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China Blocks News Websites In Protest of Nobel

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the moral-victory dept.

Censorship 213

DaveNJ1987 writes "The Chinese Government has blocked the websites of the BBC, CNN and Norwegian public service broadcaster NRK, less than 24 hours before dissident Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo is due to be awarded the Nobel peace prize. China has been vocally critical of the plans to award the jailed writer the prize and has even gone as far as setting up its own 'Confucius peace prize' to rival the awards being held in Oslo tomorrow."

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No appreciation for subtlety in China (5, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501456)

Stop being so heavy-handed and obvious. Take a page from the CIA playbook. If you *really* want to discredit Liu Xiaobo, just recruit a couple of women to say he raped them (or some kids to say he molested them, or an old lady to say he beat her, something along those lines). Easy, subtle, and no need to censor CNN. And what's really great is that it works even if he's in another country (if you can recruit locals there, even better!). Pretty soon the Nobel people are backing away from him, Visa won't process donations for his cause, everybody is calling him a rapist/child-molester/wife-beater. And you get to say "Hey, wasn't us, that's his own personal problems" if anyone asks. Now no one will touch him and you didn't have to *directly* come down on anyone.

Just make sure your recruits look credible and pay them/threaten them enough to make sure they never talk.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (3, Insightful)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501478)

Of course, make sure they weren't bragging online about having sex with him days after the alleged "rape".

open source solves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501508)

Is anyone ready to open source [metagovernment.org] human governance?

Re:open source solves (2)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501588)

Oh wow. This is exactly what I've been looking for.

Now all we need is a place to institute it.

Re:open source solves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501962)

It's called the internet.

Open source governance is free of outmoded ideas like nationalism and ethnicity. If it ends up adhering to any geography, it will be to reality-based boundaries such as cities and ecoregions.

Re:open source solves (1)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502076)

Unfortunately, you still have that other government with its boot on your neck.

Re:open source solves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502720)

You're right. We should all just give up. Can we just go ahead and get government-issued mind-control implants right now?

Or, wait a minute. Maybe, just maybe we should try (you know, just try) to see if we can have real democracy before those implants actually are issued.

Those are your options. Which do you prefer?

Re:open source solves (1)

mweather (1089505) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502018)

Sounds great. Can I fork the police?

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (2)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502122)

This world's governments are going down the tube with their anti-free speech practices. And a lot of them are copying China as if that was the ideal model

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

atheos (192468) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502446)

won't matter, that kind of information never reaches the MSM

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (2)

pitchpipe (708843) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501552)

China Blocks News Websites In Protest of Nobel

Why is the Man alway trying to hold China down?! Give them a break. They're just exercising their right to free speech. Oh wait...

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501678)

You forgot about uploading pedophile photos on his PC. think of the children!

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (0)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501752)

If you *really* want to discredit Liu Xiaobo, just recruit a couple of women to say he raped them

So easy. Is anyone even remotely willing to acknowledge the slightest possibility that Assange may be, in fact, a scumbag, and that raping women is just something that scumbags do?

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501864)

Sure. Could just be that he spent 39 years not being a rapist only to begin his rapist career a couple of weeks after releasing a huge stash of classified materials that embarrassed the most powerful government in the world.

Of course, Liu Xiaobo could have spent 54 years not being caught for molesting children, only to have his victims finally come forward around the same time he is to accept the Nobel Prize. No need for any conspiracy theories here. Maybe we should consider that he really *is* a child molester, and the timing is just coincidental.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502118)

Sure. Could just be that he spent 39 years not being a rapist only to begin his rapist career a couple of weeks after releasing a huge stash of classified materials that embarrassed the most powerful government in the world.

It could be, yes. Power does go to people's heads, after all. Did you know 70% of all rapes go unreported? Could just be the first time someone spoke up.

Of course, Liu Xiaobo could have spent 54 years not being caught for molesting children, only to have his victims finally come forward around the same time he is to accept the Nobel Prize.

I'm sure as far as you're concerned, China and the US are on the same level as far as governance go, despite the very documents that Assange is leaking providing overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502186)

Did you know 70% of all rapes go unreported?

And that’s definitely not a made-up statistic. At all. By any stretch of the imagination.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502238)

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502442)

FACTS:
Sexual violence remains the most dramatically under reported crime, with an estimated two-thirds of attacks unreported ... over 70% of all rapes go unreported

FACT: That was a made-up statistic.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502584)

And how did they compile that statistic? For it to be accurate, you'd need every rape to be reported to the rape statistic collectors, and some proportion of those to be reported to the police. It's also interesting that you cite The Women's Center for the statistic, since the police statistics in the UK showed that rapes of men are less likely to be reported than rapes of women (admitting to having been raped is a lot more damaging to the male ego, apparently).

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (4, Interesting)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501902)

Is anyone even remotely willing to acknowledge the slightest possibility that Assange may be, in fact, a scumbag, and that raping women is just something that scumbags do?

I'm willing to acknowledge the possibility ... but, these allegations, er, allegedly came about after the two women met up with one another and realized they'd both had unprotected sex with him and wanted him to get tested for STDs. The women (again, allegedly) didn't want him prosecuted.

I seriously question if Interpol and the whole world would have been notified of this if this was anybody else.

Are you willing to accept that the whole thing has escalated beyond a point that would have happened under any other circumstances and that this wasn't rape?

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502030)

Are you willing to accept that the whole thing has escalated beyond a point that would have happened under any other circumstances and that this wasn't rape?

I'm willing to acknowledge the possibility, yes. It's just interesting to me that people are willing to accept their own interpretations of events as fact. Assange could have shot three policemen unprovoked in broad daylight and people would still scream character assassination.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (2)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502114)

I'm willing to acknowledge the possibility, yes. It's just interesting to me that people are willing to accept their own interpretations of events as fact.

Huh? I've read probably 30 or 40 news stories trying to sift through what is being said by various sources on this one to try to get a handle on what is being reported. I'm not just sitting around saying "Oh, he did/didn't rape those women because that's what I want to believe".

I don't think the allegations are character assassination -- I think the women legitimately did go to police, I just don't think the scale of the response of involving Interpol matches what would be happening for anybody else. I do question the underlying reasons for that. You don't call Interpol because someone wants someone they slept with to have an STD test.

Some people will always cry conspiracy theory. And, equally, some people will always say that if the allegations have been made, they must be true. I don't agree with either standpoint.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (0)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502166)

Some people will always cry conspiracy theory. And, equally, some people will always say that if the allegations have been made, they must be true. I don't agree with either standpoint.

Hence my italicizing of the word "possibility." And by "some people" I didn't mean you in particular.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (3, Insightful)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502048)

He is arguably a scumbag. But going from scumbag to rapist is a pretty big step. And considering the actual allegations? It is disrespectful to actual rape victims.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502178)

I thought the problem was that there was no scumbag. Or that it broke.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502142)

Sure, except I've heard many of the details on NPR and no one is accusing him of what we, in the US at least, call rape. There was no non-consensual sex. No woman is pressing any charges. A politician has charged him with having sex without a condom. The local government is only aware of the issue because 2 women were trying to track him down to have him tested for STDs, but he stayed off the grid to avoid governments tracking him.

Stupid? Yes. Scumbag? No.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

Tom (822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502144)

So easy. Is anyone even remotely willing to acknowledge the slightest possibility that Assange may be, in fact, a scumbag, and that raping women is just something that scumbags do?

Yepp.

As a remote, slight possibility.

So far, what info I could find about the events and the women in question make it a lot more likely that two women learn their treasure fuck has also had someone else around the same time, and it's surprisingly common in those cases for the two "cheated" women to band together against the guy and get some revenge. I think anyone with a somewhat interesting sex history has seen it happen.

Rape victims that twitter their rape experience as a great night the day after are... well... a little less common.

So until new evidence arises, my take is that it could have been a rape, but the chances are slight indeed.

Wait a minute, what are you saying? (2)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501956)

Are you saying that the US government is trying to supress freedom by setting up rape charges on its enemies?

OR are you saying we can get laid by upsetting the US? Someone give me a flag and some matches. I am going to get LAID!

Re:Wait a minute, what are you saying? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502020)

Wasn't us, that's his own personal problems.

Re:Wait a minute, what are you saying? (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502074)

He's saying that presented with the possibility of a questionable situation (that is, I haven't seen enough to rule out Assange acting questionably) involving a potentially vindictive woman (she did post a revenge strategy to the internet), he instead chooses to believe that pressure from a foreign government must be involved.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502208)

I imagine that if I were a Chinese citizen, and some of the big foreign news websites were all-of-a-sudden firewalled, I would be extremely suspicious that negative press about China was just about to come out. That would motivate me to look harder for the information that is being blocked.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (5, Interesting)

moondawg14 (1058442) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502498)

If you were a Chinese citizen, you'd be so used to the idea, it wouldn't even make you flinch. I visited China during the run up to the 2008 Olympics. I was watching CNN international. The reporter started talking about China's "increased tranpsarency to the press" or whatever term they were using then. The screen went black for about 2 minutes. When the picture came back, the reporter was done. This happened several times over the 2 weeks I was there. I was dumbfounded. It's just a way of life. The Chinese just shrug their shoulders and go on.

Re:No appreciation for subtlety in China (1)

HertzaHaeon (1164143) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502370)

By your conspiratory logic, if you're Liu Xiaobo and want to get away with rape, it's pretty easy. Just blame it all on the Chinese government afterwards.

The Criminal from China's Point of View (1)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501498)

So, just to be clear, I do not want to sound like a Chinese sympathizer or proponent but from the article:

In protest, the Chinese Government has set up its own rival awards ceremony to the Nobel prize; the "Confucius peace prize".

I would wait a bit before that's confirmed. The only news in English I can find on it seems to indicate it doesn't exist [focustaiwan.tw] or at least wasn't given to the recipient reported by the Associated Press. Those guys aren't often wrong but this sounds like a satire or problem in translation.

Furthermore, here's the point of view from the horse's mouth [xinhuanet.com] (angry version here [xinhuanet.com] and refusal to resolve here [xinhuanet.com] ) and they are propping up external support (though I think it's selective in choosing Heffermehl's words) [xinhuanet.com] .

So, yeah, censorship is bad in any form and I think the Chinese government is terrible in doing this but they do run things their own special way over there and censorship has always been the norm.

Re:The Criminal from China's Point of View (1)

pitchpipe (708843) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501654)

So, yeah, censorship is bad in any form and I think the Chinese government is terrible in doing this but they do run things their own special way over there and censorship has always been the norm.

Gee, nobody's really said it to me in such a sexy way before. I guess it's okay as long as they have their "own special way." It is *special* after all.

Re:The Criminal from China's Point of View (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501726)

Perhaps you should look around a little more. Here's a link: http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20101209/lf_nm_life/us_china_nobel_confucius [yahoo.com]
I suppose its possible this is also wrong, but the accompanying picture suggests otherwise.

Re:The Criminal from China's Point of View (1)

M. Baranczak (726671) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501906)

The accompanying picture shows two blurry guys shaking hands. I don't think it suggests much of anything.

Re:The Criminal from China's Point of View (0)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501892)

So the Taiwanese politician's spokesman saying he has rejected the price, and then the peace prize being handed to a 6 year old girl (with photo op and all) means we need confirmation? Of course they say it's no way connected to the chinese government, in the same way the Norwegian one isn't.

It was an obvious attempt at first get sympathy from asian countries, then when that fell flat they tried to ridicule the Nobel peace price by giving it to a 6 year old girl... How can China manage to mess up their soft power to this degree?...

Re:The Criminal from China's Point of View (1)

paimin (656338) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502330)

Maybe you should try Google instead of Baidu. I'd paste you a link, but Slashdot hasn't fixed their paste bug.

Looks like Slashdot.... (2, Interesting)

BlueBoxSW.com (745855) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501538)

... is looking to get itself banned...

Seriously, when are we going to be honest about China's rise as an international bully?

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (3, Interesting)

Lilith's Heart-shape (1224784) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501648)

We'd have to be honest about the fact that the US is also an international bully first.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501696)

We'd have to be honest about the fact that the US is also an international bully first.

Those can happen in parallel. Many of us are neither American nor Chinese, so it's not mutually exclusive.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

mrsurb (1484303) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502066)

Welcome to Australian politics - how much to suck up to each bully without pissing off the other because we so heavily rely on US for defence and China for $$$.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502168)

Welcome to Australian politics

Tell me about it, the border with the US is only about 50K south from where I'm sitting.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

countSudoku() (1047544) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502154)

I'm an American. And I'll tell you that Team America World Police was a documentary! We've got a lot of screwed up shitheads voting for long-legged, big-boobed dingbats and tea bagger idiots here, so give us a break. Stupid people breed faster than smart ones. We need to reverse the helmet and seatbelt laws and let "nature" take its course. Our leaders are not our best and brightest, they are our loudest and greediest. Thank goodness for Wikileaks to point a spotlight into the shithole that is our government backroom in action. Democrats and republicans? Two biggest bunch of fucking crooks the world may never see. Anyone who says different is not an actual American, just a douchebag apologist out to protect criminals posing as public servants.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (2)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502558)

It took 2 seconds for some idiot to turn this into an America Haters thread. Figures. If you're an American, your an idiot. Lets stick to the topic, shall we? Or will you also blame China's internment of Tibet on America too?

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501750)

Not really. Hypocrisy is at the heart of all politics.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502116)

Yeah, because no one (other than major networks, newspapers, and websites) is reporting on the attempts by the US and others to shutdown Wikileaks.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502690)

Wow. nice rant.

I especially liked: "Anyone who says different is not an actual American, just a douchebag apologist out to protect criminals posing as public servants."

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502310)

"We'd have to be honest about the fact that the US is also an international bully first."

Why are you conditioning one on the other? Do you just personally enjoy being an enabler for human rights abuses?

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

Lilith's Heart-shape (1224784) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502460)

I'm a US citizen, so it seems only natural that I would be more concerned with the actions of the government to which I pay taxes than I would be with the government of another country.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502694)

You have to remove the speck from your own eye before you’re allowed to take notice of a plank in someone else’s?

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

cobrausn (1915176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502696)

Considering other international 'bullies' throughout history, I tend to think the world has gotten off pretty lightly since WWII. Given historical behavior of other bullies (most notably Britain and other European nations), America's policies probably aren't all that different from how, say, Britain would probably still be acting if it were still the 'British Empire'. We westerners have a bad habit of behaving badly outside our borders. Luckily (?), it's starting to turn inwards as well, and we're taking notice.

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501674)

Seriously, when are we going to be honest about China's rise as an international bully?

Well, we're only starting to be honest about the USA's rise as an international bully now. We weren't really honest about the UK's rise as an international bully until it had lost most of its empire.

China's thuggery won't stop the determined. (1)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501682)

They simply just don't like people pointing the facts out. Nor do they like people finding out for themselves.

The people who want to see Slashdot won't be deterred by a ban by the Chinese government.

Re:China's thuggery won't stop the determined. (1)

Apagador-Man (707934) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502088)

Am I the only one who read "China's buggery"?

Re:Looks like Slashdot.... (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502522)

I wouldn't mind if Cox blocked crappy places like Fox News and maybe Lifetime Channel's website. Maybe block a few "how to tell if your man is cheating on you websites" and we can call it a day.

This Is Not News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501546)

Posting a story that China censors XXX is really not news.

It happens regularly in that country, I have no idea why it would be considered a news story on slashdot.

The Great Firewall is a way of life there, so just get over it and save your righteous indignation for something else.

That doesn't justify its existence. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501788)

The existence of the censorship is a news story, as there are nations that don't make a point of plugging up dissent. At least, not as thuggishly or thoroughly as China.

Re:This Is Not News (4, Informative)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501924)

Well, if you knew more details you'd know that this story involves them also "persuading" at least 18 other countries not to attend the presentation, and not letting the man's relatives collect the prize for him etc. It's more than just them censoring things in their own country this time. This is just an update on that story.

It would be funny if it wasn't affecting so many peoples' lives. At least our own governments try to make their lies plausible and their political maneuvers relatively subtle.

Re:This Is Not News (1)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502658)

"The Great Firewall is a way of life there, so just get over it and save your righteous indignation for something else."

Yeah, speaking out against censorship is just a big waste of time, making political speech a government doesn't like a jail-able offense is no big deal, gunning down thousands of your own people when they protest is just a normal day in China, brutally suppressing an entire culture or two because your own Han people need "Lebensraum" is fine. No one should really give a shit about what China does. Its fine.

A point against the China Apologists: Censorship (1)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501564)

For all the things China blames other countries for doing, China still is more totalitarian. They oppose the Pope since it takes away control from China, and they oppose the Nobel for it making China look bad. Normally, countries like the US take it in stride.

So much for Deng's whitewash of government action by simply acting as a guard for semi-private entities.

And yet "the people" (1)

Fibe-Piper (1879824) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501568)

The Chinese gov't is insanely powerful due to misguided patriotism.

Or Misguided in my point of view at least. However if I was a citizen of Shanghai or another wealthy city in China, it would fill me with a certain amount of pride to know that almost every economy on the planet depends on how well that country is doing,

The idea that people with economic prosperity will see their leaders as corrupt is like expecting U.S. citizens to be outraged over Gitmo

Re:And yet "the people" (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501694)

I wouldn't really call it "patriotism" if that were the only choice the government allowed.

Re:And yet "the people" (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502002)

is like expecting U.S. citizens to be outraged over Gitmo

You mean they aren't? WTF..

Re:And yet "the people" (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502106)

I have relative economic prosperity, see my leaders as corrupt, am a US citizen and am outraged over Gitmo.

Re:And yet "the people" (1)

countSudoku() (1047544) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502320)

Not me. I'd be wondering why I live in a shithole and the government makes a ton of money off my hard work... I'd probably just jump off the Foxconn building. I wouldn't be the first or last to pick death over living like a slave. Ask the people of Tibet, or the protesters at Tienanmen Square what they think about China? At least in the US I can call my government on their actions, Gitmo, Wikileaks, all of it. I'm free to say that's wrong and do something about it. In China you just smile and take it, or end up in a jail to correct your "patriotism." You need to get a clue.

Cheap chinese knockoffs. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501586)

Totally not worth the money, and produced under appalling conditions.

China blocks websites at the expense of its people (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501602)

...US buys tons of Chinese-made goods at the expense of its working-class.

Nothing ever changes...

Re:China blocks websites at the expense of its peo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501774)

US, and the entire western world, buys Chinese goods at the expense of manufacturing jobs. Not everyone can work at Wal-Mart.

Re:China blocks websites at the expense of its peo (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501932)

Not everyone can work at Wal-Mart.

No, because more manufacturing jobs have been lost to China than Wal Mart could possibly make up for.

Re:China blocks websites at the expense of its peo (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502028)

The working class buys cheap goods at the expense of itself you mean. If America restricted imports too much then you'd be complaining about that too.

Confucious Peace Prize (1)

Shadmere (1158007) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501666)

I think it should go to China, as a whole. What other country or organization has done so much for peace?*


*Peace as defined by the Chinese government. Please check your Official 2011 Redefinition List for true definition. If you have lost your Official 2001 Redefinition List, please report to the nearest detention facility, and the problem will be corrected.

Confucius say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501676)

get prize of peace, feel price of war.

Confucius he say (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501708)

Confucius was once passing by Mount Tai, when he heard a woman, who was standing in front of a grave, wailing bitterly. He sent one of his disciples to enquire the reason. "By the sound of your lamentation," he said, "you seem to be afflicted by some grievous sorrow." The woman replied, "Yes, a tiger killed and devoured my father-in-law, and then my husband suffered the same fate. Now my son has been gobbled up by another tiger." Hearing this, Confucius asked her, "Then why don't you leave this place?" The woman answered, "Because here there is no tyrannical rule." Thereupon, Confucius turned to his disciples and said, "Keep this in mind, young fellows: tyranny is fiercer than a tiger."

How do they dare.... (1)

mseeger (40923) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501716)

We, the sophisticated western people would never do such a thing. Take a web site like that nasty wikileaks that is publishing our diplomatic small talk. We would never ever dream of kicking them from their hosters, cancel their bank accounts, block/ddos their web sites or imprison their founder.

Cross my heart...

Re:How do they dare.... (1)

u-235-sentinel (594077) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501846)

We, the sophisticated western people would never do such a thing. Take a web site like that nasty wikileaks that is publishing our diplomatic small talk. We would never ever dream of kicking them from their hosters, cancel their bank accounts, block/ddos their web sites or imprison their founder.

Cross my heart...

and hope to what? :-)

Re:How do they dare.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501970)

hop to the left ;-)

Re:How do they dare.... (1)

mseeger (40923) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501998)

Stick a needle in my eye ;-)

Confucius say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501746)

... let peace prevail and we have peace all over China (freedom no, but peace it seems there is).

Confucius Say.... (2)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501866)

Man who win Nobel prize behind bars values cake with file more.

What would Confucious do? (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501928)

I wonder what Confucious would think of

1) a peace prize in his honor

2) such a prize being given out under the direction of the current China leadership

Re:What would Confucious do? (1)

DocSavage64109 (799754) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502300)

That's an interesting point. Much like what would Jesus think of the modern organized religions and the feuding between them.

I would think that with the importance east asia places on philosophy, that they wouldn't be so easily swayed by censorship. I suppose that they are no more immune to their media, and the subtle brainwashing that goes with it, than we are to ours.

Re:What would Confucious do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502576)

I think Confucius, believing in the value of social order and respect for authority would be pleased.

Cancer - cut it off... damage - route around it (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34501942)

If all the major internet routing hubs outside China started dropping packets coming from or going to Chinese IP addresses, I wonder how long it would take for the Chinese government to be on its knees begging for another chance? More significantly, I wonder how long it would take before the Chinese people would finally rise and demand that their government act like a civilized part of the internet community?

It would probably be at least as effective as those stupid “internet addiction” camps they make their youth attend. Give them a dose of their own medicine...

Re:Cancer - cut it off... damage - route around it (2)

Tom (822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502050)

I was wondering what it'd take for the same people who yell "censorship!" whenever someone proposes to restrict traffic for political, copyright or other legal reasons to come around with their own version of it.

Not routing to China is censorship based on political views, plain and simple.

Re:Cancer - cut it off... damage - route around it (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502148)

Not routing to China is censorship based on political views, plain and simple.

Yes, it is. Sometimes you fight fire with fire.

Re:Cancer - cut it off... damage - route around it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502526)

Most websites accessed by Chinese people are in Chinese language. And guess where those are? Yes, in China.

You and the US can no longer be outraged at China after what the US has done. What China has done is expected. What US has done re: wikileaks is simply illegal and immoral. Now US is threatening New York Times too....

Confucius say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34501984)

He who use my name for lame propaganda stunt, wake up with smelly fingers and look like fools.

Re:Confucius say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502062)

Wise man say: Man who eat many prunes, sit on toilet many moons...

Censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502004)

So China is taking a cue from the United States and censoring websites it doesn't like, eh?

Confucius peace prize (2)

kungfugleek (1314949) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502110)

Of course, I prefer the peace prize in its original Klingon text.

This isn't censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502130)

This isn't censorship. China are still letting the News sites say what they want, they're just not using THEIR infrastructure (the roads, telecoms, etc) to push stuff they don't like!

PLUS there is no US constitution in China, so therefore they can't break the rules (since the only source of law is, apparently, the US constitution to many slashdot posters).

Re:This isn't censorship (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502344)

China has intentionally positioned itself as the only highway between the Chinese people and the rest of the world, and it has closed that highway to anything it doesn’t like. That is censorship.

They haven’t prevented the news sites from publishing anything they want, but they have prevented the news sites from having any avenue of getting those stories to people in China. That is censorship.

They can’t censor anything for anyone outside of China, but the people living there are getting a censored version of the internet.

Obilg John Lennon (1)

seven of five (578993) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502190)

If you go carrying pictures of Chairman Mao
you ain't gonna make it with anyone anyhow.

Censorship, not protest (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502376)

They are being blocked as censorship, not protest. The PRC doesn't care what the BBC says, as long as the Chinese can't read things they don't want them to read.

Chinese Nobel Peace Prize (1)

Evildonald (983517) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502418)

All they have to do is host their own Peace prize and make Juilan Assange the winner.

LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34502444)

Confucius Peace Prize? Bwahahahahaha!! Is China trying to get on South Park again?

Lieberman is jealous (4, Insightful)

atheos (192468) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502488)

THIS is why politicians like Lieberman wants an internet kill switch in the US

Now what? (1)

garry_g (106621) | more than 3 years ago | (#34502678)

Too bad the US has made it d@mn hard for itself to complain over China's Internet restrictions ... all they can complain about now is how ineffective their own control over the Internet is ...

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