Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Using Cinnamon In the Production of Nanoparticles

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the what-about-the-brown-sugar? dept.

Earth 126

An anonymous reader writes "Scientists at the University of Missouri used cinnamon to replace almost all toxic chemicals needed for making gold nanoparticles used in electronics and healthcare products. Nanoparticle production requires the use of extremely dangerous and toxic chemicals. While the nanotechnology industry is expected to produce large quantities of useful nanoparticles in the near future, the entire production process could be detrimental to the environment."

cancel ×

126 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

EXCELLENT! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411146)

Now the grey goo will have a homey, delightful odor as it consumes our planet!*

*(Yes, I'm aware 'grey goo' is impossible. Shuddup)

Re:EXCELLENT! (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411480)

We *are* the grey goo. We're effectively using the chemical by products of one form of nanotechnology (life) to kick start another.

Re:EXCELLENT! (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411578)

A World of Goo is definately possible. I just downloaded it from Steam the other day!

Re:EXCELLENT! (3, Funny)

camperslo (704715) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412078)

In the heat of competition expect more projects to turn to toast. ...waiting for an Apple-cinnamon edible phone

And now (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411180)

The particles will smell terrific

Cinnamon? (3, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411190)

They should taste my nano-apfelstrudel!

And... (1)

NecroPuppy (222648) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411192)

...a pinch of oregano, 'cause you know a little goes a long way.

Hmm, food-embedded electronics? (2)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411194)

I think advertisers just creamed themselves.

You got... (5, Funny)

MrQuacker (1938262) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411200)

I can see it now...

-- You got cinnamon on my gold!
-- You got gold on my cinnamon!
-- Woah, wtf is *that*!?

Re:You got... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411532)

I can see it now...

-- You got cinnamon on my gold!
-- You got gold on my cinnamon!
-- Woah, wtf is *that*!?

Mine!
I saw it first.
No you didn't.
Did to. Now let go!
...and so on.

Re:You got... (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411700)

You're obviously too young to have seen the classic Reese's commercial:

"You got chocolate in my peanut butter!"
"You got peanut butter in my chocolate!"

Re:You got... (2)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411928)

Classic? You do realize that "classic" isn't a synonym for old, right? Somethings belong in the past and should remain buried there.

Re:You got... (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412022)

I'm not sure I follow, that commercial is a classic.

Re:You got... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#34413414)

I am familiar with the commercial. Despite my youthful appearance and rugged good looks, I was born before the invention of the microwave oven and the internet. No, I was making a bid for a +5 funny by extrapolating the conversation. However, the moderators are in a humourless mood today.

Re:You got... (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412668)

I am sorry, but I find that offensive since that is my mother's "special nickname" at her job as a dancer. She still refuses to tell me what kind of dancing she does, which is odd

Re:You got... (2)

alienzed (732782) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412906)

cinagold or goldamon? hmm, the second one sounds like a Pokemon...

So is Cinnamon Toxic? (1)

Vegan Cyclist (1650427) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411214)

Ahhhh! No more Toxic Toast Crunch for me...

21st century alchemy (1, Insightful)

UBfusion (1303959) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411216)

Something tells me that this is going to end like the biofuel scam, where forests are vanishing to produce a more pollutant fuel than gasoline... Killing natural spices to produce gold in some industries' pockets.

Re:21st century alchemy (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411646)

Yeah... just how many cinnamon plantations are there? Land for more cinnamon trees or more gated communities?

Or... we could just deal with overpopulation....

Re:21st century alchemy (0, Troll)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411718)

We do not have overpopulation, we have a problem with people who think it is there birthright to drive 2 ton machines 2 hours between work and their gated community.

Re:21st century alchemy (1, Insightful)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412254)

I happen to have a birthright to drive two ton machines two hours between work and my gated community, thank you very much.

*shows you his birthright certificate* :D

PS: Just because the number key is there it doesn't mean you should use it any time you want to write a number. Save it for the really big numbers - when you use it for a number with three digits or less your perceived IQ drops by roughly 10-15 points per digit less than four - i.e. typing 300 drops your perceived IQ by ten to fifteen points, typing 30 drops it by twenty to thirty points, and typing 3 drops it by thirty to forty-five points. You should always type out three hundred thirty-three, but for 3,333 it is fine to switch to numerals.

Re:21st century alchemy (1)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412404)

I hate to interrupt a well-deserved smackdown, but you'll find any official style guide advocates the switch to numerals for any number over ninety-nine, if it's not a round number. For example, 333, but three hundred. Journalism style guides actually go for any number over ten.

Re:21st century alchemy (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412508)

The future shall prove you wrong, enjoy your poverty or wars over oil.

Re:21st century alchemy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34413322)

Yes, because never in the history of mankind has any new technology come along which eliminates the need for previous well-entrenched technologies. Now if you'll excuse me I'm going to go get my carriage horse out of his stall and into his traces for my ride into town tomorrow.

Re:21st century alchemy (1)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412528)

when you use it for a number with three digits or less your perceived IQ drops by roughly 10-15 points per digit less than four

Metahumor?

Re:21st century alchemy (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412578)

Nah, just lgw's rule of the internet: every spelling, grammar, or style post must contain a spelling, grammar, or style error.

Re:21st century alchemy (1)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 3 years ago | (#34413120)

+5 Informative

Cinnamon and Toxic chemicals (3, Funny)

TheOtherChimeraTwin (697085) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411222)

Well, that explains Cinnabon.

Re:Cinnamon and Toxic chemicals (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411474)

Does this mean they'll start putting gold in their Caramel Cinnabons? For what they charge for those things, there ought to be gold in them!

Re:Cinnamon and Toxic chemicals (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411622)

or a 360 game or something.

Re:Cinnamon and Toxic chemicals (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411844)

Its an industrial reagent.

Its a desert topping.

The Spice.. Of Course! (4, Funny)

trollertron3000 (1940942) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411232)

Once again it is proved - the spice is the worm. The worm is the spice.

Re:The Spice.. Of Course! (3, Funny)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412032)

And, of course, he who controls the spice controls the universe!

*buys cinnamon*

Unfortunately... (1)

mswhippingboy (754599) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412922)

the DEA has moved to make spice illegal, so we have to go back to using the extremely toxic chemicals to make our gold nanoparticles...

I hope it's true but: (2, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411242)

“Our gold nanoparticles are not only ecologically and biologically benign, they are also biologically active against cancer cells,”

A) How can you be benign AND active?.

B) everything is poisonous. It's the dose them makes the poison.

C) I can't see how this process uses no electricity. How does the cinnamon and gold particles get together? how is the cinnamon remove?

D) How much energy will go into harvesting more cinnamon?

I hope is true because Oz. to Oz Cinnamon will be a safer product to use in the process, but it's not magic.

Re:I hope it's true but: (5, Funny)

BradleyUffner (103496) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411322)

“Our gold nanoparticles are not only ecologically and biologically benign, they are also biologically active against cancer cells,”

A) How can you be benign AND active?.

B) everything is poisonous. It's the dose them makes the poison.

C) I can't see how this process uses no electricity. How does the cinnamon and gold particles get together? how is the cinnamon remove?

D) How much energy will go into harvesting more cinnamon?

I hope is true because Oz. to Oz Cinnamon will be a safer product to use in the process, but it's not magic.

A: Magic
B: Cinnamon is all natural, and there for only hurts bad things. It's good for your skin too!
C1: Elves, C2: Free Range Hamsters
D: None

Re:I hope it's true but: (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411504)

Your post needs more wizards.

Re:I hope it's true but: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411656)

A wizard took wizard references out of the post.

Re:I hope it's true but: (3, Funny)

not-my-real-name (193518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412970)

I put on my robe and wizard hat...

Re:I hope it's true but: (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411996)

A) The two aren't mutually exclusive, look up the definition of benign. Also consider yoghurt. Active, and benign. It's not malicious or harmful, but it's an active culture.

b) Now you're being pedantic

c) that i'll agree on, unlesss they mean that it doesnt need us to add any and it's using it's own charge or something

D) That's my big concern.

Re:I hope it's true but: (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412758)

well it's sure not benign to the cancer cell. I know, see b)

b) I know. The whole article was written like it's a magic process.

d) Not really a big concern for me. If the toxic chemicals are as nasty as others in similar industries, then spending a lot of energy harvesting cinnamon is better then poisoning the water supply . And of course the energy going into make the chemicals and so on.

Re:I hope it's true but: (5, Informative)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412280)

I can't see how this process uses no electricity. How does the cinnamon and gold particles get together? how is the cinnamon remove?

Jeeze, did you read the damn thing? They mix gold salts and cinnamon in water and get gold nanoparticles.

There is no electricity because there is no electricity. It's a purely chemical process.

Re:I hope it's true but: (0)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412782)

SO nothing stirs or mixes them? no electricity is used getting them together? separating them? Is there anything need to remove excess heat from the process?

yes I read the article, and it talked like Cinnamon is a magic energy free green process with no real facts.

I cant believe you have never heard of a chemical process creating electricity.

Re:I hope it's true but: (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412634)

I hope is true because Oz. to Oz Cinnamon will be a safer product to use in the process, but it's not magic.

I know anything about Australia is always accepted at /., but this one is about scientists at the University of Missouri. This has nothing to do wit Oz.

Re:I hope it's true but: (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412788)

Its a big 'O' because I was happy to type it.

you can't unread that!

More importantly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411254)

it's quite a bit cheaper. I would imagine that planting cinnamon trees are very cost friendly versus toxic chemicals. Cinnamon girls, less so. Toxic Avengers would also raise costs.... But cinnamon trees, absolutely lower them.

Best of all, there isn't a lag. Cinnamon trees only take a few years to begin producing large quantities. Everyone is a winner. Especially the Toxic Avenger.

For the lulz. (1)

ethan961 (1895082) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411256)

I bet there was a little voice inside their heads that said they should do this for the lulz and to show how we sometimes really over complicate things.

Where's Paul? (1)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411272)

Let the spice wars begin.

Paul is dead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411662)

Paul is dead [wikipedia.org] !

Tasty, alas ...

No he isn't! (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412702)

He's just resting. [wikipedia.org]

Not likely (3, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411276)

Real Cinnamon is rare and expensive, toxic chemicals usually aren't. Which do you think China's going to decide to use?

Re:Not likely (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411302)

Exactamundo. Cinnamon isn't exactly expensive unless you're getting something fancy, but it's a lot more expensive than putting some practically-free chemicals into a vat and running some electricity from coal through them.

Re:Not likely (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411782)

Real cinnamon is fairly expensive, cassia is cheap. In the USA cassiabark is often labeled as cinnamon.

Re:Not likely (2)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412046)

I wonder if there is a practical difference for industrial purposes.

Re:Not likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34412146)

there is a BIG difference - to us poor true cinnamon exporters :( CASIA IS NOT CINNAMON Here's to hoping that they need "real" cinnamon ;) - we promise to lower the price as an introductory offer to the nanophartikle industry ;)

Re:Not likely (4, Informative)

Khyber (864651) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412198)

In my area of industry, chemically speaking there is a *HUGE* difference.

True cinnamon works as an insecticide.

Cassiabark extract does NOT.

Re:Not likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34412358)

Its labelled cinnamon because it IS cinnamon.

Ceylon isn't the only species in genus cinnamorum, you know.

Re:Not likely (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412532)

The tomato is not the only thing in the genus Solanum, does this mean I should be allowed to sell poisonous fruits as tomatoes?

Re:Not likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34412712)

No, but you should be able to sell them as Solanum.

Re:Not likely (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#34413220)

Ah, but it is. Most people eat what's called "Cassia" which is a spice from Asia that is similar to Cinnamon but is definitely not Cinnamon. They label it as such, but as with most things it's a lie.

Re:Not likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411370)

Real Cinnamon is rare and expensive, toxic chemicals usually aren't. Which do you think China's going to decide to use?

The same as any U.S. company would use.

Re:Not likely (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411760)

Which is why most people use fake cinnamon, cassia. Which is grown in china, so maybe they will use that.

Re:Not likely (2)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412116)

The two come from the same genus and are extremely similar. This is why cassia can be sold as low-grade "cinnamon" - it is nearly identical to the Sri Lanka variety.

For manufacturing purposes I doubt there is any significant difference.

Re:Not likely (3, Interesting)

Khyber (864651) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412214)

Distill the oils of both.

Put a toothpick in each oil sample and let it soak it up.

I'll bet twenty bucks you can hold the cassia in your mouth while the cinnamon one will blister you.

Re:Not likely (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412264)

Oh wow the same genus, I suggest you substitute the fruit of Solanum atropurpureum for Solanum lycopersicum in your next salad or sandwich.

These two are farther apart then cassia and cinnamon, but those two are not quite the same either, surely not nearly identical. Their coumarin levels are quite different for instance.

Re:Not likely (1)

stms (1132653) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412164)

Real Cinnamon is rare and expensive, toxic chemicals usually aren't. Which do you think China's going to decide to use?

The one that consumers are willing to buy...

Re:Not likely (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412306)

If it is anything like the cinnamon case consumers in the EU will have no problem getting the real thing and us Americans will have to order it online and pay through the nose.

Re:Not likely (4, Informative)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412188)

Here's a map [wikipedia.org] with the top world producers of Cinnamon in 2005. China has 10 yellow bubbles (=10% of the world's top producer) meaning in 2005 it produced 60,000 tones of cinnamon.

For comparison, the entire world's gold production of 2006 [wikipedia.org] was 2,310 tons.

Me thinks that the world risks running out of gold faster than China of cinnamon... but hey, I might be mistaken.

However, on another track, TFA says:

They mixed gold salts with a common spice – cinnamon – and stirred the mixture in water to synthesize gold nanoparticles.

Now, unless one finds a method to obtain gold salts by using plain cooking salt (Ok... I'll make a concession and allow capsicum powder as well), this step may require indeed the use of toxic chemicals.

Re:Not likely (1)

jrumney (197329) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412708)

China has 9 yellow bubbles. One of those 10 bubbles you are counting belongs to Vietnam.

Re:Not likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34413268)

China has 9 yellow bubbles. One of those 10 bubbles you are counting belongs to Vietnam.

:) Patience... we do need more cablegate leaks to learn who Vietnam belongs to... or do we? :)

Re:Not likely (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412810)

Those numbers are completely meaning less to determine when we will run out.

You need to look at total available and compare it to total used over a period of time.

If we need to use 10,000 times the cinnamon then gold, that would change things now, wouldn't it?

Re:Not likely (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#34413186)

Those numbers are completely meaning less to determine when we will run out.

Theoretically, you are right.

------ In no way the following is intended to be flamebite/troll (at most, karma whoring) -------

It would be advisable, based on this theory and the above poster's estimate for a rate of 20000/1, to invest in cinnamon plantations, but keep the following points in mind:
1. cinnamon is more renewable than the Earth's gold resource - advantage? Yes, suply limited only on short periods of time ("world cinnamon crisis" will be different than "world oil crisis")
2. on long term I reckon we'll still run out of Earth's gold sonner than we run out of cinnamon. Need to plan the exit strategy from the "cinnamon plantation investment" (or see what other metals in demand would "nano-particulate" with cinnamon).

Some other info to consider before deciding to invest:
a. estimate of the world's gold consumption for industrial purposes at the present 10% [wikipedia.org]
b. total gold demand for Q3 2010 - 992 tones [gold.org] with a Y2Y increase of 12% (the demand for jewellery increasing by 8% - 4 countries sucking in 63% from this - the ones less affected by the world crisis, US is not among them)
c. use of gold as nanoparticles here (a bit old, 2007). But a bit of google-fu would orient the savvy investor better. [goldworld.com]

The Taste you can't see (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411284)

Nanoparticles Toast Crunch! The taste you can't see!

Using nano in the production of nanoposts (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411310)

By using the word nano and variations, like nanoparticles and nanotechnology, a nanoposting can include the word five times.

Nanopaste (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411780)

Using nano in the production of nanoposts (Score:1)
by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 01, @05:38PM (#34411310)

By using the word nano and variations, like nanoparticles and nanotechnology, a nanoposting can include the word five times.

I anonymously count 6—only 4 if you forget about the headline.

OK, I take it this is 5 on average ...

Re:Using nano in the production of nanoposts (1)

konohitowa (220547) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411786)

The next major release will include an accurate counter.

Re:Using nano in the production of nanoposts (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412122)

And a one-sentence critique can use the word six.

A bit hypocritical aren't we?

looks like someone discovered Goldschläger (1)

PJ6 (1151747) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411336)

Gold? Cinnamon? It's a delicious discovery for science! See, it's not toxic at all, we can drink a ton of it!

except for the coumarin (1)

slew (2918) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412682)

Gold? Cinnamon? It's a delicious discovery for science! See, it's not toxic at all, we can drink a ton of it!

Even without the toxic-by-the-ton ethyl-alcohol in Goldschläger, true cinnamon actually contains a small amount of coumarin (used as rat poison in concentrated forms, or processed into a blood thinner for heart surgery patients)...

And of course if Goldschläger cheaped out and uses the "fake" cassia cinnamon, it would actually have even more coumarin...

On the other hand, a Goldschläger challenge seems much less harmful than a cinnamon challenge (a description of which used to be on wikipedia, but apparently it's been edited out after this revision [wikipedia.org] )

As a representative for Wrigley's... (1)

Wilson of Waste (1909510) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411372)

That BIG RED freshness will last right through it. Your production goes on and on as you use this...

Basil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411398)

"Aha! I fooled you, the cinnamon was actually BASIL!"
"ngghhhhaaaah!"

Already known (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411446)

I've always known that cinnamon was toxic.

Melange? (1)

michael1221988 (1613671) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411464)

So Melange really is just cinnamon!?

Food nerds (1)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411470)

Looking forward to Heston Blumenthal's Gold Nanoparticle Flavoured 'Sounds of Science'.

oblig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411518)

the spice must flow

Hangover comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411630)

I'm a little disappointed that there aren't any Hangover - related comments. "Tigers love pepper, they hate cinnamon."

Incense and Peppermints . . . (0)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411670)

Ha! All cinnamon processes are puny in comparison to my "Incense and Peppermints" process!

From my patent application:

Good sense, innocence, cripplin' and kind.

Dead kings, many things I can't define.

Oh Cajun spice, sweats and blushers your mind.

Incense and peppermints, the color of thyme.

This patent will be more important than the Segway!

Re:Incense and Peppermints . . . (1)

Professr3 (670356) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411740)

My eyes are bleeding

scientists, huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34411688)

From the TFA: "it is clear that cinnamon – and other species such as herbs, leaves and seeds".
So leaves and seeds are classified as species according to these scientists. They must have got their diplomas online.

First step in their process: (2)

qbwiz (87077) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411752)

Make cinnamon into a highly toxic chemical.

The spice must flow! (0)

rastoboy29 (807168) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411840)

Just wanted to say that.

Re:The spice must flow! (1)

kaizokuace (1082079) | more than 3 years ago | (#34411914)

I was looking for a Dune reference! thanx guy

meh (1)

BluBrick (1924) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412172)

Using cinnamon with gold is nothing particularly new [wikipedia.org] !

The "toxicity" part is bullshit... (5, Informative)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412452)

The actual article [springerlink.com] talks about how gold nanoparticles are often made with super-strong reducing agents like sodium borohydride and how this is awesomely bad for the environment.

What the article doesn't mention is who made the very first gold nanoparticles, or how they were made.

It was Michael Faraday (yes, that Faraday), who made them using a reducing agent called. . . phosphorus. Horribly toxic, world-destroying . . . Oh, wait, it's safe. Never mind.

There are 80 thousand ways to make AuNPs, the reason the strong reducing agents are usually used is because it's simply a quicker reaction, or because you want them there to activate something else you are sticking to the surface of the nanoparticle.

Now, the part about the cinnamon extracts stabilizing the AuNPs in physiological conditions, that might be more impressive - I'm not familiar with work in that area. But the toxicity part is nothing more than a cry for attention.

Re:The "toxicity" part is bullshit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34412796)

It was Michael Faraday (yes, that Faraday), who made them using a reducing agent called. . . phosphorus. Horribly toxic, world-destroying . . . Oh, wait, it's safe. Never mind.

Nice; but nowadays the toxic hydrazine and sodium borohydride are used. Then how do you come to say 'the "toxicity" part is bullshit' in your topic?

That said, phosphorus itself is not completely harm-free itself ...

Re:The "toxicity" part is bullshit... (3, Interesting)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | more than 3 years ago | (#34412934)

Nice; but nowadays the toxic hydrazine and sodium borohydride are used. Then how do you come to say 'the "toxicity" part is bullshit' in your topic?

That said, phosphorus itself is not completely harm-free itself ...

They are only sometimes used. There are lots of current (last five years) papers where they aren't used, NaBH4 and N2H4 are just extreme examples being used - phosphorus is still used, as is sodium ascorbate (also known as vitamin C). Hell, the lab down the hall from mine makes AuNPs via laser ablation and deposition - no reducing agent needed at all, just a vacuum.

Phosphorus is only dangerous if you eat it on the multi-gram scale or if you heat it, and frankly, anyone who does that gets what they deserve. If you're worried about waste, elemental phosphorus will oxidize pretty quickly with contact with air (and gold nanoparticles) and become biocompatible phosphates.

Yes, white phosphorus is pyrophoric, but it's the less stable of the two allotropes, and it's pretty hard to make, so you don't need to worry about it being a sideproduct.

Re:The "toxicity" part is bullshit... (1)

failedlogic (627314) | more than 3 years ago | (#34413872)

The use of pesticides and fungicides to treat cinnamon trees will still pose an environmental problem perhaps even more so if there is an increased demand. And many of the countries where Cinnamon is grown, probably don't have the same environmental standards than 'Western' countries. That is, pesticides and fungicides that were banned by the EPA 50 years ago might still be used in these countries.

New nickname for nano factory rejects (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34413158)

They're toast.

There Goes Cinnamon (1)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 3 years ago | (#34413326)

Every time a new use is found for something we seem to pay through the neck. Rice, corn, potatoes and wheat can all make fuel for your car or be mixed with gasoline. Anyone priced a bag of spuds lately. Corn is now so expensive that there have been riots in Mexico as they can't make their taco shells. If cinnamon finds industrial uses my toast may never be the same.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>