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Ubuntu Powered Tablet Spotted!

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the yes-have-some dept.

Ubuntu 169

dkd903 writes "The year 2010 had been all buzz with tablets and a similar trend is expected during the year 2011 too. We have already seen a lot of Android powered tablets. But how does a tablet powered by Ubuntu sound? A Chinese manufacturer TENQ has launched a tablet called P07. The device is said to be running Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Edition and the boot time reported to be almost instant."

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169 comments

PAUL HOGAN DEAD !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34687866)

Say it ain't so, Yoggie !!

Re:PAUL HOGAN DEAD !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34688256)

It is so, uh, Boo-Bo?

Year of the Linux Tablet (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34687872)

Surely 2011 will be the Year of the Linux Tablet now?

Re:Year of the Linux Tablet (0)

zerorez02301 (1653405) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688394)

I don't want any flavor of tablet, I wish people would stop trying to sell me one.

Re:Year of the Linux Tablet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34688636)

You don't have to buy one do you?
Like you don't have to buy pretty well any bit of IT kit you don't want to.
Not everyong wants a gaming rig or a netbook or an ebook reader.

So what is your problem then? If it ain't for you then it ain't for you.

Re:Year of the Linux Tablet (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689516)

I don't want any flavor of tablet, I wish people would stop trying to sell me one.

I don't want Breck shampoo. I wish people would stop trying to sell me some.

See how stupid it sounds?

Obligatory snooty reply (0)

mark72005 (1233572) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688398)

It's been on MY tablet since 199x!

Re:Obligatory snooty reply (3, Interesting)

navyjeff (900138) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688988)

I've got Ubuntu 10.10 on my Thinkpad X200 Tablet. It works pretty well, but not everything works perfectly. I've had every version of Ubuntu on it since 9.04, and some of the earlier ones actually seemed to work a little better. There are still a few kinks, though. Thankfully, sites like ThinkWiki [thinkwiki.org] exist to help with some of the problems.

I'm still having a few issues, though, such as the fingerprint scanner not working or when rotating the screen, the touch sensor doesn't translate its coordinates properly (so left-right becomes up-down when the screen is rotated 90 degrees). The mute button doesn't work properly either, but other than that it runs pretty well.

Sigh (1)

atari2600 (545988) | more than 3 years ago | (#34687928)

I guess the server's uptime is about the same as the tablet's boot-time once the /. crowd "spotted" the product.

Obligatory (-1, Redundant)

discord5 (798235) | more than 3 years ago | (#34687956)

2011: Year of the Linux Tablet

Analogous to "Year of the linux desktop every year, next year!"

Sorry, it had to be done.

Re:Obligatory (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688056)

Yeah, I guess it's natural for the tablet to come after the phone. Perhaps 2012 will be the year of the Linux 3d holographic projection augmented reality mobile device.

Re:Obligatory (1)

SirDrinksAlot (226001) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688128)

Perhaps Linux will be ready for the desktop when we have flying cars?

I was promised flying cars by the year 2000. We have received no flying cars and I don't believe we're any closer to them as we were when they were originally imagined. The same promise is made of Linux every year I'm sure it's in the same boat(car).

Re:Obligatory (1)

initdeep (1073290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688572)

Were you promised flying cars last year?
Or were you promised them 50-60 years ago?

I'm pretty sure your analogy sucks.

Re:Obligatory (1, Funny)

SirDrinksAlot (226001) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689062)

I'm pretty sure your reading comprehension and math sucks, not so much with my statement.

"by the year 2000" would be less than 2000 so yes it could be 1999 or 1940, and since I at no point said 2009 or 2010 then I'm entirely lost where you got "last year" from.

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34689918)

Really? You complain about his reading comprehension when you completely failed at comprehending his post?

Re:Obligatory (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688612)

It will be the year of the Linux desktop when Duke Nukem Forever comes out. On Linux. With a chance to win a flying car for every copy you buy.

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34689706)

I was promised flying cars by the year 2000.

Yeah, well, you got the PT Cruiser so stop yer bitchin'!

Re:Obligatory (5, Funny)

selven (1556643) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688240)

1995: Year of the Linux server has arrived!
Linux people: Come on, year of the Linux desktop any time now!
2000: Year of the Linux wireless router has arrived!
Linux people: Come on, year of the Linux desktop any time now!
2008: Year of the open-source browser has arrived!
Linux people: Come on, year of the Linux desktop any time now!
2009: Year of the Linux smartphone has arrived!
Linux people: Come on, year of the Linux desktop any time now!
2011: Year of the Linux tablet and cloud desktop has arrived!
Linux people: Come on, year of the Linux desktop any time now!
2043: Year of the Linux mind-machine interface, interplanetary spaceship and household robot. The Windows source code has been wikileaked six times, and it is statistically impossible for Microsoft suing someone giving away their own fork of Windows to get a jury of people all 12 of which are willing to enforce copyright law, so Windows is de facto open source.
Linux people: No, all that is insignificant! Windows is still winning on the desktop! Come on, year of the Linux desktop already!

Re:Obligatory (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34688402)

I lol'd. No points to give, but have a sincere compliment on this amusing post.

Re:Obligatory (3, Insightful)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688528)

There will never be a "year of linux desktop" same as how there was never a "year of firefox web browser". You'll know it has happened when everyone has it.

Re:Obligatory (3, Interesting)

Mr_Silver (213637) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689466)

There will never be a "year of linux desktop" same as how there was never a "year of firefox web browser". You'll know it has happened when everyone has it.

The year of the Linux desktop could have been 2009 around the time of netbooks. However OEM's mucked it up by picking less than stellar variants of Linux and customers appeared only too happy to desert when Microsoft finally got their act together.

As a result, Linux netbook sales tanked and it's almost impossible to buy one in a major retail outlet these days as customers aren't interested.

I don't believe Linux will ever have such a good chance again and, personally, I blame this on the OEM's who could have escaped the grasp of Microsoft but, in their haste, failed to ensure that the customer experience was a good one.

Re:Obligatory (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689984)

I would say there was a "Year of Firefox web browser" and it was 2005. From NetApplication's quarterly numbers [wikipedia.org] it went from 3.66% in 2004 Q4 to 9.00% in 2005 Q4. Of course it did hit 1.0 in november 2004 so it's not surprising it jumped, but really they did manage to make the 1.0 push matter.

Linux has never had a year with 150% growth or even anything close to it. At least on the web browsing desktop it's been very stable at around 1% for years now, some data even suggests it's regressing a bit after the netbook wave that Microsoft quite effectively killed and even that only got the numbers up to 1.1-1.2%. Of course you shouldn't expect people to switch OS as easily as they'd install an alternate browser, but at this rate it's never happening.

Firefox has barely been keeping its market share this year with Chrome taking all the growth, even though Chromium is open source Chrome isn't. It's highly questionable how much Oracle will continue to push and support the OSS solutions they took over from Sun. I'm sure Linux and OSS will continue its success on servers, cell phones and supercomputers but on the desktop I'd say it's highly on the defensive, not the offensive at the moment.

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34688888)

You forgot at least:
- Year of the Linux supercomputer
- Year of the Linux render farm

Re:Obligatory (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689376)

So when you used both the phrases 'obligatory' and 'sorry, it had to be done', you chose to ignore two big clues that it wasn't going to be funny?

Re:Obligatory (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689566)

2011: Year of the Linux Tablet

Analogous to "Year of the linux desktop every year, next year!"

Sorry, it had to be done.

Two words Galaxy Tab 2010 was the year of the Linux Tablet!?

I think you meant was "Year of the Windows Tablet"

Sorry had to tell the truth

Here's the text and Google Cache version (5, Informative)

garcia (6573) | more than 3 years ago | (#34687976)

Google has a cached version: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:h8oRGG22slsJ:gadgetizor.com/the-tablet-season-brings-a-new-ubuntu-powered-tablet/6304/+http://gadgetizor.com/the-tablet-season-brings-a-new-ubuntu-powered-tablet/6304/&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a [googleusercontent.com]

2010 has been all about tablets - there is the iPad and a plethora of Android tablets - and it seems like it is going to continue to 2011.

Now it seems we have a different contender. A few days back, some pictures of an unnamed tablet running Ubuntu has cropped up. The device is said to be running Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Edition and the boot time reported to be almost instant.

The specifications of the device are said to be as below:

        * Intel Atom 1.6 GHz
        * 2 GB RAM
        * 32 GB SSD Hard Drive
        * Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 "Maverick Meerkat"

UNE 10.10 supports multi-touch but there has been a dearth of devices which uses its multi-touch features. While I am very excited to see a tablet running Ubuntu, I do not think Ubuntu is ready for tablets yet. For now Honeycomb seems like the OS for tablets.

And another thing, in the images the button has the Windows logo. Puzzling!!

Source: http://www.gizchina.com/2010/12/23/exclusive-leaked-images-reveal-ubuntu-powered-tablet/ [gizchina.com]
Via: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2010/12/leaked-images-of-mysterious-ubuntu-powered-tablet/ [omgubuntu.co.uk]

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (2, Funny)

Oriumpor (446718) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688152)

ROFLMDAO the image is the epitome of the Ubuntu install. Get it loaded up, try to play your music off your mp3 player while finishing it up and you get the damn codec error.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

kwerle (39371) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688184)

Exactly what I was thinking. It may be a few more miles before this is an iPad killer.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688390)

Yeah, I saw the pic and thought, "Of all the damn screenshots in all the world, why did they leak that one?"

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

kwerle (39371) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688590)

Yeah, I saw the pic and thought, "Of all the damn screenshots in all the world, why did they leak that one?"

It was the first one that didn't have a crash backtrace?
>:-)

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688672)

Yeah, when you install it yourself you get the option to install the codecs and flash etc with the OS installation, but on pre-installs you do not have that option.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688796)

Leave it to OEMs to manage to create a lesser experience than you can get by just downloading the relevant Linux distribution yourself.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689882)

I don't think that's true. They don't preinstall it, but it's relatively trivial to add another repository and install them yourself. Anybody that's not capable of that with a bit of googling is probably not going to be happy with a Linux anything.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689992)

You don't need to add another repository.

The first time you want to play an MP3 or view flash in your browser you are asked if you would want to install the relevant software.

It is really very simple.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688772)

Your FUD is a couple of years out of date.

This problem actually applies much more to Apple products.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34689300)

would you care to elucidate your point?

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (3, Insightful)

devent (1627873) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689346)

That is the epitome of the USA "IP" laws. Because cooperation have lobbed your government so much that an idea (or an algorithm) can be patented you can't just take a free copy of Ubuntu and play your mp3 files on it. On the other hand you outsource your jobs and your production so fast to China and India that in a few years the "IP" is the only thing of value your country would have left. You government knows that, that's why there is so big push towards forcing all other countries adopt your idea of "IP" as well.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

horza (87255) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688974)

Flaws for me:
* no ARM processor
* fairly bulky looking frame around the device
* looks like standard LCD, bit of glare, not as good as Samsung AMOLED

Every Ubuntu user probably bought a Microsoft Windows PC and reformatted it, probably do the same with an Android tablet.

Phillip.

Re:Here's the text and Google Cache version (1)

jnaujok (804613) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689978)

I pulled the image and inverted the colors. It looks sort of like the windows logo, but it's missing the trailing dots. It may just be a four-diamond type logo, not a windows logo. Hard to say with how hard it is to see though.

Somewhat pointless, without a tablet UI (0)

pedantic bore (740196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34687996)

The Ubuntu UI is very nice, but it's designed around the assumption of a big screen and a precise pointing device. The icons are too small, and the menus too long and deep to be navigated in a small screen with a touchscreen, from what I can guess.

Re:Somewhat pointless, without a tablet UI (3, Informative)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688172)

Uh, what? This is based in Ubuntu Netbook Remix, with big buttons and multi-touch support. This is not the desktop edition.

Re:Somewhat pointless, without a tablet UI (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688176)

Netbook edition wasn't designed for a big screen... it was designed for Netbooks.

I dunno, when I saw it originally I thought they designed it specifically for touchscreens - http://www.ubuntugeek.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/ubuntu_netbook_remix_beta.jpg [ubuntugeek.com]

Looks to be allright for a tablet.

Re:Somewhat pointless, without a tablet UI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34688556)

And here some up to date screenshots [google.com]

Re:Somewhat pointless, without a tablet UI (1)

pedantic bore (740196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689940)

And here some up to date screenshots [google.com]

This is a good example, I guess, of how two people can look at the same thing and see two different things.

Consider this screen from that page: http://s0n1c2122.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/ubuntu_netbook_10-10.png [wordpress.com]

I can hardly read the icon text on my full-sized notebook at full resolution; the default font is unusable, and the white-on-beige color scheme just makes it worse. The toolbar icons are too small for me to reliably press just one, and my fingers, although pudgy, are not unusually so.

Re:Somewhat pointless, without a tablet UI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34689184)

Ubuntu is also more than just the desktop (gnome-panel, gnome-shell, Unity, wtfever). All the apps are designed around a mouse/windowing paradigm. If you put Ubuntu on a tablet that's all touch-based, it's going to suck until applications are rewritten.

There are people at Canonical working on multitouch stuff, and that's awesome, but even when they're done with all the infrastructure work it's going to be YEARS before the desktop and applications catch up with that work. If it ever does. Linux desktop development seems to have slowed down in recent years. Maybe because it's more fun to hack on web/Android/iPhone stuff, and there's more money in it.

Anyone can have a Ubuntu tablet right now. (3, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688232)

GO to ebay, search Tablet PC. Pick one.
Download Ubuntu 10.10
Install Ubuntu 10.10 on the tablet.

Magical poof happens with a bright brown genie appearing and angels singing.... you have a ubuntu tablet! Something that nobody ever though of....

Granted, Tablet PC's have been around for decades, and running Linux on them has been happening for decades.... Ignore that.

Fujitsu stylistic works great, plus I can use a stylus so I can use it as a writing tablet. Too bad there is not a OS replacement for MSFT One Note.

MOD PARENT UP (1)

Yuioup (452151) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689396)

Yup. I was thinking the same thing, but I'm out of mod points. I wanted to grab a tablet PC, put a desktop or screensaver with a single image from Ubuntu, and take a picture of it. That'll learn everybody.

Re:Anyone can have a Ubuntu tablet right now. (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689498)

GO to ebay, search Tablet PC. Pick one.
Download Ubuntu 10.10
Install Ubuntu 10.10 on the tablet.

Magical poof happens with a bright brown genie appearing and angels singing.... you have a ubuntu tablet! Something that nobody ever though of....

Granted, Tablet PC's have been around for decades, and running Linux on them has been happening for decades.... Ignore that.

Fujitsu stylistic works great, plus I can use a stylus so I can use it as a writing tablet. Too bad there is not a OS replacement for MSFT One Note.

The 'tablet' you describe is a notebook with a wacom tablet built in. It's not a tablet in the iPad sense.

I realize that sounds like typical Slashdot pedantry , but the points about 'not having to wait for it to boot' and the 'apps are actually designed to use it' are critical to making a 'tablet PC' take off. Microsoft missed the mark. I used to have a Tablet PC. The fact that it had XP's less-than-spectacular suspend mode is what kept it from being little more than a laptop to me.

Article slashdotted but... (1)

coolmadsi (823103) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688262)

The index page [gadgetizor.com] of the website seems to be working fine, its just the articles that are down. This means that while you won't be able to read all of TFA, you can read three sentences and see a photo.

Tablets Suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34688380)

Ah, the form factor which combines all the problems of "too big" and "too small."

It's nice to see Ubuntu on there, but you've still got the "Where the fuck is the keyboard" problem and the "the screen is too small" problem and the "it doesn't fit in my pocket" problem. Some of these are problems I can live with; tradeoffs are a good thing and a sacrifice in one place can pay for itself in another. But all of the problems at once, without any advantage to balance it all out? No thanks.

Tablets: a solution which creates problems without solving any.

Get it down to where it will fit in a pocket, and I'll find a way to use it, in situations where anything bigger is too big.

Put a keyboard on it, and I can use it to get things done, whether it fits in a pocket or not.

Give it a 50" screen and I'll use it in the living room.

As is, this thing or an iPad or others like it: No place to take it to. No time when it's the right tool for the job. No point where it's useful. Lame.

Re:Tablets Suck (1)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688448)

the form factor is the cool part. you can buy board game apps so your house is not a mess and you can take your games everywhere you go. you can lay an ipad flat on a table and play monopoly like with the board game version.

any product that just tries to be a lite version of a netbook will fail

Re:Tablets Suck (1)

initdeep (1073290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688676)

not too mention they are actually decent travel visual media consumption devices.
I don't currently own an iPad or similar, but i did get a chance to play around with one over the holidays, and it was actually nice for sitting in the "back of the bus" and watching a movie with headphones.
nicer screen than most built in vehicle dvd systems, bigger than using my cellphone.

and my kid thought it was nice to play simple little games on when he was bored.

Re:Tablets Suck (1)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689108)

Well watching a video while traveling is nice, but how do you handle that - do you hold the iPad in your hands for the duration of the whole movie? That's the sort of application where I can't imagine giving up my netbook - even balancing this on my knees (if there is no fold-out table) seems more comfortable than that.

Re:Tablets Suck (4, Insightful)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689670)

I disagree on a couple of points. Please bear with me while I set this up.

I carry a Droid X, and use Logmein Ignition to log into my main workstation to do the few operations I can't yet do on the phone itself. The only thing I really need is a slightly bigger screen. So yeah, the screen is too small.

My company issues ipads, and I find them very stable and usable. I've *never* thought "damn I need a keyboard for this" because the onscreen keyboard does what I need it to do. (And I'm a fast typist.) I've also never thought "damn, I need a bigger screen" because the screen is big enough and the GUI is designed so that things pop up when you need them and go away when you don't need them anymore.

The Samsung galaxy tablet has at least as good (in my opinion better) interface as the ipad, and it *will* fit in your pocket. It has significantly more screen real-estate than my Droid X but is almost as portable. Similar to the ipad, the virtual keyboard is good enough that I've not seriously considered getting an external keyboard for it.

So on issue 1, "it's too big or too small", it depends partly on what you're trying to do, but in general the best computer is the one you have with you, and I'm more likely to be carrying a 7 inch Android tablet than I will be lugging an ipad. And if I really needed the real estate of the ipad, I'd be tempted to lug a netbook instead, and have things like USB, external video, SDRAM slots, flash support, etc etc.

I think you see where this is going. Both iOS and Android have good enough virtual keyboard support (not just the keyboard itself, but positioning, operation, how it's called up and dismissed and stuff like that) that "where the heck is the keyboard" is pretty much a non-issue.

Now what of Ubuntu?

If Ubuntu is implemented on tablets of the size, weight, complexity and cost of laptop computers, with half-assed touch support that wasn't properly thought through, you *will* be in a position saying "this is too big for this job, too small for that one, too heavy to carry around in one hand, and where the heck is the keyboard??" To which I'd add the possibility that "Right click on this thing is a right pain in the ass". ...and the product will be a failure.

Want to see how to do it wrong? Look at current Windows 7 tablet support. Instead of coming up with a touch paradigm that works well, Microsoft has chosen to fake it by leveraging their existing Accessibility tools. It's a total fail -- clunky and annoying to use, with a half-assed keyboard and kludgy mouse gestures that make you wish you had a real keyboard and mouse, too big (to make room for the task bar, tray, start button, walking menus, lack of virtual desktop) to have any kind of portability advantage, too small to be a serious PC. Windows 7 tablet support is everything you were complaining about.

To be a serious contender, Ubuntu needs to be a *lot* better than that. But Apple and Google have demonstrated that it can be done.

I can tell you from experience that I can do probably 70% of the work I need to do on the iPad, and with Ignition I can get to my real PC and do the rest.

Hell, I can do about 50% of my work from my Droid X, and (with some difficulty) still log into my PC from the phone to do the stuff I can't do locally. If either the iPad or the Droid had USB support, I could leave my laptop at home on business trips.

Having used both, I estimate that I can do any part of my workflow on the 7" Galaxy tablet that I could do on the 9.7" iPad screen, and I'm more likely to have the smaller form factor on me.

And so, an Ubuntu tablet with USB host support, SD card reader, and a decent, usable GUI in a 7" form factor would be a godsend. It should also have an HDMI out like the Droid X so I can do presentations without having to lug a laptop.

In summary, the whole point of this exercise is to be able to do most of your work without having to lug around a backpack. Current high-end smartphones and tablets come pretty darned close.

Now, mind you, there will always be fanbois who buy the devices just to fondle them, but I'm here to tell you, they really do useful work.

Your mileage, as always, may vary. If your work requires a keyboard and mouse, stick with laptops. They're not going away.

it's the software, stupid (2)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688424)

the iPad is cool not because it can read email but the app store. all kinds of apps that do things that were unimagined a few years ago.

i'm looking at an ipad next year because there are apps for kids that even out the cost between buying crap like leapfrog. there are apps to get kids to learn to read

Re:it's the software, stupid (1)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688586)

Yeah, or you could just use a book and help your kid read instead of letting a computer do your job as a parent...

Re:it's the software, stupid (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689518)

Yeah, or you could just use a book and help your kid read instead of letting a computer do your job as a parent...

Or you could do both and give your kid practical experience in the modern age of technology.

Re:it's the software, stupid (1)

lmcgeoch (1298209) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688640)

Um...Linux has great educational software. (Better than leapfrog)

I would think Tuxpaint (one of my kids all time favorite games) would be amazing on a tablet.

Re:it's the software, stupid (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688704)

Ubuntu has had free software repositories built in for basically forever. Apple borrowed the idea of an "app-store" from linux.

Re:it's the software, stupid (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688724)

Ubuntu has an app store as well. There are educational games and educational stuff.

There's a 'flavour' of Ubuntu called "Edubuntu" which is designed for classrooms.

Re:it's the software, stupid (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688862)

I can personally attest to Edubuntu's usefulness. I used it to help teach a few dozen rural African kids letter recognition. Not quite reading, but an important step nonetheless.

Re:it's the software, stupid (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688824)

Yes: "all sorts of stuff from the app store" that no one ever seems to mention when droning on how good the app store is.

Boot time? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688450)

boot time reported to be almost instant.

"Boot time"? On a tablet? Is this thing following the failed Windows Tablet paradigm rather than the iOS/Android model?

Re:Boot time? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688878)

My android phone takes many seconds to boot. What are you on about?

Re:Boot time? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689290)

My android phone takes many seconds to boot. What are you on about?

While the network connections can take time for a phone, the OS should be ready to go instantly. My iPod Touch is ready as soon as I hit the home button - I don't have to turn it off and then boot it in between uses. The only time it has to boot is when there's been a problem - and those are months apart. Boot time is basically irrelevant.

Isn't Android the same?

Re:Boot time? (1)

mdm-adph (1030332) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689560)

Yes, Android is the same. However, comparing your iPod Touch to an Android phone isn't exactly accurate -- it would be more accurate to compare it to an iPhone, which has restarts that happen far more often than "months apart." It also takes a similiar amount of time to start up.

Re:Boot time? (1)

nxtw (866177) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689768)

it would be more accurate to compare it to an iPhone, which has restarts that happen far more often than "months apart." It also takes a similiar amount of time to start up.

I haven't restarted my iPhone since applying the last software update, over a month ago.

Re:Boot time? (1)

kenshin33 (1694322) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689654)

in layman terms that's called taking a nap. it is not booting.
and the iphone (or any phone, except may be dumbphones) takes forever to boot if you shut it down.

Re:Boot time? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689898)

in layman terms that's called taking a nap. it is not booting.

and the iphone (or any phone, except may be dumbphones) takes forever to boot if you shut it down.

You're missing the point. If you just about never have to shut it down, the time it takes to start it back up is irrelevant.

Instantly ... well (1)

foobsr (693224) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688546)

TFS: The device is said to be running Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Edition and the boot time reported to be almost instant.

The question is whether it will crash instantly after a kernel update (due to a GRUB issue). This will instantly please all users.

CC.

due to a GRUB issue (1)

Ismellpoop (1949100) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688964)

Grub2 that ubuntu/mint use works very well I usually keep my kernels latest release and have never had problems with Grub2. I've had lots of problems however with Alsa/PulseAudio doing kernel updates. I use Grub2 for booting 4/os and its awesome when I install a new distro don't install the new distro's Grub/Lilo. Boot to Mint go to terminal type "update grub2" works every time.
Also with a tablet I doubt you would even see the boot loader on the screen. How many people will install 2 os on a tablet? Why give people boot options when it is completely unnecessary.
Imagine starting up your new Mac/Win machine and it gives you an option to boot into OSX/Win7 respectively wouldn't you just be thinking WTF is wrong with the people that made this thing? It would actually look kind of amateurish if there was a visible Grub2 during boot.

Already others on the market (1)

Rozzin (9910) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688594)

Sharp introduced an Ubuntu tablet 6 months ago [armdevices.net], as part of their `Netwalker' line.

I think Always Innovating [alwaysinnovating.com] was supporting Ubuntu on their tablets before that.

Maybe there are others, also; still, each new one is nice to see.

Re:Already others on the market (1)

Randwulf (997659) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689126)

I have an Always Innovating Touch Book. It currently boots (a stripped down) Ubuntu Desktop 10.10, Android Froyo, and AIOS. It's expected to be able to run Chrome OS in the future, too. The software is still half-baked, however. Ubuntu wasn't actually running on it until a few months ago. I'm a little surprised they didn't use Ubuntu Netbook, but I suspect that may change in the future.

Re:Already others on the market (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34689134)

Uh huh. Go talk to a hundred random people. Mention the iPad. Their eyes will light up and they'll say they want one.

Then mention the "Netwalker". Mention the "always innovating". You'll get nothing but a blank look. Nobody has the first damned idea what those are. They're a non-factor.

That's why Apple succeeds: it makes the things people WANT, that work great for ordinary people, not just for the one in fifty thousand who are geeky enough to want to recompile their kernel. Linux people don't seem to understand this. They didn't understand why everyone chose Windows over Linux, and now they aren't seeing why people are choosing iOS over Linux. There are perfectly valid reasons, but they refuse to listen.

one in fifty thousand (1)

Ismellpoop (1949100) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689200)

Really that many people recompile their kernel amazing. I think your being optimistic about the number of geeky enough people.

Re:one in fifty thousand (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34689408)

Hmm, yeah, you're probably right.

It's gotta be more than one in a million though: that would make it only 300 people in the entire united states. Maybe it's on the order of one in some hundreds of thousands.

Anyway, point is, if your device can't do things common people want such as play Netflix streaming video, it's dead in the water to the Common Joe.

almost instant on SI chart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34688722)

"almost instant" is equivalent to three finger snaps

This is the biggestscientific breakthrough of all (1)

multipartmixed (163409) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688774)

No more pollution, no more hunger, and no more wars.

The Ubuntu-powered Tablet shows off the first real-world application of Ubuntu power, which is the world's first free-as-in-beer AND free-as-in-freedom power source. No longer will we rely on arcane power storage devices such as Lithium-Polymer batteries, or dangerous power generation methods like coal-fired generators.

I, for one, welcome our new Ubuntu Overlords!

Quite now other wise it could be (1)

future assassin (639396) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688858)

Forbidden by the powers that be...

You don't have permission to access /index.php on this server.

Additionally, a 403 Forbidden error was encountered while trying to use an ErrorDocument to handle the request.

How do I feel? (1, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34688918)

The article has apparently been slashdotted, so I can only guess how it's been implemented.

Please bear with me, I have to take a run-up to this.

I've used the Galaxy tablet, an iPad, and a tablet running Windows 7.

The iPad is very stable intuitive and usable. The Android tablet works much the same as the iPad with the additional features of a higher degree of customization, widgets, flash, and so forth.

The Windows 7 tablet sucks.

The main reason the Windows 7 tablet sucks is that the GUI doesn't seem to like living on a tablet. Too many operations assume keyboard and two button mouse, and tablet support consists of clumsy work-arounds to simulate a two button mouse on a tablet, when what is sorely needed is a new, mouseless paradigm, as the iPad and Android already have.

An additional problem I'm having with the Win7 tablet is that the virtual keyboard is not accurate enough to type in yer damned password. I have to resort to a physical keyboard to log into the damned thing. Part of the problem is probably hardware, but it does not help that the keys do not light up or do anything to indicate what key it thinks you've pressed, and you can't see what you're typing. If this really was designed to be a touch interface, instead of something cobbled together to have a presence in the tablet market, it'd work better than that.

Parenthetically, Microsoft already has a killer touch interface in Surface, so at least some people in Redmond know how a touch GUI is supposed to work. Given that, it totally baffles me that they'd try to push off this Windows 7 kludge as a serious contender in the tablet marketplace. I mean, what the hell?

Which brings us to Ubuntu. I've used past versions, and am very impressed. It's a tight little OS with a fast, well integrated, and at times amusing GUI. (I still get a kick out of shaking the rubber windows.) I think putting Ubuntu on a tablet is a very exciting idea.

But

Ubuntu out of the box is just as mousey as Winders. If all they're going to do is paste on work-around gestures to simulate a multi-button mouse and throw up a virtual keyboard, I'm not interested. I've already been down that road, and don't want to go through that frustration again. If that's what they're planning to offer, I'll stick with Android.

However, if Ubuntu produces a really truly designed-from-ground-up-to-be-mouseless interface, and it works well, then I'm all over that.

This is going to be interesting. Apple did the transition correctly to touch devices -- they came up with a brand new set of GUI rules instead of trying to reuse the paradigms in OSX. Android was designed from the start to be a touch interface. Winders has flubbed it so far, for their consumer devices at least. It'll be fascinating to see what Ubuntu does.

Re:How do I feel? (1)

Merk42 (1906718) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689414)

If you've used the default Ubuntu Desktop installation, then you've used GNOME (panels). Unity, the interface for this tablet (and default desktop interface in the version coming in April), is built with touch in mind.

Re:How do I feel? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689778)

Thanks. So I could get a run-up on how Ubuntu tablets will work by looking at Unity on my current Ubuntu box when Unity becomes available. Thanks, will look into that. This really is exciting, but I'm trying not to get too worked up. Windows 7 Pro on the tablet my daughter got for Christmas was a crushing disappointment. I hope Ubuntu is better.

Synergy! (1)

coldmist (154493) | more than 3 years ago | (#34689448)

Why don't tablet makers that want to use a full desktop OS think about using it with Synergy (on sourceforge)???

It's a perfect complement.

If the tablet is running Win7 or x86 Linux, then when it's docked next to my monitor, it fires up synergy and the mouse and keyboard control it just like an extra screen. When I pull it off the cradle, Synergy shuts down, and now it's a distinct computer. If running Ubuntu, it can still run Windows apps via Wine (critical for how I want to use a tablet).

I don't know why these companies don't see this option!!!

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