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Hackers Dual-Boot Chrome OS With Ubuntu Linux on CR-48

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the this-sounds-delicious dept.

Ubuntu 148

jbrodkin writes "Google's Chrome OS makes Web surfing an incredibly pleasant and secure experience, but most of the knocks against it relate to what it can't do — namely, nearly everything traditional desktop operating systems like Windows, Mac and Linux can. The easiest solution might be dual-booting, allowing users to choose either Chrome OS or a Linux distro at startup. Google's Chromium project site is now hosting instructions for booting Ubuntu Linux alongside Chrome OS. The process is cumbersome but indicates that dual-booting Chrome OS should be possible — and hopefully a bit simpler — once Google releases commercially available netbooks in mid-2011."

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First! (-1, Offtopic)

salted (1390595) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582104)

First!

This is hacking now? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582134)

Following fairly simple instructions posted on the official chromium site is now hacking?

Re:This is hacking now? (-1, Offtopic)

pitchpipe (708843) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582148)

ChromeOS: because saying WeKnowEveryThingYouAreDoingOS is just a little too cumbersome.

Re:This is hacking now? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583570)

Way to reply to the first post with something completely unrelated, hoping for some eyeballs with itchy mod-fingers. Obvious karma whore is obvious.

Re:This is hacking now? (4, Insightful)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582178)

Following fairly simple instructions posted on the official chromium site is now hacking?

If by hacking, you mean adapting a technology to the needs of the users, rather than the stated purposes of the creator, then yes, that's in the finest hacking tradition.

Re:This is hacking now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582498)

It also has to take some amount of skill, and I really don't think following instructions from the people developing the product that's "being hacked" is in any way skilful.

Re:This is hacking now? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582944)

also a tad difficult to call it hacking when it isn't outside the stated purposes of the creator, after all the creator gave the flipping instructions. Hacking can be considered anything that the product wasn't intended to...

Installing linux on a PS3 prior to the alternate OS removal = Not hacking
Installing linux on a PS3 after the alternate OS removal = Hacking

Re:This is hacking now? (4, Interesting)

multisync (218450) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583390)

I really don't think following instructions from the people developing the product that's "being hacked" is in any way skilful.

The author of the article - who as you said followed instructions he found on the Chromium site - was referring to whoever wrote those instructions as hackers, not those like him who followed them.

An Engadget post says that "certified" Chrome OS laptops, when they become commercially available in mid-2011, will not support dual booting with any non-Google operating system. I haven't been able to confirm yet whether this is true, but it is certainly very difficult to boot a second operating system onto the Cr-48 prototype version that Google has shipped to thousands of testers and journalists ... So I was happy to see that a step-by-step installation guide for booting Ubuntu on Cr-48 has now appeared. I don't think it was written by a Google employee, but it is being hosted on what appears to be Google's official Chromium project site.

From the sounds of it, the manufacturer has every intention of making it hard for the user to duel-boot. The prototype the author has suggests this as well. So I think this more than qualifies as a hack, as it gives the user control over his hardware that he might not otherwise enjoy.

You've just misidentified who the hacker in this story is.

Re:This is hacking now? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583706)

...duel-boot...

This is an awesome typo (hopefully?). I imagine a couple of colonial-era gentlemen, one with a Windows icon prominent on his shirt and the other with a penguin on his going for pistols at dawn to decide which OS gets to boot up.

"You have offended my honor, sir, and I will put an end to your open-source ways!"

Re:This is hacking now? (2)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#34584044)

So I hacked my espresso machine this morning when I made a double shot?

After all I followed the simple instructions from the people who made it.

Re:This is hacking now? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582618)

The bar gets lower and lower each year.

Today: hacker: a person who is able to install a Linux operating system

Soon it'll get low enough you can trip over it.

When that happens: hacker: a person who is able to read and follow instructions

Re:This is hacking now? (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583228)

i thought it was at people who can google the right terms to find the instructions were hackers

Re:This is hacking now? (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#34584236)

I suppose the next step will then be:

hacker: a person who is able to read

Re:This is hacking now? (0)

zonker (1158) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582700)

The better title for this article would be "A Guy Follows Web Instructions To Make Cr-48 Actually Useful".

I remember in the pre 1.0 days when getting Linux to run at all was more involved than this "hacking".

Re:This is hacking now? (2)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582978)

I remember in the pre 1.0 days when getting Linux to run at all was more involved than this "hacking".

Yeah, I faintly remember that. Something to do with voodoo rattles and candles laid out in a pentagram, right? I think I went back to DOS because I couldn't find a virgin goat to sacrifice ....

Re:This is hacking now? (5, Funny)

achenaar (934663) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583462)

You must have been living in Wales.

Re:This is hacking now? (2)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583658)

No, that was Jonah.

um if it cant do what windows or linux can (1)

chronoss2010 (1825454) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582744)

Just what the hell does it do....haha JokeOS

Re:This is hacking now? (2)

Gerzel (240421) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582980)

I wonder why can't you create an OS where only part of it boots up for websurfing like Chrome OS and you can fire up more to get more features?

Re:This is hacking now? (1)

2.7182 (819680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583074)

Newsflash - after the internet came into vogue, hacking has meant to commit "computer" crimes.

Re:This is hacking now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34584332)

If the pro-Wikileks script users are full "hackers" to our media and government prosecutors, what can we geeks do?
It's a losing battle to show how we're special; nobody needs even a license for this and everyone just follows scripts... sad. It's why the good ones can't get re-employed in this economy.

2011 (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582136)

Year of the mainstream Linux derivatives.

Re:2011 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583766)

Clearly the year of the linux smartphone has arrived, the year of the unix tablet is here, the linux tablet is next year, what else? Servers and embedded computing and supercomputing. The 'year of the linux desktop' joke has become obsolete. No one will miss Microsoft when they're gone.

Overly optimistic (2)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582160)

The assumption being made here is that any commercially available hardware running ChromeOS will be in any way as open as the Cr-48 is. I suspect it will be far more like the G1/Nexus* hardware vs. every other Android based handset, in that Google provides you an easy out while all of the 3rd parties put extra effort into keeping you inside the box.

Re:Overly optimistic (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582272)

There are other android devices that are like that, but yeah most of the big names attempt some amount of lockin.

Wow, really? (3, Insightful)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582172)

People are being given free ChromeOS laptops for the purpose of testing ChromeOS, and theyre going to throw Ubuntu on there (and thus presumably stop testing ChromeOS)?

Seems kind of cheap, why dont you just buy your own laptop, or actually TEST the one youve been given?

Re:Wow, really? (4, Interesting)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582196)

Testing the boundaries of the cage is among the OS tests I care most about. Already, we know it's superior in this respect to, say, an iPad, which isn't dual booting a damn thing.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582292)

I think it can dual boot android, or at least it is very close.

Re:Wow, really? (0)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582430)

But they aren't testing for you. They are testing for Google.

This is a cheap ass stunt that violates the spirit of the program the signed up for.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582534)

I find it hard to believe that Google didn't fully expect this to happen.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582552)

Considering that they're hosting the instructions specifically on their site -about- the CR48...

Re:Wow, really? (2)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582666)

This is a cheap ass stunt that violates the spirit of the program the signed up for.

AFAIK, the agreement for the test program is:
1. To use the Cr-48 as your primary computer, and
2. To provide feedback to Google.

At least, that's what they ask you to do in the application.

I don't think there is anything about "not installing another OS on the Cr-48 so you can dual boot it."

Re:Wow, really? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583964)

Providing feedback that "btw ive been using ubuntu thru the trial period, thx lol" doesnt really help. Im sure they were aware that you could rip out the google bits and set up an ubuntu rootfs; actually doing so is just lame and cheap. You want to do it with a chrome laptop? Go buy one, dont leech off of the free demo laptop program.

Whats next, a community winning the Google GB fiber rollout, only to restrict it so they could resell it to Verizon?

Re:Wow, really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582772)

Yeah Google has always been a inside the box sort of place. I hear that they have mounted rulers above the keyboards, that smack your hands whenever you type outside the lines.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583214)

Of course the iPad is not a laptop. I'm not certain if there are many UMPCs/keyboard-less tablets that allow you to easily replace the operating system. From what I've seen, those things are seen and marketed as versatile but limited appliances while laptops are marketed as full-fledged portable computers.

So yeah, it's unsurprising that you can dual-boot this and the iPad not.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

MidnightBrewer (97195) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583490)

Having one operating system do everything you need is not less superior than needing two operating systems to accomplish the same task.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582200)

Because it shows that, given a sample of users that might actually use a device loaded with ChromeOS, a fair number of people will be geeks and tinkerers who will do things not expected by the vendor. Especially if this is "the future of computing" as so many people blather about, people not interested in being stuck in a tiny box will try to find their way out.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

Lennie (16154) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582424)

The silly thing is here, it's a technology preview/beta test/whatever and thus it might not be the same as normal hardware.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583974)

Im sure they knew this, theyre not dense. It doesnt really help them to say "btw Ubuntu works great on this laptop"; the purpose of demo laptops is to try ChromeOS and find what issues it has, not to rip the OS off and do something completely different.

I mean if Google had just wanted to give you a laptop to dick around with, they wouldnt have given you one with EFI and a boot loader that needs to be tweaked to run ubuntu.

Re:Wow, really? (2)

bem (1977) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582220)

I'd mod you up if I had the points.

I'm actually using the cr48 for -everything- at home. That's what I agreed to, so that's what I will do.

My only cheat is to ssh out to read mail. (It was rooted for a while, but I got bored of that... don't really need root to ssh out .. just ctrl-alt-T, and use the ssh in crosh... good enough for mutt.)

Re:Wow, really? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582372)

Everything? What if you want to burn a CD? Or an EEPROM for that matter?

Re:Wow, really? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582448)

Or wipe his ass.

Re:Wow, really? (1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583112)

NO NO NO!
You need something running Windows for that kind of behaviour, young man!

usb just need drivers / software for both (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582740)

usb just need drivers / software for both

How is that a solution? (4, Insightful)

markdavis (642305) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582182)

>"The easiest solution might be dual-booting"

How is "dual booting" a solution? If I load Linux on a machine, then I already have access to web surfing under Chrome/Chromium, Firefox, or whatever.... in addition to anything else I want to do. I think if one finds they want to load Linux "dual boot" on a machine running Chrome OS, that makes Chrome OS a "FAIL" because the user really doesn't want to just run a web browser.

I agree with the other articles- there is no need or demand for "Chrome OS". If you want open, fast, free, flexible, use Linux on the machine. If you want to run lots of commercial software, games, etc, run MS-Windows on the machine. If you want both, run Linux and load MS-Windows in Virtualbox, or dual boot the two. Otherwise, Android seems like the best "solution".

Re:How is that a solution? (1)

lindseyp (988332) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582258)

Completely agree. I'd mod you up if I had points.

Who in the world would dual boot a machine just to use a web-browsing-specific OS?

Re:How is that a solution? (3, Insightful)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582354)

Because for some usage you may not -need- full functionality, and could benefit from the very-fast boot time and snap resume that the chrome iteration offers.

Re:How is that a solution? (2)

markdavis (642305) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582496)

Not sure how long it takes to boot ChromeOS. But this Mandriva 2010.1 Linux system is about 10 seconds. Granted, it is not a netbook. But my EEE 1000 netbook boots Unbuntu 10.04 Linux in 18 seconds. Both are pretty darn reasonable for full functionality.

Otherwise, give me my 4.3" Evo Android phone or perhaps a 10" non-X86 tablet running Android 3.0...

Re:How is that a solution? (1)

Tenebrousedge (1226584) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583860)

The Intel team behind what has become MeeGo Linux made an Eee 900 boot Fedora in five seconds. This took advantage [google.com] of the SSD in the 900, but there are a number [debian-adm...ration.org] of generally-applicable things you can do to speed up boot times; it's as good an excuse as any to compile your own kernel.

I know everyone secretly wants to compile their own kernel for fun and profit. Chicks dig it.

Dual function maximies potential (1)

rakjr (18074) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582506)

I can see Chrome OS as a field solution where the hardware is cheap enough to be throw away. The fact that in a pinch, a techie could bump it up on Ubuntu to have the extra features at a cost of speed would make it a nice plus. I know people that break a laptop a year because of how they handle it when off the desktop. They can't switch down to netbook or other device because they need the visual real estate of a good sized screen.

The worst part ? I believe you are serious. (2)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582654)

"Who in the world would dual boot a machine just to use a web-browsing-specific OS?"

Uhmmm .... that is almost enough to blow my mind. They wouldn't . They would boot into Linux when they wanted to do more than just browse the web and email.

Re:How is that a solution? (3, Funny)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582590)

"How is "dual booting" a solution?"

For the same reason that Peter Paul makes Almond Joy and Mounds [coolest-ho...stumes.com] , or people dual boot Windows and Linux: Sometimes you feel like a nut [microsoft.com] , and sometimes you don't [distrowatch.com] ;-)

Re:How is that a solution? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582592)

I couldn't agree more. I think this wraps it up; end of story. Chrome is useless.

Re:How is that a solution? (1)

greymond (539980) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582656)

I completely agree.

My laptop runs Fedora right now which is what I use for work, writing and web browsing. I have a partition set aside for Windows because I like to play some PC games, primarily WoW, LOTRO, DDO and STO (mostly WoW, though I write about MMO's in general so I kind of have to check in with them...anyway...)

With my current setup I fail to see why I would consider ChromeOS as a possible third boot, or for anything really.

Now, if ChromeOS came out of the box and ran things like OpenOffice, GIMP, Inkscape and Scribus or alternatively Office, Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. I'd probably replace Fedora, if it could run WoW, I'd probably replace Windows. unfortunately, Chrome offers me nothing. Hell, even my Apple desktop runs almost everything my Windows side does.

Re:How is that a solution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583532)

My laptop runs Fedora right now which is what I use for work, writing and web browsing. I have a partition set aside for Windows because I like to play some PC games, primarily WoW, LOTRO...

Whoa, whoa, whoa. Stop right there; no need to say more.

Look, what you have is called a "desktop replacement" laptop. You want a single machine that can do everything. The Swiss Army knife, or the emacs, if you will, of machines. That's fine. ChromeOS is not for you.

But that doesn't mean it's not for anyone.

At the other end of the laptop spectrum are the "netbook" users. They don't want a Swiss Army knife. They want a tool optimized for a specific purpose, picked out of a chest of other tools.

They don't want to play the latest video games on their netbook; they already have a desktop optimized for that (or two if they multibox), with a nice set of video cards driving multiple very large monitors, a precision mouse, nice chair, etc. They don't want to read e-books on their netbook; they've got a Kindle for that. They don't want it for serious work; they've got a workstation in their office for that. They may also have a PS/3, an Xbox 360, and maybe even an iPad. You get the picture.

How does the netbook fit in? It's for light web browsing/emailing (maybe the occasional SSH into a pre-existing screen session) while you're sitting down in between other things (maybe waiting for a train or plane). It needs to be ultra-light and ultra-portable. It should not require you to be constantly searching for an outlet for the charger. It should have integrated 3G data. It should power on instantly (not in 10 seconds; instantly), and go into serious power saving instantly when you close the lid; you may have it open for less than 60 seconds at a time. If it gets lost or stolen or confiscated by US Customs or dropped onto the train tracks, that should be no big deal, because it's not really your "computer" -- it's just a terminal you use to talk to other computers. It's slightly better than a smart phone (which you also have for when you don't want the netbook) at all this stuff because it's got a bigger screen and a keyboard.

The netbook is to your desktop replacement as the disposable razor is to the Swiss Army Knife. Sure, it can't do as many things, but it's way better for the one thing it does, and if something happens to it, no big deal -- you were probably going to get a new one soon, anyway.

(All of this leaving aside the "Grandma" market, which is a use for a class of netbooks with a different design skew. [Less "sleek jet-setter", more "big buttons and non-threatening".])

It's great that you like your desktop replacement laptop, and ChromeOS will therefore never be your thing. So, just skip the ChromeOS news, then, and spend the time contemplating empathy.

Re:How is that a solution? (2)

bgarcia (33222) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582670)

I agree with the other articles- there is no need or demand for "Chrome OS".

You're thinking about Chrome OS the wrong way. Chrome OS allows for very cheap laptops. The cr-48 uses an Atom CPU, but the real beauty will be when ARM ChromeOS machines are sold, booting off a little 8GB flash drive. We're talking about ubiquitous < $200 laptops.

Yes, the technically competent will prefer to install a complete Linux distro on such a machine, but the average user won't. But the average user WILL buy a "Google Laptop". This could end up being a perfect solution for your family members - the ones who treat you like tech support. There is very little that they could actually "mess up" on such a machine.

Otherwise, Android seems like the best "solution".

I would imagine that Android & Chrome OS will eventually be merged. But I think that Android is currently a poor experience for devices with larger screens & non-touch screens.

Re:How is that a solution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582750)

Run desktop Linux?

Dude why don't you just go tell them to drink and drive....

Re:How is that a solution? (1)

Godskitchen (1017786) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582852)

"The easiest solution might be dual-booting" - Yeah, and how is this the "easiest" solution? How about using a computer that can surf the web just fine AND do other things... oh wait...

Re:How is that a solution? (2)

dudpixel (1429789) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583388)

Linux (or win xp) on the 1st generation of netbooks is not fast. chrome os may be able to run on even lower-spec hardware and still acheive decent speeds, thereby providing a net-focused laptop to a lot more people.

Lets wait and see shall we?

Re:How is that a solution? (1)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583984)

Same thing when I think about Linux. I want to play games, so I need Windows. Now, I could use Linux for other things and dual boot to Windows for games, but then I can just use Windows for everything and not need to reboot my computer unless there is some problem. If Linux only has a subset ow functions that Windows has I might as well use Windows.

Same here - it looks like Chrome OS is just the Chrome browser as an OS. I can just use Chrome on Linux or Windows and get the same result but I would still have the option of running other programs. Hell, I probably can make "Chrome OS" UI equivalent just by changing the Windows shell to chrome.exe yet it would still allow me to run other programs.

Why dual-boot Chrome OS and traditional Linux? (2)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582184)

Google's Chrome OS makes Web surfing an incredibly pleasant and secure experience, but most of the knocks against it relate to what it can't do — namely, nearly everything traditional desktop operating systems like Windows, Mac and Linux can. The easiest solution might be dual-booting, allowing users to choose either Chrome OS or a Linux distro at startup.

The easiest solution for people who need the power of a full traditional OS but want to be able to have the Chrome experience would be to just boot Ubuntu with the Chrome browser. If you take one desktop and maximize Chrome on it, you can easily toggle back and forth between the regular Ubuntu experience and Chrome.

Since Chrome OS is essentially Linux stripped down to what is necessary to support the Chrome browser + the Chrome browser, dual-booting Chrome OS and a full Linux distro, while it might be useful in a very small set of circumstances, seems to mostly be the hard way to achieve, well, almost anything you might want to achieve by doing that.

Re:Why dual-boot Chrome OS and traditional Linux? (1)

markdavis (642305) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582274)

I totally agree with your posting except for the assumption that the *easiest* solution requires Ubuntu. There are other full Linux distros just as easy (or more) to use/install and just as powerful (or more).

Re:Why dual-boot Chrome OS and traditional Linux? (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582560)

I totally agree with your posting except for the assumption that the *easiest* solution requires Ubuntu. There are other full Linux distros just as easy (or more) to use/install and just as powerful (or more).

Yah, sure, "Ubuntu" in GP really stands for "the most appropriate Linux distribution for the things you need outside of Chrome".

Re:Why dual-boot Chrome OS and traditional Linux? (1)

rta (559125) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582470)

A better question even is why dual boot at all (as a user)? Nowadays what I care most about is the documents and tabs I have open.

I could probably remedy this with some utilities for session saving/restoration... but dual booting is a clunky solution for a user and it's especially unnecessary w/ the rise of virtulisation over the past few years. Want a different OS for some tasks or "just because"? Get another gig of ram and run a VM.

Getting a new/different OS to run on some hardware is cool, but multi-boot for a general purpose box? Forget it.

Re:Why dual-boot Chrome OS and traditional Linux? (4, Insightful)

Lennie (16154) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582490)

The whole idea of ChromeOS is that it is automatically updates OS, with your settings and everything saved 'in the cloud' and the only personal things that are saved locally are cache files (as I understand it, what is locally saved is encrypted and what is replicated to the cloud is just the encrypted data. So there is nothing for anyone else to see. So you need to use your username and passprase to decrypt it). The 'web apps' from the 'app store' are connected to your account.

If the hardware breaks you just login to an new device and everything should be 'there', ready to use.

I think that is something else then what Ubuntu is.

Re:Why dual-boot Chrome OS and traditional Linux? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#34584448)

you can pretty much do that with any OS, just never use anything that is not on google's website and your good to go

Can't see this standing (4, Insightful)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582382)

I imagine that by the time the final hardware is ready, it's going to be a lot more locked down. There's always been some speculation that Google may subsidize the cost of these devices and make it up on ad revenue. If that's the case, they're not going to want people to supplant ChromeOS in favor of something else.

If they're unsubsidized, why bother buying a ChromeOS device? Just install ChromeOS on a netbook/notebook that you already have.

Re:Can't see this standing (3, Funny)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582574)

To give to grandma, so she can have an email appliance just like the one she used to have that hooked up to the TV and the phoneline, back in the late '90s.

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583396)

If you're going to give grandma an appliance she'd probably prefer a device to treat female hysteria.

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34584178)

I'd moderate you "Insightful" instead of "Funny" personally. The beta plan so far seems to be $10/month for 100MB transfer, right? I'd throw that on a Chrome OS netbook that's impervious to Windows viruses and disposable in a heartbeat to give to my less technically savvy family members. Grandma's 78 years old and can't figure out playing a DVD on her TV.

Something where she can hit a button and get email access to the grandkids would be ideal. If she can view an occasional funny video that someone sends her on youtube, even better.

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582604)

If they're unsubsidized, why bother buying a ChromeOS device? Just install ChromeOS on a netbook/notebook that you already have.

Aside from the Chrome OS (branded OS available only with hardware) vs. Chromium OS distinction -- and while this concept may be foreign to some people who use slashdot -- most computer users aren't interesting in installing an operating system other than the one that comes with their computer.

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582660)

while this concept may be foreign to some people who use slashdot -- most computer users aren't interesting in installing an operating system other than the one that comes with their computer.

Using the ignorance of the average user as an excuse to engage in excessive lock down is hardly justification, especially when the lock down takes the perspective of the user being an enemy equal to that of a hostile 3rd party. At best it is justification for strong security defaults, but should always offer an accessible "out" for anyone who wants it.

Re:Can't see this standing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583276)

Grandparent: ...Just install ChromeOS on a netbook/notebook that you already have...

Parent: ...most computer users aren't interesting in installing an operating system...

You: Using the ignorance of the average user as an excuse to engage in excessive lock down is hardly justification...

me: Huh?!

I realize you've probably been saving up your little rant about "lock down" for a while, but did you actually read the thread you're replying to? They are talking about installing an OS on a completely-un-locked-down notebook.

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583718)

but did you actually read the thread you're replying to?

I did.

They are talking about installing an OS on a completely-un-locked-down notebook.

Which will probably be the only one of its kind, since Google expects 3rd parties to pick this up and release hardware with it and -they- will probably go through the motions to lock the device down, then suggest doing so was for "security."

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583960)

Calm down on the nerdrage. Google is under no obligation to cater to your every computing need, and you are under no obligation to use their services. It's a pretty reasonable arrangement.

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

indi0144 (1264518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583794)

In that paragraph.. I really couldn't figure out if you were talking about ChromeOS or Apple in general.

Why people get pissed off when somebody offers an alternative NOT MEANT FOR THEM? It's like watching a Business guy pissed off because his new tata is kinda cheap, or a farmer pissed off because his new Bugati can't work the land, or family guy pissed off because his new Mini can't accommodate the family...

Give the guys a break, at least they're trying something different (not different as in Apple different)

Chrome OS: less internal storage than my phone, no RJ45, lame

Re:Can't see this standing (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583904)

Why people get pissed off when somebody offers an alternative NOT MEANT FOR THEM?

Because companies like Google tout shit like this as "the future of computing." They don't intend for there to be options outside of this. This goes double for people who buy in only to find that, later on, there's a bunch of stuff they can't do.

Who knows, I got into computing because the computer my parents had wasn't deliberately crippled. What's some kid going to do when he tries to explore but the system is designed to stop him in his tracks?

Give the guys a break, at least they're trying something different (not different as in Apple different)

I'd give them a break if it wasn't virtually guaranteed that 3rd parties are going to disable the unlock option.

Re:Can't see this standing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583336)

BECAUSE I RAGE EVERY TIME I USE CAPSLOCK

additional text added to make the computer filter happy

Backwards (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582400)

I read it backwards at first. I thought they were making ChromeOS work on machines that already had Ubuntu on them.

Ah well.

It's probably not that hard... There are instructions on how to compile it for USB booting and virtual machines. (I got VM to work, but not USB for some reason.) But the VM is horribly slow on my Linux machine.

defaulting to Windows is inevitable (1)

spandex_panda (1168381) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582408)

The problem with this is that people will then dual boot Windows (XP, 7) and ChromeOS and will then end up just defaulting to Windows all the time... That is what happens when you give people the option in my experience. Google (or the folks who can hack ChromeOS) should perhaps enable different desktop environments, i.e., log out of ChromeOS and log into gnome. That should be possible right?

Re:defaulting to Windows is inevitable (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34582588)

You may be right but you know the faggots will still boot Linsux. That's just the way those faggot homos are. Sucking dicks, taking it up the ass and booting Linsux.

Of course (1)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582426)

Of course Google wants you to figure out how to get the dual boot working as well as you can. Then you can post it on the Internet, then they can read how you do it, then they'll figure out how to better lock the system.

From the instructions, it looks like they think that you can only put Ubuntu over their kernel because they don't support initrd. They want to find out if that is the case before releasing the commerical models. I'm going to guess if you need to use their kernel, from there they can make you use their OS.

Re:Of course (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583790)

Except it was Google that did the "hacking" and posted the instructions. This isn't some conspiracy.

Chrome OS would make an awesome boot loader (2)

bitsofbytes (1460709) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582444)

I think Chrome OS needs to be focused on something that would make it unique and useful... not trying to replace the desktop.
Chrome OS would make an awesome instant-on boot loader replacing GRUB, LILO, or Windows Boot Loader.
Surf the web while your OS of choice boots in the background.

Re:Chrome OS would make an awesome boot loader (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582636)

I think Chrome OS needs to be focused on something that would make it unique and useful... not trying to replace the desktop.
Chrome OS would make an awesome instant-on boot loader replacing GRUB, LILO, or Windows Boot Loader.

I think that the number of people for whom that would qualify as either "interesting" or "useful" is much smaller than the number for which Chrome OS with its current focus would meet those descriptions -- but Chromium OS is open source, so feel free to fork it as a bootloader and make your own splash in the market.

Another handbag , Fashion life (0)

hennyjack (1933170) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582484)

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Crippleware has its place. (2)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582532)

Crippleware has its place, and I hope Google sells (other people) a metric shitload of these things so I can get a (used) one for almost nothing after (inevitably) enough people buy them expecting them to be a "regular compyooter".

Here's an archive of sorts for some niche products of yore and a reminder of the business models they served:

http://www.linux-hacker.net/cgi-bin/UltraBoard/UltraBoard.pl [linux-hacker.net]

Virtualizing Applications (1)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582538)

Here's an idea: strip out all of Google's big-brother code and make the OS a back-end for a virtual machine that can be started and destructed at will, with a browser window as the front-end. If the OS encapsulates everything that can be used for the purposes of surfing the web, why can't it be instantiated and then started from the same point every time? It could be used as a way to ensure complete privacy.

Re:Virtualizing Applications (2)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582696)

Just boot an .iso image of a live distro with a persistent home partition for storage. No need for a VM.

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/boot-multiple-iso-from-usb-multiboot-usb/ [pendrivelinux.com]

Re:Virtualizing Applications (1)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582714)

That's precisely the problem, though..."boot." You want to use it as you would a browser, in tandem with other applications. You can't do your day-to-day work inside of a live CD distro.

Re:Virtualizing Applications (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583122)

What big-brother code? The whole thing is centralized around webapps. Don't like Google? Then don't use their apps. Don't like Chrome features? Then here's a fucking novel idea: turn them off.

Splashtop anyone (2)

jisom (113338) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582872)

Goes by expressgate on Asus products boots in like 5 seconds and it dual boot linux and windows.

sequence of events (2)

Jaktar (975138) | more than 3 years ago | (#34582926)

1. Get ChromeOS laptop
2. Dual Boot Ubuntu
3. Realize Ubuntu does everything ChromeOS does and more
4. Never boot into Chrome again
5. Profit???

Re:sequence of events (2)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583320)

1. dual boot mint
2. use mint when u need more the a web bowser
3. use chrome because its faster
4. ?????
5. profit

chrome sucks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583092)

that's so stupid. it slows down your system to such an extent that you have time to fuck yourself and both of your partners while it's downloading single webpage ;)

Virtualized Modes (2)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583240)

If a virtualization host can be installed first on the HW, why dual boot? Why not just run both Ubuntu and Chrome OS simultaneously? If you can share the clipboard, "Chrome OS" could be just what's for browsing, and Ubuntu is really your OS for doing more serious (interactive) work on what you find while browsing. Indeed, if the two could share a desktop, it might not even look like two OSes, but rather just one with two personalities.

Re:Virtualized Modes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583558)

That's a stupid idea. It'll kill your battery life, for one thing, and if you're going to do that you might as well just install Chrome on a generic Ubuntu-running PC and be done with it.

Re:Virtualized Modes (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583808)

Chrome is different from Chrome OS. And virtualization doesn't have to kill battery life.

You don't know what you're talking about.

just another x86 notebook (2)

keeboo (724305) | more than 3 years ago | (#34583634)

From the installation instructions:
ubuntu-10.10-desktop-i386.iso

So this CR-48 is just a x86 notebook with a custom firmware. I was expecting something based on ARM instead.
Meh.

Chrome OS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34583764)

OK, I know it would be a very unlikely scenario, but if ChromeOS becomes popular (HA), how would they not be considered unfair business practices? Not only does it only allow you to run Chrome web browser, almost all of the apps are Google apps.

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