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Putin Orders Russian Move To GNU/Linux

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the putin-on-his-tux dept.

Government 500

Glyn Moody writes "Vladimir Putin has signed an order calling for Russian federal authorities to move to GNU/Linux, and for the creation of 'a single repository of free software used in the federal bodies of executive power.' There have been a number of Russian projects to roll out free software, notably in the educational sector, but none so far has really taken off. With the backing of Putin, could this be the breakthrough free software has been waiting for?"

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I knew it! (4, Funny)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679796)

Linux really IS communist!

Re:I knew it! (5, Insightful)

fishexe (168879) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679874)

Linux really IS communist!

But this would indicate Linux is post-communist kleptocratic...

Re:I knew it! (5, Insightful)

burnin1965 (535071) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679944)

You've been spending way too much time in a French cave [wikipedia.org] .

The Russians left Communism behind around 1991 and have managed to leap past the United States to Mafioso Capitalism. Though the U.S. is trying hard to catch up.

Re:I knew it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679978)

In Soviet Russia they use Windows, but in the new Russian Federation they will use Linux.

Re:I knew it! (1)

camperslo (704715) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679996)

Linux really IS communist!

Already there are communal hallways and television sets.

Stop this sinister sharing before we get communal toothbrushes!

Re:I knew it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680038)

Linux is not a communist, it is just that his friend GNU is influencing him

Re:I knew it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680098)

In Democratic Russia, System administrates YOU!

Putin and freedom !!?? (4, Insightful)

JonySuede (1908576) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679808)

With the backing of Putin, could this be the breakthrough free software has been waiting for?

I am pretty sure that Putin don't care about the freedom part of free software

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679846)

Then his move might have unintended consequences. ;-)

K.L.M.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (2)

aristotle-dude (626586) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680148)

Then his move might have unintended consequences. ;-)

K.L.M.

Are you trying to be funny or are you just that naive? Linux is "free" as in gratis. Putin does not care about the GNU "freedom".

End users gain nothing from the GPL because it is not an EULA. It only applies to people who would modify and redistribute it outside of the organization they work for.

If you read the license literally, the Russian government can modify it all they like as long at it is kept within the Russian government without ever contributing those changes back to the "community".

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680174)

Why is that a problem?
Seems like complying with the GPL.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680178)

not many care about GNU Free(tm), except maybe Stallman cultists.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (5, Insightful)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679896)

With the backing of Putin, could this be the breakthrough free software has been waiting for?

I am pretty sure that Putin don't care about the freedom part of free software

Why is that? Putin is acting on behalf of the government who are primarily users, not developers of software they hope to sell. The 'freedom" part is freedom for him, and brings real benefits to him and his, like the ability to gain free code contributions from others around the world and the ability to comparison shop when looking at vendors for support and the like. Any code generated by the government will likely cost less in the long run if they contribute it back rather than maintaining a fork.

So really, while we may not see a pile of code contributions as a result of this, more adoption means more motivation to support it for hardware vendors and more motivation for application developers and tool creators to target it. And really, lack of momentum and market share is one of the biggest problems for OSS, a chicken and egg scenario.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (5, Insightful)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680076)

For Putin, there are likely two draws to FOSS: 1. using it means money likely isn't being shipped to Western software companies leaving more for in-country software development, and 2. his mafia geeks in the FSB, the genetic spawn of the KGB, can check for any sneaky backdoors.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (2)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680198)

I don't imagine the money is that much of a problem. Wholesale pirating may have been slowed down a bit by Microsoft in later versions of Windows 7, but I doubt it would affect the Russian Government. Organizations that big can get site licenses for dirt cheap.

It might have something to do with not wanting to be dependent on US closed source technology. Or free of suspected back doors.

In reality the question is now why Russia has ordered this, it is why is the US dragging its feet?

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (4, Interesting)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680092)

This.

If Russia starts using Linux and demanding that app vendors make programs compatible for the OS, or else they will pay or find application vendors that will, this will get the mainstream guys to start treating Linux as a top tier platform and not something to hide in the server room racks.

The result? A win/win/win situation. Linux can become an alternative to Windows. Application makers have a gigantic market (Russia, then possibly China, then perhaps Europe, anywhere there is distrust of closed operating systems.) Users have an OS choice that has proven itself in the "big boy" arenas that can run their applications without having to buy new hardware.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (2)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680220)

the Russian government doesn't buy too many games, so don't expect much progress on that front.
Important($$) industry applications generally have Linux versions available. (Pro/E, Cadence, ...)

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (2)

JonySuede (1908576) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680100)

I don't see the adoption of something by a dictator as a great endorsement. And I am certain that the code in theirs own repository will contain some kind of monitoring system of some sort that will report back to today's KGB

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (2)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680188)

I don't see the adoption of something by a dictator as a great endorsement.

I don't care about celebrity or anti-celebrity endorsements. I care about real world effects upon the stagnant and broken desktop OS market. Charles Manson wore Levis jeans, that's not a reason for me to avoid them.

And I am certain that the code in theirs own repository will contain some kind of monitoring system of some sort that will report back to today's KGB

It's called the FSB now, and they may well insert backdoors in code they contribute or in a fork. Of course, we can always audit the code (and our security agencies will for any we use) and you can compile your own Linux distro and be largely compatible with their systems. This is nice because it opens up innovation and moves a large group of users to both open code and open protocols, making it easier to interoperate and more profitable to develop for Linux.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680236)

not hard to install keyloggers and hidden proxies in a Windows box either. The open source nature of Linux doesn't really make a difference for that kind of stuff.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680240)

If it is CODE in their own repositories then it becomes very difficult to hide "report back to today's KGB".

Code is vastly more transparent than closed binary sources from, say, Microsoft or Apple.

"Dictator" is open for argument.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (2)

fishexe (168879) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679900)

With the backing of Putin, could this be the breakthrough free software has been waiting for?

I am pretty sure that Putin don't care about the freedom part of free software

For him, it's free beer that counts.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680030)

With the backing of Putin, could this be the breakthrough free software has been waiting for?

I am pretty sure that Putin don't care about the freedom part of free software

For him, it's free beer that counts.

I think beer is something Putin drinks when he wants to sober up after a vodka bender.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (4, Insightful)

kenrblan (1388237) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680126)

I think you have Putin confused with Boris Yeltsin. In regard to the move to GNU/Linux, I suspect Putin has seen the number of exploits and malware written for Windows and is aware that much of it originates in Russia.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (4, Insightful)

aBaldrich (1692238) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680070)

I think it its "free from American companies" that counts.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (5, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680044)

Pretty sure Stuxnet has got his attention. I assure you that the Free part is relevant, because the Open thing is part of the Free thing, and that means peer-reviewed software. Sure, you could still do something like Stuxnet in a Linux environment, but hopefully people are thinking about all kinds of security and not just precisely the same type of breach that is in the news.

If Putin asked me (heh heh) how he could enhance the security of computing in Russia, I'd certainly suggest Linux, maybe even GNU/Linux.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (1)

ChiChiCuervo (2445) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680112)

Of course he cares about the freedom part of free software. He (and by extension, the FSB) cares about being able to audit the code their systems are using. I'll bet STuxnet has alot to do with this, plus their history of dealing with us (the US) sending them (literal) spyware. I seem to remember a story about a very large natural gas explosion caused by the CIA leaking the Soviets fake/bad software.

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (1)

JonySuede (1908576) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680192)

that is not the free part, that is the open part

Re:Putin and freedom !!?? (1)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680234)

This is really good news for the OSS movement. Any large org. that move to put OSS in place on a large scale is good for all of us.

In Soviet Russia! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679810)

In Soviet Russia, software frees you!

At last! (4, Funny)

gregthebunny (1502041) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679816)

2011 WILL be the year of the [Russian] Linux desktop!

Re:At last! (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679834)

I smell a "In Soviet Russia" joke coming ....

Re:At last! (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679862)

I smell a "In Soviet Russia" joke coming ....

In post-Soviet Russia, they know the USSR no longer exists! (And they use GNU/Linux!)

Re:At last! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679914)

But the CCCP is a windows-only program!

Re:At last! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679878)

In Soviet Russia, the president chooses Linux.

Yes, he does actually.

Re:At last! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679882)

In Soviet Russia the gnu infects you. ;)

Re:At last! (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680054)

In Soviet Russia the gnu infects you. ;)

Ew. I found the image that produced in my brain to be particularly disturbing.

Obligatory Joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679824)

In Soviet Russia, GNU/Linux move to you!

IF THE GLOVE FITS CONVICT !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679828)

Kommie OS for Kommie Kronies

Its about control/censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679830)

They're creating the repository, they're holding the code. Its about easily creating back doors and then mandating the use of the software. In Post-Soviet Russia, the Free Software controls you!

Re:Its about control/censorship (4, Insightful)

WaywardGeek (1480513) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680020)

Actually, it's probably just the opposite. After the BSD backdoor story [slashdot.org] and after the Wikileaks cables [allvoices.com] , maybe Russia is concerned about using Microsoft Windows. Of course, Microsoft would *never* work with the NSA/FBI/CIA/Control/Chaos on back-doors that undermine the security of Russia... I can't imaging why they would want their own operating system...

Breakthrough everyone's been waiting for? (1)

comcn (194756) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679842)

It's always "the breakthrough free software has been waiting for"... free software has been growing over the years, but these sorts of things never seem to make the big global impact that the news reports they will. (Not saying this is a bad thing, though!)

Re:Breakthrough everyone's been waiting for? (1)

onefriedrice (1171917) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679950)

It's always "the breakthrough free software has been waiting for"... free software has been growing over the years, but these sorts of things never seem to make the big global impact that the news reports they will. (Not saying this is a bad thing, though!)

The summary doesn't seem to suggest any impending "global" impact. The sentence you took that fragment from is clearly only talking about Russian free software programs. Nobody is suggesting that free software is inevitably going to take over the world over night, but with local victories such as this, the long-term viability of free software is definitely assured.

In Soviet GNUssia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679850)

In Soviet Russia GNU move to Linux

i'm so sorry so sorry (5, Funny)

caffeinemessiah (918089) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679856)

In America, you put in Linux.

In Soviet Russia, Putin Linux you.

Re:i'm so sorry so sorry (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680072)

Thats a good one.

Re:i'm so sorry so sorry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680142)

Mod parent UP!

Proof (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679870)

This is just more proof that free software is a virus. Communism lives in Russia, and lives in free software. Free is only free to a certain point, eventually you have to pay for it.

Re:Proof (1)

burnin1965 (535071) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679966)

Who let you out of your bunker?

In Soviet Russia... (0)

PhilipTheHermit (1901680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679872)

Linux runs YOU!

Re:In Soviet Russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679902)

Linux runs YOU!

...YOU are at the fingertips!

Glyn Moody is just trolling again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679876)

This isn't being done because Putin believes in the GNU manifesto or the free software hippy fest, but purely for no other reason than cheapness. This is highly likely going to be a proprietary fork just like Google does with their internal Ubuntu distro.

Re:Glyn Moody is just trolling again (2)

Voulnet (1630793) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679906)

Really, is there anything wrong with wanting cheapness and robustness?

Re:Glyn Moody is just trolling again (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679922)

No, but don't try to veil this as some sort of win for the ideals of FOSS when it's not. It's a political play and nothing more.

Re:Glyn Moody is just trolling again (1)

Voulnet (1630793) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680036)

I am not a simpleton who believes USA GOOD RUSSIA BAD, so I have no reason to think that the Russian gov't can actually make good use of FOSS, even if it doesn't support all of its ideals.
Is there a memo I missed that says any prime minister in the world can't possibly be supportive of some FOSS ideas such as ridding one's self from Microsoft's crap systems?
No matter the ulterior motives; wanting to get rid of Microsoft's systems is always a good thing.

Re:Glyn Moody is just trolling again (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680210)

No, but don't try to veil this as some sort of win for the ideals of FOSS when it's not. It's a political play and nothing more.

I am not a simpleton who believes USA GOOD RUSSIA BAD,

Logical fallacy, false dichotomy. USA BAD, RUSSIA BAD.

Re:Glyn Moody is just trolling again (1)

Voulnet (1630793) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680260)

Maybe you're right.

Re:Glyn Moody is just trolling again (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680218)

The ideals are winning, the ideals are what brought about cheap and good.

I should really stop talking to trolls.

Re:Glyn Moody is just trolling again (1)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680018)

This isn't being done because Putin believes in the GNU manifesto or the free software hippy fest, but purely for no other reason than cheapness.

What's wrong with that? Cheapness and efficiency are big parts of the "GNU manifesto" with enlightened self interest on the part of the users being key.

This is highly likely going to be a proprietary fork just like Google does with their internal Ubuntu distro.

Again, I don't see the problem. Google finds it cost effective to contribute back most of their changes because then they are incorporated into the main code base and the burden for maintaining a fork is greatly lessened. Realistically, I don't even see that Russia needs a fork or how it would benefit them. For Google, they like having a performance leg up for massively parrallel computing. Russia though, they mostly want servers and desktops and don't need a performance leg up. Likely they'll implement some proprietary applications, maybe even a security module or something, but for the most part there isn't a benefit to not giving the changes back and there is a cost.

In Soviet Russia... (0)

theNAM666 (179776) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679880)

Putinix Desktop install you.

Doubt they will use a common distro (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679884)

Although they might, I would speculate that their "specialized" distro will not be openly available. It's not like they are going to shutdown every computer in mother Russia in one night, load up ubuntu, and continue on their merry way. Think about ALL of the things that have to be changed, right down to the local government level. The training will be horrendous, and in a few years, they will more than likely be using windows again.

Re:Doubt they will use a common distro (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680048)

The process will certainly be a very, very gradual one(heck, even moving a single enterprise between Windows versions can take quite a bit of doing, a Windows -> Linux transition of a government is going to take some time); but I suspect that there are three things going on: One, you'll never finish a gradual process if you don't start. Two: The more serious you sound about Linux, the cheaper your Windows licenses get. Three: It is dawning on people that being able to inspect your software is a security issue. Putin is probably willing to pay for Windows(and MS is quite likely to be willing to offer discounts that make switching economically dubious in the short to medium term); but he probably puts on his old KGB hat and mutters darkly when he thinks about American spooks crawling merrily around Redmond...

Politically motivated. (1)

wcrowe (94389) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679890)

This is probably politically motivated. Getting away from American-based Microsoft.

Next to come: using Linux will be considered anti-American.

Re:Politically motivated. (1)

Voulnet (1630793) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679910)

I honestly expect something of the sort in some stupid US media.

Re:Politically motivated. (0, Troll)

rudy_wayne (414635) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679948)

This is probably politically motivated. Getting away from American-based Microsoft.

Governments around the world adopting Linux only care about 2 things:

(a) price - it's cheaper than Windows
(b) it's not from an American company.

Re:Politically motivated. (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679956)

Amazing... they see they are pumping huge amounts of money into America, so they take steps to curtail that.

Now... about that america oil usage... if only we would take steps to stop our dependency on foreign oil... at a minimum, we've spent about three trillion dollars that we spent on the military could have gone into solar plants, superconducting wiring, and investments into low energy technologies, hell even insulation for federal buildings.

I expect with this move that gnu/linux will gain more credibility in the russian territories and so we'll see more contributions by russian programmers to open source projects in a few years (not government programmers- but general populace).

Re:Politically motivated. (1)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680162)

Errr...try comparing Russian oil exports to the U.S. against the imports of software. There's no comparison, the U.S. is pumping way more money into Russia in that comparison, not sure about the rest of trade.

Re:Politically motivated. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680268)

Sweet! You will finally need to have antivirus on Linux after those Russian programmers start working with it.

Re:Politically motivated. (2)

ACS Solver (1068112) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680186)

Quick note: it's free software, not necessarily Linux. The actual 18-page document which constitutes Putin's order doesn't mention GNU, Linux or any specific piece of software. According to the plan, in 2011 they'll form a "package" of free software that they need and in 2012 the government will be running a repository with it, so presumably it's next year for decisions on which software specifically it's going to be. Of course, Linux is very likely.

As for motivation, one of the big things in Russia now is the idea of getting their own Silicon Valley (Skolkovo) up and running. They want their own stuff. And the document includes mention of looking into possibilities of how to support homegrown Russian software developers. While I'm sure they're happy to get away from an American company, this is also beneficial for Russia if it indeed wants to make its own stuff. There's obviously no commercial Russian OS that could be used as a basis for, well, anything, but building a successful Linux distro with state backing would be quite possible for them in the long-term.

Oh Please! (1)

scharkalvin (72228) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679908)

Forget the commie jokes here, it no longer applies. Russia is now a republic with real elections (usually more than one person on the ballot). While their government may be as corrupt as any is South America, the country is no longer a Marxist dictatorship.

Anyway, who would have thunk that the Linux world domination would start in the land of the Czars?

Re:Oh Please! (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680066)

" While their government may be as corrupt as any in South America, the country is no longer a Marxist dictatorship."
Why do I find so little comfort in that statement?

Re:Oh Please! (2)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680190)

Care to lay odds on Putin losing an election, ever?

Modern Russia is not so much post-Soviet as pre-Soviet; it's always been an autocracy and probably always will be. Or rather, it's long periods of autocracy punctuated by moments of sheer chaos. At least they've got a pretty good autocrat these days.

Re:Oh Please! (2)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680196)

It never was a Marxist dictatorship. It was always a government kleptocracy. Now it is less so, but Putin is moving them back to the level of government kleptocracy he's comfortable with. You can take the man out of the KGB, you cannot take the KGB out of the man.

Re:Oh Please! (1)

ravenspear (756059) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680226)

When the president finishes his 8 years in office and gets to hand pick a successor that amends the Russian constitution to give the aforementioned president 12 more years in office, it's not that far off.

Re:Oh Please! (1)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680242)

Forget the commie jokes here, it no longer applies.

For those who rely on facts, you'd be correct. For the average resident of Glennbeckistan though, it's still a Commie morass.

American (2)

Sanat (702) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679924)

I am a true blue American and served my country during war time and ... yet... I find myself aligned more with Putin and his actions than with ANY political leader presently serving here in the USA. Perhaps, it is all publicity carefully crafted to make Putin look like something he is not, yet he seems to make so many choices that would parallel choices I would make if I were to be in his place.

What do other see that perhaps I am missing?

Re:American (4, Informative)

Cidolfas (1358603) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680024)

The murder/arrest/expulsion of journalists and news sources who disagree with you? That's a big one for me.

Re:American (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680120)

I would recommend either reading up on Putin's quietly enthusiastic suppression of opposition, close ties with a circle of crony-capitalist plutocrats who did very well in the post-soviet privatization, and vaguely sinister cult of personality.

If you have already done that and still like him; I urgently suggest checking yourself for signs of closet authoritarian nationalism...

Re:American (3, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680130)

Like you, I'm an American vet, and what we fought for is still worth preserving, however tattered it may be.

Look, Putin is a very, very smart guy, and he's made a lot of decisions that have been good for Russia. But the problem is that the system under which he makes those decisions -- Tsarism in all but name -- depends on having the decisions made by someone smart who has his country's best interests in mind. Putin's not immortal, and if he's followed by someone with similarly autocratic powers, there's no way to know what he'll be like. All it takes is one bad absolute ruler to wreck any amount of progress made.

In the US, we can in fact limit the power of our leaders -- of course it doesn't work perfectly, and the current corporatocracy it seems like our "choices" at the ballot box don't matter a hell of a lot, but we do have a legal and non-violent mechanism by which we can replace our entire government in a period of no more than six years. Russia doesn't, not really; its electoral system is as firmly under government control as it ever was in the Soviet days. Which, as a lot of my older relatives can tell you, is pretty much the way things have always been in Russia, no matter the title of the guy in charge. Tsar, General Secretary, President, Prime Minister ... nothing really changes.

Corruption, gridlock, and general incompetence may be the practical result of our system most of the time, but historically, autocracy is a hell of a lot worse.

Useful idiot defined (1)

amightywind (691887) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680180)

Were you brain damaged on the battlefield perhaps? Putin's assassinates journalists, jails political prisoners (Khordokhovski among others), blackmails his neighbors with gas exports (Ukraine, Latvia, Poland, Georgia), occupies Georgia, and enables Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea's nuclear programs. His propagandists make him look like an action hero, or one of the Village People. You, sir, are the definition of 'useful idiot'.

Stuxnet aftermath? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34679928)

Hmm... it must have something to do with the Stuxnet thing...

obligatory.. (0)

somepunk (720296) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679952)

In Soviet Russia, the gov't wants YOU to use free/libre software!

GNU? (5, Funny)

slapout (93640) | more than 3 years ago | (#34679960)

Did Putin really say "GNU/Linux" or just Linux?

Re:GNU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680096)

hah, that was the exact first thought that popped into my head on reading the headline!

Putin ordered neither GNU/Linux nor Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680154)

Just searched through the official documents (including those linked by the Russian news site). Not one document mentions "Linux" by name, but "free software" is apparently mentioned throughout. The Russian news article is the one that adds "Linux" to the mix.

It would be nice if "free software" translates into "Linux," but I see no document mandating its use - only personal commentary by a Russian news reporter.

Re:GNU? (5, Informative)

ralphdaugherty (225648) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680194)

Did Putin really say "GNU/Linux" or just Linux?

Putin's order didn't even say Linux. Says free software. Free as in speech. They already use free as in beer.

Re:GNU? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680206)

The referenced link points to Russian text that doesn't have "GNU" in it - just "Linux". The SlashDot article title is (*gasp*) misleading.

Re:GNU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680252)

Dunno, was there are a hairy guy behind Putin holding a gnu to his back ?

Maybe ... (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680010)

With the backing of Putin, could this be the breakthrough free software has been waiting for?

If its not, someone will be going to the salt mines!

In other news... (2)

Krackbaby (123197) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680016)

And in other news, hundreds of top programmers in Russia have been summarily convicted of tax evasion and embezzlement, and have been sentenced to 20 years hard labor in the Siberian software mines.

Re:In other news... (1)

k6mfw (1182893) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680254)

If this were true, maybe it's because they didn't pay local police a share of the money they took from hacking and setting up phony retail sites. I was talking with someone that does computer security (I learned from him one of the countries of post USSR is called "Hackensten"), when they find actual address of scammers in some town in Russia, they contact the police to have them go in and arrest/shutdown their operation. But local police don't do much but demand they get some of the loot.

Good grief (1)

amightywind (691887) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680094)

What irony.

He's just trolling for more M$ (1)

almondjoy (162478) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680114)

I bet this is just political posturing so that MS will cough up more free SW and influence $$$ for their Bureau of State Software (BS SW for short...)

wait for the other shoe to drop... (1)

bobl (35751) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680128)

If history is any guide, the next move will be for Microsoft to offer an attractive discount.

Makes sense (1)

frankmu (68782) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680138)

In light of the Stuxnet virus and Iranian centrifuge sabotage , I'm surprised that the Russians didn't drop Microsoft sooner.

And what he personally uses? (1)

camcorder (759720) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680146)

I wonder which distro he uses personally? Or what Medvenev uses, since he's more geeky than Putin. Maybe Medvenev has already changed his iPhone 4G gifted by Steve Jobs with an Android based phone.

Diden't MS sue even have people go to jail for use (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680212)

Diden't MS sue even have people go to jail for useing linux and not paying for windows in Russia?

Maybe Ulterior motives? (1)

DadLeopard (1290796) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680216)

Could this be preparation for a Future Cyberwar? Makes sense that if you are going to release really virulent Viruses, Trojans, Spyware and other Malware into the wild, then you might want to be using a different Operating System than the one you are targeting! Even if you are just going to go the Stuxnet route, you would still want to be sure that your electric grid didn't get destroyed along with your opponents!

"could this be the breakthrough... (4, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#34680244)

...free software has been waiting for?"

No. Free Software has not been waiting for anything.

in soviet russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34680256)

in soviet russia, linux uses YOU!

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