Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

iPhone Alarms Hit By New Year's Bug

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the wake-up-and-smell-t dept.

Bug 405

An anonymous reader writes "Non-recurring iPhone alarms stopped working on January 1 for devices running iOS 4.02, 4.1, and 4.2.1. Apparently, it will fix itself by January 3, and the current workaround is to set the alarm to repeat. My girlfriend wasn't impressed, sleeping in, and I wasn't either, having to race her to work!"

cancel ×

405 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Use a real alarm clock (0, Troll)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735524)

I don't understand why you use a phone as an alarm clock. For one it depends on a single power supply, or you have to charge it overnight next to your bed. Second, it uses software prone to bugs. I use a normal alarm clock on 220V, with a backup battery. It invariably goes of in time...

The only time I use my phone as an alarm clock is when I'm on vacation/business trip and even then, hotels have waking services

However, to be frank: These kind of bugs are unacceptable. If this were Microsoft, everyone would be laughing and scolding, but since it's Apple I'm sure we'll get excuses....

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735534)

What's to excuse? Bugs happen, they get fixed. This one becomes a non-issue in two more days.

-jcr

Re:Use a real alarm clock (2)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735550)

Date issues... These have been "known problems" for ages, there are libraries for this. Why aren't those being used?

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735640)

I remember learning the correct date formulas in the first semester. What's so hard about them?

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735748)

I remember learning the correct date formulas in the first semester. What's so hard about them?

They were different by second semester. The problem with rolling your own date/time functions is that people keep switching things, adding a second to a year due to a close earth asteroid or switching when DST is applied. The problem with using the common libraries is that you need to update the library regularly and trust that the library maintainer is doing the above.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (5, Insightful)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735786)

remember learning the correct date formulas in the first semester. What's so hard about them?

That's probably the sort of thinking that resulted in the bug in the first place. Dealing with time zones and daylight savings issues and the goofy calendar is a big pain in the ass. It's easy to get it subtly wrong. I doubt there's a programmer alive who hasn't made at least one mistake in dealing with time and dates.
I suggest we adopt a 12 month 30 day calendar, with a five day holiday at the end of the year (six days for leap year.) And no friggin' daylight savings.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (2)

bysin (173686) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735874)

I hope we've all made time and date mistakes before, that I'm not the only one. I wrote some accounting software that ran a script every hour that calculated a set of numbers for billing information. Each hour the script would run, then at midnight another script would run to calculate the average hourly total for the day. To calculate the average, I merely added each hour's numbers together then divided by 24. My fatal mistake was assuming each day contained 24 hours, which would normally be true, except for one day. This specific day, the script ran only 23 times instead of 24 due to daylight savings time skipping an hour. The mistake lead to an artificially deflated average and quite the yelling from my boss. You would think we programmers could assume something simple like there being 24 hours in a day, but apparently our time and date system wasn't invented by a programmer.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735686)

What other phones have this bug? I would say this is pretty major, considering it can affect things like your job, appointments or other engagements.

unreliable (2)

mschaffer (97223) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735730)

The point is that the iOS time routines are unreliable. You need a redundant clock/alarm that doesn't run on iOS.

Re:unreliable (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736070)

The point is that the iOS time routines are unreliable. You need a redundant clock/alarm that doesn't run on iOS.

I am sure you can give us an example where the iOS time routines don't work as advertised.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (2)

jaymz666 (34050) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735760)

these are simple errors that anyone who has written clock and alarm code should be aware of to begin with. It's not like date and time algorithms change very often or without a lot of fanfare.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (5, Insightful)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735958)

What's to excuse? Bugs happen, they get fixed.

Two points here.

First of all, it's not the first time [appleinsider.com] a stupid but major bug is found in iOS alarm app.

Second, it's a major issue. Alarm not going off at the right time is a bug that would be classified as "critical" under any sane categorization system - it's the most basic, fundamental function of the application not working properly. Even worse, alarm is by its nature a "mission critical" app - unlike most other stuff, which is annoying but mostly harmless when it fails, this one really trips you up. Consequently, it should be heavily tested.

And this leads us to another issue... these kinds of bugs, both this one and the one back in November, show that unit and functional testing coverage of the alarm app in iOS is really horrible. I mean, DST change and year change? It's some of the most obvious and basic corner cases that you write tests for, especially in an application that specifically deals with time! It's practically textbook stuff, or an interview question for QA position. And so it's extremely surprising when that kind of thing goes wrong in production.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736032)

What's to excuse? Bugs happen, they get fixed. This one becomes a non-issue in two more days.

-jcr

I have a Despair Inc. poster hanging in my office that was made just for people like you -

"Mediocrity: It takes a lot less time and most people won't notice the difference until it's too late."

1. There is nothing unexpected about a new year, guess what... there's going to be a new one in 364 days.
2. This isn't the first time this has happened.
3. This isn't even a hard problem to solve OR test.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735552)

Probably because it's convenient for most of us in almost all situations.
Just because you happen to be a retarded cunt doesn't mean we all need to be.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (0)

MikeDataLink (536925) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735588)

Mod parent up!

Re:Use a real alarm clock (4, Insightful)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735554)

They're probably (like me,) old nokia candy bar phone users. You could leave the battery dead for a week where the phone wouldn't even power on, but it would still wake up and tell you to go hop in the shower for work for another week or so. Phone clock (and more importantly, phone alarm clock) software has been stable and 100% trustworthy now for over a decade. I still have two extra (wall plug) alarm clocks for those occasions when you absolutely have to be there on time, but my phones have served me well as my primary alarm solution for the last 10 years, am i'm sure that's the case for most other people, as well.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (2)

fatalwall (873645) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735568)

well you could have an alarm clock like mine that randomly started passing time at a much faster pace so that at 1am your 8am alarm is blasting. That's when I started relying primary on my phone over a normal alarm clock.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (2)

wintersdark (1635191) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735584)

Errr, why NOT use a phone as an alarm clock? Virtually every smart phone typically needs to be charged daily. If it doesn't need to be, generally people do anyways. Plug it in, let it charge overnight while you're sleeping, alarm wakes you in the morning, ready to go and fully charged.

It's *better* than your average AC alarm clock, as a power failure throughout the night won't interfere with your alarm. The phone's battery keeps you covered. I've been using my cell phones as alarm clocks for, well, as long as cell phones have had alarm clocks. I've never once had a problem with it.

And I've certainly never once considered getting a 'traditional' alarm clock since having a phone that could do the job just fine and, thanks to the magic of custom alarm/ringtones, much less offensively.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735814)

It's *better* than your average AC alarm clock, as a power failure throughout the night won't interfere with your alarm.

There are several comments like this. What sort of alarm clocks are you guys using? My $20 alarm will work just fine with the electricity out. The only difference is that without power the time is not projected onto the ceiling. The alarm and the clock don't get affected at all.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

BagOBones (574735) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735848)

The last $20 alarm clock I used that had a battery backup would keep poor time, and run many minutes fast every time it when on battery.. even with the battery it would start blinking and want to be reset just to be sure..

Also those alarm clocks just take up space, travelling? Yet another thing to pack, you could figure out the hotel alarm clock or ask for a wakeup call but it is still convenient to have your own alarm. Many people have stopped wearing a watch because they have a phone with them everywhere.

I really can't believe this is a problem.. I figure someone at Apple is getting fired over this..

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735864)

Also those alarm clocks just take up space, travelling? Yet another thing to pack, you could figure out the hotel alarm clock or ask for a wakeup call but it is still convenient to have your own alarm.

I wasn't thinking about traveling. I sure don't pack a clock. And I don't trust those crazy "sleep system" alarms in hotels. I both set my phone alarm and ask for a wake up call.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735986)

Yeah, why the fuck would I want to use a feature on a device that I paid quite a lot of money for? In fact, why are we using our iPhones as anything other than a fucking phone?!

(Note: For the slow amongst you, this post is laden with sarcasm).

Re:Use a real alarm clock (0)

MichaelKristopeit333 (1966806) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735610)

who is "we"?

you are NOTHING.

cower behind your chosen pseudonym some more, feeb.

you're completely pathetic.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735644)

Suck cock. Fucking fag.

To Quote the Doctor! (-1, Troll)

kristopeit2000 (1950188) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735724)

Michael_All_Fucking_Stupid_500_Of_You_Kristopeit will you please go now!
The time has come.
The time has come.
The time is now.
Just go!.Go!. Go!!!
I don't care how.
You can go by foot.
You can go by cow.
Michael_All_Fucking_Stupid_500_Of_You_Kristopeit will you please go now!
You can go on skates.
You can go on skis.
You can go in a hat.
But... Please go...Please!
I don't care.
You can go By bike.
You can go On a Zike-Bike If you like.
If you like You can go In an old blue shoe.
Just go, go, GO!
Please do, do, do, DO!
Michael_All_Fucking_Stupid_500_Of_You_Kristopeit
I don't care how.
Michael_All_Fucking_Stupid_500_Of_You_Kristopeit
Will you please GO NOW!
You can go on stilts.
You can go by fish.
You can go in a Crunk-Car If you wish.
If you wish You may go By lion's tale.
Or stamp yourself And go by mail.
Michael_All_Fucking_Stupid_500_Of_You_Kristopeit
Don't you know The time has come To go, go, GO!
Get on your way!
Please KristopeitXXX!
You might like going in a Zumble-Zay.
You can go by balloon . . .
Or broomstick. Or...
You can go by camel
In a bureau drawer.
You can go by bumble-boat . . . or jet.
I don't care how you go. Just get!
Michael_All_Fucking_Stupid_500_Of_You_Kristopeit!
I don't care how.
Michael_All_Fucking_Stupid_500_Of_You_Kristopeit
Will you please GO NOW!
I said GO And GO I meant . . .
The time had come
So . . .
Mikey WENT.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

toriver (11308) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736014)

Trollbot is boring.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (4, Insightful)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735628)

Why shouldn't I use a phone as an alarm clock? I have been using my phone as my 'watch' and as my alarm clock since getting my first mobile back in 1999.
It has multiple advantages:
1) It allows me to set the required waking time during the day when I'm at work and find out what will be my schedule tomorrow, do I have a 8:00 meeting that I need a bit of preparation, etc.
2) Alarm clocks usually have a single alarm time and don't work well for multiple people - I want to keep napping if my wife's alarm rings first and vice versa;
3) The phone is always with me - it ensures that I can stay with my clock habits when on a hotel on business trip or when I'm staying over at a friends place - no need to bother with different options;
4) On decent mobiles, alarm clock function works even when the phone is turned off due to low battery - the screen and calls are off, but the alarm still ran;
5) It's more accurate than an alarm clock - since it must sync time with the operator anyway for proper functioning, it's always accurate, I never have to adjust it (as for a watch), and it handles daylight savings time automagically.

Frankly, the only issue is how deeply faulty your testing process has to be to ship with such bugs in core functions such as clock and making calls? It's not a frigging computer you're shipping, it's a consumer device for which these functions are not 'additionally included applets', but main features of the product...

Re:Use a real alarm clock (5, Informative)

Solandri (704621) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735650)

I use a normal alarm clock on 220V, with a backup battery. It invariably goes of in time...

I started using my phone as an alarm clock after discovering that although a backup battery will allow a regular alarm clock to keep the time through a power failure, the alarm will not ring if the power is out at the time of the alarm.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

egranlund (1827406) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735676)

Yeah, most won't do this.

I use one of those bose wave radio things as my alarm though, and that does ring the alarm if the clock is running off the backup battery.

Redundancy, redundancy, reduncancy ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735970)

Llike with building services do _not_ trust any single device not to fail.

Instead use any two different type wake-up devices whenever it's important to get up at certain time. If it isn't that important then any single device will do the job usually.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736052)

But a regular alarm clock that runs only on batteries will ring just fine in a power failure. They can take years to drain those batteries, too...

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

seebs (15766) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735704)

I use my phone for alarms because it's the thing all my other alarms and alerts are in. I have a lot fewer missed alarms using my phone than I did when I used physical alarm clocks, which are much more failure prone in my experience.

Heck, I don't think I even own a clock anymore. Why would I bother? I have many things which reliably know the time.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735732)

This bug is AMAZING. It will revolutionize the way you get fired.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735818)

It will revolutionize the way you get fired.

Did anybody ever get fired for buying an Iphone?

Re:Use a real alarm clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34736068)

Someone at my previous job almost did, he bought an iPhone, and stuck his corporate SIM in it, and started using the data without a data plan.... Managed to pull off a $5k+ bill in 1 month....

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735800)

I don't understand why you use a phone as an alarm clock.

Because I already have it, and don't want to go out and buy another alarm clock when I already have something that functions perfectly well.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

torsmo (1301691) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735808)

Why do you even need an alarm clock to wake up? Your body's own clock works pretty well. Whenever I have to get up at a predetermined time, I just repeat loudly " Wake up at $time", before going off to sleep, and I have consistently had positive results, waking up anywhere from 15 - 30 mins before the desired time.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735892)

You and GP seem to be playing a game of "trolling by pretending that whatever works for me obviously would work for everyone else." Seems fun, so I'll jump on:

Why would anyone need to "wake up?" I just contracted fatal familial insomnia and won't go to sleep for several months until I die.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

torsmo (1301691) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735974)

Why would anyone need to "wake up?" I just contracted fatal familial insomnia and won't go to sleep for several months until I die.

Did it help?

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

welshmnt (787086) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735966)

I actually do this, I swear! I haven`t had an alarm clock for years now. I MAY be ten to fifteen minutes late waking up once or twice a year - tops. This includes odd times for holidays and awaydays etc.

I can`t be the only one surely ("you are - and don`t call me Shirley").

Oh yeah. Happy new year, everybody.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735876)

I don't understand why you use a phone as an alarm clock. For one it depends on a single power supply, or you have to charge it overnight next to your bed. Second, it uses software prone to bugs. I use a normal alarm clock on 220V, with a backup battery. It invariably goes of in time...

Because it is there, is an alarm clock, and that is good enough for those of us who aren't alarm clock elitists.

Also what is this "single power supply" business? Most alarm clocks you plug into the wall don't have backup power or aren't actually using the backup power option (who actually puts backup batteries in?), phone alarm clocks do. Power goes out on my alarm clock that plugs in, it won't go off. My phone would though.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

sjwt (161428) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735884)

You are aware that the 9volt dosent run the alarm if the power is off, only keeps the clock on time and the alarm in memory, I lent the hard way on that.

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

Lincolnshire Poacher (1205798) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736020)

One of the first actions that I take when arriving in a hotel room is to disconnect the alarm clock, so that the room at night is not illuminated by its red LCD glow!

Re:Use a real alarm clock (1)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736042)

I don't understand why you use a phone as an alarm clock. For one it depends on a single power supply, or you have to charge it overnight next to your bed. Second, it uses software prone to bugs. I use a normal alarm clock on 220V, with a backup battery. It invariably goes of in time...

This is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. A normal alarm clock runs on 110V, everyone knows this.

Hmm (0)

IRoll11!s (1609859) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735526)

First poster's alarms must not be working.

Boom ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735530)

first post

Wow. Just wow. (0, Troll)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735532)

My girlfriend wasn't impressed, sleeping in, and I wasn't either, having to race her to work!

Shall I call you a waaaambulance?

Re:Wow. Just wow. (1)

siddesu (698447) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735556)

Why so much noise, won't ordering a wake-up call to that same phone work better?

Uh oh (1)

Tripp-phpBB (1912354) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735546)

Uh oh, I see Apple bashing coming. Defend yourselves

Thanks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735558)

Thank you for posting this very interesting story. I am utterly fascinated at this, at alarm clocks failing to work. I look forward to reading the commentary on this breaking news piece.

What's with apple and alarms in phones? (5, Insightful)

jaymz666 (34050) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735560)

Day light saving errors, new year errors, do they just have crappy coders at apple?

Re:What's with apple and alarms in phones? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735596)

yup, but they are all pretty

Re:What's with apple and alarms in phones? (1)

pmontra (738736) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735682)

Don't know about coders but it seems they do crappy testing.

Re:What's with apple and alarms in phones? (2)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735744)

Day light saving errors, new year errors, do they just have crappy coders at apple?

No, they've got crappy hardware designers as well!

Oups .. ;)

Re:What's with apple and alarms in phones? (1, Interesting)

drolli (522659) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735872)

My Girlfriend also has an iphone. I mean lets forget about fucked up blue tooth support, not being able to send vcards (as i have done from small device to small device since my first palm/mobile phone), and lets just accept that automatic configuration (which worked for me in all courntries i have been in recently) is a little bit complicated for a phone for approx. 500Euro). Lets also forget that video calls follow just apples standard.

But what really disappointed me in this incredibly immature device is that under certain conditions EDGE support from the mobile cell tower prevents making calls on the iphone (my nokia works fine at the same conditions). As long a a device call itself a phone thats an epic fail. (Oh yes, dear Steve, we tried to use an legally unlocked iphone with some provider who is not one of the customer-sucking premium provider you chose. We will ask you forgiveness when you present in the next keynote 'it took us a littl bit longer to get it right, but you you can place calls in all EDGE networks'.)

Re:What's with apple and alarms in phones? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34736018)

Day light saving errors, new year errors, do they just have crappy coders at apple?

They haven't apparently realized how much people put trust on these devices and unless they pick up now quickly they might find it hard way that losing the trust is easy but gaining it back once lost is damn much harder.

Shouldn't go bragging around, but I've wrestled with calendar, time and timezone algorithms quit a bit 15-20 years ago and they can be really tricky to get right. I don't recommend anyone any more try to reimplement those algorithms but instead use already implemented and tested public alogrithms and code. If you can't for some reason then you have to extensively test at least the full calendar period (28 yr) and the range you will ever expect the algorithms to cover. It's lot of thinking and pen & paper work too that is quite hard to fully automate.

Re:What's with apple and alarms in phones? (1)

Idbar (1034346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736040)

Dude, iTunes on Windows should had give you a clue!

Still? (3, Informative)

MayonakaHa (562348) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735566)

Apple can't quite seem to get that alarm working right. This isn't the first time [macworld.com] . My Android based phone hasn't had any issues with the alarm, but since I work from home it's not as much of an issue.

Re:Still? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735750)

But can you send texts to the correct person?

Re:Still? (1)

MayonakaHa (562348) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735880)

Hell I barely touch the text application. Between phone calls, email and Twitter DMs there's no reason I ever need to.

Morning sex (4, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735590)

See, this is why you need to convince your girlfriend to get into the habit of morning sex. There is no alarm clock more reliable than the human wang and as an added bonus there is no snooze button either :P

Re:Morning sex (5, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735620)

There is no alarm clock more reliable than the human wang

Interesting theory Julian.

Re:Morning sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735674)

+1 Mod this up please.

Re:Morning sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735702)

There is no alarm clock more reliable than the human wang

My dog was extremely disappointed when he found out HIS wang was not sufficient for HIS girlfriend.

Re:Morning sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735712)

By the way, my dog's girlfriend was most definitely not me.

- Above AC. Really.

Re:Morning sex (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735776)

Are you forgetting that one of the after-effects of orgasm in males is drowsiness?

Re:Morning sex (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735798)

The girlfriend is the one that had to get to work, not the OP.

Re:Morning sex (0)

Sitnalta (1051230) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735792)

I don't know what's sadder. Your lame The Todd-esque sexual joke, or the fact that it was labeled "insightful."

Re:Morning sex (2)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735802)

I think the fact that you decided to take the time out to comment on a joke you didn't like when it would have been easier just to skip it is the saddest part honestly.

Re:Morning sex (2)

andyr86 (1942246) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735842)

Lets not forget that commenting on a comment of a comment is also pretty sad....oh...damn.

Re:Morning sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735910)

It's even sadder that all who posted in this thread did so instead of having sex, which obviosly is the preferred human activity at any given time.

Re:Morning sex (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735860)

Geeks and nerds with girlfriends? LOL!

Re:Morning sex (1)

MayonakaHa (562348) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735888)

Hey if you find that one funny, this one will blow your mind.

I'm a geek with a WIFE and you know what? We have a CHILD!

Some pretty crazy shit there, huh?

Re:Morning sex (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735906)

Yes, prove it that you do have them. :)

Re:Morning sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735968)

But there is an iApp for that ... it's the iToss and the person who uses it is an iTosser.

So... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735592)

Thinking back to the Zune clock bug error, that one affected only a single model because the bug was in the interface between a particular brand and model of RTC hardware and the kernel.

Is this a similar error, confined to a driver issue with one platform's RTC, or is it an error in logic somewhere higher up the stack, and thus going to occur on all iDevices of a given firmware level?

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735826)

Let's put it this way: recurring alarms are not affected. You decide if it's the hardware messing up, or the alarm clock app... ;)

Happened to mine (1)

Chewbacon (797801) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735598)

Mine didn't go off to get me up for work. Fortunately I woke up only 10 minutes after it was supposed to go off. Apple released a comment saying they were unaware of any reason this could happen, but as the article above said it should resolve by Monday.

Y2k here we come (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735622)

This is like the third slashdot reported instance of a Y2K style timing bug and the last was in 2010 when 9++ = kaboom lol. It's unbelievable that people still leave glitches like this in their software. Is time really that hard to calculate and program around? People still can't program their software mere months out from a year rollover to be able to handle it?

Time routines aren't "sexy" (1)

mschaffer (97223) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735758)

Don't be surprised that this keeps happening. Writing reliable software as mundane as the clock routines just isn't going to impress anyone. Everyone assumes that the existing, broken & untested date time routines works fine. We all know what happens when you make an assumption...

It will fix its self? (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735624)

OMG, it is self aware, has introspection and can self improve? Now I know what all the Apple fans love it so much.

Re:It will fix its self? (1)

lxs (131946) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735742)

SAM: I mean it fixed itself.

SPOOR: Fixed itself.

DOWSER:... ixed itself.

SPOOR: Machines don't fix themselves.

DOWSER: ... fix themselves.

SPOOR: He's tampered with it, Dowser.

DOWSER: ... ampered. with it, Spoor.

Re:It will fix its self? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735824)

"Will start working again" would be a better way of wording it. I guess the problem is that 1st and 2nd of January is not in week 1, which means the iOS probably think it was 2010 or similar.
Last year there was a power outage in a small town in Norway because the software was not handling week 53 at all...

Yeah, right. (4, Funny)

dangitman (862676) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735638)

This just isn't a plausible claim. As if "anonymous reader" has a girlfriend. Now I've heard everything.

CS 101 (0)

vlueboy (1799360) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735656)

Very few millions of people 20 years ago were downloading shareware. Cellphones, on the other hand, have an explosion with millions of Apps being marketted, and it's now cool and mainstream to pay cash for programs from sources who barely know how to code. Our world is being overrun again by easy-money coders who never passed a CS101 course or never got a full programming education. They are likely people programming in Visual Basic made obsolete by the new niche we call the Apps world. 7 years ago the New York Times said only 10-20% of IT workers in the US had a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science (4 year studies.)

The rest just wing it; never mind that not every CS degree makes you a programmer. Some untrained people are good, but from the rest we have buggy code like these alarms; nobody tests their products well because updates are "easy."

Last year, IIRC, there was a problem with Playstations (or PSP's or some MS hardware product) with the change of date for the New Year. As GOOD programmers get older, none of the fresh programmers care to learn how to avoid the old mistakes, probably because of details in my above rant. These bugs could have happened to wipe their phone data too, and the day we start seeing that is when people will realize that Apps are just like shareware code. Then, they'll return to ignoring things from untrusted or unproven sources.

Re:CS 101 (4, Insightful)

seebs (15766) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735718)

For what it's worth, I've never taken a CS class. As to whether that makes me underqualified or not, well, I guess that's up to the rest of the world to decide, but my employer seems happy with me.

So, let's see.

1. You seem to assume that shareware is bad code, but quite a lot of the shareware I've used over the years has been excellent.
2. Nothing to do with "Apps" has anything to do with the built-in clock and alarm in the iPhone, which is part of the Apple-provided stuff, presumably developed by relatively qualified developers.
3. You have this rant about "Visual Basic". Whatever. I have an app in the app store, and I have never in my life touched VB.
4. Who cares about a 4-year BS? For crying out loud, I never even finished high school, nor did I get a GED. Instead, I hopped on over to doing college, where I got a BA in Psychology.

Just given the quality of this rant, if I had to choose between you and whoever wrote the code with this bug in it, I'd probably take the author of the buggy code, because that person might just have made a silly mistake, which most people do from time to time. I know you're incoherent; I'll take someone I just know made a single mistake over totally incoherent any day.

Re:CS 101 (2)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735816)

4. Who cares about a 4-year BS? For crying out loud, I never even finished high school, nor did I get a GED. Instead, I hopped on over to doing college, where I got a BA in Psychology.

So you're the guy who wrote the $999.99 app? Excellent use of your degree.

Re:CS 101 (1)

donscarletti (569232) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735916)

The rest just wing it; never mind that not every CS degree makes you a programmer. Some untrained people are good, but from the rest we have buggy code like these alarms; nobody tests their products well because updates are "easy."

This is the alarm clock program that ships with the iPhone. Apple does not hire untrained programmers to write the iPhone's core apps, nor does it hire bottom of the range code monkeys. It hires qualified and experienced people who somehow still make mistakes like this. The difference between a good and a bad programmer is that a bad programmer will write a thousand line solution to a problem like this over the course of a week, it will have hundreds of edge cases because of its needless complexity and will fail in some cases. A great programmer will write a ten line solution in an hour that is elegant and captures the essence of the problem and the patterns within, but it will still fail, because the great programmer only spent an hour thinking about it and nobody can think through everything in an hour. This is why we have testing.

Re:CS 101 (5, Insightful)

subreality (157447) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736034)

never mind that not every CS degree makes you a programmer

No CS degree makes you a programmer. They make you a Computer Scientist.

Proper testing is a function of Software Engineering. This isn't some nitpick: they're completely different fields that both happen to often involve computers, and are frequently confused by many people who go to school to learn CS when what they really want is to be a programmer.

This is exactly the kind of bug I'd expect from someone with a CS degree, fresh out of college and working their first SE job.

Apple (3, Insightful)

billsayswow (1681722) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735708)

It just works.

Re:Apple (3, Insightful)

mschaffer (97223) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735766)

It just works...if it's approved, and if you hold it the right way, and if don't mind being late, and ...

Re:Apple (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735780)

... and you don't actually make phone calls

Steve Jobs comments on the situation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34735950)

"You're holding it wrong".

No alarm? Thank god! (2, Interesting)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735746)

I bought my girlfriend an iPhone, and the damn thing seems to set off the alarm at random times.

However, when I look at that thing, my Nokia N95 looks like crap in comparison. I'm no Apple fanboy, but I am really impressed with that thing.

My girlfriend wasn't impressed, sleeping in, and.. (2)

uofitorn (804157) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735788)

Really? Is that what really happened?

Iron-clad reason to be late. (2)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735856)

"...My girlfriend wasn't impressed, sleeping in, and I wasn't either, having to race her to work!"

So for once in your life, you have an iron-clad excuse as to why you were late to work (posted on Slashdot, confirmed by vendor), and you're bitching?

That is sad, when you really think about it. Sad.

Busy Morning? (5, Funny)

gafisher (865473) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735930)

We've gotta nap for that!

Didn't they do this last year? (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#34735980)

Though last year they failed to charge the battery for some reason.

With the first being Saturday... (4, Funny)

DigitalReverend (901909) | more than 3 years ago | (#34736010)

and the 2nd being Sunday, I am actually surprised how many people have crappy jobs that hey had to get up for on the weekends.

have kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34736058)

If you want a reliable alarm clock, have kids

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>