsibilities of a living, breathing hoo-man being.

Actually, I thought the entities we refer to as "corporations" were non-corporeal. So does that make them spirits?

Re:A law that has been passed... (1)

Caerdwyn (829058) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336446)

... with no consultation of the people, and by an institution that many of us already consider to be nowhere near democratically accountable enough.

Do they expect us to follow it?

Cops have guns that say you will. Don't think it will come to that? Look at what can happen to people who have a nickel bag.

If this becomes law, it will be abused, as all laws which are pretexts for invasive searches are.

Re:A law that has been passed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336890)

with no consultation of the people

There have been such. It is called "Voting" (actual term may vary for your native language). What would you want? Door to door polls? The problem is that most of the people are not informed enough or don't care enough, not that they couldn't have a say here if they wanted to.

by an institution that many of us already consider to be nowhere near democratically accountable enough.

If you think that a law was passed (IE: Didn't notice any glaring errors in TFS/TFA) you probably aren't well enough informed on EU/ACTA that your opinions would have much weight.

Even ignoring that, this public vote wasn't in comission but in the parliament. The body we elect directly. I don't see how you could get more democratical accountability. If they don't face consequences, it is simply because most of the people really don't care that much. Perhaps we (perhaps even you?) should have done more to raise public awareness instead of complaining that the institution isn't accountable enough.

Do they expect us to follow it?

Technically, they expect the member states to follow it. Which they will. (If this law actually gets passed next year)

background and swpats (4, Informative)

ciaran_o_riordan (662132) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336238)

Background info:

http://en.swpat.org/wiki/Anti-Counterfeiting_Trade_Agreement_overview [swpat.org]

On the software patent problems (or patents "in the Digital Environment"), it seems most or maybe all have been fixed (provided the the signatory uses the Section II option of excluding patents from that section) but a thorough reading is still needed:

http://en.swpat.org/wiki/ACTA_and_software_patents [swpat.org]

they work fast (1)

bugi (8479) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336252)

That was fast. Did they not read and discuss it, or were they simply in on it from the beginning?

Re:they work fast (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336370)

The "once secrete" part of the story should have indicated that this has been around a long time before we started talking about it. They were most likely in it from the start.

Re:they work fast (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336856)

I seem to recall the EU parliament complaining about the negotiations being secret.

Re:they work fast (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336968)

Was it the EU parliament or people in the EU.

I fear for Canada (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336258)

I have often felt we are one of the more sane countries with respect to the digital age, but seeing this I believe we are all F***ed.

I guess I should start voting Pirate party.

Re:I fear for Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336362)

"You won't recognize Canada when I get through with it" -- Stephen Harper
 
Voting for anybody other than that right wing douchebag would probably have covered it.. but it's a bit late now

Re:I fear for Canada (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336448)

I think Canada failed at the digital age when they charged a tax on recordable CDs just because you MIGHT burn pirated content to the CD!

Re:I fear for Canada (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336764)

I think it's better than the US method - those who buy blank CD's only have to put in pennies more and support Canadian Artists and you don't get people's Lives ruined due to crazy lawsuits.

Call it crazy - but it keeps musicians happy, keeps the people happy, and isn't a giant FU to the States.

Re:I fear for Canada (1)

suutar (1860506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336832)

Don't knock it. Because of that, they are in fact allowed to download stuff and burn it to the CD, by Canadian case law. After all, they already paid for it.

Re:I fear for Canada (1)

colesw (951825) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336490)

Canada is part of the EU?

Re:I fear for Canada (1)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336686)

Does it matter?
Canada is a lemming when it comes to things like this.

Patent on life and seeds: check
Software patents: check
body scanners: check
DMCA/ACTA: In progress
Constitution free zone: TBD
Police state: TBD

Re:I fear for Canada (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336912)

Does THAT matter?

You mention all those things like they are terribly bad, Patents are a good idea but just terribly implemented. We're a lemming on things like that because they generally don't affect us. And when they do, (like Copyright issues) we just work our way around it (Blank CD Tax).
DMCA and ACTA? Let them come. The people will complain, we actually still hold some influence over the government. If they don't take it away, they'll at least make some kind of legal loophole for the people to exploit. Or they'll get voted out, and the next government will.

As a side note I went to San Fran this February and I did not have to go through a Body Scanner, it wasn't even an option, and the "Pat Down" I recieved was less than that at a local bar, he basically went to my knees and stopped. I'll be going to Washington in a few weeks and I also don't expect any issues.

Really Canada is pretty laid back when it comes to things like this, even if we've technically implemented them. The law may be stringent but the enforcement is lax.

The EU... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336288)

Is now OFFICIALLY our bitch. Any doubt there once was is now gone.

Ahhhhhh stop your argument right there. You're our bitch. Now go get me some beer and chips before i backhand you.

And put on something sexy like the whore you are.

All righty then... (0, Offtopic)

countSudoku() (1047544) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336292)

Keep your 10" Android Tablets off my fairly used Righthaven Once-Secret ACTA Copyright Treaty articles, before I come down on you like a Spring Dynamic Module In Action, Cuz'!

Been there already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336488)

The Church has already forced ridiculous stuff on people in order to protect its interests. It hasn't helped us progress as a society and we've had to break free of that in order to allow ideas to be researched on and technology being developed.

The government should avoid going down the same path in order to protect private interests. It won't help us progress as a society and we'll have to break free of that in order to allow ideas to be researched on and technology being developed through competition once again.

Re:Been there already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336592)

And by "through competition once again" you actually mean "copy some proprietary piece of software half-assed", right? This seems to be the FOSS version of what the term means.

Re:Been there already (2, Informative)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336728)

It's interesting that you bring the church up as an obstacle to new ideas, research and technology when it was the church that created the very university system that is used to spread new ideas, research and technology (along with the modern court system, hospitals, etc.). Not that I am an apologist for the church (big C or little c), but I do think that if one is to spout off, they should at least get their facts straight.

History Repeats Itself... (1)

BerretSO4 (934290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336494)

Wasn't there a three-strike rule for terrorism, too? [/tongue]

Can we just RBL these people? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336502)

It's a problem even more insidious then spam. So why not take our open sourced projects, that we freely give our time, skill and money too, and instead of letting these content owners use them freely against us, place restrictions right back on them? We can create a completely opt-in RBL, just like we do for spam, and encourage ISPs to block access to those on the blacklist.

It's an inconvenience sometimes not getting an email I wanted and it might be an inconvenience to have sony or abode blackholed for a few days but I think that problem will solve itself a lot faster then spam has, using the same techniques. We don't have to work in the legal system exclusively. Sometimes it's important to remind law makers that it is only by our continued tolerance that laws are allowed power. When they cross some lines then we can always just go around the process.

Alright, Europe. You still know how to riot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336524)

Unlike Americans, you still got some fire though I imagine you'll need a guillotine or two.

Do you hear it? (1)

Grapplebeam (1892878) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336600)

It sounds like... OH BOY! It's the Godwin's Law train!

Mission accomplished (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336720)

This is what happens when the general public is too complacent and too ill educated to recognize fascism. The corporate sponsors of our "Leadership" are laughing hysterically behind the curtains, especially since they are essentially unassailable. Nobody would confess to have been seduced by simple old fascism again, right? So anyone who points it out will be met with flat out denial, no matter what. It can't happen, by definition, which makes it so much easier to get away with. Just as Hitler said, "Lie big, and people will never realize it's a lie, because people will never imagine anyone would be audacious enough to tell such lies." Fuck. This is really bad.

Is johnnie copying a cd the real issue? (2, Interesting)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336754)

The real problem is not the occasional copying of a CD for ones personal use, heck, it might not be the same quality, but you can record it off the radio. The real problem is the wholesale mass production of reproducing copyrighted material. Most of this occurs in South East Asia. So, exactly how will passage of ACTA stop it?

Was voting anonymous? (1)

plaukas pyragely (1630517) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336782)

If not, anyone knows if it's possible to get a list of EP members voted for this?

Re:Was voting anonymous? (4, Informative)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336898)

Re:Was voting anonymous? (1)

SirJorgelOfBorgel (897488) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337120)

I don't get it. That page seems like the right page to me too, but it also says they DECLINED on ACTA with 306 votes for and 322 votes against.

So what gives ? Can anyone explain ?

It's meaningless (1)

Pop69 (700500) | more than 3 years ago | (#34336804)

The European Parliament has absolutely zero legislative power, it's only there to make a noise and keep hasbeen politicians in an all expenses "job"

Re:It's meaningless (1)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337040)

Unfortunately, the European Commission (which is on the industry lobbies' payroll) will approve it as well. The European Parliament is the only institution that paid at least lip service to democratic rule, and who had until now resisted the lobbyists' pressure. Since this bastion has fallen to almighty bribe, it is now war. The soap box has failed, they didn't listen. The ballot box has failed, they're all bought. The jury box has failed, the laws have been paid for. The ammo box is all that remains. Industry lobbyists, lawyers, politicians who support them and every agency connected to the industry mob is a legitimate target.

mo3 dowN (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34336862)

vitality. Its paper towels, gran3standers, the

Mixed feeling about this.... (1)

plusser (685253) | more than 3 years ago | (#34337026)

I have some rather mixed feeling about this....

On one hand your have the music and film industry complaining about piracy of their product and being completely ignorant that their business model is out of date.

On the other hand there is the chance of counterfeit components appearing on cars, trains or aircraft that produce a serious hazard in a situation where potentially lives are at risk.

Mind you we have a third problem in that we have fake politicians that don't really know anything but what their advisors tell them.

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