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473 comments

Grad studies (5, Funny)

CaptainMoron (1798168) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448946)

Grad studies are worse than any kind of death. I experienced both.

The Truth (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449142)

Alright, WHO'S GOING TO EAT MY PUSSY? Come on now, you basement dwelling virgin troglodytes, get off your asses and step up for some MOUTH WATERING POONTANG!

Re:Grad studies (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449292)

Alternate wording: "When you've already been through hell, you have nothing to fear." (kinda sounds like a horror movie slogan)

Also, is "fear of death is most common among women than men" grammatically correct? Most/Than? Shouldn't it be "more than"? (I'm guessing that they have editors and this is technically correct, I'm just unfamiliar with it)

Odd. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34448950)

I think these are odd findings. Lower literacy also correlates to a higher belief in the supernatural and "life after death" (heaven, virgins, whatever), so you'd think lower literacy would correlate with a lower fear of death.

Re:Odd. (2, Interesting)

Nursie (632944) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449000)

Maybe belief in the supernatural correlates well with fear of death.

Maybe if you're shit-scared of death all the time you find refuge in faith.

Me, I have a university degree and an IQ in the genius range (I don't think I'm a genius). Count me as someone that is educated, reasonably intelligent and scared of death. Isn't fear of death natural? I mean, I don't want to imagine a world without me, I won't be there. And that's leaving out the part in which you actually die, which isn't going to be any fun either.

Sign me up for immortality treatment please.

Re:Odd. (4, Insightful)

IICV (652597) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449134)

If I believed that there was a good chance that after I died I would be thrown into a lake of fire and otherwise punished for the rest of eternity, you can bet your sorry ass that I would be scared shitless of dying. Yes yes if you're good you get to go to heaven, but what if you accidentally committed a mortal sin without realizing it or something? After all, if you read the Bible, God is nothing if not capricious; how can you know that when He said "No mixed fabrics!", He didn't really mean it? What if you really are supposed to believe in the Miracle of Transubstantiation, reality be damned? It's just so uncertain.

Fortunately there's no hell, so there's no worries on that front. Honestly, I can't for the life of me see why theists think that religion brings peace and comfort. What is any amount of Earthly reassurance, in the face of the threat of infinite torture? (take that, Pascal!)

Re:Odd. (4, Funny)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449240)

Honestly, I can't for the life of me see why theists think that religion brings peace and comfort

Religion brings money and political power. If you can't derive peace and comfort from those, there's no hope for you!

Re:Odd. (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449322)

It's not easy making money off of religion. The whole idea is that money flows from the many to the few, so only so many religious people can actively profit from it. It does make getting and keeping a job easier in many (if not most) cases, but this depends on what sector you work in.

Of course, if you're an atheist, you could argue that it's not an immoral decision to *pretend* to be religious, for the perks. In some countries the "perks" include staying alive.

Re:Odd. (4, Funny)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449258)

And if I unexpectedly should be thrown into that lake of fire instead of fading into nothingness, well... That would be the time to go ahead with the full survive, evade, resist, escape program and take the bastard responsible for this on. Let's see who's burning in the end.

Re:Odd. (2)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449402)

"It's better to reign in hell than serve in heaven"
-- John Milton

When you get to heaven, you will wish you're in hell"
-- Marilyn Manson

Why not have a little fun with it? Why not ask Satan if he may drag you out of the lake of fire so you can join him in flipping the bird at the man and trolling and Screwtaping [wikipedia.org] mere mortals to their damnation? If the puny humans lack the capacity for creative fun and want to remain sheep, then let 'em live as slaves in heaven or burn in hell. As long as heaven exists, so will hell...and why not be content with your imperfections and your innate animalistic evil?

The Satanic Bible makes much more sense than the Holy one does. Quoth the Wikipedia:

To LaVey, god is simply what we all wish we could be. He kills without mercy or explanation, is free to do as he/she wishes, and is responsible to no one.

p.s. I sold my soul to the Devil and all I got was this lousy terrible karma.

Re:Odd. (5, Insightful)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449434)

Oh, I did not mean Satan with the guy responsible for this. Any god condemning a single soul to infiinte punishment for a finite transgression is pure evil. That one would be the target in this unlikely case.

Re:Odd. (1)

CosmeticLobotamy (155360) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449420)

If that happens, the guy on the other side created a universe, of which something as insanely complicated as a human is one trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a percent. The guy built the moon and is way better at physics than Steven Hawking, so it's not like you're dealing with a guy that lacks either brains or brawn. Plus if the lake of fire is actually on the moon, you're pretty much fucked on that escape part. So best of luck, assuming you weren't the rare total douche who deserves a lake of fire, but I don't like your chances.

Re:Odd. (1)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449190)

It is normal to not want to die. This is normal self-preservation in action. When you realize that you must die as billions have before you then you fear death less - it is inevitable and there will be no miracle 'cure' to avoid it - all you can do it treat your body well and really live as well as you can. Then you will be truly be living in full knowledge that one day you will too pass away - probably never to return. So don't fscking waste the time you have! You will transcend the fear the more you accept the inevitable. I'm not Jewish but the L'chaim (not meaning "to life", but instead "life!") is as good a philosophy as any.

Re:Odd. (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449338)

A) Greetings existentialists :)
B) I *am* Jewish, and "Le-Chaim" means "To Life" if you approximate it to modern Hebrew. If you look at the etymology of it, and at the purpose of the phrase, it becomes more complicated, and (arguably) a question of opinion.

Re:Odd. (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449436)

I'm wondering exactly how they posed the question--because I'm not scared of death in the slightest, but I'm scared as fuck of dying. I have a feeling that won't be pleasant unless I'm very lucky.

That said, regardless of how I get there I'd pick consciousness over oblivion any day.

Re:Odd. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449064)

You seem to have got it backwards.

Lower literacy also correlates to a higher belief in the supernatural and "life after death"

Whoosh!

Re:Odd. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449218)

>Lower literacy also correlates to a higher belief in the supernatural and "life after death" (heaven, virgins, whatever)

weak troll bro
you should've at least put "sky wizards" or some other equally unfunny nerd speak in there.

Re:Odd. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449238)

Bah! I'm advanced to trolling 102, I try to make my trolls look like "just some guy thinking out loud, not tryin' to cause a stir".

Once I've mastered that, it's on to trolling 200 - "making posts that absolutely nobody can tell are trolls, and which actually bolster the position of those you're lampooning.".

Re:Odd. (3, Funny)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449382)

Just wait til you graduate from "I can't even tell anymore whether I'm trolling at any given time."

Re:Odd. (3, Interesting)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449272)

Exactly the opposite.

If you believe in after life, you'd probably expect "they" will settle the score once you die, and who isn't a "sinner"?

Other fears? (0)

drolli (522659) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448952)

Could it be that being frightened correlates with mental problems, which in turn correlates with having a university degree?

Re:Other fears? (5, Insightful)

Bruce Perens (3872) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448980)

People fear what they don't understand. Ignorant people fear more, and are manipulated by their fear en masse.

Re:Other fears? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449156)

I'm so afraid to be ignorant and afraid of things I don't understand that I'm going to go to college again!

Re:Other fears? (5, Insightful)

drolli (522659) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449334)

Saying that as somebody who spent a lot of time in the academic world:

Ignorance is not at all a privilege of people without a degree.

pure Poppy pock! (1)

coolmanxx (150620) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449026)

I'm a post grad with many a cirtificate and degree. The secret of happiness and contentment are within reach to any man, be they slow wit or quick to action.

Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the state And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.


My good friends Jonnie and Hennessy concur. No man fears death when he has seen the light and ingested the nector of the gods! To life! Death is but the ultimate adventure!

I don't know.... (1)

Deus.1.01 (946808) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448956)

When i failed completing my degree at time i felt it would be perfectly fine if i took a long walk of a short cliff...

Dilbert (5, Funny)

eggman9713 (714915) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448960)

I became an engineer. I work in a cubicle. I bear a slight resemblance to Dilbert when in my work attire. This my friends, is worse than death. Therefore, I have no fear of death because I am beyond it.

Seems obvious to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34448968)

People with a university degree fear death less than those at a lower literacy leve. In addition, fear of death

Oh, the irony!

C'mon, it seems easy to me: People who are educated tend to be better off and have less to worry about (they're enjoying life, not worrying if life will end before it gets better).

Additionally, more educated people tend to be aware of risks more. For instance, a more educated person is more likely to know that the odds of getting into an accident where you are saved by a seat belt is far more likely than an accident where a seatbelt could trap you underwater. A well educated person is likely to know the odds of shark bites are in the millions and that you're more likely to die on your way to a theme park than you are on one of its rides.

Indeed (4, Funny)

Bruce Perens (3872) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448972)

degree fear death less than those at a lower literacy leve.

But they fear typographical errors much more :-)

Re:Indeed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34448988)

"most common among women than men"

Re:Indeed (2)

r3verse (1202031) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449196)

Yes. In addition the latter group drove their Chevy there and found it was dry. It does not bode well.

Film @ 11.

There's more than one "fear of death" (4, Interesting)

dlenmn (145080) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448978)

Fear of eventually dying and fear of dying young are quite different things, but both get named "fear of death". I read TFA, and it's not clear what fear they're talking about.

IMHO, it's silly to fear the former but good to have some fear of the latter.

Re:There's more than one "fear of death" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449130)

In reference to your comment, I personally have never feared death, eventual or immediate. I have always and do however fear pain.

I know it is anecdotal but neither my family nor me is religious. As a child I was quite logical about death and just saw it as an end or an unknown , not something to be feared.
I don't think it is academic education that necessarily makes the difference but possibly religious beliefs, religious education and the influencing beliefs of family.

As an aside I am told by doctors that I have already died once (technically) for approximately 3 minutes. If anyone is interested in what I saw.....nothing.
Just black empty absence of thought, a non-existence.

Re:There's more than one "fear of death" (4, Insightful)

r3verse (1202031) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449242)

Oh freakin' hell --

This is such baloney. It's not influencing beliefs, it's good 'ol human sentimentality. Which I value very highly. THIS IS WHAT MAKES US HUMAN. Think of everything you love, and hold dear. Now imagine your life without it. You are not on a horse, you are dead, in a blank void, as you clearly stated.

I have a 6 year old son. Tell me why I would not be scared of losing the chance to see him grow up?

And as an aside, please tell me how you managed to cognitively grasp the concept of thought if there was no thought itself.

Re:There's more than one "fear of death" (0)

register_ax (695577) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449302)

I read your comment 3 times before realizing it had nothing to do with the comment AC left, but was a reply to the OP.

Why must people reply to a reply just to get their post higher up?

If internet avatars had human sentimentality, yours would be one of those emo dudes who go around trying to get people to notice them.

Re:There's more than one "fear of death" (1)

r3verse (1202031) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449364)

I tried to develop some kind of cogent, informed commentary re: your snide comment. I failed.

a) How the hell does my post relate more to the OP than the AC post?

b) I honestly couldn't care about some kind of imaginary ranking; I made this account 4-5 years back and have _maybe_ posted 5-6 times.

c) Internet avatars != Human sentimentality, unless they have acquired some HAL-9000esque quality i'm not yet aware of. Are you suggesting that a picture has manifested itself as a version of me? Trolling /.? I've been in a hospital as a result of self-inflicted maladies, because I honestly wished I was dead at that point. Was I crazy? Of FUCKING course.

I don't want to die, and nobody i've ever known isn't inherently shit scared of death. I just want to stop the mental masturbation.

Re:There's more than one "fear of death" (4, Insightful)

tenchikaibyaku (1847212) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449184)

This might be pretty obvious, but there's also a difference between the "fear of death" you feel in everyday life and the kind of "fear of death" you have when you believe that your life is actually threatened in some way. I don't walk around being afraid of dying or anything, but a panic attack a few years ago gave me a new perspective on a few things.

Re:There's more than one "fear of death" (1)

catbutt (469582) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449236)

Why is it silly to fear the former? Fear of death is of course deep in us for obvious Darwinian reasons....there is no real "rationality" behind wanting to continue living except that natural selection put it at the very center of our motivational system. And there was no reason for evolution to make us *only* fear early death.....the important thing was that we do everything in our power to avoid death. -- no good reason to have it be selective between early or late death.

Re:There's more than one "fear of death" (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449360)

I don't fear death. I fear the pain of dying. I've been seriously injured several times, it's the pain that makes me fear it. Oddly enough my non-university graduate grandfather believed the same thing, he died quite painfully with cancer eating away his spine. He lived about 4 weeks from the time it was diagnosed to the time he died it progressed that quickly.

Death? (1)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448992)

You can only die once, and I have been dead, so I will live forever now....
I think the University was worse than death anyway, pain goes away when you die, at the University the pain never went away...

Re:Death? (1)

zakeria (1031430) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449048)

If you only die once then how come more people have died than the total number of people ever born?

Re:Death? (4, Insightful)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449110)

Because that's a false statement (more people can't die than the total number of people born, as those who are not born can't die, due to not existing in the first place), and you're begging the question.

Re:Death? (2)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449252)

You can only die once, and I have been dead, so I will live forever now....

You say that, but we all know that Vicious kills you in the end, even if you can stagger down the hallway and shoot a finger gun at the camera.

Hmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34448994)

I am male and have a university degree. I fear death more than anyone I've never met.

For anyone reading, by the way, Freud was very insightful on fear of death. My very poor summary is as follows... It's hard for us to conceive of nonexistence, because to do so requires us to exist and observe that nonexistence, which means that we would have to exist to have any thoughts on the matter. Pretty trippy stuff.

I also think of the scene from Annie Hall, where all of Woody Allen's books have death in the title. "It's a very important issue!", he says. I guess Allen's character is more neurotic than most, but when I think of fear of death I do picture this sort of thing: a nervous intellectual male who fears death. Such as Freud. I have a hard time thinking that it's just the uneducated that are worried about this.

I guess there is a slight tendency for the well-off in this world to act like they're immortal. If you've seen more unfairness you're probably thinking more of your death. Rich bastards don't think they'll ever die.

The more wealthy have the time to ponder (2)

arcite (661011) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449128)

Just feel the beating heart in your chest. Thump Thump Thump. Now imagine it slowly stopping. The world around you going fuzzy and out of focus. A slow, deep, sleep over coming your senses, beckoning you to release yourself to the void. You try to take a breath, but have no strength left to do so. Slowly the air exits your lungs and you become numb. Everything becomes quiet...then silence. Peace at last.

As a thought exercise, its un-nerving to say the least!

"I don't sleep. I hate those little slices of death."

I am quite sure I have been an insomniac for most of my life. I'll sleep enough when I'm dead.

Re:The more wealthy have the time to ponder (3, Insightful)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449304)

Everything becomes quiet...then silence. Peace at last.

That's incorrect -- death is not peaceful silence. Peaceful silence is something people have experienced and are familiar with. Death is your own non-existence, which by definition it is impossible for you to experience.

(You might get some moments of peaceful silence just before you die.... but that's not death, that's dying. And depending on how you die, you might not even get that)

Re:The more wealthy have the time to ponder (1)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449424)

I can't imagine that not existing would be anything other than peaceful and silent. If it's loud and violent, I don't want to ever not exist.

Given current trends... (2)

RancidPeanutOil (607744) | more than 3 years ago | (#34448996)

If we're talking about undergraduate degrees, and the average amount of debt involved, then yeah, if asked if I was afraid of dying right after graduation, I'd be like, "meh."

conformance (0)

FuckingNickName (1362625) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449010)

People with a university degree tend to be (in b4 outliers) more conformist, walking in lockstep with society and less willing to question themselves or their surroundings. Like the old stereotype says, the easterner spends too much time in meditation staring into space, and the westerner spends too little time doing so.

Before anyone cries, "dropout!" and/or "education broadens your horizons, luddite!", only the components of my degree(s) containing philosophy really helped me contemplate mortality. And we're increasingly insulting about philosophy (even while, in the UK, many of the major players in government/civil service have been through PPE [ox.ac.uk] ), and study it in an increasingly bookish manner rather than asking students to use it as a vehicle to contemplate for themselves.

Re:conformance (1)

Nursie (632944) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449060)

Oh what utter rot.

Have any proof to back up your unfounded assertions that having a degree makes you more conformist?

Philosophy iss interesting, sometimes, but an awful lot of it is just mental masturbation.

Re:conformance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449344)

mental masturbation is the pinnacle of the conscious mind...

Re:conformance (0)

IICV (652597) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449114)

People with a university degree tend to be (in b4 outliers) more conformist, walking in lockstep with society and less willing to question themselves or their surroundings. Like the old stereotype says, the easterner spends too much time in meditation staring into space, and the westerner spends too little time doing so.

[citation needed]

In fact, I'll see your "more conformist" and raise you a "no they're not" - politically speaking, academics (a subset of people with degrees, I know) tend to be Democrats where the general population is mostly Republican. That doesn't sound at all like "walking in lockstep with society" to me.

Re:conformance (2)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449438)

Wait, it's nonconformist to support one of the two dominant political trends in the most powerful country in the world? Lolwhut.

Re:conformance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449116)

See Hitchens' chapter "There is no Eastern Solution" in God is Not Great.

What about the people in US Government? (0)

vkv.raju (1285590) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449014)

What about the people in US Government?

Re:What about the people in US Government? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449046)

They fear the rule of law more than death and Government is their God.

Re:What about the people in US Government? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449186)

And they don't get along with my dog.

Re:What about the people in US Government? (3, Insightful)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449284)

They fear the rule of law more than death and Government is their God.

Yes, and they also kidnap infants and drink their blood at their Satanic gatherings.

Can we stop with the hysteria yet? People in the US government are like people anywhere else -- some good, some bad, most just trying to pay their bills and keep out of trouble. Just because it's in the political interest of certain right-wing media organizations to regularly vilify them doesn't mean you have to mindlessly play along.

Re:What about the people in US Government? (0)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449332)

They fear the rule of law more than death and Government is their God.

Yes, and they also kidnap infants and drink their blood at their Satanic gatherings.

Can we stop with the hysteria yet? People in the US government are like people anywhere else -- some good, some bad, most just trying to pay their bills and keep out of trouble. Just because it's in the political interest of certain right-wing media organizations to regularly vilify them doesn't mean you have to mindlessly play along.

People with security clearance fear the law and follow it ruthlessly. See here http://www.fas.org/sgp/isoo/guidelines.html [fas.org]

So it's reasonable to believe people in the government aren't like people everywhere else because unlike everybody else they know how not to get in trouble.

Whatever doesn't kill me . . . (1)

Greg Merchan (64308) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449016)

Whatever doesn't kill me makes me stronger . . .

. . . unless it maims me.

The maiming sucks. I'd rather avoid it.

Well (0)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449018)

I'm sure this will make many atheists happy to here (despite the fact that this is coming from the University of Grenada...I mean, c'mon!?) but I can assure you, no matter what your education level, if you stand down the barrel of a gun at the hands of a killer you will fear death.

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449232)

I'd love to know what a psychiatrist would think of your post.

Planning on shooting anybody?

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449374)

Some people fear death all the time, that's why we have ridiculous TSA security checks and other bullshit. These are designed not to catch terrorists but rather to say "see? we have all these scanners, you're safe!"

This just in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449020)

Breathing helps keep humans from dying.

After 4 or more years at university (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449028)

death probably seems like a nice change of pace

Reasoning? (4, Interesting)

Renraku (518261) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449034)

Death is inevitable. I don't fear taxes, and I don't fear death.

What I do fear, however, since I live in the United States where suicide and assisted suicide are illegal, is becoming almost completely nonfunctional due to sudden paralysis, stroke, etc. The fear is that if I were locked in and could only communicate one character an hour, they'd still keep me alive for as long as they could, even if I had to lay there awake but bored and paralyzed for 16 hours a day.

A distant second is dying a horrible slow death, perhaps by starvation.

Death itself, though, I don't really fear.

Re:Reasoning? (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449076)

> where suicide and assisted suicide are illegal,

True, but you could always drink or smoke yourself to death ... :/ Seems to me it is only the timeframe that people don't like -- quick and painless, or the long, slow, painful in agony.

Not sure what gives the the living to dictate the rights over my body and / or control how I wish to die ...

Re:Reasoning? (1)

riverat1 (1048260) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449120)

Actually in Oregon and Washington at least assisted suicide it legal under certain circumstances. In Oregon 2 doctors have to certify that you probably have less than 6 months to live. Then you can get a prescription for a fatal dose of barbiturates that you must swallow yourself at a time of your choosing.

Re:Reasoning? (0)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449296)

There have been exactly 0 charges filed for Suicide since the law was put on the books. Clearly, it is working as an excellent deterrent against the practice!

Loans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449038)

Well, now you're free from all those student loans!

Obligatory Simpsons (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449054)

Lisa: "Dear Mom, I no longer fear Hell, because I've been to Kamp Krusty."

Extrapolation (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449066)

So if we extrapolate for the hell of it (no pun intended), then PhD's are committing mass suicide?

For Khalis! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449080)

Today is a good day to die!

makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449092)

Since those who fear death resort to religion to get over their fear while the intellect realizes that death is absolute for everything, including our universe. I fear of being dead but I put myself into situations where I could easily die, but the experience is priceless.

Marcus Aurelius (5, Insightful)

fremsley471 (792813) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449126)

Maybe the better read have listened to the words of Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius:

"Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones."

Re:Marcus Aurelius (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449268)

That quote just reeks of needing an addendum: for sufficiently narrow definitions of "just".

Re:Marcus Aurelius (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449388)

Anubis IV - your comment was both unnecessary and idiotic.

Re:Marcus Aurelius (5, Informative)

blackest_k (761565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449406)

Thanks for posting that, I have never heard that before, I came to the same conclusion many years ago and try to be a fair and decent person.

Last year I had a heart attack and as I was in the ambulance with the sirens and blue lights going I knew I might well die. I wasn't really afraid of dying but I did feel it was too soon I wanted to see the kids grown up, married and with children of their own.

I also am a huge fan of morphine, it doesn't so much stop pain as take away the fear of death. It gives you the calm to accept what will be will be. You don't fear for your own fate but feel for your loved ones and the upset they feel for you being so close to death. I also remember the priest coming round to see me and he asked me religion? I said not yet. I really don't feel like it is time for me.

The first year after my heart attack was tough, the statistics are frightening 30% of people who have a first heart attack die before reaching a hospital of the 70% left 50% will die within 6 to 8 years and in the first year you have a 25% chance of dying in the following years it drops to about 3% everybody has a chance of dying but its about 1.5% so now although my chances are raised I don't feel like its that much higher.
Year one was depressing I was constantly thinking about my health and didn't feel like I had a future.

Now I just want to get back on track and find a job and live a happy life doing something with somebody I love. I'm really grateful for my medical treatment and thanks to the irish health service I was treated for free and pay a nominal amount for my meds. Just hope there is someone who will take me on doing something.

 

Fear of death is rational. It is not a flaw. (1)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449136)

Death wouldn't be so bad if it didn't have to involve every memory you ever had being erased from existence. Written word and other recordings are completely inadequate to compensate for everything that is lost when a person dies. Just because death is currently inevitable does not make fear of it irrational - fear focuses awareness, which is perfectly appropriate when it involves everything you are in the world ceasing to be, lost to everyone.

That's one of the reasons I've always been fascinated by computers and programming - it goes further down the path of being able to record experiences more and more completely as they advance, beyond the single narrative of previous recording technology.

Ryan Fenton

Or: advantaged kids loose survival instinct (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449144)

researchers took a sample of 288 children

Not a strong correlation to the title.
I theorize reproducing should allow people to fear death less (since their primary objective is accomplised),

and since non-educated adults reproduce significantly earlier and at a higher rate would thus fear death less.
Additionally the less educated would in general have a less sensitive nervous system and should be less prone to paranoia in general.
So even if the family unit doesn't have a healthy acceptance of death, it wouldn't be something they worried much about until it happened.
But would need numbers to back that up.
Of course when it finally happens most anyone will be scared to death, so this is only relevant as a long term daily fear.

Re:Or: advantaged kids loose survival instinct (1)

profplump (309017) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449274)

Good job quoting out-of-context to support your contrarian post. I'm sure a good proportion of readers here won't have read the rest of that sentence in the article and won't know that you're trolling until they get to the third or fourth line in your post.

Basis in reality? (1)

johncadengo (940343) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449150)

How much of the fear of death measured in this study has a basis in reality?

What I mean is, if someone has reason to fear death (because of circumstance, or illness, etc.) then they probably have bigger things to worry about than getting college degrees?

Re:Basis in reality? (2)

Totenglocke (1291680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449300)

Well, circumstances are irrelevant. Like it or not, you will die. The only questions are when and how. As my dad always says: "You're not getting out of life alive, so you might as well enjoy yourself".

I have no fear of death, partly because it's inevitable, and partly because I can think of many cases where living can be much worth than death. The reason people fear death is because of the uncertainty over if there's an afterlife and what it's like - primarily, they're afraid that maybe those religious wackos are right and you really WILL be tortured for all eternity for not following what they say.

Education == realization of ignorance (1)

iamacat (583406) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449152)

What is consciousness exactly? Matter organized in particular ways? Electric impulses? Information? Which of these really disappear when you kick the bucket? According to cosmology, even if you are sucked into a black hole someone could later observe every photon it emits as it evaporates due to quantum effects and reconstruct you atom by atom. For more practical solutions, you could upload important parts of your persona to cloud computing (write books, raise children, etc) and they will happily keep running after your passing.

We don't REALLY know what makes us self aware. We know about neurons, axons, and neurotransmitters but that has nothing to do with why some being fired feels good, bad or whatever. We simply don't have (and probably will never have) enough information to know weather to fear death, look forward to death or just be indifferent. For all I know rocks or skeletons are having one big great party. I simply can not speculate on self awareness, intelligence or feelings of the rest of the universe from my single fixed point of reference. People who throw around either science or religion to obscure a fundamentally unsolvable problem fear death primarily because trying to understand it exposes the ignorance of their small minds. Educated people naturally approach ignorance as an exciting challenge.

Worry about losing that joy for life. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449164)

Nobody chooses to be born. Fear of death shouldn't be a worry. There is no doubt that you will die some day, so why worry about that. Worry about living.
Have you ever seen people smile or laugh in developing countries, or third world countries? Even though they might not have a clean sanitation or water system, they still find a way to enjoy life, for however long that may be. Worry about losing that joy for life.

There is a good lyric in a Kid Cudi song "Pursuit of Happiness" that goes:

If I fall, if I die, I'll know I lived it till the fullest
If I fall, if I die, I'll know I lived and missed some bullets

I do not fear death (1)

subanark (937286) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449290)

I fear being forgotten. We strive to be remembered; some do this though writing stories, other though research. Some do it though gaining popularity, or by changing history as it happens. Those who take refuge with God, they hope that He will remember them for all their hard work. For everyone else, there is facebook.

Even if I COULD live forever... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449356)

I would not want to. I subscribe to the theory that too much of ANYTHING is bad. Imagine having to roam this planet for hundreds of millions of years... it would get so very boring. I don't even think I could be happy in a "heaven" for eternity, because again... too much of anything is bad, even if I get whatever I want all of the time. My idea of a heaven would be not knowing that I died and for my entire consciousness to just be completely gone.

I can tell you why men fear death less than women (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449358)

It eventually sinks in that most men finishing college means they will be stuck working a job they don't really like until either they drop dead or they become too decrepit to work anymore, usually through age but possibly through irreparable injury.

Then add in the responsibility of maintaining a house, a car, paying bills and managing finances, emotionally supporting your wife and maybe needy friends or parents etc etc etc. Then possibly having responsibility for raising children that men haven't had throughout human history except for the last few decades.

So yeah compared to the rest of your life how bad could death really be?

Education good. (5, Insightful)

haeger (85819) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449384)

Seems like there's a long list of benefits in education. Not only will you be less religulous, but you will also not fear death as much and hopefully get a more fullfilling job.
Educating women is even better, they have fewer children and a better health. And they tend to see education as something important for their children.
Have a look at Hans Roslings excellent talk about the miracle in Pakistan for what education has done, and especially education of women.

Long live education, which should be free and availible.

SYD BARRETT HERE !! LISTEN TO ME !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34449396)

And I am not frightened of dying, any time will do, I
don't mind. Why should I be frightened of dying?
There's no reason for it, you've gotta go sometime.

I never said I was frightened of dying

hahahahahahahaahahahahhaahhahahaahO...imdead !!

I hope they weren't being literal (4, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34449430)

From the article:

at present, the education system does not have any formal and systematic method to deal with death in class. If death were introduced in the education system, children would have a more real and intense approach to life, and many of the problems derived from the mourning process in the adulthood would be prevented.

I hope they mean the topic of death rather than death itself. I don't really want our teachers killing anybody as an object lesson.

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