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New MacBook Pros To Sport Light Peak Technology

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the obsoleting-your-dongles dept.

Intel 356

An anonymous reader writes "Over the past few years, Apple has systematically upgraded the base level MacBook to a level where the difference between the Pro and consumer models were arguably becoming negligible. That's about to change. Apple will reportedly introduce a completely re-designed MacBook Pro this April that will borrow features from the recently released MacBook Air. The new Pros will reportedly come with an SSD and Light Peak technology, a transfer protocol capable of 10 Gbps both up and down. Light Peak, jointly developed by Intel and Apple, will reportedly be an Apple exclusive at first."

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356 comments

STEVE JOBS WILL NOW BLOW YOU !! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34352808)

You lucky dog you !!

Gotta hand it to you Taco !!

Fantastic (2, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352832)

Apple customers will subsidize the adoption of this technology, so I can buy a similar laptop in 6 mos for much cheaper.

Thank you Steven Q Jobs! :)

Re:Fantastic (0, Redundant)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352890)

Mac people ...

Now as for light peak, here's why you should get excited. Really excited. Light Peak is an emerging technology capable of transferring huge chunks of data with blazing speed. We're talking about 10 Gbps both up and down. So yeah, we're talking about a huge technological leap here.

So what is it? A connectivity alternative? Network replacement? 10 Gbps? Really? And I should be impressed why?

Or is it wireless? Somewhat better. But still? Yawn?

That make it "pro"?

Yawn twice.

Re:Fantastic (5, Informative)

Samalie (1016193) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352986)

Light Peak is a design that is intended to replace the myriad of bus technologies present in the average computer.

For example...in my current rig, I have IDE, SATA (both 1.5 and 3gb versions, no SATA/6Gb),eSATA, USB & Firewire.

Light Peak is an optical technology eventually destined to replace all these different specifications into one 10GB/s-capable-today bus, with speeds expected to reach 100GB/s+ by 2020.

(All this info, and more, from TFA)

Re:Fantastic (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34352992)

You should be excited because it allows protocols over LightPeak transport and is fast enough to actually handle it. That means we may finally have one connector type for network, display, peripheral, whatever...

Re:Fantastic (1, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353080)

Or, alternatively another dead end like Firewire.

Re:Fantastic (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353422)

Firewire is dead? Really? I wonder how my 5TB or so of external storage is accessible... I must look into that.

Re:Fantastic (2, Insightful)

Macrat (638047) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353234)

So what is it? A connectivity alternative? Network replacement? 10 Gbps? Really? And I should be impressed why?

If LightPeak had USB in the name, you would probably be posting how great it will be.

Re:Fantastic (5, Insightful)

bonch (38532) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353326)

So what is it? A connectivity alternative? Network replacement? 10 Gbps? Really? And I should be impressed why?

Here you go. [lmgtfy.com]

Yawn twice.

Don't worry. Like USB in the 90s, this technology will eventually become standard on PCs thanks to Apple forcing device manufacturers to support it for the Mac. And, like before, PC users won't acknowledge yet another one of Apple's contributions to computing standards. Instead, like always, there will be more outdated one-button mouse jokes.

Re:Fantastic (1)

History's Coming To (1059484) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353514)

My girlfriend (yes, really! ;) ) was asking me this morning if I knew where she could buy an as-new MacBook from circa 2007. She wants a Mac but can't afford the latest model, whereas I quite happily pootle along on a £200 netbook. Seriously, Apple could make a killing by producing a really budget level MacBook rather than ever more expensive ones with...er....well I'm not entirely sure what they've introduced, but it's not as useful as, you know, a cheap portable Mac that people can afford to get them out of the Windows cycle....

Re:Fantastic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34352902)

yah and they'll be able to use it with absolutely nothing else since nothing else will support it. how often do apple users link up over a cable anyway? that wouldn't make them look cool on the coffee shop circuit.

Re:Fantastic (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34352910)

After spending $2,500 on a Mac, you get about 3 months of superiority feeling until the thing is clearly obsolete.

Ah, I just figured out the optimal apple spending habits:

Year 1: buy $2,000 laptop + $500 phone
Year 2: buy $2,500 desktop

Cycle for ever.

Of course, there are a few other yearly expenses such as phone case, a couple adapter cables, mobileme subscription. And the occasional iPad.

Re:Fantastic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353054)

Re:Fantastic (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353096)

Please tell me you aren't trying to argue that integrated graphics, a Core 2 Duo, and 2GB of RAM in a cheap plastic case with soldered-in battery for $1000 is anything approaching a good deal.

Re:Fantastic (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353184)

look, when you buy a mac you are paying the equivalent of a self-imposed fine on stupidity - we all know this.

it's not as if the quality of the internal parts is going to make any difference to the perceived value of one of these shithouses, lets face it.

leave apple alone

Re:Fantastic (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353510)

This is not a troll, mods!

Re:Fantastic (4, Interesting)

bennomatic (691188) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353120)

Hm. I like apple products, and some here have accused me of being a fanatic. But looking at my history, it's more like this:

Year 1: buy $1100 laptop. Give old laptop to wife.
Year 2: remain happy with laptop.
Year 3: remain happy with laptop.
Year 4: remain happy with laptop.
Year 5: Wife spills coffee on her laptop. Give "new" laptop to wife, buy $1100 laptop.
All years: Consider phone, put it off for a year because work pays for crappy blackberry.
This past year: Consider iPad, put it off for the time being.

I guess I'm just not enough of a zealot.

Re:Fantastic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353528)

I guess if I made my living begging my mom for enough my money to stuff my fat basement-dwelling face with McDonald's cheeseburgers, actually spending money on a computer would bug me.

Also you got the prices wrong, but don't worry, it didn't weaken your point since you didn't have one anyway.

Re:Fantastic (0)

Totenglocke (1291680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353202)

Apple customers will subsidize the adoption of this technology, so I can buy a similar laptop in 6 mos for much cheaper.

Thank you Steven Q Jobs! :)

Quite true, and based on Apple's advertising and my own person experiences with Mac users, they won't even know / care about the new technology. I'm not bashing Mac users here, just pointing out that (with the exception of two people I know who are IT consultants), all the Mac users I know have little understanding about hardware, nor do they care to know about the hardware.

Re:Fantastic (1)

Knuckles (8964) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353312)

Imagine this ... hold your breath ... they may care what they can *do* with the hardware.

Re:Fantastic (4, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353562)

Apple customers will subsidize the adoption of this technology, so I can buy a similar* laptop in 6 mos for much cheaper.

* For sufficiently loose definitions of "similar".

FireWire? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34352844)

If you use FireWire, you can kiss it goodbye. Apple will probably remove it and replace it with LightPeak.

There's also rumors that they're dropping the optical drive. That makes room for a better CPU, better GPU and bigger batteries. Still need an optical drive? Use an external one connected via USB.

Re:FireWire? (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352968)

Why USB when you have Light Peak on board?

Makes you wonder how durable these fiber cables and connectors are going to be.

And does it run Linux?

Re:FireWire? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353000)

Apple already has an external USB Superdrive available for sale.

Re:FireWire? (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353204)

Carefully suited only to the nonstandard power-delivery of the macbook air's single USB port, for your Universal serial bus convenience...

Re:FireWire? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353270)

Also works on the new Mac minis. The port is standard as far as connector and data go, but they use double the 500mA specified by the USB specs.

It probably will work with all newer Mac models from now on. Nothing prevents other companies to also support 1A through their USB ports. If enough of them do it, it could become USB 2.1 or something.

Re:FireWire? (1)

644bd346996 (1012333) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353418)

From what I recall, all Macs for the past 2 years or so have supported much-higher-than-spec currents over USB so that they can charge iPods and iPhones more quickly.

Re:FireWire? (1)

pankkake (877909) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353538)

USB 3.0 raises the 500mA limit to 900mA. Why create a nonstandard extension when there is a standard one?

Re:FireWire? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353262)

This device only works with Macbook Airs, not with Macbook Pros or any other Mac products. Don't ask me why.

Re:FireWire? (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353484)

Good riddance to optical drives. Outside of spending a few minutes trying to get a Playstation emulator working, I haven't used one in at least a year - including an OS reinstall; I haven't used optical media on a regular basis since probably 2005. For the longest time I've been hoping someone will make an adapter which will allow me to swap my DVD drive for an additional battery, something that I haven't seen as an option since using a Thinkpad Ultrabay [thinkwiki.org] probably fifteen years ago. If Apple finally does this across their entire laptop line rather than just the Airs, so much the better.

Re:FireWire? (2, Interesting)

spyfrog (552673) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353532)

Some of us watch DVDs using these optical drives you know...
It is especially nice if you is on a business trip and want to see a movie - you only need to go down to the gas station and rent it and it will fit right into your laptop. So until we have another way of renting movies (and preferable not over Internet since that would be slow when you connect from hotels or with a 3g modem) I would like to keep the DVD drive.

Light Peak? (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352878)

I thought they discontinued that technology in favour of USB 3...

Now the most obvious reaction is to just say "Meh, apple can play around with their expensive toys".

But history has shown that within 1 month we'll have SUPER LAPTOPS with this technology in them.

I can't understand anything...

Re:Light Peak? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352912)

I think they want to make USB 3 obsolete before it has a chance to really take off. Yes, I'm sure you can give me real-world examples of USB 3 hardware already for sale but it's not widespread yet.

I'd bet that there's more DisplayPort/mini DisplayPort hardware than USB 3 hardware at this point.

Re:Light Peak? (2, Insightful)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352952)

I think lightpeak is both much faster and much more versatile, and aims to replace usb, firewire, dvi, hdmi, even ethernet. this may be a good thing, because my experience with USB ( and , no yet) has been quite bad, from compatibility issues, to slow transfers, to high cpu usage. I lamented the fact that firewire was not cheaper and more widespread... maybe i'll get my wish with lighpeak.

Re:Light Peak? (1)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353164)

What are your compatibility issues with USB? The only compatibility issue I have with USB is when I try to plug the damn thing in upside down.

Re:Light Peak? (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353276)

I assume he refers to the unfortunate mixture of optimism, on the part of peripheral manufacturers, and strict adherence, on the part of some computer makes and models, to the USB spec's sections on power delivery. USB2 is quite clear about 5VDC, 500ma; but devices that work poorly, partially, or not at all without at least a few hundred ma more are downright ubiquitous. How exactly a fiber optic interface is going to solve that particular market problem is utterly beyond me; but it is a pain in the ass in some USB situations(mind you, firewire was even worse, since the spec explicitly allowed ports to deliver almost whatever they wanted...)

The only other compatibility issue is with drivers; but USB's "classes" are probably the closest thing to a solution we've yet seen. The world is still replete with non-class-conformant widgets; but it isn't clear how a new bus is going to solve that...

Re:Light Peak? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353242)

It'll be a cold day in hell before anything replaces ethernet. Do you have any idea what the install base on that stuff is? and the fact that(aside from autonegotiation issues on some chipsets) you can get anything from 10mbit crap with external AUI dongles to contemporary 1Gb gear happily chatting away on even a fairly cheap switch?

The consumer market is, increasingly, wireless for anything that isn't within a few meters of the ugly-stack-o-network-gear that inevitably collects next to the DSL or cable modem; so there is approximately zero interest there in experiencing the joy of dealing with optical fiber just to get a 10Gb/s connection to the cable modem that is doing 20mbit/s with a following wind. On the corporate side, the idea that fiber-to-the-desk is going to replace dirt cheap copper seems equally implausible...

There's still hope (3, Interesting)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352880)

Let's drop VGA, DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, FireWire 400, FireWire 800, USB 3 and only use two types of ports: USB 2.0 for the low-cost/low-bandwidth stuff and LightPeak for everything else.

Wait, what about my old EZ135 SCSI drive? Those carts have 135 MEGABYTES each! That's a lot of data! Oh, my USB flash drive can store 118 of those carts, never mind.

Re:There's still hope (1)

whiteboy86 (1930018) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352976)

drop VGA, DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, FireWire 400, FireWire 800, USB 3 and only use two types of ports

iPad dropped even the USB port, just Wi-Fi everything. Cables and ports are so last century for the Q guy from Cupertino.

Re:There's still hope (2, Insightful)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353038)

Cables are a bit annoying for something you're supposed to be holding in your arms and walking around with.

Re:There's still hope (1)

AaronW (33736) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353558)

But USB is still quite useful for connecting things like SD readers (or better yet, have a SD reader slot) and thumb drives for data transfer. Not everything can easily be done over wireless.

Re:There's still hope (1)

frosty_tsm (933163) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353060)

There is an adapter for USB-in so you can download pictures from a camera straight to the iPad. You're comment is still valid since a very small number of iPad owners would buy it.

Re:There's still hope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353542)

There is an adapter for USB-in so you can download pictures from a camera straight to the iPad. You are comment is still valid since a very small number of iPad owners would buy it.

Does this make any sense to you? No, right? Then don't type it like that.

I don't do this all the time, but "your" <-> "you're" sounds too stupid to pass.

Re:There's still hope (4, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353068)

and LightPeak for everything else.

Will lightpeak be able to power my external hard drive? Will it charge my HD video camera while I pull video off it? Is it easily adaptable to HDMI? My new TV doesn't have a lightpeak port, and I'm not interested in buying another tv to get one.

I can hdmi cables for under $10. How long before lightpeak cables are that cheap?

DisplayPort is fine and all, but the adaptor to connect my macbook to my tv cost a small fortune, and it uses the headphone jack for optical audio, the displayport for video, and the usb port to power the adapter that converts it all to hdmi. A good PC laptop comes with an HDMI port... which just works with external equipment.

Hey apple, I'm onboard with modernizing connectors and letting the legacy fall away. Your switch to USB was welcome (although your awfully stingy with ports.)

But every generation of your laptop doesn't need a whole new video connection. PCs are going from VGA to HDMI. That makes sense. Macs... started with some apple proprietary garbage, to mini dvi, to mini displayport, and now on to light peak... 4 separate connectors in the same period of time, while managing to bypass anything that anyone actually uses for anything else.

LightPeak sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353238)

and LightPeak for everything else.

LightPeak is a product that just won't make it I'm afraid. And like other Intel products, it just doesn't measure up and is inadequate.

My benchmarks?

I'm using the same standards that Intel used when they moved their R&D overseas because they "couldn't find qualified Americans".

If they can lie and make bogus qualifications, so can I and vote with my money.

Re:There's still hope (1)

acromosh (1645811) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353362)

Firewire 400 is important for audio engineers. It transfers with data streams rather than bursts. Until audio waves start organising themselves into uniformly arranged packets, I'm using firewire 400.

Oh, come on, ir's a rumor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34352882)

How many Apple rumors have been wrong over the years? It's much more likely they'd introduce this in the Mac Pro first.

Screw macbooks, I want an HBA! (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352884)

If Light Peak is everything it's cracked out to be, I want to see it replace idiotic Infiniband and FC on HBAs, stat! We've been stuck on these outdated interfaces for far too long.

Re:Screw macbooks, I want an HBA! (0, Flamebait)

amorsen (7485) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353178)

Hasn't ethernet pretty much won over Fibre Channel?

Re:Screw macbooks, I want an HBA! (1)

Darkinspiration (901976) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353432)

Tel that to my SAN.... Frankly i would welcome something to make fiberchannel configuration less of a pain.

"jointly developed by Intel and Apple" (1)

Elbart (1233584) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352966)

Anybody got a source for that? Other than an Apple-fanboy-page.

Re:"jointly developed by Intel and Apple" (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353084)

Anybody got a source for that? Other than an Apple-fanboy-page.

The LightPeak page at Intel Research [intel.com]doesn't even mention Apple at all, but do mention partners like Sony and several others.

Some tech sites, blogs and fanboy pages have been posting claims/rumours of Apple involvement, but with Intel not acknowledging this, and even promoting Sony and others as partners, it doesn't seem very likely.

Usefulness of Light Peak? (1)

fluffy99 (870997) | more than 3 years ago | (#34352974)

So Apple is finally catching up with SSDs in laptops. Light Peak is still in its infancy and useless as there are no devices to connect to it yet. Why pay more for something that should be standard now, and something that it's going to be useful until he laptop is well past its prime?

Re:Usefulness of Light Peak? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353032)

The laptop's release is five months away, and between now and then we'll probably see some devices come on the market hoping to capitalize on the new market.

Re:Usefulness of Light Peak? (3, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353044)

Chicken and Egg.

If laptops have the ports people will develop devices for it. That Macs are -known- to be coming with them then it's highly likely that peripheral manufacturers are creating devices that use it to be ready for the release.

Re:Usefulness of Light Peak? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353058)

The same could almost be said for USB 3. What's the point of USB 3 when there's eSATA? USB 3 is too slow for connecting a monitor, we already have ethernet ports... You either move forward or you'll get stuck with parallel ports, serial ports, SCSI, etc.

It's also a chicken-egg problem, device manufacturers won't make anything compatible with LightPeak until there is at least some computers with it.

Re:Usefulness of Light Peak? (1)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353146)

Finally catching up? They were the first to offer SSD as a standard drive. As far as I know, they are still the only manufacturer to do so. The others still offer it as an upgrade, but not baseline as Apple has started to do. You'll also be hard pressed to find manufacturer's offering 512 GB SSD drives from the factory, also as Apple is already doing.

As to the 'why', Light Peak to USB adapters will most likely be an easy win for manufacturer's who aren't yet ready to make the jump to Light Peak, meaning it could easily support USB 'ports' out of the box even though it uses Light Peak underneath.

Re:Usefulness of Light Peak? (1)

amorsen (7485) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353196)

It's hard to see why "taking away the choice between a traditional hard drive and SSD" would be innovation. Why would it be innovation that something is baseline rather than only fitted on certain models?

Re:Usefulness of Light Peak? (1)

Winckle (870180) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353322)

Because it means the size of the laptop can be greatly reduced as the chassis no longer has to account for a hard drive bay.

Re:Usefulness of Light Peak? (1)

fluffy99 (870997) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353464)

It's hard to see why "taking away the choice between a traditional hard drive and SSD" would be innovation. Why would it be innovation that something is baseline rather than only fitted on certain models?

I wouldn't call it innovation either, but a design choice. It does give better speed, albeit typically lower capacities. They might even go proprietary on the SSD and not use the standard form factor for an SSD drive or include it on the mainboard, allowing them to gain real estate within the chassis. Imho, that would be a mistake, but then again how many MacBook owners actually upgrade components instead of buying a who new unit?

Someone learned a new word today (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353014)

you know, reportedly...

are we in for $30+ adapters to use usb e-net dvi v (4, Insightful)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353020)

are we in for $30+ adapters to use usb e-net / dvi / vga / hdmi / display port / firewire?

Does ATI and NVIDIA video work over light-peak? Or will you need some kind of voodoo 1 daisy-chained cable setup?

also what about mouses and key boards light peak is extreme overkill in them?

What will light peak hubs and cables cost?

how much power can a cable pass?

Will you need a powered hub / powered adapters for DVI / VGA / Display port out?

they need to keep the Ethernet port.

What about sound?

Re:are we in for $30+ adapters to use usb e-net dv (1)

pankkake (877909) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353332)

how much power can a cable pass?

This is a very good question, still unresolved. Funny how people state LightPeak will replace everything, yet we don't even know what it is supposed to be.

Re:are we in for $30+ adapters to use usb e-net dv (1)

Ricken (797341) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353366)

Or you could have 1 universal adapter with all those ports connected to a single Light Peak port.

Re:are we in for $30+ adapters to use usb e-net dv (3, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353378)

Well who knows how it will work in Apple land. They are known for forcing changes because they think they are cool, whether it is time or not. For other manufacturers, Light Peak is just going to be another port at first. It isn't going to replace anything. Capabilities aside, you need to wait as peripherals get support. The first things I expect to see are external HDDs, and things like pro audio/video capture equipment. Video is going to be some time. No monitor today supports Light Peak (and relatively few even support DP) so it'll be some time. If it is to gain any traction, it'll have to have an interface to work with the high end discrete cards.

Even then it may need to develop a generation or so before it is useful 10gbps is not fast when you talk video. It is acceptable, but not fast. DP has 17gbits of bandwidth with its current standard, HDMI has 10gbits. So it is around as fast as current video standards, but offers no real speed advantage, which is really what it would take to force a change at this point. HDMI is heavily entrenched because it is what home theater gear uses. The reason to move to somethign else would be higher resolution, colour depth, and frame rate displays will need more. Say we want 2560x1600@30bpp@120Hz. That would need about 15gbits so DP could barely handle it, but nothing else. Now suppose we go with a 4k display, and 96bpp (32-bit floating point per colour to allow for HDR) again at 120Hz. Now we need 108gbps. So if a connector can offer much higher bandwidths, there'll be interest as we eventually want that for video, but at 10gbps Light Peak offers nothign the current ones don't. If Intel let's nVidia and AMD support it they probably will, but otherwise people will give it a miss.

For networking, no fucking way. Networking is stuck on Ethernet because networking uses Ethernet. It sounds like a tautology and that is really how it works. All local area nets are Ethernet. As such you have to support Ethernet to use them. As such all devices ship with Ethernet, as such all future stuff has to support it and so on. Nobody is going to redo their network to Light Peak. This is particularly true because 10gbE is already here, and really with networks even 1gig is really fast. Your network is local disk speed at that point. So you aren't going to convince people to dump their existing infrastructure for it.

In the long run Light Peak may become a popular somewhat universal computer interconnect but it is not happening any time soon. If Apple thinks they can force it they are wrong (for that matter they didn't force USB adoption, Mac users had to deal with it and then the industry moved that way at its own pace). However networking it will probably never replace, just because of the massive installed base of Ethernet.

Re:are we in for $30+ adapters to use usb e-net dv (1)

donstenk (74880) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353430)

Everybody knows mice and keyboards are only Bluetooth.

isn't exclusivity counterproductive? (1)

YesIAmAScript (886271) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353030)

If this is true, someone really doesn't get it.

The usefulness of a port is directly proportional to the number of things you can connect to it. Exclusivity means fewer devices available.

I'd much rather have USB 3.0 than any kind of exclusive port.

Isn't exclusive just another way of saying proprietary?

Re:isn't exclusivity counterproductive? (2, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353088)

Isn't exclusive just another way of saying proprietary?

No, it just means they're the first to roll it out. I expect it'll start appearing on expansion cards and other motherboards not long after. But Apple will get to tout having the first systems with the interface.

Re:isn't exclusivity counterproductive? (1)

spyfrog (552673) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353106)

Yeah, and as long as they are the only one rolling out the Lightpeak because they are the only one allowed, there will be almost no devices made to plug into the interface... an interface without anything to plug in isn't much to brag about.

Re:isn't exclusivity counterproductive? (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353328)

there will be almost no devices made to plug into the interface

Just like no one ever made devices that plugged into the far more proprietary Apple Dock port? Come now, it's an Intel backed technology that appears first in MacBook Pros and is guaranteed to appear shortly afterward across the PC market.

The only question is what will appear, not if anything will appear.

Re:isn't exclusivity counterproductive? (1)

spyfrog (552673) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353354)

I am not saying they won't appear.
I am saying that most won't appear until Apples exclusive right is over.
Having "exclusive right" off an interface is only stupid - you want an interface to be as widespread as possible so as many uses it as possible to get as many devices to use it as possibly.
Exclusive is the opposite of that.

Sweet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353074)

Then slap Light Peak on the iPod Touches, and they'll finally be useful (if not practical) for clustering with many common parallelized algorithms. That'll be fun times.

10 Gbps? Really? (1)

HunterA3 (553453) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353076)

What advantage will this have over everything else when no home network, and many corporate networks, won't operate at anything over 1Gbps. Your Mac may be the fastest thing on the network, but that's no good when it has to talk to slower devices. Are we going to see an entirely new lineup of network equipment, accessories, etc that take advantage of this too? Netflix streamed from your Mac to your TV would be sweet at 10Gbps.

Re:10 Gbps? Really? (1)

Totenglocke (1291680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353236)

What advantage does it have? It'll load your program / files off your hard drive significantly faster and boot faster (the best SATA is only 6 Gbps). I don't know about you, but I can definitely see people being happier that their system / files load 66.667% faster.

Re:10 Gbps? Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353406)

Advantage: lots of headroom for the future.

Oh, great idea (1, Insightful)

spyfrog (552673) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353090)

Lightpeak "will reportedly be an Apple exclusive at first."
Sounds like a very good idea - making an interface exclusive for a manufacture which makes less than 10% of the computers. That will off course make the third party appliance makers go wild and support this interface instead of USB3 which can be used with the other 90% of the computers... really a great idea.
It will sure be funny for the Apple users to brag about their new Lightpeak connections when they have almost nothing to plug into them and all other poor users will envy them.

Re:Oh, great idea (0, Troll)

spyfrog (552673) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353152)

I see. If you don't applaud Apples decisions, you are a troll?

Re:Oh, great idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353446)

No, it's just that your point is inane to where the only reason to write it is to rip on Apple. Lightpeak will obviously be released on other platforms, and both Apple and Intel already know this, as does anyone who isn't mental deficient either due to physical/chemical reasons or blinded by their hatred for Apple. This will just give Apple a little bit of bragging rights for a short period of time, being able to say that they have (insert cool new feature) first. We've seen this many times over, from many manufacturers besides just Apple; you know this, bothered to pretend you don't, and bothered to derive conclusions that you would recognize as dumb if you saw someone else write the same thing about a similar situation involving a different manufacturer. Hence, your post got modded troll.

Re:Oh, great idea (1)

KarmaMB84 (743001) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353340)

It just means nobody else is going to have Lightpeak devices at first. Apple is playing the early adopter here.

Re:Oh, great idea (1)

spyfrog (552673) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353428)

Which is a bad way to spread an new interface.
You want an interface to become widespread and used by everyone - making it exclusive for Apple is counter productive even if it is only for a limited time.

Remember the USB launch? USB didn't took off until PCs and Windows supported it - there was quite few USB devices made before when Apple was the only one delivering USB equipped computers and then it almost exploded when Windows 98 was launched with USB support. Now I am sure some Mac zealot is going to dig up one hundred USB devices that existed before PCs got USB ports but I am not saying that USB devices didn't exist - I am saying that there was no mass market like became later.

SSDs - when will TRIM come to OSX (3, Funny)

speculatrix (678524) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353124)

linux and windows have TRIM [wikipedia.org], so when will OSX have it?

Re:SSDs - when will TRIM come to OSX (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353488)

linux and windows have TRIM [wikipedia.org], so when will OSX have it?

I'm guessing in Mac OS 10.7 ("Lion"), which is due in Summer 2011. I don't that SSDs are mainstream enough quite yet, but if an OS doesn't have them soon it's going to start being an issue.

I also hope that the new version would support querying SATA/SAS drive for logical and physical sector sizes to help with alignment issues. Currently most disks lie and say "512" even if they're not, but given the average life span of most OSes, you need to 'future proof' things a bit RSN.

Repeating History (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353162)

This is just repeating history. Firewire sought to dethrone USB and never did because, at first, it was exclusive to Apple. Even being superior to USB, it still fails to catch on.

USB will continue on. I have no use for a Mac so my next peripheral technology in this realm is likely to be USB3.

Docking Bay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34353192)

So, with the claimed speed and versatility of this port onboard, does this mean we might FINALLY get a non-shitty, official or third-party docking bay option for Apple laptops?

I haven't upgraded my Macbook Pro since their aluminum Core2 model because I have been disgusted at the lack of features/expandability and dramatically decreased value proposition of the newer models. Does this finally represent a MacBook Pro that can be docked, and take any variety of expansion like an external video adapter that is faster than PCIe 1x? Hallelujah!

LightPeek (1)

hey (83763) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353216)

LightPeak is reportedly nearly as fast as the LightPeek protocol which is currently use for transmitting "peeks" of cleavage in close proximity. Common applications include viewing plumber butt-crack and looking at the waitress's cleavage as she leans over the wipe the table.

Pure speculation. Don't believe it! (1)

JonathanF (532591) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353226)

The podcast is pure (and false) speculation -- it doesn't cite sources, and it's providing supposedly very definite details about something that won't show up for half a year. Having talked to Apple workers and knowing a bit of what goes on in the inside, even *Apple* doesn't know what the system will necessarily be like that far out. It has cancelled systems at the last minute or made part swaps weeks before launch because they either didn't work properly, cost too much or even for political reasons. Apple dropped ATI video cards from a line of Power Macs because an ATI PR confirmed the new models a day early.

DVD drives (1)

philj (13777) | more than 3 years ago | (#34353330)

From the article: "We’re not sure how we feel about removing the optical drive from the Pro machine, but that’s a debate for another time." I welcome it. I've never used the drive in my MacBook Pro. I used the drive in my old MacBook Pro once, and that was to upgrade to Snow Leopard. Shipping Lion on a USB stick would be awesome. A few people would whinge if they dropped the DVD drive but I guess if they had 2 models, one with and one without, they'd end up killing the one with the DVD drive as it'd be fatter. Before people wittier on about Blu Ray - I can't see Jobs doing it. the DRM is such a headache what with key revocation etc.
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