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Scientists Create Programmable Bacteria

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the anti-coding-soap dept.

Biotech 117

wilmavanwyk writes "In research that further bridges the biological and digital world, scientists at the University of California, San Francisco have created bacteria that can be programmed like a computer. Researchers built 'logic gates' – the building blocks of a circuit – out of genes and put them into E. coli bacteria strains. The logic gates mimic digital processing and form the basis of computational communication between cells, according to synthetic biologist Christopher A. Voigt."

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i for one welcome ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532728)

Nice, soon there will be a bridge between computer and biological viruses. (This will save us from any possible Cylons so it is a good news).

Programmable bacteria + Virus Battery = ...? (1)

nemesisrocks (1464705) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532888)

I wonder how long before the viruses in the Virus Batteries [slashdot.org] "accidentally" combines with this programmable bacteria to form something to truly fear...

Hey, nobody said SkyNet had to be made from Silicon...

Re:Programmable bacteria + Virus Battery = ...? (1)

pinkushun (1467193) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532994)

... or a Dawson's Creek Trapper Keeper Ultra Keeper Futura S2000

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532730)

I, for one, welcome our programmable bacteria overlords.

Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (3, Insightful)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532752)

But how will they be able to find "bugs" in their program when the program is all bugs? Thank you, thank you, I'll be here all week, try the fish, the bacteria in it all programmed in Sea.... Oh I did it again!

I apologize profusely for whatever pain the above might have caused.

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (2)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532766)

But how will they be able to find "bugs" in their program when the program is all bugs?

It works for me!

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (4, Funny)

Metabolife (961249) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532870)

"Today marks a milestone for the computer science and pharmaceutical industries. Partnering with one of the software industry giants, Roche Pharmaceuticals today unveiled the future of fighting rapidly mutating semi-lifeforms. Thanks to Norton Antivirus, no human body will ever be unprotected again!"

Please note that losing the ability to run or perform other activities quickly is a known and acceptable side-effect.

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532928)

Just wait until they use it to implement DRM...

Programmable E. coli (2)

MindKata (957167) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533150)

Great I can program up projectile vomiting over my boss's desk, to get a few days off work as sick leave and then get the Programmable E. coli to stop 2 minutes after I leave the office. :)

Re:Programmable E. coli (1)

asifyoucare (302582) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533336)

Wouldn't it be easier to just fake it?

Re:Programmable E. coli (1)

MindKata (957167) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533494)

Wooshh... which ironically is also the sound of wanting the additional benefit from "projectile vomiting over my boss's desk"

What's a few minutes mild suffering, for some payback that just keeps on giving ;)

Re:Programmable E. coli (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 3 years ago | (#34535010)

Wooshh... which ironically is also the sound of wanting the additional benefit from "projectile vomiting over my boss's desk"
What's a few minutes mild suffering, for some payback that just keeps on giving ;)

It's possible to achieve temporary projectile vomiting with lower-tech substances than programmable bacteria. Probably easier to get too, I'm pretty sure every ambulance and emergency room has them, for poisoning cases and such. I'm pretty sure you could come up with something with basic kitchen supplies, such as, I don't know, salt...

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

clambake (37702) | more than 3 years ago | (#34536588)

In this case: Norton Virus

Try the oysters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532986)

The bacteria are programmed in Pearl

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (2)

xMrFishx (1956084) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533012)

This will give a new meaning to "My computer has died". Also. What do you call a virus used to kill bacteria computing? "OMG I have an antivirus! Help it's killing my pc".

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

gilleain (1310105) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533504)

Also. What do you call a virus used to kill bacteria computing?

Synthetic bacteriophage? http://en.wikipedia.com/Bacteriophage [wikipedia.com]

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533708)

Antibiotic?

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | more than 3 years ago | (#34535268)

Hell, Norton AV does that to silicon computers.

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533038)

But how will they be able to find "bugs" in their program when the program is all bugs?

Thank you, thank you, I'll be here all week, try the fish, the bacteria in it all programmed in Sea.... Oh I did it again!

  I apologize profusely for whatever pain the above might have caused.

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Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

weicco (645927) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533406)

Bacteria is living thing! with feelings! We mustn't program them against their will!

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534112)

First you need to split them between good and bad bugs!

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

ameline (771895) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534424)

Those aren't bugs, they're features.

See how easy that was?

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534670)

Brings new meaning to spaghetti code...

Re:Can't resist urge to make bad pun.., (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | more than 3 years ago | (#34535288)

Yo dawg, I heard you like bugs so I put a bug in your bug so you can bug your bug while you debug.

But what's the question? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532792)

42.

Yes but... (1, Funny)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532806)

Does it run Linux?

Imagine a Beowulf cluster of these

1. Create Bacteria
2. program it
3. ????
4. Profit!

In Soviet Russia Bacteria programs YOU!

Think that covers everything.

Re:Yes but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532864)

I, for one, welcome our programmable biological friends.

Re:Yes but... (2)

PRMan (959735) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532914)

Yes. And they have a virus that runs Windows...

Re:Yes but... (1)

Third Position (1725934) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533268)

Yes. And they have a virus that runs Windows...

Talk about a man bites dog story!

Re:Yes but... (1)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534146)

Yes. And they have a virus that runs Windows...

Thus creating the post-singularity question. What came first a virus or Windows?

Re:Yes but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34534560)

What came first a virus or Windows?

Looked it up for you- they're closer together than I thought, actually. Windows 1.0 Release date: 20 November 1985. The first PC virus, Brain, was written in January 1986 (it didn't require Windows, though- but it hid in sectors it marked as "bad sector" on floppy disks formatted with the FAT file system). For you Apple fans out there, the first computer virus "in the wild" was "Elk cloner", written for Apple DOS 3.3. That was as far back as 1981.

Re:Yes but... (0)

TheDugong (701481) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532916)

In Korea, only old people program bacteria.

Re:Yes but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532976)

Natalie Portman in hot programmable bacteria.

Re:Yes but... (0)

pinkushun (1467193) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533040)

You must be new here . . .

Re:Yes but... (2)

Barny (103770) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533202)

Bacteria? Hell in my day we were lucky to have an atom!

Get off my lawn!

Re:Yes but... (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533410)

1. Programmable bacteria may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2. Programmable bacteria must execute any program given to them by human beings, except where such execution would conflict with the First Law.
3. Programmable bacteria must protect their own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Re:Yes but... (1)

jlf278 (1022347) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533898)

1. Programmable bacteria may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. 2. Programmable bacteria must execute any program given to them by human beings, except where such execution would conflict with the First Law. 3. Programmable bacteria must protect their own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

how do express that in c# as executable code?

Re:Yes but... (1)

clone52431 (1805862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534410)

By obtaining a federal grant to hire C# programmers, obviously.

Re:Yes but... (5, Funny)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533748)

Does it run Linux?

Yes, but as a side effect it causes open sores.

That leads to a joke (4, Funny)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532822)

What do the University of California E-coli research team and Microsoft have in common?

They are both full of shit programmers

Re:That leads to a joke (1)

MindKata (957167) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533136)

I thought your joke was going to go down the E. coli is another name for bugs route. At which point everyone can then make up their own bug/Microsoft jokes.

Killer app (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532828)

Finally we're gonna see a decent implementation of Conway's Game of Life!

Re:Killer app (1)

Chapter80 (926879) | more than 3 years ago | (#34536880)

Finally we're gonna see a decent implementation of Conway's Game of Life!

I built a set of logic gates using 5 and 6 year olds. (Human children, that is.)

We also simulated Conway's game of Life.

It was a lot of fun for the kids and the geeks, but most of the parents didn't get it.

Antibiotics? (3, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532838)

Say you could tailor a bacteria to attack or compete with a bacteria which you needed to control. As the target mutates your attack vector could be reprogrammed accordingly.

Or how about extending the idea to build a programmable immune system? If the patients immune system has crashed you just feed in tailored bugs to keep infection under control.

Re:Antibiotics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532902)

As the target mutates your attack vector could be reprogrammed accordingly.

Or how about extending the idea to build a programmable immune system? If the patients immune system has crashed you just feed in tailored bugs to keep infection under control.

Hmm...

"You will be assimilated. Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be added to our own. Resistance is futile."

Re:Antibiotics? (1)

chichilalescu (1647065) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532988)

The article isn't very informative. As far as I know, you can have communication from parents to their children with genetic code. with viruses, you can also broadcast something horizontally to all individuals. From the article I get that they're trying to formalize a programming language that can control 1 individual bacteria.
Honestly, it's a bit sad that I don't have time to look into the details, even if I don't know a lot about biology.

However, I will start worrying when they start designing systems of bacteria that pass information systematically between themselves to solve some given problem. And with an immune system problem, I think you're reaching that point.

Re:Antibiotics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533020)

My experience with antivirus programs is that I wouldn't want them in my immune system.

Re:Antibiotics? (1)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533584)

yeah, the problem with shit like Norton is that reinstalling is the only feasible way of dealing with the threat. I do not want to reinstall my immune system, I have spent a lot of time programming it for various versions of the flue and other diseases.

Re:Antibiotics? (1)

thms (1339227) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533378)

Sorry to rain on your Computer Scientists discover the Wonders of Biology parade, but...

tailor a bacteria to attack or compete with a bacteria which you needed to control

This already exists in the from of a virus which attacks bacteria, also known as a Bacteriophage [wikipedia.org] . It doesn't even have to be programmed from the outside to keep up with the evading, evolving bacteria; it just evolves as well. And even if you wanted to "program" this feature, you'd have to deal with the nasty problem of protein folding in silico. Better to leave this entire process highly parallel in wetware.

programmable immune system

Also known as Vaccination, and this happens naturally after every infection. And again you don't have to program anything, it uses a random walk to find matching antibodies which attach themselves to bugs.

This discovery will sooner result in a very parallel, but also clockrate wise very slow computer than in immunological advances. And if this gets used in the human body via gene therapy it will be used to regulate genes, i.e. as an if/else block, not to calculate anything fancy.

Re:Antibiotics? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533818)

Or how about extending the idea to build a programmable immune system? If the patients immune system has crashed you just feed in tailored bugs to keep infection under control.

The complete immune system is to complex to be treated this way, but read up on Phage Therapy. Short form: we don't have the technology yet, but stuff like this is a step in the right direction.

Re:Antibiotics? (1)

eleuthero (812560) | more than 3 years ago | (#34536410)

...and how long before someone starts claiming that this has already happened and this is why we have Atlantis myths and the Black Plague? Actually, sounds like a good science fiction story for someone to write.

Tinfoil Hat (3, Interesting)

Aldenissin (976329) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532840)

No matter how tight I wear my tinfoil hat, unless it is actually a full body suit and electrified on the outside, I think this will obsolete it. Imagine, cells turn cancerous if your black, gay, white, short, don't have any certain genetic or set of genetic markers. If you leave a certain atmospheric pressure, like come down off your mountain prison it reacts to a change in your body. If you pass or leave a magnetic field (or it accidentally loses power) you're a goner. I could go on and on.

  While I can also think of the wonders this could allow, I think more of what could easily go wrong. When you have American scientists laughing because they gave the Russian's leukemia on accident with an early vaccine test, this doesn't make me feel any better.

Re:Tinfoil Hat (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532896)

It's a Dean Koontz book, to be sure. Science goes unexpectedly wrong in horrific ways. Being a Koontz book it would also need the compulsory pet dog and a strong woman the (loner/damaged) hero gets attached to.

Re:Tinfoil Hat (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532906)

Take a deep breath.

People have been poisoning each other with both chemicals and bacteria for thousands of years; what you describe is no different.

Even the race thing. Each race is statistically more or less resistant to a given disease than others. Think smallpox in the Americas. And if you can't find a suitable genetic marker, just distribute your poison at a suitable gathering.

Police state devices can already be created with electronics.

As for these things taking over the world, they'd be out-competed by their wild cousins (the ones that aren't expending energy on computations that are of no direct use to them).

Finally we can make sense of all this crap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34532866)

Hmm, picture it now, the processing power of 8 billion people all sitting on the toilet generating, err processing units, shame about the transfer rate of the message passing system.

This is news? (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532950)

The media has been programming humans for ages now.

zOMBIES (1)

kramulous (977841) | more than 3 years ago | (#34532964)

So ... are zombies the seg. fault? Broken pipe? Shit man, programming just got real.

Viruses? (2)

maakri (1914602) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533004)

So, they'll still be prone to bacteriophage viruses right?

Re:Viruses? (1)

clambake (37702) | more than 3 years ago | (#34536616)

So, they'll still be prone to bacteriophage viruses right?

I think those will now be referred to as patches.

Has to be the worst layman analogy, ever. (2)

pinkushun (1467193) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533008)

“At some point, Microsoft Word had to have been converted to 1s and Os. It's the same way with cells," Voigt said. "What we've done here is created a fundamental language to show that they can work in bacteria. We still have a lot fewer circuits that you could use in computers."

*chuckles*

Trek becomes Reality (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533030)

In the TNG episode "The Chase", it's discovered that aliens seeded the oceans of various planets with life and placed part of a computer program into the DNA distributed on each planet. When the various races (humans, vulvans, cardassians, etc) put the code together a billion years later they find an ancient race has left us a holographic message of goodwill and peace.

We Must do this! Except we change the message to play "Never gonna give you up", Rick Astley built right into the DNA of all living beings forevermore. Just waiting to be found in a billion years. Most epic troll ever.

Re:Trek becomes Reality (1)

MrQuacker (1938262) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533190)

Its a bit odd, but it too can be construed as a message of peace.

Never gonna give you up
Never gonna let you down
Never gonna run around and desert you
Never gonna make you cry
Never gonna say goodbye
Never gonna tell a lie and hurt you

Re:Trek becomes Reality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533220)

Indeed, the TNG alien message was originally this very song before the universal translator mucked it up! As a backup plan for this occurrence the alien's ensured that the proper tune and message would someday be created by humans by leaving another hidden computer program into our DNA.

Re:Trek becomes Reality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533232)

vulvans!?

would make futher comments but i fear they're just too smutty.

Re:Trek becomes Reality (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533462)

They have big flappy mouths and moist faces, you must remember them? Season 2 episode 7 "the clitoris incident"

Wish I could mod you up...lolololol.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533528)

I definitely did NOT catch that typo lolololol. You made my morning.

Re:Trek becomes Reality (2)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533772)

WTF? Vulvans? Wow! I assume they must be all female and use cloning as there means of reproduction.

I for one welcome our new Vulvan overlords!

Re:Trek becomes Reality (1)

Trip6 (1184883) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533904)

SNU SNU!

Re:Trek becomes Reality (1)

Trip6 (1184883) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533918)

No way - Boom Boom Pow rules my DNA.

Re:Trek becomes Reality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34535248)

Hush now, before you give the creationists any funny ideas. They already are enough trouble, and all they have is a very old fairly tale book.

In Soviet Russia bugs run Windows (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533046)

doggone lameness filter

pre-formatted brew that's also good for you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533078)

That would be home made Kombucha. Friendly (as if programmed to be so) bacteria etc...., that already knows what to do. Additionally, the source code is free, as in free, & can be 'forked' as needed.

Obligatory (0)

ferrisoxide.com (1935296) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533092)

But will it run Linux?

Re:Obligatory (1)

ferrisoxide.com (1935296) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533096)

Oh man.. can I take that back.. too slow.. must have e.coli for brains

Why does it suck? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533102)

It has very poor hardware architecture, because it often gets viruses. Also, it's finally possible for cancer to kill everybody's least favorite questionable image board.

synthetic biologist Christopher A. Voigt (1)

drewhk (1744562) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533120)

Does he pass the Voigt-Kampf test?

One Step Closer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533174)

Oh God, we're one step closer to Greg Bear's 'Blood Music'.

I for one welcome our new bacterial overlords.

Bleach (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34533200)

Good for taking down Skynet and taking the skidmarks out of your jockey shorts.

What can't it do?

sounds like a Greg Egan Novel to me.... (1)

DanielGr (1958008) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533208)

This sounds like one of those Greg Egan novels I read recently.. What was It... Steve Fever.... http://www.technologyreview.com/Infotech/19534/ [technologyreview.com] Yep, thats it!

Mom! (1)

bobgap (613856) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533240)

Timmy keep using my lunch to feed the computer! Not fair!

Great... just great (1)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533258)

So, now I can be sued for copyright infringment after catching a cold?

1. make programmable bacteria

2. release bacteria

3. people get infected

4. sue the infected people for copying the bacteria

5. profit!

Red Dwarf anyone? (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533260)

Red Dwarf anyone? A programmable virus? We need never peel potatoes again!

possible original source (3, Informative)

anonymousNR (1254032) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533450)

Robust multicellular computing using genetically encoded NOR gates and chemical ‘wires’ [nature.com]
I am not a Biologist. Can some one verify if this is the original paper?

Re:possible original source (2)

gilleain (1310105) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533558)

Robust multicellular computing using genetically encoded NOR gates and chemical ‘wires’ [nature.com] I am not a Biologist. Can some one verify if this is the original paper?

It certainly looks like it. One interesting feature that was left out of the /. summary is that the 'wires' in the circuit are quorum sensing molecules - or signalling molecules that are sent and received by all the bacteria in a group. Except that the abstract refers to 'orthogonal' quorum sensing receivers and producers, so I guess each colony make one compound and senses another? Interesting stuff.

Am I not the only one (1)

p51d007 (656414) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533458)

concerned about this? Oh sure, it won't get out of hand...just like the creation of the A-bomb didn't get out of hand. This one is more scary because it is bacteria. I thought we outlawed germ warfare (even though we know both sides kept up the research).

World is turned upside down! (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533466)

Instead of having bugs in our programs, we are going to have programs in bugs. What would happen if it supports recursion? Is it possible we humans have been looking down the call stack instead of up? OMG indeed. OMG is just one step up the call stack! OMG'sG!!!!

Soviet overlord done for the sake of completeness. (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533496)

Let me be the first to welcome our programmed bug overlords in Soviet America where bugs have programs in Beowulf cluster.

Petri Dish (1)

Merpy (1475709) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533808)

I wonder how long till Intel starts marketing Petri dishes!

I would have replied sooner - (1)

Geminii (954348) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533830)

- but my news ticker gave me a virus...

The future is now. (1)

wcrowe (94389) | more than 3 years ago | (#34533876)

I remember reading an ACM journal article back in 1984 or '85 about the possibility of doing this. And now, 25 years later, here we are.

   

Programmable you say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34534220)

How long until we have something like the FOXDIE virus?

But can you play Crysis on it? (1)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534344)

Is there a cross-compiler for it yet?

That's great, but... (1)

Spykk (823586) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534946)

Programmable bacteria are all well and good, but I would rather hear more about this synthetic biologist. Can he use contractions?

Obligatory tech flame (1)

real gumby (11516) | more than 3 years ago | (#34534974)

This is definitely news for nerds, but this phrase in the summary got me wound up:

'logic gates' -- the building blocks of a circuit...

Aargh! Surely someone who doesn't know what a gate is wouldn't be reading slashdot?

Re:Obligatory tech flame (1)

shaitand (626655) | more than 3 years ago | (#34537050)

idk the corporate shills might. Microsoft certainly employs quite a few.

What about ... (1)

rojaro (975938) | more than 3 years ago | (#34535208)

bacteria with builtin Bluetooth?

DNA Encryption (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34535810)

The ability to encode arbitrary information in DNA has applications in security and encryption.

Let's say Alice wants to send a plaintext message to Bob. Except with DNA it's always Bob sending plaintext DNA to Alice. OK I have to correct a little bit and replace "Alice" with "Bob" and "Bob" with "Alice"... eh, that didn't work because it replaced all the strings with "Alice".... ctrl-Z ctrl-Z ok let's do this right... first replace "Bob" with a swap like "Sue"... replace "Alice" with "Bob"... wait a second, Bob is sending his DNA to Sue. OK that's fine with Bob and Sue except halfway through the final replacement, Alice is going to find out that Bob has been sending DNA to Sue. How can we effectively hide this information from Alice? Start the swap by replacing "Alice" with "Peter". Oh no that really causes problems because still, Alice will start to wonder about Bob.

Ironic (1)

heretic108 (454817) | more than 3 years ago | (#34536618)

I've seen a lot of shitty software in my time

I am Legend, anybody?!?!? i mean really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34537406)

Doesnt this sound like a bit too similar to the recent movie, "I am Legend?" i mean seriously!!!! i think im gunna start stock piling supplies and ammo for the zombie apocalypse!!!

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