Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

IBM Projects Holographic Phones, Air-Driven Batteries

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the get-it-projects-get-it-huh dept.

IBM 109

geek4 writes "In 2015, we will be using mobile phones that will project a 3D holographic image of callers, claims IBM in a list of predictions of future technologies culled from a survey of 3,000 IBM scientists. 3D displays are also the focus of work between Intel and Nokia in the development of a holographic interface. Cities heated by servers and advanced city traffic monitoring are also listed as being among the prevalent technologies of the next five years, according to a Bloomberg article."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Wrong way to conduct the survey. (3, Insightful)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672108)

Instead of asking 3,000 people, what they should have done is ask the 3,000 people to pick the 10 smartest and THEY should have made some educated guesses.

Re:Wrong way to conduct the survey. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672130)

Dead Nigger Storage Inc is a successful business founded in 1994 by Toluca Lake, Los Angeles resident Jimmie Dimmick, after a misunderstanding with two acquaintances from the local underworld. In an interview made in 2004 with Pulp Magazine, Dimmick stated that the idea for his business originally came from his dealings with a mysterious "Mr Wolfe" several years previously.

Dead Nigger Storage Inc is publicly traded on the Nasdaq stock market under the symbol DEDNIG.

Business Overview

The business focuses on a simple service provision as the basis for their corporate offering, namely the creation of storage facilities specially built to store dead and/or decaying afro-americans. With offices in Alabama; Elko, Nevada; Georgia; Louisiana; Palmdale, California; and South Carolina, Dead Nigger Storage Inc now has more branches throughout the Confederate States of America than both KFC and Big Kahuna Burgers combined.

Originally run from Jimmie and Bonnie Dimmick's garage, the business' growth rate within the first few months of operating forced them into a rethink. In 1998, the Dimmicks purchased Monster Joe's Truck and Tow in Downtown Los Angeles, which has remained their base of operations to this day.

With the catchy friendly slogan of "Storing Dead Niggers is our business" Dead Nigger Storage Inc remains a market leader at the forefront of ethnic minority storage, despite the recent upsurge in the market for companies such as Jews on Ice and the Cracker Barrel.

Very recently, Dead Nigger Storage Inc has expanded into a chain with several branches outside of the United States. Though each branch outside the USA are largely similar to their American counterparts, most customers note a handful of "little differences". For example, in America one can store a decapitated Nigerian. In the Paris branch, however, one stores un Nigirié guillotin. In general, dead niggers are still called dead niggers, but over there they're called les dead niggers and corpse sizes are measured differently because of the metric system.

In 1999 Detroit became the largest Dead Nigger Storage facility in the western hemisphere.

Traditional Methods of Storing Dead Niggers

“You know what they preserve dead niggers with in Holland instead of synthetic petroleum based chemical preservatives? Mayonnaise.”
~ Vincent Vega on storing Dead Niggers

Many individuals have struggled with the issue of dead nigger storage, including Jefferson Davis and John C. Calhoun who favoured the time-attested methodology of dry suspension, a technique that preserved by hanging them in carefully controlled environments for up to 21 days.

Other techniques utilised include smoking, often over specially constructed firepits or pyres. Although this often provides a more pleasurable flavour and aroma, it often led to a complete burning of the subject.

Pulverization is often utilised, either through the use of sticks, or in more extreme case through "dragging", a technique thought to include a pick-up truck. Another practice designed to aid tenderization is referred to as "curbstomping".

Dead Nigger Storage in Popular Culture

Dead Nigger Storage is subtly referenced in 14 separate Quentin Tarantino movies including Reservoir Dogs and the two Kill Bill films. The company also has numerous placements with Tarantino's latin lover Robert Rodriguez' movies, including The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl.

English Murder Mystery Writer Agatha Christie, referenced the company in perhaps her most famous work, Ten Dead Negroes made into the 1957 film The Only Good Injun is a Dead Injun. Perhaps her most famous reference remains the Hercule Poirot "quote" "Sacre bleu! C'est un morte negro, non?" in The Murder of Michael Donald.

One of the main accusations of racism aimed at George Lucas over his Star Wars franchise was his portrayal of certain species along stereotypical lines. Famously, in the scene when Jar Jar Binks is fatally wounded in the head whilst riding in the back seat of Mace Windu's landspeeder, a small sign can be seen in the background stating "Dead Gungan Storage".

My personal prediction (0)

2.7182 (819680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672190)

I bet in the future there may be a way to make Linux work with drivers my scanner. Just a prediction. I know it's way out there.

Re:My personal prediction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672538)

Not if it's a Goddamned Lexmark

Re:My personal prediction (1)

arisvega (1414195) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673668)

Super off-topic (yet useful info)- I gave up on scanners long ago. I use a digital camera instead, setting it to 'macro' to get a picture of whatever is to be scanned. Importing a picture this way is far more trivial. I even bought a tripod for the camera, and made a simple wooden construction to hold documents in an angle, to get the lighting right. I even used a webcam once -_-

Re:My personal prediction (1)

no1nose (993082) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674248)

That's actually a very good idea and makes "scanning" much easier and faster. I do the same thing.

Re:My personal prediction (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675186)

I bet in the future there may be a way to make Linux work with drivers my scanner. Just a prediction. I know it's way out there.

The mistake you made was buying a "$my" brand scanner, for your local value of "$my". Or "my $my;"

Brother MFC devices that include a scanner work right out of the box on linux. On windows you need to download some bloatware app, not the worst I've ever seen, but it does nicely slow down boot times. On my tiny herd of macs (just a breeding pair) the bloated app was, if I recall correctly, optional, and we never reboot the macs, thus slower booting is irrelevant (said in best 7 of 9 voice). So linux was the simplest, then mac, then windows.

Re:Wrong way to conduct the survey. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672192)

>In 1999 Detroit became the largest Dead Nigger Storage facility in the western hemisphere.

Come on, this happened much, much earlier than 1999

John Galt batteries? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672170)

Sorry, Ayn Rand was confused about physics, but I thought IBM would be better.

Re:Wrong way to conduct the survey. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672530)

they did but the 10 smartest guys either reserved judgement or predicted boring things they were working on.

These guys are crazy (1, Insightful)

Simonetta (207550) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672722)

These guys are crazy. They live in a ultra-high-tech fantasy bubble world. In the real world, where we all must live, there will be either little difference between 2015 and now (if we're lucky) or things will be a lot worse for some of us and a little worse for most of us.

Technological advancement is peaking. The 20th century, the era-when-everything-happened is over. It was an aberation caused by huge amounts of cheap petroleum energy. With cheap oil depleting, the huge technology positive-feedback loop slows and stops.

Plus there isn't any money. The banking system is fundamentally broken, nobody trusts that due-process rule-of-law applies to the financial sector anymore. And one-by-one all the industries in the USA are going down like the housing industry in a chain reaction. Government will frozen and powerless to do anything to stop it from happening.

The 20th century was the era of focused positive-feedback technological advancement. The 21st century is the era of entropy; things falling apart; the center can not hold.

Re:These guys are crazy (2)

harrytuttle777 (1720146) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673070)

Technological advancement is peaking. The 20th century, the era-when-everything-happened is over. It was an aberation caused by huge amounts of cheap petroleum energy. With cheap oil depleting, the huge technology positive-feedback loop slows and stops.

China had quite and advanced civilization 1500 years ago. I don't think that had anything to do with cheap petroleum energy. I don't think the technological (e.g. financial achievement) has anything to do what so ever with natural resources. It has everything to do with the character of the people. Witness Japan.

I agree with you other points though. I think the problem is that there are too many parasites (lawyers, politicians, tv personalities). The poeple that produce e.g. farmers, scientists, engineers need to rise up and declare war on the hair dressers and bullshit artists of the USA. Maybe we can send them all overseas to 'invest' in the emerging markets.

The other day I was reading a X-man comic book from the 1970's. It had adds in the back for kids to buy kits to make their own analog computer! It kind of makes me realize how far we have devolved as a nation. Go to u tube and look at old tv talk shows from the 70's i.e. Donahue. Compare that to the TV pundits we have on the air today. The difference is truly shocking. I wonder if there are not a bunch of alien UFOs hovering over the United States, and sucking out our brains while we are unaware. It would explain a hell of a lot.

Re:These guys are crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673278)

I wonder if there are not a bunch of alien UFOs hovering over the United States, and sucking out our brains while we are unaware. It would explain a hell of a lot.

LMAO yes it would explain a lot but why did the aliens pick the USA for all that brain sucking action? Maybe we should ask our tv hosts and investment bankers. Shoehornjob

Re:These guys are crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673624)

"The poeple that produce e.g. farmers, scientists, engineers need to rise up and declare war on the hair dressers and bullshit artists of the USA" this reminds me of "The Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy" the B ark where they sent all the hairdressers ect. off, and I agree lets do the same

Re:These guys are crazy (1)

Evtim (1022085) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675180)

And shortly afterward the rest 2/3 expired by a virus that spread by means of dirty telephones......

Re:These guys are crazy (3, Insightful)

vertinox (846076) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674142)

Technological advancement is peaking. The 20th century, the era-when-everything-happened is over. It was an aberation caused by huge amounts of cheap petroleum energy. With cheap oil depleting, the huge technology positive-feedback loop slows and stops.

Really now? What about nations which are not dependent on oil such as France, Germany, and Japan. Yes peak oil would most likley be a pain for international shipping, but nations who had the forethought to actually build nuclear power plants and decent mass transit systems will shrug and keep on going.

Plus there isn't any money. The banking system is fundamentally broken, nobody trusts that due-process rule-of-law applies to the financial sector anymore. And one-by-one all the industries in the USA are going down like the housing industry in a chain reaction. Government will frozen and powerless to do anything to stop it from happening.

Government? Whose government? Are we talking about? You talk as if the past 200 years of advances were primarily made by people who lived on Washington, DC's payroll.

The world will advance. It will adapt and it will progress... The statement you should be saying that the world will not progress should say "The United States will not progress, while China, Japan, and Europe keep going."

Its not like China is short on cash.

Re:These guys are crazy (2)

blincoln (592401) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674346)

Technological advancement is peaking. The 20th century, the era-when-everything-happened is over.

Maybe you are just getting old and jaded, while the rest of the world continues on. Did you ever think of that?

I have a phone that is more powerful than the supercomputers that were built when I was growing up. I have a desktop PC that runs at a combined clockspeed of something like 20,000 times that of the Apple IIe my parents bought, and is probably more powerful than most of the computers in the US at that time combined. I have a camera that lets me photograph visible, infrared, and ultraviolet light. I think that's pretty cool, but feel free to think that everything of value has already been created.

Re:These guys are crazy (2)

ShooterNeo (555040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675014)

ALL of those problems that you speak of are almost exclusive to the United States.

China won't have energy problems : they have the guts (and the money to pay for) thousands of small nuclear generators, engineered to be fundamentally safe. China has our money, and their banking system isn't leveraged by credit default swaps.

Europe has similar protection against these problems : they don't depend so utterly on cheap light crude oil to run their cars.

Nuclear energy is cheap, if you use fundamentally good reactor designs and you don't bury the plant operators in red tape.

And we are a matter of a few years away from having solar energy so cheap to be better than coal. Photovoltaic cells have consistently declined in price, decade after decade, and are only a couple times more expensive than coal today. About 10 separate companies are producing cells using new processes that are substantially cheaper than conventional silicon. Yes, there's a way to store the power : compressed air in caverns is cheaper than any battery technology ever invented.

Oh, and the United States has colossal reservoirs of coal.-centuries worth. Coal energy is cheaper than oil. It's horrible for the environment, but if we were desperate, we could burn it and power everything. It's easy to make natural gas from coal, and with more complex chemistry you can make gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and the rest.

Re:These guys are crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34675144)

Yeah, enjoy your United States. Meanwhile the rest of the world isn't awful and broken like yours.

And your people, obviously, since you are obviously one of the types who think the US is the only country that matters, despite the complete inaccuracy of that claim, it is the other way around, the US depends on pretty much every other country for most of its stuff besides some very limited food-stuffs and material production.

Perhaps you should mo.. actually no, stay there. If there is one thing i don't want is more Americans realizing how their country isn't the land of the free, isn't the land of dreams and want to go back.

Re:These guys are crazy (3, Informative)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675962)

Technological advancement is peaking.

Bullshit. You sound like the patent examiner in the 19th century who resigned his position on the grounds that everything worthwhile had already been invented.

If you were paying attention you'd see that we are on the cusp of inventions that make the 20th century's inventions seem trivial. We have nanomaterials, metamaterials, new knowledge about subatomic particle physics (and thanks to the LHC, more will be coming quickly).

If you weren't young you would see that we live in incredibly primitive times, and the present is ALWAYS primitive compared to the future.

It was an aberation caused by huge amounts of cheap petroleum energy.

Cheap petroleum doesn't fuel progress. Scientific advances fuel technological advances.

Plus there isn't any money.

There wasn't any money in the 1950s, either, yet the US Interstate highway system, transistors, lasers, and the birth of space exploration happened in that decade.

one-by-one all the industries in the USA are going down like the housing industry in a chain reaction.

The US isn't the world.

The 21st century is the era of entropy

Every century is one of entropy. Time is simply a measure of entropy. Our evolution was a function of entropy. Progress is a function of entropy, and it's not likely to stop any time soon.

Re:Wrong way to conduct the survey. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673230)

Especially since holographic phones they propose are nigh impossible, what exactly are the projected photons bouncing off of in midair again?

Re:Wrong way to conduct the survey. (1)

ewanm89 (1052822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34677268)

well there are plenty of air particles there to bounce them off of. Not sure how to actually manage it myself but well...

Holligraphic Phones, TV? (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672154)

Everything Must GO!

Get Bebe Neuwirth and Kim Cattral on the phone!

David ASSENGE... RAPED ME (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672268)

Davic Assenge RAPED me. Fact.

Re:Holligraphic Phones, TV? (1)

ThunderBird89 (1293256) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672274)

3D phones? I'd pay money for something like V's headset from Ultraviolet. Or the disposable printed cellphone too, which can double as an autopilot for her car.

not this crap again (4, Insightful)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672156)

I'm still waiting for my flying car and meal as a pill In short, just because it's possible does not mean it should be done much less that it will be profitable or functional.

Re:not this crap again (1)

MavEtJu (241979) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672414)

I'm still waiting for my flying car and meal as a pill.

You are waiting for meal as a pill? I feel bad for you.

Re:not this crap again (1)

msauve (701917) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672594)

"You are waiting for meal as a pill? I feel bad for you."

If the alternative is Soylent Green, which do you choose?

Re:not this crap again (1)

no1nose (993082) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674262)

Obligatory Flying Cars [youtube.com] . (Is IBM still making a "different kind of software"?)

Re:not this crap again (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#34676536)

Personally, I want the kind of meal in a pill they have in The Fifth Element. Put the pill in a big bowel, stick it in the thing that looks like a microvave, shut the door, two seconds later DING! and there's a turkey dinner. Sure would beat the hell out of cooking!

Re:not this crap again (1)

JDHannan (786636) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672548)

Screw meal as a pill.  I want the opposite.

I want huge whole meals that have the caloric content of something the size of a pill.  I love eating, but if I ate what I wanted, when I wanted, I'd be 300lbs.  I wanna be able to eat and eat and not gain weight, and so does most of America.

Re:not this crap again (2)

funkatron (912521) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673042)

Why not try bulimia? It does exactly what you want and it's available right now.

Re:not this crap again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672922)

I'm sorry to disappoint you but they put the meal-as-a-pill idea on hold.
This is because the fastest, most economical meal turns out to be a rectal bolus.
Analysts saw difficulties in pushing this forward, marketers were constipated
for ideas as well and decision makers thought that the research may have gotten
their results backwards.

Re:not this crap again (1)

arisvega (1414195) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673694)

I want to ascend beyond eating

Re:not this crap again (2)

RicktheBrick (588466) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673978)

I am waiting for intersection that do not have traffic lights or signs because every car will know where every other car is that is within a hundred yards of it and will adjust its speed to avoid a collision at the intersection. I waiting for cell phone that once placed in a base will connect all the other cordless phones one has in their home. I can remember when most homes had only one phone and it cost extra to get another one in the house. It seems we have gone back to that era except when the cell phone leaves the house there are now no phones unless everyone in the family has there own cell phone. I am waiting for a cell phone that can easily vnc into any computer in the world. One should be able to control their home computer from anywhere in the world. I am waiting for race track memory. Maybe a trillion bytes of non-volatile ram memory so that hard drives are a thing of the past. Cell phone should need very little memory since they should be able to access all the programs on the home computer and exchange any data that is needed. I think my examples are a lot more useful than those in that article.

Re:not this crap again (1)

ShooterNeo (555040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675046)

Got $2000? Then you can buy yourself a terrabyte of non-volatile, flash drives and the high speed controller chips to make them work.
Not pocket change, but I bet you can afford it if you sacrificed elsewhere.

The car thing is physically doable, but thanks to another parasite on society (lawyers/the U.S. legal system) it's unfeasible. (because even if fully automated cars were 10 times safer, plaintiff lawyers would sue the pants off the company that made the cars every time someone DID die)

The phone thing...very doable, using several methods. Just turn the cell phone off when you get to the house (or use an app running on the phone to do this automatically) and forward your calls to a VoIP box in the house.

Remote desktop lets you control a computer remotely for years. It's not anything new.

And the final comment : that is impractical due to software architecture constraints. And it makes for a more reliable phone if the phone can keep functioning the moment it loses link to the computer, because the computer crashed or whatnot. But, come to think of it, it IS possible.

Re:not this crap again (1)

Per Wigren (5315) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674996)

"Meal as a pill" almost exists, in the form of nutrition bars. Not the supplemental bars that athletes use but the complete "everything you need except water and most calories" bars that you can quite safely eat exclusively for several weeks in a row. Most commonly used for VLCD diets [wikipedia.org] when you eat only 600-800 kcal/day for 1-2 months. I've tried it and you are actually (very) hungry only the first 3 days or so. Then your stomach gets used to the lack of volume and since you get about all the nutrients you need your body isn't screaming for more.

Also predicted (1)

SupremoMan (912191) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672158)

Flying cars and cities on the moon within 50 years...

Re:Also predicted (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672650)

Its gonna be tricky to get cars flying on the moon.

Re:Also predicted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672874)

Its gonna be tricky to get cars flying on the moon.

Why? All you need to do is hit a bump at high speed.

Flying cities though, that's going to be a bit more tricky.

Re:Also predicted (2)

Lord of the Fries (132154) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673072)

Even trickier to get cities flying on the moon.

Why survey the scientists? (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672180)

They should survey their patent attorneys. Nothing goes out without their stamp.

Re:Why survey the scientists? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672198)

I just farted and violated at least 213 patents!

Re:Why survey the scientists? (3, Informative)

NameIsDavid (945872) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672958)

At IBM, the patent attorneys aren't a part of the process for approving patents. Rather, depending on the division, there is a panel consisting of various representatives from the department. Some are engineers, usually one is an attorney. Inventors pitch their idea and the panel asks questions and decides to either ask the inventors to return with more details or additional information or may approve moving forward. Usually, the next step is to pass a search of prior art. Only then is the disclosure rated "file," where the inventors can start working with an assigned attorney to prepare the actual application. In some divisions, the panel may be just a few people, but always predominantly from the scientist/engineering side, not the legal. Legal is usually just one representative, providing guidance so no time and money is wasted on ideas that fail basic patentability criteria. A key consideration through all this is how important the idea is to IBM business. Another consideration is how discoverable the idea is. If it's too hard to detect whether or not someone is violating the patent, it's not worth going through the process. Ideas that relate to an upcoming product tend to be prioritized over those that are just potentially connected to product. This is based on going through this process a few dozen times when I used to work there.

What is it with seeing a face? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672240)

Seriously, video calling has been possible for years. But (other than webcam chat) no-one does it.

This is because we don't actually WANT people to see us when we've just got out of bed, or we're doing something on the computer at the same time.

Man these guys have no idea about how people act. That's the problem with getting nerds to guess the future.

Re:What is it with seeing a face? (1)

blincoln (592401) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674378)

Seriously, video calling has been possible for years. But (other than webcam chat) no-one does it.

What about Facetime (or whatever it's called) on Apple's devices? I was skeptical, myself - I don't even own an iPhone, and I almost referred to it as "the Dick Tracy watch application" until I realized the person I was talking to was probably too young to get the reference - but apparently the businesspeople I work with are in love with the idea. Maybe (like so much of the other stuff that Apple has done recently) it was just clunky and unintuitive to use in earlier incarnations?

Cities heated by servers? (1)

Hasai (131313) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672242)

THAT I can believe. You should have seen this year's HVAC bill.

Re:Cities heated by servers? (-1, Troll)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672460)

I see from your "resume" that you never finished college, and live in your mom's basement. Since you use vi (or maybe emacs) to write all your correspondence, it's not surprising you have no concept of modern software. Isn't it time you unlocked your mother's bedroom door and let the police in to recover the mummified body and burry it? You know, there are now better email clients than Pine, and you miss out on a lot of the Interwebs by using Lynx. GET OUT OF YOUR MOM'S BASEMENT! GET THERAPY!

Re:Cities heated by servers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672982)

I don't understand why the parent is modded "Troll", clearly it is "Insightful".

In a shocking development, it turns out... (1)

Eric S. Smith (162) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672258)

...that this article is baseless fantasy. Half of it's gibberish: what does "cities heated by servers," even mean? The other half ignores what's known to be possible, with the holographic projections popping out of phones within four years being the most obvious clanger. How's that supposed to work? Like in Star Wars, of course, which is to say only as a special effect in a movie.

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (1)

ThunderBird89 (1293256) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672316)

sudo mod parent -1.

Cities heated by servers would be a good start to get the future into today's world, and smart traffic grids should have been implemented some time last decade (2001-2010, now that we're heading out of it...)

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (3, Informative)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672360)

...that this article is baseless fantasy. Half of it's gibberish: what does "cities heated by servers," even mean? The other half ignores what's known to be possible, with the holographic projections popping out of phones within four years being the most obvious clanger. How's that supposed to work? Like in Star Wars, of course, which is to say only as a special effect in a movie.

If you're going to be using electrical heating, you might as well get some useful work out of that energy instead of just setting it on fire.

As for holographic projections, a heliodisplay isn't technically the same thing, but it looks like the ones from Star Wars, so I'll give them a pass. It isn't that difficult to project a holographic phone. [io2technology.com]

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (1)

Rhywden (1940872) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675018)

Not to slighten the achievement of projecting an image into mid air (pretty impressive, that) but this is not "holographic" per se. A holographic image would contain the image information of several angles while the io2technology's version projects a flat image.

Furthermore, holography does not mean "draw with light" - it means "draw the whole (image)" (holos = greek: "whole") since if you cut a holographic image in half, you will still have the whole picture on _both_ halves. They'll be smaller and fuzzier, though.

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (1)

robi5 (1261542) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679112)

If you're going to be using electrical heating, you might as well get some useful work out of that energy instead of just setting it on fire.

Maybe it will be illegal in the future NOT to combine electrical heating with computer processing. Your electrical heater won't work without it receiving Folding@Home and other distributed computing tasks which in turn generate heat. In some countries kWh price is based on peak/off-peak hours and other policies; it would be illegal or extremely expensive to directly convert electrical power to the high entropy heating without harvesting computational power.

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672398)

I'd be surprised to see it happen on a significant scale, because of the legal, cultural, and infrastructure hurdles in many areas; but "cities heated by servers" is actually a perfectly cogent idea.

On many large institutional campuses(academic and corporate), and (if memory serves) a few closely built cities, there is a single "steam plant" that heats the whole place. A single large generator of heat, with that heat piped around the campus in underground steam lines.

In principle, a city or institutional campus with one or more very large datacenters could adopt a similar scheme using the waste heat from those facilities. Depending on distances, logistics, and a bunch of fiddly engineering considerations, this could either mean just directly pumping hot-aisle air out of the datacenter and into other buildings, mixing it with ambient air at the concentration required to provide the requested temperature, or it could mean using the hot-side output of the chillers to pre-heat water going into a conventional steam plant, to reduce the deltaT that needs to be provided by other fuel sources, or some other such arrangement.

Now, outside of greenfield or total-conversion deployments in campuses owned by a single entity, there would be a lot of legal and cultural hashing-out to be done, about billing, running heat lines, etc. but as an engineering exercise it is cogent enough. (Of course, legal and cultural and to some degree economic stuff tends to be where "futurists" and sci-fi writers are at their absolute weakest. How many sci-fi stories feature superhuman strong AI in a technological environment where every other computer system is a 70's dumb terminal, rather than our present situation, where AI is still at the '20 years off' phase; but malnourished 3rd worlders have cellphones? Never mind the hoary 'ship crews calculating the trajectory for their faster-than-light drive with slide rules and tables of logarithms' stuff. Or the venerable flying car: guess what, kids, the future where the middle class can afford helicopters and will be allowed by the feds to operate them is further off now than it was when that stuff was written...)

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (1)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672560)

I can see how it could work over here in Sweden (and Northern Europe in general I believe), we have extensive district heating networks in many cities. The question is how large of a server farm would be required to replace all the heat otherwise generated by burning biomass, etc.

Steam is not used in any modern installations btw, water is the most common medium nowadays. Steam can be pretty dangerous, and is generally less efficient. New York is an example of a US city that has an extensive district heating network, using steam, hence the steam coming out of the ground in Manhattan.
It's also possible to use the same networks for district cooling..

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673228)

I imagine that A)IBM sees a future with more servers, ideally bearing their logo and B)you use the heat from the servers that you would need anyway, and then use whatever you were using before to make up the difference.

Electrical heating for its own sake doesn't make a huge amount of sense(outside of the extreme convenience of just being able to plug a big resistor into the wall wherever you need the heat) and servers make fairly expensive electric heaters unless you happen to need them for some other purpose. If they are already paying for themselves by doing server stuff, anything you can squeeze out of their waste heat is just gravy.

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34674866)

(Of course, legal and cultural and to some degree economic stuff tends to be where "futurists" and sci-fi writers are at their absolute weakest.

No. Most sci-fi is very strong with those subjects, not weak at all. Stronger than most other genres of fiction, and in some cases stronger than what you find in the non-fiction section.

I'd start posting some citations but it will be easier if you just start with any Classic reading list of Sci-Fi authors. I'll recommend you start with Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clark, and Philip K. Dick.

I will agree, however, that "Futurists" don't really have much of a clue about anything.

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (1)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672550)

Well, it makes some sort of sense. Why burn fuel just to make heat when you could use some of it to run electrons through some silicon and get some computation done?

(Answer? A lot of technical difficulties making it tricky, expensive, or less efficient... e.g. the fact that to avoid transmission losses you'd probably need to put the power plant and the servers right near the city, but the cheap power is all coal and no one wants that right near the city, and the good dense cities are expensive places for servers, too.)

Re:In a shocking development, it turns out... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673326)

Oh IDK it sounds like a good idea to create some technology that reclaims excess heat from servers and put it to good use. I believe the next 50 years will not be about what we can invent. anyone can invent anything even if it's just a concept(just ask a patent attorney). I believe the next 50 years will be about doing more with fewer resources. The USA and the rest of the world will eventually realize that petroleum is dead and climate change is real (regardless of wether we caused it or not)and the days of a booming market and fast money are long gone. I believe the industrius nature of this country will rise again and we will reclaim our place as an economic superpower.

By 2020 (3, Funny)

serutan (259622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672270)

Most 3D projector cell phones will run on ethanol.

Re:By 2020 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673632)

You forgot 'as thin as a credit card.'!

"Advanced city traffic monitoring"? (1)

Reality Master 301 (1462839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672280)

We already have advanced traffic monitoring, at least in my city. As soon as I even think of doing anything not pre-approved with my internet connection, the speed drops to almost zero. Or is this one of those newfangled car analogies?

Re:"Advanced city traffic monitoring"? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672328)

I just farted and violated at least 213 patents! !

Re:"Advanced city traffic monitoring"? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672424)

Given what places like the City of London are already doing, I'm not sure that "advanced traffic monitoring" counts as a "projection"...

Re:"Advanced city traffic monitoring"? (1)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672696)

All joking aside, monitoring traffic is okay to a point, but can only get you so much; cars still need lanes. Personally, I don't need a fancy computer to tell me about my commute. I already know it will be miserably slow no matter which way I go.

Re:"Advanced city traffic monitoring"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673292)

There's only so many more lanes you can add. Plenty of research has shown that, unless your city has something ridiculous like a major highway with only 4 lanes through the heart of it, there's a diminishing set of returns on the cost of just adding lanes. Take Miami, for instance, where some places have TWELVE LANES, 6 in either direction, and it still turns into constant gridlock.

More lanes can be good, but they're expensive, and there is plenty that can be done to manage the traffic that is there before just adding more places for you to get stuck. The trick is to find a nice balance.

(The fun part is, the push is almost always for more lanes because, surprise surprise, there are a LOT of construction companies out there that make good money doing that sort of thing, and trust me, they're not interested in the more cost-effective solution.)

Re:"Advanced city traffic monitoring"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673894)

Pfffff.... Downtown Atlanta has 14 (7 each direction) and it's really slow moving parking lot.

Re:"Advanced city traffic monitoring"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34677392)

Yes, but Atlanta has the bonus of not enforcing speed limits outside of heavy traffic times. ;)

They also do a lot of traffic management in the metro ATL area, albeit a bit outdated in their systems/methodologies. (They're just now moving from a distributed analog cctv system to a digital video network. The former is hard to manage and prone to breakage. The latter is far easier to expand and manage On the other hand, that means they've decided to start recording everything soon...ugh.)

Then again, it's not like they have room to add any more lanes between East Point and the 75/85 split. As it is, the addition of the HOV lanes made the shoulders ridiculously dangerous, to the point that GHP/APD will tell you to drive your damaged vehicle to a nearby parking lot to finish out the report unless it HAS to be towed...

IBM Was Big on Second Life, Patented Accordingly (2)

theodp (442580) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672366)

In 2007, Bloomberg notes, IBM was bullish on online immersive environments like Second Life [bloomberg.com] . Big Blue certainly put its patent efforts where its predictions were - 250+ published IBM patent applications [uspto.gov] mention 'avatar' or 'avatars'.

Glasses (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672404)

If even because privacy problems, holographic display of information (a la star wars, at least) probably won't happen. But not so technologically disruptive glasses where you display to the wearer information, would be able to be 3d, augmented reality or HUD like displays, shouldnt be so far.

Holographic Mobile Phones... (2)

Nozsd (1080965) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672408)

Aren't cell phones annoying enough as it is without people projecting the person on the other end in my face?

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (4, Insightful)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672606)

Nope. They are not annoying at all. There are some PEOPLE that are annoying. There are also some PEOPLE that are annoyed by other PEOPLE, but the phones themselves? Not annoying in the slightest. It is unfortunate for you that you don't have anyone in your life that you would want to see in 3D or larger than what a phone screen can show. That isn't the case for all of use though, so holographic projecting would be a good thing for us. Of course the real boon would be having the phone display a computer screen.

Phones today are PC. Not Wintel machines, but definitely Personal Computers. The two biggest missing pieces are lack of a real keyboard and full sized monitor. We live with the tiny screens and keyboards because we have to choose between full sized IO and compact carrying size. We already have keyboards that displayed by laser, so that part just needs some shrinking. There is a phone or two that have a built in LED projector, so we are right on the verge of having a tiny but usable PC. Holographic display would make the screen usable anywhere.

Don't let your lack of loved ones sour you on the bright future of ultra tiny PCs.

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (1)

Zakabog (603757) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674038)

While I do enjoy seeing my girlfriends face, I hate web cam chats. Most of the time I end up just typing on my keyboard because either there isn't enough bandwidth for the sound to sync or transmit properly (she's on a very heavily used campus network) or I'm somewhere where I don't want to shout at the computer in order for the crappy little microphone to pick up on my voice. Speakerphone is annoying enough when it's just you in a car, I can't imagine what it'll be like on a bus where everyone in a call is holding their phone at arms length shouting just so the person on the other end can hear and see them. Plus why do I want the person next to see who I'm talking to? Sure in certain situations a 3D holographic projection would be fantastic, but those situations would most likely be in the privacy of your own home, not surrounded by dozens of people on a packed NYC bus during rush out. And if you're going to end up using the technology while at home, then why even put it on a cell phone when a normal desktop or laptop computer would be far better at handling the task?

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674190)

Because for many, the cell phone will be their desktop and laptop.

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (1)

Zakabog (603757) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674602)

That sounds like a horrid concept. "Yeah sorry hun I'd call you but I clicked a link on facebook and now my phone's infected with some nasty spyware that injects 5 second ads for viagra in all of my calls."

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34674842)

Like it or hate it, smart phones are PCs, and more and more of the phones will be PCs. Although, since that problem is just not all that common on desktop PCs, I don't know why you would expect it to become more common on a phones.

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675222)

Because for many, the cell phone will be their desktop and laptop.

Why would anyone want to work on multiple 20 inch screens with an ergonomic keyboard and mouse, when they could use a teeny tiny little cellphone instead? God knows whenever I'm in a CAD app or working on a text document (including source code), I always wish I had a smaller screen. Also whenever I have a nice keyboard, like an IBM model M, I always wish I could use my Atari400 style cellphone membrane keypad instead.

This also explains the industry wide utter dominance of tiny commuter cars over those obese SUVs that no one buys.

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 3 years ago | (#34676886)

You seem to A) missed what the conversation was about since you are talking about interacting with something tiny, and B) Become confused into thinking that most people have a need for multiple screens that outweighs the convenience of always having their computer with them, D) for some reason believe that a full sized keyboard and monitor could not be use when they are available.

All in all you seem confused.

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675212)

"compact carrying size" change that to "compact everything" and I would agree with you.

People use phones in crammed spaces: elevators, public transport, airport waiting areas. Give people more space and you will be able to immediately fit there a normal classic PC or laptop.

Re:Holographic Mobile Phones... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34676254)

Until some random creepy guy/girl in the bus starts gawking at the person that is shown.

Give me phones that can PHONE properly first! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672438)

It's pathetic: we have more and more functionality crammed into so-called "smartphones", but the sound quality (emission & reception) is still crap...

Oops, sorry, I forgot. Phones are made for apps, not longer for conversations. Sorry, my bad.

Sad.

Oh my! I'm a time traveller! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34672448)

I can get zinc-air hearing aid batteries at my pharmacy!

From "the boxes told us" idiots (0)

MobileDude (530145) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672552)

IBM sure did have RFID pegged right...... <smirk>

ibm know nothing about consumer (1)

kentsin (225902) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672844)

Forget it

Micromanagement of traffic will have a big impact (1)

nroets (1463881) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672870)

Firstly, the infrastructure to measure traffic flow patterns is being created as we speak. Every smartphone with a GPS can act as a sensor.

The political will is there, largely due to the desire to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Authorities should try to disincentive drivers to drive when peaks are predicted. It may take the form of toll charges being continually adjusted or it may take the form of free parking. But even without them, a mere warning from their smartphone will lead some drivers to reschedule or reroute.

Re:Micromanagement of traffic will have a big impa (1)

Unipuma (532655) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674326)

Actually, this system is already in place, in Europe. Tomtom has an agreement with a large european mobile phone company, and receives anonymized information about the speed and location of mobile phones of this provider. This enables them to indicate traffic jams even on minor roads.
Their navigation system receives both the official TMC signals, as this data, and uses it to calculate the most efficient route to destination.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TomTom#HD_Traffic [wikipedia.org]

outdoors (1)

Nyall (646782) | more than 3 years ago | (#34672906)

Are holograms visible outside? Because I'd really appreciate a cell phone that was usable in the sun.

Re:outdoors (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675234)

Are holograms visible outside? Because I'd really appreciate a cell phone that was usable in the sun.

When you're driving at night, they'll work fine, although I agree when driving during the day it could be annoying. Other than driving, why would I go out in the sun and get skin cancer?

What IBM really Wants ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34673102)

... is all those holographic phones and air batteries to be powered by WebSphere.

Air-driven battery, you mean zinc-air? (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#34673318)

Zinc-air battery [wikipedia.org]

Re:Air-driven battery, you mean zinc-air? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34674662)

I also had to think of that stuff when I read the line. Is the future in air-driven batteries because they predict a massive hearing impairment from using ipods/phones whatever?

Re:Air-driven battery, you mean zinc-air? (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674924)

Haha. I learned of these when I once idiotically got them to power a keychain laser pointer, thinking I had snagged a 12-pack for only a few dollars. It would start out bright, but fade quickly after a few seconds. Leave it off for several seconds, then it would power up bright again. I'm asssuming the laser pointer drew excessive current, and thus used up all the air in the batteries. Then when off for a few seconds, more air was able to diffuse in through holes, "recharging" them. I also imagine that once their seals were broken, they would degrade the electrodes after a week or so, even if not used. Bleah.

Re:Air-driven battery, you mean zinc-air? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675262)

I'm asssuming the laser pointer drew excessive current, and thus used up all the air in the batteries. Then when off for a few seconds, more air was able to diffuse in through holes, "recharging" them. I also imagine that once their seals were broken, they would degrade the electrodes after a week or so, even if not used.

The funny part is you missed the point of your parent post... they're specifically engineered to dump about a milliamp for a week into an "in ear" hearing aid. Low short circuit current / high internal resistance is actually considered an intrinsically safe feature, it is impossible to burn your ear or set your hair on fire. Personally I would not want a LiPoly or nicad battery in my ear.

Another part thats cool is that if the seal is not broken, they'll theoretically keep "forever" certainly longer than even lithium primary cells. Maybe decades. You can buy a multi-year supply if you get a good deal, and as long as you don't unpeel the tape seal, they'll have 100% capacity. The only thing that will kill them is intense vibration ... car glove compartment would be a very bad place for spare zinc-air batteries.

You could re-engineer that battery chemistry into being able to dump kiloamps if you wanted, would probably require forced air and an O2 sensor to make sure humans don't suffocate like some kerosene heaters have. But the market forced that specific battery chemistry into the hearing aide sub-market, so you simply can not buy low internal resistance / high capacity zinc-air batteries.

Why? (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34674322)

If the current cheap phones had perfect support for 3d-holos of the caller for free already today, I still wouldn't really use it...

Re:Why? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34675266)

If the current cheap phones had perfect support for 3d-holos of the caller for free already today, I still wouldn't really use it...

I'd use it just as much as the free videoconferencing software on my desktop...
One time, oh isn't that cool technology, well that was interesting, goodbye. And never again.

As if the videophone was ever a great success (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34675118)

"..mobile phones that will project a 3D holographic image of callers.."
Will this be as huge a success as the videophones? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Videophone

It will be out in 5 years... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34676504)

...we promise...

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?