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The French Government Can Now Censor the Internet

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the think-of-le-children dept.

Censorship 419

Psychophrenes writes "A new episode in French internet legislation — French ministers have passed a bill (original in French) allowing the government to add any website to a black list, which access providers will have to enforce. This black list will be defined by the government only, without requiring the intervention of the legal system. Although originally intended against pedo-pornographic websites, this bill is already outdated, as was Hadopi in its time, and instead paves the way for a global censorship of the 'French internet.'"

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419 comments

france sucks (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577456)

I am french and at the moment everybody should leave this country for china.

Re:france sucks (2, Funny)

ThePangolino (1756190) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577522)

I am french and at the moment everybody should leave this country for china.

Thanks for confirming French people are cowards!

Re:france sucks (3, Interesting)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577530)

I think China may actually be worse, but I am not sure, I can't get anyone their to comment.

Re:france sucks (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578030)

I think China may actually be worse, but I am not sure, I can't get anyone their to comment.

That may be a good thing. Making contact with China only to get a lecture on the difference between 'there,' and 'their' would be embarrassing ;)

Re:france sucks (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577818)

I am United Statsian and I fear that my country isn't too far behind yours in terms of censorship.

Re:france sucks (3, Funny)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578230)

I too, but thanks to this, we now have an extremely effective rally cry...

"No Internet Blacklists No! You Don't Want To Be Like France, Do You?!"

Of course, the most impact it could possibly have is that they'd probably just implement a freedomwall instead of a firewall :-/

Je t'aime, au revoir! ;-)

Re:france sucks (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578712)

I am United Statsian

You're a what now? What the smeg is a "Statsian?" Sounds like a species on Star Trek.

Dude, I live in North America, and I'm not American. I don't know of a single North-American residing non-American that objects to residents of the USA referring to themselves as "Americans." You're American, dude. Just use the term and get over yourself.

first censorship (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578140)

You, sir, lost a great opportunity to post an on-topic goatse link [goatse.fr]

Re:france sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578350)

There are probably fewer muslims in China...

How long does it take... (4, Insightful)

fluch (126140) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577480)

...that Wikileaks is on that list? Or similar sites?

Business as usual (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577590)

The business of government only expands in power and revenue throughout its lifetime, never willingly or permanently reducing power or revenue. History has proven this over and over again, to the point where one could argue that the entire objective of government is power and revenue.

I remain absolutely shocked that the common man doesn't consider this a giant red flag.

Re:Business as usual (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577788)

The business of government only expands in power and revenue throughout its lifetime, never willingly or permanently reducing power or revenue. History has proven this over and over again, to the point where one could argue that the entire objective of government is power and revenue.

I remain absolutely shocked that the common man doesn't consider this a giant red flag.

B-b--b-but government is a force for the greater good, and higher taxes are needed to pay for that!

How else are we going to pay for the wonderful health care we'd get from the very same government that gave us the TSA?

Re:Business as usual (4, Funny)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577868)

How else are we going to pay for the wonderful health care we'd get from the very same government that gave us the TSA?

Just think of the benefits. Apparently from next year Americans are going to get a free prostate exam from the TSA every time they fly.

Re:Business as usual (1)

Chibinium (1596211) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578410)

Pardon me officer, but I would like to skip the scanner and go straight to the pat-down. For the lucky agent, I'll pick...her!

Re:Business as usual (2, Informative)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577988)

In the U.S., we don't get health care from the government. We don't even get health insurance from the government, unless you fall under Medicare or Medicaid.

Re:Business as usual (5, Insightful)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578078)

Governments are like nuclear power. If left unchecked they will kill a lot of people, screw up the neighborhood for generations and cause loss of standard of living for a lot other people. In the extreme, they can be used as a weapon and cause far more damage yet.

On the other hand, given enough containment and backup control systems, they can be the most powerful source of help in everyday life to a lot of people.

So where the challenge truly lies is in engineering such containment and control (see for example: the US Constitution) and then maintaining it. But when citizens willing to fight for their rights to the death are replaced with the likes of lardy American Idol fans, there is simply no one left to look after rusty, sieve-like containment vessels.

And so, unfortunately, most governments on the planet today are in various stages of performing their Chernobyl thing.

Re:Business as usual (2)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578446)

there's something beautiful about that analogy.

now if we could only get all politicians sealed inside an airtight lead box.

Re:Business as usual (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578604)

hahaha! Brilliant Ignoramus! I agree with you completely.

Re:Business as usual (2)

Capt_Morgan (579387) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578424)

That actually would be ok ..... IF the common man controlled the government. Notice that when populations are small... there is far less complaining about the govt. The problem is that when elites control the govt (which is the case in many places) you're statement has a lot of truth to it Heck, in the US we've reached the point where NEITHER party cares about civil liberties. I must be a weird guy.. because I find a lot of common ground with both Bernie Sanders (socialist) and Ron Paul (libertarian)

Re:Business as usual (1)

oliverthered (187439) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578590)

the system is rigged.
As they say.
Democracy is two wolfs and a lamb voting for what to have for lunch.

Also those that learn by authority (which is generally the common teaching method) will undoubtably end up on top, and think that system works.
Also those that need to be taught right from wrong, and want to teach others (psychopaths 1/25), and possibly don't realise that others have an inbuilt sense of right and wrong.

Funny how things are getting more and more selfish.

What usually happens is violent revolution.

Re:How long does it take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577626)

Or, thesimpsons.com, for the 'Cheese Eating Surrender Monkeys' line.

Re:How long does it take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578028)

What, all 2194 of them?

Re:How long does it take... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578188)

Officialy, this is only for child-pornography websites but since there will be no external control, who knows Last week, one of our minister (the guy who expulse Romanians) already tried to block wikileaks to be partially hosted in France, without any justifications We're still fighting to preserve Freedom of Speech in France, there is still a chance that a judge approbation can be added in the law. If you want to learn more or help us out, check out: http://www.laquadrature.net/ [laquadrature.net] Sarkozy is proud of its Hadopi and Loppsi laws, we know that he's already trying to export it, be warned :)

There they go again... (2)

PmanAce (1679902) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577484)

France being France.

Re:There they go again... (3, Insightful)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577718)

The problem with that is that France is now what the US will be in a few years... pissed off that it's no longer a global superpower, and pissed off that it's language is no longer considered the "lingua franca" for global commerce.

Re:There they go again... (1)

cdrudge (68377) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577978)

pissed off that it's language is no longer considered the "lingua franca" for global commerce.

Don't you mean "langue franque"?

Seriously though, French hasn't been the lingua franca since WWII. 60 years is a long time to be pissed off about something and waiting to do something about it.

Re:There they go again... (1, Funny)

corbettw (214229) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578668)

They're French, what did you expect? It takes a while to organize a protest when your people are only working 30 hours a week.

Re:There they go again... (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578732)

Remind me. What were all those "The south will rise again" bumper stickers I saw when I visited the USA?

Re:There they go again... (2, Funny)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577802)

They're only censoring it to protect their culture. French ISPs need to carry at least 75% French content, like their television and radio.

Re:There they go again... (1)

ushering05401 (1086795) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578116)

That is an interesting concept. One question might be how that decision is going to impact relationships across generations. Those that feel at home navigating the nets are going to be feel distanced from the priorities of 'French Culture.' Doesn't seem like a good move at this particular time.

It fits the character of France (2)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577506)

...given that they have gained a sort of reputation for having a canonical answer to everything--they have an institute that defines their language (and quashes neologisms); they have extensive fights regarding the IP that defines their wines; I wouldn't be surprised if they insist on the One True Baguette Recipe.

While this is a rather stupid step to take, I'm going to be very interested in how it plays out. They'll fail, of course, but perhaps this will spur faster development of distributed DNS or alternative DNS systems.

Re:It fits the character of France (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577686)

Unfortunately, they're not going to block DNS resolution of said servers but most likely their IP addresses. Which means that in the end the things will be blocked. The whole problem with the french governement is that they start stupid laws like that without even knowing their repercussions/meaning and this gives lots of ideas to countries around them. 3 strike rule is another example of it.

So now everybody in Europe is going to start filtering internet blocking entire ranges (and why not entire countries) from being reached, because "we're not the first one to do it".

Re:It fits the character of France (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577780)

Says the man who has never heard of tor or any other form of proxy it seems.

Re:It fits the character of France (1)

dachshund (300733) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577890)

I wouldn't be surprised if they insist on the One True Baguette Recipe.

You have to admit that their baguettes are awfully good.

Re:It fits the character of France (1)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577968)

Well, yes, but that's still no excuse to quash innovation. What about the walnut baguette? The oatmeal-raisin demi-baguette? The venerable rosemary-and-sage baguette?

Greaaaaat. (1)

Aerorae (1941752) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577570)

Just what the world needed. Another government deciding what it's citizens should and shouldn't see.

Just a matter of time (0)

Palmsie (1550787) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577602)

Before child pornography-blocking bills find their way to the US and ultimately give the government the power to censor the entire internet. o... wait...

I Wonder (4, Funny)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577610)

I wonder if they will add Google's list of French military victories [albinoblacksheep.com] to that blacklist...

Re:I Wonder (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577688)

Pretty funny, if you've never heard of Napoleon, because you're an unfortunate byproduct of the American (de) education system.

Yumm.. Feedom Fies!

Support are troops! /me salutes

Re:I Wonder (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577840)

Wasn't he that guy that wasn't born in france?

Re:I Wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578200)

you should shut your mouth when you don't know, Corsica is an island which became French in 1768, 1 year before Napoleon birth... So he is French

Re:I Wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578510)

So he wasn't born in France, then...

Re:I Wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577912)

because you're an unfortunate byproduct of the American (de) education system.

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black. That page does account for Napoleon. You might not like what he had to say about him, but he was accounted for.

If you weren't such a moron, you would have noted that the page did not account for Charles Martel.

Re:I Wonder (1)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578132)

Actually, I am very well educated, so well educated, in fact, that I can recognize a good practical joke when I see it and appreciate it as such. But please, don't let that subtlety get in the way of your crusade to eliminate all humor from the internet AC. ;)

Re:I Wonder (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578748)

He's on that list, genius, and is given as the second example of the First Rule of French Warfare (France only wins when not led by a Frenchman).

History (1)

Tenant129 (1362913) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577636)

Apparently the French have forgotten their history, and are thus repeating it. Say hey for the death of freedom of speech in the 1st world.

Re:History (1)

trollertron3000 (1940942) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577786)

Or maybe just the leadership forgot how their heads can most certainly end up rolling free from their body given the right "social conditions". Pulling this in France is pretty insane given their history.

Re:History (1)

morgauxo (974071) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578624)

How many centuries was it from the end of Grecko/Roman democracy to The French Revolution or any other Western nation democracy? I just don't see much encouragement in history right now. Granted, I would like my Great^10 Grandchildren to have good lives but I am much more interested in our own time and that of my children.

Re:History (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578130)

the French have forgotten their history, and are thus repeating it.

The French invented the guillotine once, they can do it again.

Oops (5, Insightful)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577638)

There goes that "Liberté" thing you fought for. Better luck next time.

Re:Oops (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577946)

Well, they never archived "égalité" in the first place, and I assume that the "fraternité" is as dead there as in any other place these days, so I guess it fits the picture.

Re:Oops (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577958)

Off with yer hed!

Re:Oops (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578064)

You laugh, but they're on their fifth republic already. I'm sure they'll go for a new one eventually.

Re:Oops (1)

stimpleton (732392) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578596)

And many international troops died for especially in WW2. Yes, it was an international theatre of war, but france was at its core as a location. My grandfather, as a New Zealander, fought germans, retaking french villages.

I disagreed with the American's "Freedom Fries" response to France's reluctance over the Iraq war. But to hear the French hindering French freedoms grates a little.

Censor This Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577738)

site [slashdot.org].

Yours In Novosibirsk,
Anonymous

Oblig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577756)

First banning the use of "Le Hotdog", now this.
France surrenders its liberties ... again.

I can't believe the French just gave in on this (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577814)

Where is that legendary fighting French spirit?

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (4, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577888)

it's not a labor issue. the french will burn down their cities on any minor issue having to do with labor laws

likewise, americans don't consider themselves free until everyone is walking around with unconcealed submachine guns. labor issues? not so much a concern

all nationalities have their quirky interpretation of what "free" means

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (3, Insightful)

Pi1grim (1956208) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578262)

For some weird reason government tends to listen more readily when the citizens have their SMGs.

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578400)

(citation needed)

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (1)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578402)

Bullshit.

Suppose you have your SMG. What would it take for you to take and use it against the government? I bet it's something very, very big. Now for anything less important than that, what does it matter that you have your SMG even if you're not going to use it?

Short of the government deciding to institute Sharia or something similarly huge, an armed revolt by the population is extremely unlikely. That's quite a lot of things they can do to really screw up your life, without that weaponry helping in the slightest.

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (5, Interesting)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578564)

it's worse than that. if the usa ever does fall under the boot of fascism, that fascism will start with a committed group of heavily armed partisans. when i hear about heavily armed ideologues running around the woods, i don't think of protection from fascism, i think of the soil in which fascism grows

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578048)

you want to know the anwser: we have a shitty government with an idiot at its head like your G. Bush. few years back.
Our political sphere is composed by 70 years old guys, they didn't even know what facebook is.
2012 will probably bring changes.

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578598)

You kidding me, right? Fool they were on the last vote, fool they'll be on the next one! Just look at how Sarkozy-mini is courting Le Pen junior's idea! He's just afraid that spewing xenophobic garbage might make people vote for the original fascist instead of him.

De Gaulle told it as it is: "French are beefs", slow to act. And I think we've never been slower than today.

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578456)

We lost a battle but the war continue.

Re:I can't believe the French just gave in on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578520)

Where is that legendary fighting French spirit?

Not that it matters, and I know that you are joking... but The United States of America would most certainly be flying a British flag if it wasn't for the French Navy oh so long ago...

Who pays for this? (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577828)

...add any website to a black list, which access providers will have to enforce.

I don't know how feasible this really is. Are they going to block encrypted and VPN traffic as well? Deep packet inspection to disallow the use of proxies? Denying access to DNS servers outside France? The government has essentially passed legislation to hold service providers accountable for something that, frankly, is impossible to impliment. If you are an internet service provider in France right now, I'd be seriously thinking of selling my stocks, cashing in, and getting the hell out now, before you lose your whole investment on a piece of government legislation destined to cause many, many judges to facepalm.

Re:Who pays for this? (2)

dachshund (300733) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577984)

Are they going to block encrypted and VPN traffic as well? Deep packet inspection to disallow the use of proxies? Denying access to DNS servers outside France?

In the past few years working with DRM systems I've basically come to appreciate the 'mom rule'. Namely, if a technology's good enough to keep your mom from accessing data, then it's probably good enough --- meaning it'll keep 90+% of potential customers on the paying hook.

In this case, while my mom's excellent at typing nytimes.com into her browser, I can't see her downloading VPNs, using p2p systems or even accessing mirrors. Thus, while this law doesn't provide a perfect shield against the populace accessing 'bad' things, it'll probably do most of the job. After that all you have to do is keep the media outlets busy with other things, and you've basically got what you need. Berlusconi and Putin have some lessons to teach there.

Re:Who pays for this? (1)

IWannaBeAnAC (653701) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578012)

All the providers have to do is block a specific set of URL's. Easy to implement, but also easy to work around, so basically pointless. But I don't expect it will add much to the ISP's workload.

Re:Who pays for this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578636)

They can also use DPI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_packet_inspection) which is a weapon of choice in the law.

Will they publish it ? (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577832)

Will they publish the blacklist publicly ? If not, there's no telling what they could block, especially since there don't appear to be any checks or oversight.

Re:Will they publish it ? (2)

Zorpheus (857617) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578324)

If it is not published officially, somone will probably give it to wikileaks or a similar site. With all providers having that list.

Well I guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34577866)

They can run the streets and protest.

Oh wait, they are already doing that.

Well, protest *more* then.

Blacklists... (2)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577900)

Allright boys and girls, lets all say it together.

Blacklists don't work. :)

Buying a new domain costs very little - especially if we're talking about child porn websites - which aren't meant to get millions of hits per day.

Now, lets wait until someone discovers that torrents may contain child porn. Then the circle will be complete.

If they wanted to help the victims (1)

exentropy (1822632) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577928)

... they would put their resources into investigating the source of the pornography. Rather, this is just a power grab by the French government to get the ability to censor the Internet.

FFFFUUUUUUUU- (1)

scarface71795 (1920250) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577938)

I can't believe for the time being Murica is one of the last free places on the internet I feel for my eurofriends as i know it will only be maybe a year before we're taking it up the ass from our friendly neighborhood NSA agent

singe rendu (2)

demonbug (309515) | more than 2 years ago | (#34577972)

Just go on QuatreChan and get Anonyme to threaten a DdSD (déni de service distribué) attack on all of France.

There is a saying (1)

3seas (184403) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578026)

Locks are for honest people.

What this means here is that the dishonest will find a way to get around the wall, while honest websites that teh government decides to ban, right or wrong, remain hidden from French public view.

the usual stalking horse (5, Informative)

Baldur_of_Asgard (854321) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578118)

Once again a western government uses the drummed-up fear of pedophiles as a stalking horse to eradicate human liberty. The damnedest thing is that pedophiles are about as peaceful a group of people as can be found - but I suppose that is why the government has chosen this target. It's harder to crack down on minorities who are inclined and strong enough to strike back.

It's easier to hire the angry people to put down the peaceful people than the other way around, and get the angry people to accept the loss of freedom as "necessary" to the struggle.

A few facts about the bête noire du jour. [b4uact.org] Remember, the loss of your freedom depends on the people never learning the truth ... at least, until it is too late.

Re:the usual stalking horse (-1, Troll)

inerlogic (695302) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578658)

uh... people who harm children need to have their kneecaps broken, white hot iron pokers shoved up their asses, and then they need to be shot in the gut and allowed to die in slow agony.

they don't need to be defended, if you feel they do, then i suggest the same treatment for you.

Re:the usual stalking horse (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578766)

The damnedest thing is that pedophiles are about as peaceful a group of people as can be found

Except of course when they abuse children. I know, details...

This is not about rehabilitating pedophilia. This is about protecting freedom of speech, and this is about not letting the government abuse victims of pedophiles once more in the pursuit of a censorship infrastructure. People who abuse children should still get life imprisonment.

Ah yes, the French haven't changed, have they? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578136)

Can you pronounce:

"The Maginot Firewall"?

I knew you could!

The US does this same thing... (5, Informative)

netsavior (627338) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578142)

Only with Drugs. The FDA, HHS, and DEA have this exact power [wikipedia.org], completely unchecked by the legal system to basically make laws on the fly about individual substances by changing their classification.
If they wanted to make Asprin a felony tomorrow, they could... and stores would have to comply in a hurry. It is not subject to Judicial review

Although on the surface it would seem like the two have not much to do with each other, drug convictions are a great way to imprison people and deny them their right to vote, which is perhaps more powerful than merely limiting free speech online.

I hope they censor only citizens and not sites (1)

KBrown (7190) | more than 2 years ago | (#34578162)

OVH [ovh.com] is one of the largest hosting providers in the world. Censoring sites hosted in OVH could do some damage on France's economy because clients might want to move their sites to other countries..

Anonymous has a new song (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578212)

Quoi ! des cohortes étrangères
Feraient la loi dans nos foyers !
Quoi ! ces phalanges mercenaires
Terrasseraient nos fiers guerriers ! (bis)
Grand Dieu ! par des mains enchaînées
Nos fronts sous le joug se ploieraient
De vils despotes deviendraient
Les maîtres de nos destinées !

Aux armes, citoyens,
Formez vos bataillons,
Marchons, marchons !
Qu'un sang impur
Abreuve nos sillons !

Tremblez, tyrans et vous perfides
L'opprobre de tous les partis,
Tremblez ! vos projets parricides
Vont enfin recevoir leurs prix ! (bis)
Tout est soldat pour vous combattre,
S'ils tombent, nos jeunes héros,
La terre en produit de nouveaux,
Contre vous tout prêts à se battre !

Aux armes, citoyens,
Formez vos bataillons,
Marchons, marchons !
Qu'un sang impur
Abreuve nos sillons !

PROPOSED NEW BATTLE HYMN OF ANONYMOUS

xxx (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578396)

I say just one thing ... "For they know not what they do "

Stereotypes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34578432)

Lets see if the stereotypes of the French are true, that they are going to surrender immediately, or will they become leaders for the rest of the nations in defeating this blow to freedom.

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