×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Linux Radio

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the free-traffic-report dept.

Idle 141

An anonymous reader writes "This might very well be the nerdiest site we'll ever encounter... Linux Radio is an online radio station broadcasting the Linux kernel! Each time someone visit the site, a random source file is selected and read loudly by a virtual speaker materialized through the open source speech synthesizer eSpeak. Will it prove useful to anyone is probably a difficult question to answer, but the excitement provided is worth experiencing at least once. However, this concept proves once more the advantages of open source over proprietary software making such achievements impossible : whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

141 comments

i don't understand (1)

Mister Pedant (1722084) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365512)

could you repeat that in binary please?

Re:i don't understand (3, Funny)

maeka (518272) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365570)

whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?

I like my Autechre just fine, TYVM.

Re:i don't understand (1)

Phat_Tony (661117) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366166)

whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?

All the music I listen to is binary files. How else would I keep them on digital storage?

Of course, I don't listen to them by having a voice read the ones and zeroes, but interpreted to analog via the proper codec.

Still, I don't know that listening to a computer voice reading source code is much more useful or pleasant than a computer voice repeating ones and zeroes.

Re:i don't understand (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365964)

Well, probably in hex, it's more interesting. You can also get by a little bit more with leet speak. 0xBAD 0xCAD 0x15 0x5AD :D

It's a bit too fast (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365532)

They need to slow it down a bit even if seems to mainly be saying asterisk, slash and sync for my file (mm/msync.c).

Re:It's a bit too fast (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365584)

I know the feeling—I lucked out and got init/main.c. Check out the text version: [linux.no] it's nothing but includes for the first three minutes.

The "Linux Radio" name should be reserved for something that does, say, interviews with kernel developers, distro maintainers, and summaries of mailing list results. I'm sure there are enough people in the community to garner a worthwhile audience.

nothing but includes for the first three minutes. (5, Funny)

wagadog (545179) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365648)

lol it's like the begats in the bible.

Re:nothing but includes for the first three minute (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365838)

The voice ruins it. For the real deal, just type "cat /boot/kernel/*" (in FreeBSD) or "cat/boot/vmlinuz". I actually do that from time to time, not sure why...

Re:nothing but includes for the first three minute (1)

haruchai (17472) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365990)

Have you tried piping the output to /dev/audio?

Re:nothing but includes for the first three minute (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366708)

That works in Linux, but not in FreeBSD -- system permissions won't allow it, even as root.

What this might say about the security of permissions in Linux vs BSD is left as an exercise for the reader. :)

Useful? Not too difficult a question actually (3, Informative)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365544)

No.

See? That was easy.

Re:Useful? Not too difficult a question actually (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368004)

Its just Linux trying to comply with the ADA so blind people "access" the code.

Re:Useful? Not too difficult a question actually (4, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368344)

Access it? I'm pretty sure they wrote most of it.

Re:Useful? Not too difficult a question actually (1)

adamofgreyskull (640712) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368436)

For some reason, after months of having mod points out the wazoo, I haven't had mod points for a couple of weeks, This comment deserves +15 funny. Could someone get on that while I clean coffee out of my keyboard?

Holy cow !!! (4, Funny)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365552)

For some fscking reason, this thing actually sounds appealing and coherent to me. Not to mention relaxing and understandable.

You know you might be an autist when . . . (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34366094)

. . . you find Linux source code read by a text to speech synthesizer appealing and relaxing.

Re:Holy cow !!! (2, Funny)

fuego451 (958976) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366502)

Glad I'm not alone. I even added a little brown noise to give the illusion it is coming from light years away.

Re:Holy cow !!! (2, Insightful)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#34367042)

its as if someone is whispering very fundamental, existential information from aeons away, from the back of your head.

Re:Holy cow !!! (2, Funny)

plover (150551) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368306)

Agreed. When you get into some of the blocks of repeated stuff, such as #includes, it builds up a bit of rhythm, then breaks arrhythmically into code, which sounds like it evolves its own rhythm. It's not unlike a techno or electro percussion line. Throw some lines of synth along the top of this, and you'd have an album.

And I just followed the advice on the page: "if you can't get enough, you can always open Linux Radio in two or more different browser tabs". Ooo! It makes me feel all cybery inside! :-)

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365554)

Seriously...there aren't any real people with enough time to carry out such an important task? What _is_ everyone doing?

Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365558)

This is stupid, period. This statement can't be bargained or reasoned with. It feels no pain, or remorse, or pity, or fear..and it absolutely will not stop...err ok enough.

Can we get a sultry female voice instead? (4, Funny)

haruchai (17472) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365562)

  I mean, c'mon, does Stephen Hawking really have time to read all this? And, this has to be the most tedious method of mirroring the kernel sources that I've ever "heard"

Re:Can we get a sultry female voice instead? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365654)

I think I remember that in one of the Captain Kirk Star Treks, that the computer got repaired, and refitted with a sultry female voice. He was annoyed, and got it fixed back to the non-emotional female robot voice.

Your choice: listen to the sexy computer, or go off to fight the Klingons .. . ?

Re:Can we get a sultry female voice instead? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365948)

They need the voice from MoanMyIP.com.

Re:Can we get a sultry female voice instead? (2, Funny)

plover (150551) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368338)

They need the voice from MoanMyIP.com.

http://www.moanmyip.com/ [moanmyip.com]

OMFG, I thought you were kidding! Then I thought it was a hack of some sort, but Blitzableiter didn't complain about the flash. It really does moan your IP!

"Binary files"? (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365566)

whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?

Presumably that's why they offer only source files (there are binary blobs in some drivers, though).

Re:"Binary files"? (1)

arielCo (995647) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365834)

I guess the binaries would sound a lot like its sister station, White Noise FM [whitenoise.fm] :

White Noise FM is an online radio broadcasting white noise, a sound known to improve concentration by covering background noise. It also helps relaxation, and can aid people to sleep. Although we're focusing on white noise at the moment, we have plans to add more colored sounds to our programs in the future : pink noise, brown noise, and grey noise. We aim to become a fully featured white noise generator!

It also features pink and brown(ian) noise, though they all look like pre-generated samples in a loop

Re:"Binary files"? (4, Interesting)

Genrou (600910) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366108)

When I started using computers, they used K7 tapes to store programs. You know, they were mostly used for audio, but since they were cheap, it was a perfect media for home computers of that time -- bits were converted to sound, mostly using some sort of frequency modulation. There was no Internet then (I know, how can one imagine a world without the Internet), so the only source of information about computers were magazines and an occasional TV or radio program. Well, there was a weekly radio program where I lived that broadcast computer programs -- the binary files themselves. You just pressed "record" in your tape recorder, hoping the transmission was good enough, and then you could load it in your computer. Sometimes, they broadcast ZX Spectrum, sometimes it was MSX programs. They usually worked well, but sometimes the noise in the transmission would cause a lot of errors. It was a very nice way to distribute the programs

froggy bastard (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368472)

When I started using computers, they used K7 tapes

I think I remember those. Was it before C10s came in?

Hell... (4, Funny)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365568)

It's still better than at least 90% of what counts as "music" today.

Re:Hell... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365998)

I think there is a proper word for that, you are getting old.

Re:Hell... (1)

Genrou (600910) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366134)

I think there is a proper word for that, you are getting old.

Correct! After all, the words recited from the Linux kernel are not very different from the babbling and mumbling from the last Lady Gaga success!

Wow there are a lot of asterisks! (1)

roll_w.it (317514) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365578)

the free asterisk software foundation

Re:Wow there are a lot of asterisks! (2)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365920)

This just goes to show that this was set up by amateur wannabes. It's pronounced 'splat' or 'times', depending on context.
With no desire to follow TFA to the actual radio which must be slashdotted by now, do they say 'octothorpe' and 'exclamation mark' too?

shebang whacka-bin-whacka-essage

Re:Wow there are a lot of asterisks! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365952)

it seems to promote the use of drugs, all i can pick out is "hash include".

Not nearly nerdy enough (3, Insightful)

dangitman (862676) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365580)

If it were being broadcast on a shortwave radio band rather than internet radio, it might classify as one of the nerdier things ever. The internet is just so conventional.

Re:Not nearly nerdy enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34366074)

And it takes the average programmer 5 minutes to do it again. It's not nerdy enough if you don't work hard to achieve it.

Re:Not nearly nerdy enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34366100)

Not only that but I was initially excited when I saw the words "Linux Radio" and thought that someone had finally made some interesting ham-radio stuff for Linux...

like for example a software defined radio [gnuradio.org] - preferably could handle raw IQ via multiple channels on open sound cards with AD-DA upto 192 bps ... for a start

or that someone had finally made an open implementation of STANAG 5066 [isode.com] ...

and what about open mobile base stations?

or write some open FPGA code to to get wider bands of actual RF and electrically tuning steering the antenna array...

trouble is nice development hardware [ni.com] is expensive ...

Anyone got an extra 100,000 USD for a fun open radio project?

Re:Not nearly nerdy enough (1)

tusam (1851540) | more than 3 years ago | (#34367640)

If it were being broadcast on a shortwave radio band..

It was -> http://lwn.net/2002/0207/a/radio-free-linux.php3 [lwn.net]

Actually it was surprising that on the dozen or so times I saw linux.fm mentioned on IRC for the past week no one seemed to be aware of it being "old news".
Is this the span of our cultural memory?

Re:Not nearly nerdy enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34367810)

yes, and if these audio files were given as input to a speech recognition software, would one get the original source code back? I wonder ...

Re:Not nearly nerdy enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34368244)

ELF, now *that* would be nerdy!

Binary (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365592)

"whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?"

I think you've finally solved the mystery of the 'numbers stations': it's not Russian spies sending secret messages, it's the oldest method of P2P file sharing!

Re:Binary (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365754)

"whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?"

I think you've finally solved the mystery of the 'numbers stations'

If you have the right "one time pad" ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_time_pad [wikipedia.org] ), listening to a numbers station ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numbers_station [wikipedia.org] ) could save your life. "Yo. Bad news, your cover has been blown . . . "

If you were a spy, living illegally in a foreign country.

Re:Binary (3, Interesting)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365796)

Actually, around 87-89 in Hungary it wasn't uncommon for radiostations to broadcast homebrew C-64 programs. The C-64 casette-tape only used the audible spectrum by spec anyway.

I understand (3, Funny)

Johann Public (542327) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365612)

wanting to prove that it's possible to install and run Linux on (nearly) any computer imaginable, but something tells me you're going to need a little more work in the patching, drivers, and other modifications department to get it running on H. sapiens wetware computers...just saying

Re:I understand (1)

Genrou (600910) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366190)

Since they're broadcasting via electromagnetic waves, I suppose they are trying to install Linux in the Universe. It will take a little while for the changes to propagate, but maybe -- only maybe -- the Universe might make a little more sense from now on. I heard they were trying BSD instead, but the drivers weren't available...

Source in binary broadcast isn't exactly new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365620)

In the eighties Dutch radio broadcast software in binary, so yeah, some people were actually enjoying listening to binary broadcasts :)
The idea was to tape it, and you could simply load the program in machines that used audio casettes for storage like the Commodore 64. IIRC there was some kind of encapsulation that maybe did parity or checksumming so you needed another program to get at the software. The software itself was BASIC sourcecode, so the broadcast was slightly more efficient than someone speaking the sourcecode out loud :) See wikipedia for the gory details.

Re:Source in binary broadcast isn't exactly new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365746)

Forgot to mention: it was called Basicode.

Why synthesized voice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365626)

Seriously...there aren't any _real_ people with enough time for such an important task? What _is_ everyone doing?

Binary? (2, Insightful)

digitalPhant0m (1424687) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365642)

[quote]
whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?
[/quote]

Good thing it's actually reading the source code, and that I have a volume nob.

Human Brain booting linux anyone? (1)

rangans (906251) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365720)

Implanting Kernel Source into Brain, Please Wait............ Finished downloading source using ear:// connection, building kernel source.... Rebuilding initramfs........ Booting Linux Kernel, rootfs=/human/head/brain console=/dev/mouth First Successul HUMANDRIOD booted droid:/>

Re:Human Brain booting linux anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365866)

What shell are you using, man? Clearly that would be
droid:~#

Um well,... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365778)

... just heard:

slash slash asterik asterisk THIS NEEDS TO BE FIXED asterisk asterisk

Flash yes Rhythmbox Banshee Amarok no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365790)

At least they could give us Linux users a link to the streamed file so...., you know, we could actually play it in our music player.

Final goal (4, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365812)

Make all kernel developers to give some time to improve eSpeak and/or getting new voices for it. Will give a whole new dimension to that radio if is the Linus Torvalds voice the one reading the kernel source (and probably more interesting, the comments attached to it).

Re:Final goal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34368394)

I asterisk don't know asterisk. mm/mempool.c had a asterisk asterisk decided British asterisk sound to it. asterisk asterisk

linuux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365836)

i love how it pronounces /linux/random.h as lin uuu x

What the fuck? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365858)

That is all.

Turn it into music (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34365876)

This would be cool if they wrote something to generate some funky electronic beepbeepbeep music from the source files.

Along the same lines: (1)

arielCo (995647) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365886)

Linux.fm links to its "sister station"White Noise FM [whitenoise.fm] :

White Noise FM is an online radio broadcasting white noise, a sound known to improve concentration by covering background noise. It also helps relaxation, and can aid people to sleep. Although we're focusing on white noise at the moment, we have plans to add more colored sounds to our programs in the future : pink noise, brown noise, and grey noise. We aim to become a fully featured white noise generator!

It also features pink and brown(ian) noise

And WhiteNoise.fm in turn links to none other than Vuvuzela Radio [vuvuzela.fm] !!:

Vuvuzela Radio is a station dedicated to playing the sound of the vuvuzela, the famous South African blowing horn the whole world learned to love (or hate) during the 2010 World Cup. We are broadcasting non-stop, without commercial breaks, so you can get your full daily dose : anywhere, anytime.

Though, I'm pretty certain that the four "streams" are actually pre-generated samples in a loop.

Re:Along the same lines: (1)

fridaynightsmoke (1589903) | more than 3 years ago | (#34365940)

Linux.fm links to its "sister station"White Noise FM [whitenoise.fm] .....

Wow, 'White Noise FM' seems quite big around here. It's being rebroadcast almost everywhere on the dial where a music station isn't.

Dumbest thing ever. (1)

bradgoodman (964302) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366084)

This is a joke, right? I searched for "Dumbest" and was surprised to find no comments with the word in it. This is supposed to be useful why? If you're going to "troll" me - at least please explain how you think this would be usefull, first!

Re:Dumbest thing ever. (1)

igreaterthanu (1942456) | more than 3 years ago | (#34367126)

If you're going to "troll" me - at least please explain how you think this would be usefull, first!

Nice try!

We all know that if we explain how it's useful first we can't "troll" you.

wait...ugh...too late now.

Is the OP insane or on drugs? (2, Funny)

KingFrog (1888802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366096)

I quote: "However, this concept proves once more the advantages of open source over proprietary software..." WTF??? You could have a machine read ANY pointless information into a 'net radio. It's not like this is useful in any way. If Open Source needs to have its source code read over internet radio to demonstrate an advantage over proprietary software, it needs to crawl into a nice quiet corner, lay down, and die. You want real advantages? Get reliability, scalability, security. Those are Open Source (potential) advantages. Reading source code on the net radio station? What a waste of time.

Re:Is the OP insane or on drugs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34367922)

Got a reading comprehension problem? It's a joke [wikipedia.org] -- you can't read the source code to proprietary software because it's not available to read. The OP even emphasizes that with the /rest/ of the sentence that you half-quoted.

What a waste of time.

The article is friggin tagged IDLE. You clicked through, you read it, you posted, and /you/ complain about wasting time?!

Good god man, maybe it's heroic that you're not hiding your failings, but please stop drinking decaf.

Difficult question? (1)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366106)

"Will it prove useful to anyone is probably a difficult question to answer,"

No it's not, this is completely worthless to EVERYONE. Simple test: Can you name a single way this could be useful? I can't.

Re:Difficult question? (1)

f3rret (1776822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34367862)

Maybe you could write a speech-to-text program and get the source code for the linux kernel that way.
Not sure why you would do it, but you could.

Listening to the kernel in real time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34366152)

I have noticed if you hold an older am radio next to a laptop computer, and tune it to very low and sometimes higher frequencies you can have a bit more realistic "radio broadcast from the kernel".

My evil plans (1)

L053R (555186) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366604)

Step 1: write a automatic speech recognition app to ping that site and translate the words back to text.
Step 2:
Step 3: take over the world.

espeak is cool. (1)

louden obscure (766926) | more than 3 years ago | (#34366610)

Fah, anyone can do it over the internet. I broadcast a weather report from a python weather script (found in the debian repo) and espeak on a dedicated debian xen domU through the sound chip into a ramsey fm10C and into the very exclusive FM cloud. The downside is my FM cloud is only about 1/2 mile across.

Battlestar Galactica hybrid speaking? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34366720)

I think they have tapped to the cylon that controls their ships. I hope that in the next kernel filles they will inglude bits of profecy in the comments.

It won't compile! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34366844)

I cant believe I wasted all of that time...

lol (1)

Jeian (409916) | more than 3 years ago | (#34367454)

"whoever in his right mind would want to listen to binary files loudly?"

About as many people who want to listen to source files, I imagine.

Flash alert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34367538)

Only _______s use flash to serve audio.

zZzZZzzzzz (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34367894)

zZzZZzzzzz

Has anyone managed to compile this? (1)

Dalzhim (1588707) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368114)

Anyone has been able to make a program which translates the speech back to text in order to compile this kernel?

So true (1)

BlindBear (894763) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368292)

Yes who would want to listen to loud binary files? I like mine a little softer with the treble down a bit.

I clicked out of curiosity (1)

stevie.f (1106777) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368406)

After listening for a minute or two I started to find it strangely relaxing. I think I'd prefer a different voice though.

Modern, cool and therefore hip (1)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368468)

Modern, cool and therefore hip. Something I could, for obvious good reasons, ram down the throat of my teenage daughter?

How I hate the amorphous drivel coming from the main stream radio stations nowadays.

Bazinga! (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368614)

"This radio station is dedicated to the best scientist ever : Dr. Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory." :D

Needs to go analogue (1)

horza (87255) | more than 3 years ago | (#34368926)

We need to put up a transmitter broadcasting this. In 1,024 years when the electromagnetic radiation hits Microsoftopia, the people will finally receive a beacon of hope.

Phillip.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...