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Bank of America Cuts Off Wikileaks Transactions

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the hello-complaints-department dept.

Businesses 467

Chaonici writes "The first actual bank to do so, Bank of America has decided that it will follow in the footsteps of PayPal, MasterCard, and Visa, and halt all its transactions that it believes are intended for WikiLeaks, including donations in support of the organization. 'This decision,' says the bank, 'is based upon our reasonable belief that WikiLeaks may be engaged in activities that are, among other things, inconsistent with our internal policies for processing payments.' Coincidentally, in a 2009 interview with Forbes magazine, Julian Assange stated that he was in possession of the hard drive of a Bank of America executive, and that he planned to release information about a major bank early next year."

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Our advise is to place your funds somewhere safer (5, Informative)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599198)

Ok, so it's time for a run on the bank.
Get in before the rush!

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (4, Insightful)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599224)

the war has begun (?)

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (0)

DarkKnightRadick (268025) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599262)

It has indeed begun.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599588)

Yeah, in 1963

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (-1, Troll)

Coldegg (1956060) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599294)

Having a hard drive of a B of A executive is hardly conclusive as to the banks safety. As far as we know, the contents might have been removed, etc - and it was sent in for repair.

On a side note, I do wonder how he obtained it. Perhaps the executive had their house robbed and when somebody realized the guy was with BofA they figured they'd send the drive over to Wikileaks to go to work on. Or perhaps the repair situation listed above.

It does need to be a lesson to every organization though. Wikileaks / Assange will turn on you any second that they think they have something that they can use to feed their ego. You're not safe doing business with this guy - he will gladly screw you over for his own good the first second he can.

On a side note, I'm going to go hide that childhood picture of me dressed as a girl for halloween... I'd hate to see it end up on Wikileaks after the cleaning lady steals it.

Of course, that would be more interesting than 99% of what Wikileaks has released so far.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (5, Insightful)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599332)

Having a hard drive of a B of A executive is hardly conclusive as to the banks safety. As far as we know, the contents might have been removed, etc - and it was sent in for repair.

Safety? Wikileaks isn't going to be releasing Bank of America's passwords or security information. If they release anything it's going to be about corruption, insider dealing, complicity in illegal activities etc. The concern isn't the bank's "safety" per se. It's that if shit falls on Bank of America, their share price will get hit, there might be legal investigations into wrong-doing... That sort of thing. And I don't know what sort of shape Bank of America is in - are they part of the general morass that US banking has sunk into over the last couple of years? If so, probably the last thing they need right now is investors getting out. A run on the bank by the public? That's not a first response to this. It's this hit on share price and investors that would be the immediate effect. Expect some emergency buying by non-neutral parties to keep share price up if Wikileaks comes out with anything juicy.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (5, Informative)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599386)

In Arizona, BoA is being charged with fraud.

http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/12/17/arizona-attorney-general-charges-bank-of-america-with-mortgage-and-foreclosure-fraud-complaint-here/ [wordpress.com]
So yes... my hope is that Wikileaks does right by the people and exposes this corrupt bank and its practices.

Banks are the number one enemy these days, and rightfully so. They could have actually helped stop the recession by helping homeowners with the mortgages.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (5, Interesting)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599510)

They are known as MBNA in Europe (Bank of America took over MBNA, but kept the MBNA name in Europe because it is much better known than BoA), and they are in trouble with the Office of Fair Trading for their debt collection practices http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2010/dec/14/mbna-credit-card-debt-procedures [guardian.co.uk]

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (4, Interesting)

tunapez (1161697) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599600)

Heard that yesterday, sounds like Goddard's swan song on his way out the door. Will be good for his next office election and maybe state coffers.

This decision,' says the bank, 'is based upon our reasonable belief that WikiLeaks may be engaged in activities that are, among other things, inconsistent with our internal policies for processing payments.'

Too bad Wikileaks is not an international drug running [bloomberg.com] or firearms smuggling [pbs.org] organization, they appear to be more befitting "internal policies".

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (2, Insightful)

defaria (741527) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599694)

If you believe that helping the homeowners with mortgages would have magically helped stop the recession then you are woefully ignorance of economics.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599486)

99% of what Wikileaks "leaks" to the public is a bunch of boring tripe. I'm counting on a whole lot of emails to the executives wife / husband... and maybe one that'll be sticky. Yay.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599638)

or, maybe it'll be a bunch of mundane stuff, like the HDD owner's emails to his wife about picking up the kids from soccer practice...

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (5, Insightful)

pwilli (1102893) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599336)

Assange / Wikileaks doesn't do business with Bank of America, and likely never has.

Bank of America did not close a bank account (like the swiss postbank) or terminated a payment processing contract (like Paypal, Visa and Mastercard), it stops transferring money to other banks. So anybody with a Bank of America account is no longer allowed to transfer his money to another bank account without "moral approval" of the BoA.

I am surprised that this hasn't led to more media coverage jet.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599494)

This is crap, the banking world should have precisely 2 options:

1. they receive some kind of common carrier status, which means they will have to accept everyone as a customer and have to process everyone's transactions.

2. they can have the freedom to do business with whomever they like and maintain blacklists of payments they will not process, but that means they will become accomplishes if the transfer is part of some crime.

The only possible exception would be specific government regulation.
(assuming an uncorrupted government off course, in that case all bets are of)

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (5, Insightful)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599378)

It does need to be a lesson to every organization though. Wikileaks / Assange will turn on you any second that they think they have something that they can use to feed their ego. You're not safe doing business with this guy

In order: 1. It's not a lesson to every organization. It's only a warning to ones that have been engaged in wrong-doing. 2. "Wikileaks / Assange" is not good terminology: Wikileaks is not synonymous with Julian Assange and the constant identification of the two with each other is a symptom of our media which simplifies everything to Hollywood plot-lines. We shouldn't perpetuate this. 3. Wikileaks has not "turned on" anyone because this has strong connotations of betrayal. When were Wikileaks and Bank of America ever partners in anything? 4. Why this business of "feeding the ego"? It seems a cheap way to try and invalidate an action by alleging a base motive to the person doing the action. If someone wants to "feed their ego", they're better off trolling innocents on Slashdot or getting a job in Airport security where they can boss people around, than taking on the US government. As a member of the public, I have an interest in knowing about wrong-doings committed by world governments or large corporations.

On a side note, I'm going to go hide that childhood picture of me dressed as a girl for halloween... I'd hate to see it end up on Wikileaks after the cleaning lady steals it.

Wikileaks isn't for people's personal foibles - it's about malfeasance by those in power.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (-1, Flamebait)

cvtan (752695) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599518)

So Wikileaks has carefully read 250000 documents to insure that everything it releases concerns malfeasance by those in power. I don't think so. Normally I would support them, but now it seems that EVERY government secret is evidence of something bad. This just isn't true. They are not carefully releasing evidence for any particular evil plot, but releasing so many items no one can possible digest them in a sensible way. If all secrets are bad, then I want Assange's credit card numbers. And if I can't have them, he must be hiding something...

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599554)

You can't possibly be this stupid, can you?

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599396)

Something is wrong with BofA, we just don't know what yet. In a few days or weeks you may not be able to access your money anymore. Why take the risk to leave your money there?

Besides BofA are A-holes anyway for telling you who you can send your money to. My money my decision.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (2)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599362)

I wouldn't worry too much however if Assange does have a B of A harddrive means he is in position of stolen goods which is a crime.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (1)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599404)

Or perhaps it was imaged and sent back to it's owners.
Or perhaps someone working for B of A sent a drive to wikileaks to leak information.

I see no reason to hang on to the drive either way.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599634)

if Assange does have a B of A harddrive means he is in position of stolen goods which is a crime.

Damn. If only he'd asked you for legal advice he could have avoided this situation.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (2)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599680)

Or perhaps he (or someone) bought a used computer that still had data on it. Much more likely, and legal too...

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599366)

When you close your account, be sure to note that it is because you have reasonable belief that Bank of America may be engaged in activities that are, among other things, inconsistent with your internal policies for a bank-customer relationship.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (2)

ethanms (319039) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599562)

Hah... anyone who was waiting for THIS news to leave BoA has had their head in the sand...

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599708)

The head is not in the sand....aim higher up.

Re:Our advise is to place your funds somewhere saf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599702)

So what bank do you recommend doing business with? I would be glad to move my money elsewhere. It will be a pain to do so with direct deposit, checking, savings, and online banking. So I want to make sure I do it only once. Makes it hard to make a run on the bank when my business is so integrated.

BTW, I don't think making a run on the bank is that big of a deal anylonger. The government will simply step in and save them. Still, less business should hurt their bottom line.

I think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599200)

I smell fear!

I've been loving these articles (4, Insightful)

definate (876684) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599522)

I smell duplicity.

I have been loving these articles, as it routes out the companies that obviously aren't aligned with supporting liberty, and I hate to use companies which don't espouse, or support in some way, the values I believe in. So all of these articles, and businesses, have saved me a lot of time. More so, I love the ones where some companies steps up to fill the void. Those are the companies I'll migrate my business, and my businesses business to.

Nothing like a little private and public sector cleansing!

Getting nervous? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599226)

Seems some US banks are getting nervous ... wonder why... might have something to do with the dirt WikiLeaks may have on them.

Poor Mr. Assange (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599230)

Now he'll have to sleep with both his screwdriver and his piggy bank under his pillow. He probably won't be sleeping well for some time to come.

Free speech? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599234)

If the government can declare something "illegal" and pressure private companies to not do business with a particular entity... does it really matter if they can "make no law" abridging freedom of speech? Isn't the first amendment completely worthless?

Re:Free speech? (0)

DarkKnightRadick (268025) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599314)

It seems like it is.

Re:Free speech? (5, Insightful)

zach_the_lizard (1317619) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599534)

It's like the US drinking age. Congress has no power to set the drinking age, but they do have the power to deny money to states that lower it below 21. In the end, the result is the same.

Re:Free speech? (3, Insightful)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599618)

Makes me wonder what Congress has been snorting all these years ...

All bad laws do is lower respect for all laws. Here's the solution:

  1. For every new law you pass, you have to remove two old ones
  2. No consolidating, no riders, etc.
  3. If the word count of the new law is higher than the combined word counts of the two old laws that are removed, additional laws have to also be removed until the word count achieves parity

It would cut down on excess verbiage, legalese, and get some outdated laws off the books.

Re:Free speech? (1)

Foobar of Borg (690622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599590)

If the government can declare something "illegal" and pressure private companies to not do business with a particular entity... does it really matter if they can "make no law" abridging freedom of speech? Isn't the first amendment completely worthless?

All the others are. I'm surprised they haven't gone 10 for 10 and started requiring that we quarter soldiers.

@America, you are loosing your freedom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599236)

@America, you are loosing your freedom

Re:@America, you are loosing your freedom (0)

DarkKnightRadick (268025) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599388)

We already lost them. It's only now that the illusion comes crashing down around us.

Re:@America, you are loosing your freedom (1)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599416)

The word is "Losing".

And yes, they are.

Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599238)

Assange also claimed he had a "poison pill" file he'd release if he were arrested.

He was arrested, and I see no poison pill file was released.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (2)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599264)

I'm assuming that they're trying to keep the rape allegations and wikileaks issues separate.

Expect it if he gets shipped off to America specifically over wikileaks stuff.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

Ash Vince (602485) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599670)

I'm assuming that they're trying to keep the rape allegations and wikileaks issues separate.

Expect it if he gets shipped off to America specifically over wikileaks stuff.

Apparently this is not likely to happen since most countries will treat breaking your espionage act as a political crime and the US - UK and US - Sweden extradition treaties do not cover political crimes.

Also, since some of your politicians have suggested killing Assange we could not extradite him if there was any danger of this happening. Almost all countries in Europe (UK and Sweden definitely anyway) consider the death penalty to be so barbaric that we refuse to extradite people to face it regardless of the crime they are accused of. The espionage act does have some parts which are punishable by the death penalty.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (4, Interesting)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599272)

his arrest was temporary and for show. nothing more.

not worth getting big guns out just for that. that was simply a practice run.

this drama won't end for years, in all probability.

and keeping it all alive is *exactly* what the big liars don't want.

btw, if I was a bofa customer, I'd pull all my funds out of their bank. if my bank pulls this shit, I'll definitely yank my account and transfer it all elsewhere. it will be a hassle but I'm fully willing to do it. (hint, its over 6 figures, too. that HURTS banks, if enough of us do that).

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (-1, Troll)

Coldegg (1956060) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599320)

Good for you. As a Bank of America customer, I'm transferring more money over to them because they are willing to stand up to a bully who is in receipt of a stolen hard drive and trying to damage the organization.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599392)

Be careful. The Bank of America may decide that you are not allowed to take your money back or transfer it wherever you want. Preventing their customers from transferring their money to other bank accounts is exactly what they are doing right now.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599474)

Yes take great care, large amounts of cash flowing out under one name can trigger a report of a suspicious money transfer.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599398)

Yeah, one man and his loose knit band of info leakers are REALLY bullying a multi-billion dollar international corporation...

Nice try.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

scarboni888 (1122993) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599450)

Bully? That's a laugh. No wikileaks is more like the snitch who blurts it out to everyone what the bullies are doing.

There. Fixed that for ya.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599454)

Those mean old activists bulling the multi billion international corporation.
And having the GALL to suggest other people not do business with a company which is blocking their donations.

when will these peasants learn!

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599466)

You don't even know what the information is about. Yet you outright judge Assange and Wikileaks.

Wow, the propaganda has really gotten to you.

As a side note, if you want to crash a bank: get enough people to withdraw their money, IN CASH, from a bank.
Due to fractional reserve banking only 10% of the money really exists. The rest is just fluff.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599692)

Good for you. As a Bank of America customer, I'm transferring more money over to them because they are willing to stand up to a bully who is in receipt of a stolen hard drive and trying to damage the organization.

Do you have any proof the hard drive in question was stolen?

It may be an exec's personal laptop hard drive, and when he got fired, he sent it in.

As for "trying to damage the organization, BofA doesn't need any help with that. They have that one covered all by themselves.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (4, Interesting)

humphrm (18130) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599286)

I think, technically, he turned himself in to the UK police.

Which I think is a strategic move on his part. Once Sweden extradites him, in all likelihood, he can't be extradited *from* Sweden by another country (say, US). Note that he got bail in the UK despite basically being a nomad, and all he has to do is spend four hours during daylight hours and four hours during night hours at a friend's mansion. I suspect (and it is just a guess) that the reason is that he agreed not to fight extradition to Sweden. Note also that the criminal charges he faces in Sweden do not carry any mandatory jail time.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599306)

Note also that the criminal charges he faces in Sweden do not carry any mandatory jail time.

So Interpol got involved with something that doesn't even carry mandatory jail time?

It looks like they solved all serious crimes, and are now working on the other ones.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599530)

It has been pretty broadly reported (with quotes direct from Assange) that he is indeed fighting extradition on principle.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (2)

DarkKnightRadick (268025) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599292)

You obviously do not have the 1.4GB "wikileaks insurance" file.

Now to get that key.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (3, Informative)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599298)

Assange also claimed he had a "poison pill" file he'd release if he were arrested.

No he didn't. I challenge you to find a single quote from him saying anything even remotely like that.
All the "poison pill" stuff has been speculation by commentators and pundits regarding the insurance.aes256 file - but Assange hasn't said one word about what that file is or what anyone might do with it.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (2)

jpmorgan (517966) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599352)

Assange has "distributed to fellow hackers an encrypted 'poison pill' of damaging secrets, thought to include details on BP and Guantanamo Bay." This from his lawyer.

'This is what they believe to be a thermo-nuclear device in the information age.

http://www.businessinsider.com/julian-assange-is-going-to-drop-a-poison-wiki-bomb-if-hes-killed-or-arrested-2010-12 [businessinsider.com]

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (2)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599606)

Or more directly here [bbc.co.uk] in case anyone was wondering if the dailyheil had twisted it.

Thanks though, I hadn't kept up with the recent statements.

Re:Assange also claimed a poison pill if arrested (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599648)

The file was released a while ago. It's heavily encrypted, and several people have copies. It's only if Assange is physically harmed that the files will be decrypted and posted.

Apparently, it's stuff that makes the current revelations look like weak beer.

My guess? The story behind the Kennedy assassinations.

Why? Because it has to be something that's been around for a while, not recent; it has to be something that people want to know about; it has to be something controversial; and it has to have connections with a lot of the "dirty tricks" that have been going on for decades.

Scheming American bastards (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599244)

The actions of Americans to hide what they have truthfully and secretly said to their kin disgusts me.

The whole insular and antagonistic country needs to go and d.i.a.f. and leave the rest of the world to live their lives in peace.

Americans espouse freedom of speech... until it gives them a red face, then they show their true colours. A country of warmongers.

Re:Scheming American bastards (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599376)

And your real name, address and phone number is?

Re:Scheming American bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599446)

You should know. Since you are him. Fractured personality disorder, Mr. Anonymous Coward?

Re:Scheming American bastards (2, Insightful)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599470)

The actions of Americans to hide what they have truthfully and secretly said to their kin disgusts me.
The whole insular and antagonistic country needs to go and d.i.a.f. and leave the rest of the world to live their lives in peace.
Americans espouse freedom of speech... until it gives them a red face, then they show their true colours. A country of warmongers.

Have you ever been to America? They're some of the politest and most welcoming people you'll ever meet. The dichotomy between the decency of the people there, and the corruption of the government is inexplicable. Until you turn on a TV in the USA and see what passes for news in that country. You want someone to blame? Blame the oligarchy that owns America's media.

Re:Scheming American bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599608)

Have you ever been to America? They're some of the politest and most welcoming people you'll ever meet.

Have you ever been to Florida during snowbird season?

Re:Scheming American bastards (2)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599616)

every country has this shit, if anything it's that americans talk about it
1: because they're unlikely to be dragged from their beds and killed for speaking out.
2: sometimes things actually change.

A great deal of wikileaks supporters are americans who want to root out the corruption in their own government.

Of course, they never (5, Insightful)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599254)

accepted any manner of shady transactions regarding

-Bernie Madoff
-mortgage derivatives
-selling mortgage securities without proper paperwork

The problem, anymore, is that banks and ISPs aren't content to just be carriers. They have to judge the content of your transactions, too.

Public Utility (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599402)

I see this action as proof that Bank of America and other monster banks need to be regulated like a public utility.

Mod This Nonsense To Oblivion (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599422)

Bernie Madoff and his scheme had nothing to do with Bank of America.
Also Bank of America had very little to do with MBS, and only got bigger because by buying up those collapsed companies.

You just made all that shit up. Moderators, please mod this blatantly false drivel to oblivion.
 

Re:Mod This Nonsense To Oblivion (3, Informative)

Teancum (67324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599666)

Bernie Madoff and his scheme had nothing to do with Bank of America.
Also Bank of America had very little to do with MBS, and only got bigger because by buying up those collapsed companies.

Bank of America purchased Countrywide Mortgages, which were right in the thick of the whole mortgage-backed security mess and practically started the system in the first place. When they purchased that company, they took on all of the liabilities including the responsibility to clean up the mess that the company made in the first place. In this sense, Bank of America is Countrywide Mortgages, one of the most notorious lenders of underwater property in America. Their hands are certainly not clean with this mess.

As for Bernie Madoff, I don't think Bank of America was necessarily active in terms of any of its officers directly involved with setting up the ponzi scheme, but to say that Bank of America was completely uninvolved is sort of a lie as well. I don't know the full extent of how they were involved, if any, but I'm sure at least some money that Madoff used went through one or more Bank of America accounts. They are too big of a bank not to be completely uninvolved with the kind of money and the number of clients involved. It was a bit unfair, however, to even invoke Madoff as the MBS mess and loans to illegal immigrants (at the insistence of many within the Democratic Party leadership in Congresss) and other "disadvantaged minorities" with little by way of credit worthiness or ability to pay off the loans routinely did happen with this bank, and that is sufficient to show how corrupt the system got. Madoff is a side show, not the main event, and may even be shown in the long run as a hero as he was at least up front in the end that he was running a ponzi scheme. These banks are doing much worse and getting away with it too.

To paraphrase *our* douche (4, Insightful)

rastoboy29 (807168) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599256)

It is clear then that Bank of America is an instrument of US foreign policy.

Re:To paraphrase *our* douche (0)

Coldegg (1956060) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599310)

Hardly an instrument of US Foreign Policy if Assange is trying to shit on them (and has a stolen hard drive) and they are working to protect themselves.

Re:To paraphrase *our* douche (2)

scarboni888 (1122993) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599488)

Wikileaks doesn't 'steal' anything. At worst you might accuse them of 'receiving' stolen property but they don't have to go around actually doing any of the stealing themselves.

Damn you're one inaccurate SOB ain't ya? Wonder why that is...

Re:To paraphrase *our* douche (1)

scarboni888 (1122993) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599496)

disregard that last post I need to learn to read first before posting :(

Re:To paraphrase *our* douche (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599700)

I don't know anything of any harddrive story. But I assume the people over at Wikileaks are capable of copying data, so they could probably had returned the drive or brought their own if that was the case.

I don't know what the punishment for harddrive theaft is in the US either.

So BOA really is the target of next leak? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599266)

Way to spoil the surprise. Thanks alot, BoA.

Counting down (2)

Tripp-phpBB (1912354) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599276)

Let's make wagers on how long it takes until Anonymous DDOS's them because at this point it's not a matter if it will happen but when.

Looking forward to another wikileaks story (5, Interesting)

EnsilZah (575600) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599282)

Though this isn't the best fit, I came across a quote by Thoreau in a short story called "Repent Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman that seems like a good fit for the whole thing in general so I thought I'd share.

The mass of men serve the state thus, not as men mainly,
but as machines, with their bodies. They are the standing army,
and the militia, jailers, constables, posse comitatus, etc.
In most cases there is no free exercise whatever of the
judgement or of the moral sense; but they put themselves
on a level with wood and earth and stones; and wooden men
can perhaps be manufactured that will serve the purpose as well.
Such command no more respect than men of straw or a lump of dirt.
They have the same sort of worth only as horses and dogs.
Yet such as these even are commonly esteemed good citizens.
Others--as most legislators, politicians, lawyers, ministers,
and office-holders--serve the state chiefly with their heads;
and, as they rarely make any moral distinctions, they are as
likely to serve the devil, without _intending_ it, as God.
A very few--as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the
great sense, and _men_--serve the state with their consciences
also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part; and
they are commonly treated as enemies by it.

Re:Looking forward to another wikileaks story (0)

khallow (566160) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599440)

TL;DR: If you had a government job, Thoreau didn't respect you. While Thoreau was a great writer and had some good points, it remains that he demonstrated a remarkable ignorance both of human nature and of the consequences of his own actions. The classic example is the "Battle of the Ants" from "Walden". He describes a battle of ants, muses on analogies to human warfare and patriotism, and misses what I consider the most crucial point, namely that he started the "war" in the first place by creating the pile of refuse that the ants were fighting over!

Re:Looking forward to another wikileaks story (1)

valley (240947) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599658)

Are you sure you got the title right, there? The title you cite is Harlan Ellison (unless this is some weird Slashdot thing where you're trying to skew the Google results for an Ellison search with those for a Thoreau search, in which case, carry on).

Ireland (4, Funny)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599284)

Maybe Bank of Ireland would be willing to help out Wikileaks. They are so broke they are not really in a position to care about where the money is going to

Re:Ireland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599318)

Considering WL helped them over the few bank managers that were funneling billions out of the country, yes.

Re:Ireland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599372)

And you're assuming Bank of America isn't broke?

Your comment is funny, but only one layer deep.

Here is the thing about banking... (5, Informative)

netsavior (627338) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599312)

If Federal regulators even SUSPECT you have been allowing terrorists to receive payment, you are subject to an audit with a cost of about 50 million dollars to support (you have to pay all of your people to deal with the audit instead of their normal job responsibilities). The fines and reprecussions are on top of that initial cost, and can include being barred from the FDIC, which basically shuts down a bank forever.

My guess is that bank of america merely has the inside scoup and wikileaks is about to be declared official terrorists.

Re:Here is the thing about banking... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599374)

com'on we're not speaking about over-the-mill FCU , is BoA - who is almost owning FDIC .

And btw Assange had any money there? Or this is just publicity stunt ? Is like "I'm going to close all my bank account and all my credit cards with BoA" ( but in fact I have none).

Re:Here is the thing about banking... (1)

definate (876684) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599462)

They're not talking about shutting down HIS account, they're talking about stopping YOUR account from transferring TO HIS account.

Come on, RTFS at least!

Re:Here is the thing about banking... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599408)

You could just call it extortion - someone from any other country would.

Re:Here is the thing about banking... (4, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599410)

Even wonder that the show might be on the other foot, that the Bank of America knowingly dealt with criminals of all sorts including terrorists and that is what they really fear.

Re:Here is the thing about banking... (5, Insightful)

scarboni888 (1122993) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599516)

Well in that case the term 'terrorist' really gets fuzzy doesn't it?

A terrorist uses VIOLENCE to further a political agenda.

I'm sure you'd be more than happy to argue that wikileaks has a political agenda but where, pray tell, is the violence?

Because if this were to happen it would set precedence for pretty much any journalistic entity that doesn't tow the party line as 'terrorist'.

I'd be very careful about that one.

Re:Here is the thing about banking... (1)

AngryNick (891056) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599642)

My guess is that bank of america merely has the inside scoup and wikileaks is about to be declared official terrorists.

or they (BoA, US Govt., et. al) are trying to financially suffocate WikiLeaks. The problem is that, in theory at least, there is no single entity they can call WikiLeaks. This information may as well be distributed via torrents, botnets, or hand addressed postcards. The real "evil" in this so called terror-plot is that the data was compromised by insiders. Julian is just a reporter with questionable integrity.

Re:Here is the thing about banking... (5, Insightful)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599652)

If Federal regulators even SUSPECT you have been allowing terrorists to receive payment

Sorry to spoil it for you but that would include every single American tax payer.

I know I will eventually get moderated down to the middle of the world for saying so. But I put no label on the tax payers as such or claim that the American government would be anything special in this regard. Just stating the facts. Or isn't it terrorism just because the government are in charge?

What else than terrorism can you call the first helicopter attack video Wikileaks leaked?

Though I have no idea who the photographers where, or if the people in the helicopter know them, or why they shoot in the first place.

Oxford American dictionaries:
"terrorism |?ter??riz?m| noun the use of violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims."

Policies (5, Insightful)

Andy Smith (55346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599330)

"our reasonable belief that WikiLeaks may be engaged in activities ... inconsistent with our internal policies for processing payments"

Shut up. You're a bank. Just move people's money around for them and don't try to have an opinion.

Pyramid and ponzi schemes (4, Insightful)

evanism (600676) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599342)

They deal with scum like Bernie maddoff and involved with some of the shadiest operations imaginable and they turn off the hose to THIS? banksters are the cancers of our society. When the revolution comes, there won't be enough brick layers to keep up with the wall building demand.

It's about Time (0)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599384)

Really, Bank of America should not be helping Wikileaks in any way - Wikileaks is threat [washingtonpost.com] to their corporate future. They'd be stupid to help Assange, et. al. bring them down.

Full disclosure: I have a financial interest in Bank of America's stock underperforming (the market only took BAC down 3% on the Wikileaks news - my target is $4.50). This news makes me feel positive about that speculation. Wait, am I on Slashdot or the investing site? ;)

Bunch of Assholes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599394)

I've been with lots of banks, but BOA is the only one that actually stole money from me...and they were pricks about it. I hope they get what's comin' to them.

The 'Verified by VISA' internet service in the UK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599430)

seems to be operated by Bank of America I noticed the other day. You can't even escape them by living in a different country. I hope if anyone attacks Bank of America's web services they realise they won't just be inconveniencing Americans.

What the hell, BoA? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34599438)

What on Earth is Bank of America thinking? They don't have the right to do this! A bank should never, ever tell me what I can and cannot do with my money, and any bank that thinks that they have the right to meddle with my political donations isn't going to be seeing a cent of mine. I am closing out my Bank of America accounts today, and moving to the M&I across the street.

No News. (1)

jobst (955157) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599508)

Sorry, this ain't News. Whoever thinks this is news should have probably read the news a few weeks/months/years back. The reaction of the bank is completely expected. Yawn!

I'd make a joke about corporate overlords (5, Insightful)

HangingChad (677530) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599536)

But it's really not funny that there doesn't seem to be an inch of daylight between government and big business.

And, no, it hasn't always been that way. There have been times historically the situation was similar, but it hasn't always been that way.

double standard (1)

troll -1 (956834) | more than 3 years ago | (#34599592)

Wikileaks didn't leak any info they just published what was already leaked which is what the New York Times and others have done so how come B of A isn't doing the same thing to all the other media outlets that publish this stuff?
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