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391 comments

Nothing to see here (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803370)

Move along

Re:Nothing to see here (4, Interesting)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803450)

That's actually a bigger worry IMHO than whatever random stuff is on Twitter. The flow of cables from Wikileaks has dried up. They hardly released any at all since the new year.

Given that only 2000 of them have been released out of 250,000 they need to be stepping up the pace dramatically if they want these cables to ever see the light of day. But the exact opposite is happening. Is the biggest leak in history destined to actually be the smallest thanks to infighting and problems at Wikileaks, I wonder?

Re:Nothing to see here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803522)

We'll see how many leaks start popping up closer to the US election. I have a feeling Assange is a tool.

Re:Nothing to see here (2)

stuckinphp (1598797) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803600)

This would be wise, given the memory and attention span of public opinion.

Re:Nothing to see here (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803534)

I suspect that one of the problems they are having is manpower; they need the 'big' news organizations to help them sift through all the cables and see what can be released and whether those need redacting, but those organizations are now very busy handling the news around the whole affair. And the wikileaks people themselves may be a bit preoccupied with several legal procedures. There are other internal problems at wikileaks but I do not think that those are the only reasons the flow seems to dry out.

Re:Nothing to see here (1)

Teancum (67324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803628)

Of course part of the problem here is that they really don't use the "wiki" in Wikileaks. At least in theory they were going to be using wiki or wiki-like tools that would let newcommers and ordinary people help with the processing of the information, but apparently that has been thrown out the window. Yes, it started that way, but it isn't any more.

Certainly something like Distributed Proofreaders [pgdp.net] could help in processing the information, to show what a "crowdsourcing" model or at least community development effort could look like without the wiki itself.

Yeah, there is political infighting, but a great deal of that is self-inflicted. There is a need for something like WIkileaks and I'm glad that they are doing what they are doing, but they also need to get their act together if they are going to pull through this as well. That Julian Assange couldn't keep his pants zipped up has also hurt a whole bunch too.

Re:Nothing to see here (3, Interesting)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803680)

You can't really wiki anything that requires secrecy. It's not practical do do background checks and personal interviews with tens of thousands of volunteers.

Re:Nothing to see here (2)

Teancum (67324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804104)

Why not? Supposedly the whole point of Wikileaks is to uncover secrets and to push them into the open, not to be gatekeepers over what is secret.

There is some legitimate concern over protecting the privacy of "innocent people" who may be mentioned in some of the content. I do think it may be possible to train tens of thousands of people to be able to discretely and quietly remove that kind of information which can do unintended harm, but it certainly wouldn't be easy.

What is the whole point of the secrecy anyway with Wikileaks, beyond that simple goal of processing the information to protect privacy? And more significantly, who is Wikileaks going to get "clearance" from in terms of a background check? The FBI? Department of State? Yeah, I'd like to see that happen.

Re:Nothing to see here (2)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804212)

You can't really wiki anything that requires secrecy.

I thought the "leaks" part of wikileaks was an indication that secrecy was what was being avoided. The whole point of the project was to be a conduit through which conscientious individuals could bring information to the public; information that an agency or corporation might be trying to hide because it would expose activities that are illegal, immoral, or harmful to the public welfare.

Re:Nothing to see here (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803540)

Is the biggest leak in history destined to actually be the smallest thanks to infighting and problems at Wikileaks, I wonder?

I suspect that if it gets too mired someone will just release a full dump.

Re:Nothing to see here (-1, Offtopic)

linxiaoben (1972880) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803640)

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Re:Nothing to see here (2)

HumanEmulator (1062440) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803698)

Given that only 2000 of them have been released out of 250,000 they need to be stepping up the pace dramatically if they want these cables to ever see the light of day. But the exact opposite is happening.

Regardless of how you feel about it, this would seem to be a sign the US Government's tactics are working.

Re:Nothing to see here (-1)

3seas (184403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803818)

Cable flow or not, the point has been communicated to the people.

Of the near 7 billion people on this planet, its some fraction of 1% screwing things up for the rest of us.

See: http://bit.ly/dRgM7b [bit.ly]

However, what Wikileaks is sitting on and the next major thing to happen being the release of the pass code to the insurance file exposing this is...

(Yes it insane, but its what insane people do)
We have enough in knowledge, technology, man power and natural resources to support a human population size far greater than what we now have.

The ONLY reason for mass reduction of the human population is the continuation of ELITISM!

It is population growth that leads to major changes in society.
It was population growth that lead to the breakdown of the bicameral mind (Julian Jaynes and the metaphor of the tower of babel) and it was population growth that overcame the limitations of non-zero mathematic as people simply started using the Hindu-Arabic decimal system, zero inclusive, regardless of the Roman sponsored Roman Numeral system.

It is population growth that drives us to advancement.
It is population growth that overcomes false constraints.
It is population growth that is overcoming Elitism.

There are near 7 billion people on this planet and some fraction of one percent that is of the controlling elite that don't need to exist.
This fact is becoming known to the population (via wikileaks and the likes) and as such is a threat to the Elite.

They will mass kill to continue their position.

Those of Elitism suffer from mental disease that lacks morals and ethics and intelligence but instead pursue the skill of deception and force through the manipulation of others.

The basic tool of the deceivers is their skill at abstraction manipulation. Words....

Prior to the breakdown of the bicameral mind, man was without sin, or better stated "guilt" as man was unable to think in terms of higher level abstraction and was incapable of introspection.

But then population growth created a need to create consciousness and higher level abstractions, Languages beyond first level abstraction. The side effect of doing this was the discovery of introspection and deception.

The bicameral mind had its advantages of being far better in touch with nature. Like how birds can seasonally fly back and forth to the same locations, how crabs know to move inland prior to a flooding storm, etc...

During that transition there was the use of "oracles" as the go between. Even today we still have some of these, such as Edgar Cayce and many other unknown "readers".

We are again at the threshold of a transition, where those who want to maintain their elite positions of "control" are becoming outdated and ineffective, exposed to the population. Their only defense is to reduce the population. If they succeed, they will eventually have to do it again, and again..... until they are stopped and their power of deception stripped from them.

How do you strip the power of deception from those who use it? Its really quite simple. You learn to fully understand the usefulness and LIMITATIONS of Abstractions. Then you are able to judge whether or not the abstractions used actually get you from where you are (point A) to where you want to go in a manner that at the very least causes no harm to others, at the very best improves life for all... (point B). If it does not then the abstractions are verified deceptive.

Bait and switch? This shows a lack of integrity. Honesty does not have a lack of integrity.

We have plenty "Elite" who have shown such a lack of integrity. They need to be stripped of their ability to command anyone. Laws or bills they have passed to be nulified and re-evaluated for honest intent.

Genuinely, the only defense the Elite (the deceptive) have is massive population reduction.

Sometimes its not what you see, but what you don't see. Which files have torrent links in the http://wikileaks.ch/file/wikileaks_archive.7z [wikileaks.ch] but are unavailable?

Re:Nothing to see here (1)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803992)

C'mon Rush, don't hold back...

Why is this a surprise? A law was broken.. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803782)

In case everyone has forgotten it is against the law to release classified documents in the US and in most other nations. This includes people who assisted in the release making them an accomplice to the crime. PFC Bradley Manning who stole the documents and sent them to Wiki will likely either be put to DEATH or sentence to life at hard labor.. Even if you are glad the "MAN" got his . It is still against the law and subject to the law. Until someone changes that law. Just like all the attacks on companies who pulled support of Wiki, all the ISPs have to keep information about everywhere you go for over two years. Every byte you transmit or receive. Chances are they already know who all were in on it. We are not talking about M$ or the RIAA we are talking about "A" federal government. I suggest looking up ESPIONAGE. Again why it this a surprise??

Re:Why is this a surprise? A law was broken.. (2)

Teancum (67324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804130)

Once the information is in the public, it can't be made secret again.

I'd suggest somebody read a little used document I suppose, at least if you claim to be an American: The U.S. Constitution. Most particularly the first article of amendment. What WIkileaks is doing clearly falls within the realm of that document where congress is explicitly prohibited from making a law in the first place to restrict such speech.

Re:Nothing to see here (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803916)

Twitter hates freedom and they support terrorism.

America America (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803376)

Land of the free... as long as you dont badmouth the goverment. Otherwise we will throw you in jail for what you read crying thought crimes.

There is a threat to democracy! (5, Insightful)

owlstead (636356) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803382)

There is a threat to democracy, quick, suspend all civil liberties!

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (2)

cyrus0101 (1750660) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803514)

Enter arma enim silent leges. Just sayin'.

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804046)

thats "Inter" not "Enter".

Also, this defense didn't work at nuremberg, why should it work here?

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803586)

Seriously, the US strategy on constitutional rights reminds me of the much ridiculed "French war strategy." I am seriously starting to consider moving to China as a realistic alternative, because at least they have a growing economy. Or, are there still some freedom friendly nations out there that I don't know about? Last time I checked, they where all "following the leader" off the cliff.

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803614)

pack you bags and leave now - China is waiting for you

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803722)

Seriously, the US strategy on constitutional rights reminds me of the much ridiculed "French war strategy." I am seriously starting to consider moving to China as a realistic alternative, because at least they have a growing economy. Or, are there still some freedom friendly nations out there that I don't know about? Last time I checked, they where all "following the leader" off the cliff.

Not only that, but there's more chance (slightly less than fuckall) of China getting a Bill of Rights than there is of the USA actually regaining any of theirs (absolutely none). While China allows it's citizens few rights - at least they don't bullshit about it.

While the scale of any single incident is not comparable - the Israeli experience of terrorism surpasses that of the USA - and yet I only need to be at check-in 30 minutes before a flight - they've never zapped me or felt me up and despite the very real risk - I feel a hell of a lot safer traveling there than I do visiting the US for say, DEFCON, and waiting to see who the FBI is gonna grab this time. Yeah - go on, leave the USA and go to China, see how long the Xtra-wides and TSA groupies take to destroy what remains of the economy without you.

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803642)

There is a threat to the twitterati, quick, suspend all consequences for the stupid believing they were anonymous!
Sorry to report your very nonymous.
Duhaa

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (1)

Demonoid-Penguin (1669014) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803734)

There is a threat to the twitterati, quick, suspend all consequences for the stupid believing they were anonymous! Sorry to report your very nonymous. Duhaa

b/tard is that you?

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (-1, Troll)

linxiaoben (1972880) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803672)

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Re:There is a threat to democracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803730)

One wonders what your take on Obamacare is.

A giant overweening government is the root cause of the threat to liberty, and you can't keep giving government the power to solve all life's little ills (even if you make the outlandish assumption that it could) without turning it into an overweening threat to personal freedom.

If you bitch about illegal wiretaps, you can't logically cheer on that same government taking enough power to run the 1/6 of the US economy that's health care.

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803856)

Private health insurance = paying a big bonus to a ceo

Public health insurance = fewer people dead

Single payer would cost less money, and provide healthcare to those that cant afford it. WTF is your god damned problem you greedy son of a bitch? Thats what it boils down to. You think you deserve healthcare, but that no one else does. Your a greedy piece of shit bastard.

Also if your a Christian, didnt Jesus say that whatsoever you do to the lowest, you do to him. So if you deny the poor healthcare, your refusing to bandage your savior. Go rot in hell. If the religious right actually followed their religion, you wouldnt be able to call them the religious right

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803866)

Oh Noze! The government wants everyone to have health care! That's exactly like illegally listening in on our private conversations!

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804124)

Score:6, Funny

Re:There is a threat to democracy! (1, Informative)

Jaktar (975138) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804164)

How does Twitter being served a subpoena suspend anyone's civil liberties? While it's true that you're allowed to say anything you want, it is another matter when crimes have been committed. A subpoena could expose those crimes. Please notice I said "could" and not "will". Just because you happen to agree with what Wikileaks does, doesn't mean that some people connected with Wikileaks haven't committed any crimes as defined by US law.

It should be no surprise that if you use any services from companies owned by citizens of the US, your data is subject to scrutiny by US officials. As for the Icelandic official, they should have known that anything that they wrote using Twitter was being hosted in the US and that they have no control over it. Ignorance is never an excuse in matters of the law.

Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (5, Insightful)

walshy007 (906710) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803386)

Individuals are entitled to say as they wish to each other in their private lives, the moment that is stopped in the name of 'national security' when they are discussing politics is when you should get the hell out.

To where is the only real question.

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (2)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803460)

There are tons of things which shouldn't have a leg to stand on either. Doesn't stop anyone* from doing it does it?

Good thing America is democratic! Pity the people seem to have lost their teeth a while back.

*hums* The land of the free.... and the home of the brave *hums*

*US government/MPAA/RIAA/TSA

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (1)

damaged_sectors (1690438) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803470)

Individuals are entitled to say as they wish to each other in their private lives, the moment that is stopped in the name of 'national security' when they are discussing politics is when you should get the hell out.

To where is the only real question.

You are right of course - and there may be a prize for that, hopefully not a hood and a plane ride - because the subpoena is surely just for statistical purposes.... not being American, I have nothing to fear because:-

A: my government will protect me, and

B: I don't twitter, so I only have to worry about my use of Freenet and my donations - the latter is safe because Mastercard will refuse to co-operate.

Or have I missed something here?

---

Yesterday the media told the truth, today they announced a retraction

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (2, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803616)

Anyone notice Obama is acting a lot like Bush lately? I would have expected a "give me your damn twitter accounts!" coming from the Bush government, but not under Obama who was supposed to end that nonsense. ALSO I wonder what the politicians fear wikileaks so much? I'm tempted to set-up a twitter account and "friend" Wikileaks just for the sake of solidarity. Maybe they'll come after facebook next. Or Michael Moore (he supports the website).
.

>>>Move to where is the only real question.

Pretty much. The European Union is not any more free than the American Union. China is definitely out, and Australia/Canada are less free then even the US. (Australia is filtering the net, arrests people who DRAW sex images of children, and Canada recently forced a reporter/artist to submit to questioning when he included a Muslim in his cartoon.) Ironically the freest state might be the former soviet union, now known as the Russian Federation. Too bad it's so damn cold there.

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803728)

Anyone notice Obama is acting a lot like Bush lately?

Bush never ordered the assassination of an American citizen. Or at least if he did, he had the decency to be ashamed of it and not announce it as being public policy.

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (1)

Demonoid-Penguin (1669014) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803798)

and Australia/Canada are less free then even the US. (Australia is filtering the net, arrests people who DRAW sex images of children,

Settle down sport - there's no need to exaggerate. BigPuddle censors the 'net, but that entirely voluntary.

Just wait till *our*( National Broadband Network comes on line. We're gunna raise some eyebrows then. [theage.com.au] We'll see who's laughing at us then.... [mutters - bloody yanks]

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (1)

kanto (1851816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803850)

Ironically the freest state might be the former soviet union, now known as the Russian Federation. Too bad it's so damn cold there.

In Soviet Russia, the beatings you get at human rights demonstrations will keep you warm. There the state run media will be all over some poor grandma being deported back to Russia or call for tanks when one of their neighbors moves a statue the USSR left behind; what they won't do is give the time of day for ethereal stuff like yro. It's not funny btw. because it's true.

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (1)

Tanuki64 (989726) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804192)

Anyone notice Obama is acting a lot like Bush lately?

He is not acting like Bush, he is acting like an American president.

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803652)

Canada?

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (1)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803736)

Sometimes freedom is little more than an illusion deliberately foisted off on those who can't measure the cage in which they operate.

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803922)

Individuals are entitled to say as they wish to each other in their private lives, the moment that is stopped in the name of 'national security' when they are discussing politics is when you should get the hell out.

To where is the only real question.

I think you should go to China or Russia where there is more freedom; perhaps even N. Korea. Weakie leaks has endangered many lives - espionage is not free speech.No such thing as free speech anyway.

Re:Shouldn't have a leg to stand on (2)

walshy007 (906710) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803986)

Weakie leaks has endangered many lives - espionage is not free speech.

The discussion of political implications of the leaks of internal government stuff is now espionage hey? We are talking about people discussing and being in favour of what wikileaks has done, ignoring whether you think what it has done is good or bad, you think that people agreeing with it politically should be enough to let the government have it's way with them too?

Wikileaks was also not involved in any espionage themselves, those that gave them the information may have but that is irrelevent to wiki leaks. Wikileaks merely published what they were given, as did the new york times and other publications. By your reasoning are they too guilty of espionage by covering some of the cables in articles?

Icelandic MP supeanad (4, Informative)

SomethingOrOther (521702) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803394)


Looks like they are requesting personal data of an Icelandic Member of Parliment [guardian.co.uk]
I see a minor diplomatic incident on the horizon.

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (4, Informative)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803418)

Uh, US diplomats were already tasked with illegally obtaining DNA and credit card numbers of other countries civil servants and politicians at the UN. That didn't seem to cause any diplomatic incident at all, so I really doubt the IP address of some Icelandic MP will even cause a ripple.

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (-1, Troll)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803654)

Don't mince words.

It was HILLARY CLINTON who was caught stealing credit card numbers. Gee, a Clinton breaking the law - I'm shocked. (Almost as shocked that Bush was a dumb president - pretty much called that one back in 2000. My brother voted for him; I refused.)

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803434)

If the US were really worried about foreign policy, much of the information wikileaks has wouldn't exist.

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803880)

the US doesn't like foreign policy. That's why they think they're trying to take over the world, that way there would be no foreign policy.

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (0)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803442)

Iceland? That's part of the country called europe right? How many nukes do they have? Do they have oil or other stuff we need?

Yes I'm being satrical.

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (5, Funny)

Husgaard (858362) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803576)

They do not have nukes, they have volcanoes.

When they triggered one of them last year, it caused a lot more disruption to European air traffic than 9/11 did to US air traffic. And they know how to use their volcanoes right: During the incident Reykjavik airport was one of the few airports in Europe still open.

I am pretty sure this was retaliation against the Brits abusing anti-terror legislation to freeze Icelandic assets.

If you do not understand satire, you should not have read this...

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (1)

Demonoid-Penguin (1669014) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803836)

They do not have nukes, they have volcanoes.

Weapons and power sources.... me thinks they might have to be freed from the yoke of oppression. Anarchy is yesterday's Communism.

What is this satire thing you speak of? Is there a newsletter?

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (1)

ifiwereasculptor (1870574) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803602)

Iceland? That's part of the country called europe right? How many nukes do they have? Do they have oil or other stuff we need?

Yes I'm being satrical.

We know. If you weren't, you'd be asking your underlings on the USG, not us.

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (2)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803618)

Satire aside, they have three things you need, actually - location, location, location. While after the Cold War, Keflavik Naval Air Station and the SOSUS sensors stretching from Iceland to Greenland and the UK have been more or less deactivated, you sure as hell wanna have access to this again as soon as control of the North Atlantic becomes a concern again. And you do not want to mess with the Vikings. Remember the Cod Wars - they didn't hesitate to take on the British Navy with their coastguard cutters in the dispute about their territorial waters, which, by chance, was actually resolved only when Iceland threatened to throw the US out of Keflavik. So, treat carefully there, if nothing else, they'll be after you with Viking battleaxes...

Re:Icelandic MP supeanad (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803976)

Yes they had very cool net cutters. Strange how the UK wanted distant oil rights, but Iceland was not going to get the same distant fishing rights :)

Just another day... (2, Interesting)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803396)

... in the US government's life of doing whatever the hell they want without a court involved if they're caught with their pants down. But that's not what's scary - it's that this will happen without objections, other than a silent whisper from the victims here, effectively quenched by a public that wants to read more about Khloe Kardashian getting her own reality show. Heck, it hasn't even been established in a court that what has been leaked could be endangering lives. But who cares?

Re:Just another day... (1)

ThatsNotFunny (775189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803454)

RTFA: There was a court order, you can see a PDF of the judges' order linked right from the article. And you say there were no objections, but there were, by Twitter, who insisted that the subjects of the court-ordered release of data be given notice and the opportunity to appeal. Also, the court does not have to find that there are lives in danger when issuing a subpoena, only that there is reason to believe that a criminal act has occurred.

Re:Just another day... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803508)

RTFA: There was a court order

RTFAA (again): there only was a court order because Twitter chose to get the courts involved. The original request came directly from the government.

And you say there were no objections, but there were, by Twitter, who insisted that the subjects of the court-ordered release of data be given notice and the opportunity to appeal.

Indeed. The initial request was for Twitter to turn over the information without even notifying the victims. Twitter declined, and the court agreed with them.

Also, the court does not have to find that there are lives in danger when issuing a subpoena, only that there is reason to believe that a criminal act has occurred.

Of course. That's not to stop the propaganda machine from saying otherwise, though.

Re:Just another day... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804012)

Try reading the subpoena you will see after the United States Attorney's cover page the subpoena clearly marked with the header "United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia Alexandria Division". The first line of the subpoena then goes on to say and I quote

This matter having come before the Court pursuant to an application under Title 18, United States Code, Section 2703, which application requests the issuance of an order under Title 18, United States Code, Section 2703(d)

Section 2703(d) being the requirements needed for a court order. Oh and it is signed by Theresa C. Buchanan United States Magistrate Judge.

Even TFA that you suposedly read states the the request was filled by the Justice Department in U.S. District Court 14.

That's not to stop your propaganda machine from saying otherwise, though.

Twitter knew since December 14th (5, Informative)

data2 (1382587) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803406)

Twitter has known about this for >3 weeks, but they were forbidden to tell the affected persons about it. It seems like to they had to go to court just to give them this information.
News like this just makes me sad about the state of liberties in the USA.

Re:Twitter knew since December 14th (1)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803788)

That's part of the bullshit system we have of "National Security Letters".

Re:Twitter knew since December 14th (2)

Espen (96293) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804194)

Is there an obvious follow-up question which need to be raised: What other organisations have been similarly subpoenaed but didn't or haven't been able to challenge it. Is it really realsitic that this is only about twitter?

To quote Padme... (2)

bonekeeper (1294622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803430)

"So this is how democracy dies, with thunderous applause."

Re:To quote Padme... (3, Insightful)

Notch (1612475) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803554)

Who's applauding, though? From what I can tell, it's mostly just a stunned silence punctuated by occasional mutterings of "wait, isn't this wrong?".

Re:To quote Padme... (3, Informative)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803912)

Mosey around the intertubz for a while. Slashdot has been keeping the discussion "reasonable" in comparison to some of the other forums out there. Seems to be quite a few people who would like nothing better then to send anyone even remotely involved straight to gitmo for some "enhanced questioning."

Re:To quote Padme... (1)

Notch (1612475) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804126)

I mostly frequent European forums and communities. Am I correct in understanding that the people who want Assange assassinated are the same people who shout the loudest about democracy and freedom? :-/

Re:To quote Padme... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803630)

It wasn't "democracy dies" it was "liberty dies".
Democracy is just tyranny of the majority.

Re:To quote Padme... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804186)

It's ironic that you would quote something from a product of the MAFIAA, in this circumstance.
On another note, does anyone else remember when we used to openly criticize the CCCP for pulling this kind of crap? Has democracy really become too great a burden to bear?

Hey Remember in those books... (5, Insightful)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803432)

When you have a facist/nazi/evil/whatever state you have people getting taken from their homes for not supporting the glorious leader/fuhrer/overlord/whatever and protesting?

Good times.

Re:Hey Remember in those books... (2)

lul_wat (1623489) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803664)

Oh I think I had a book like that on my Kindle, 19-somethingerather. I'll turn it on and get the name for you.

Strange it doens't seem to be there anymore

Encrypt? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803436)

Wouldn't the Wikileaks people be encrypting their messages?

Re:Encrypt? (2)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803606)

They used an air gap via a discreet postal network ect.
Its one way, you send the data out.
Their irc had SSL encryption. Once its 'public', chat away.

Dear Governments, Here is how to control the Web (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803438)

Step 1: Pressure internet companies into violating individual rights
for the sake of security. e.g. withhold money saved online, block
websites.

Step 2: Play into anti-free-market sentiments of the Internet users.
Whine about how the companies that make the Internet possible are the
real threats to freedom of information on the Internet. Cite examples
of companies which were pressured into violating the individual
rights.

Step 3: Justify government control of the Internet as a measure
against excessive human greed.

Step 4: Take control. Decide who can see what on the Internet.

Step 5: POWER!!!

Re:Dear Governments, Here is how to control the We (0)

ifiwereasculptor (1870574) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803646)

wut no profit????

Twitter was to spread... (3, Insightful)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803456)

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2010/01/state_dept_launching_democracy.html [npr.org]
..the State Department says, it's launching a Twitter contest to "tweet what you think democracy is in 140 characters or less." The person who gets the most "unique re-tweets" will receive a Flip Video HD Camcorder."
"Evan Williams [co-founder of Twitter] says Twitter fundamental to government"
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8563109.stm [bbc.co.uk]
"open exchange of information will prevail in most regions, but we don't have any specific plans in China or other areas where we're blocked"
All sounded so cool when it was aimed at ....
Welcome back to reality. Enjoy the gems from WikiLeaks, note whats missing and welcome to the honeypot.

Re:Twitter was to spread... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803656)

Twitter didn't let me use my desired tweet, something wrong with their validation.

"; drop table democracy; --

Re:Twitter was to spread... (1)

darjen (879890) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803738)

perhaps someone show go tweet some support for Wikileaks. would love to see the state department renig on their promise if that were to become the most re-tweeted.

I'd hand it to the Justice Department immediately (4, Insightful)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803516)

Well, at least, I'd hand them a gigantic picture of a whale. "Sorry, your legal standing is over capacity."

Re:I'd hand it to the Justice Department immediate (3, Interesting)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803732)

Twitter has been ordered to produce

The following customer or subscriber account information for each account associated with Wikileaks; ...

Were I Twitter, I would send them thousands of account records -- Every user that has ever mentioned Wikileaks via Twitter [twitter.com] and let them sort it out themselves.

The order said they must produce the information, but did not specify that the info must not be anonymized, or mixed in with thousands of other accounts.

What??? (5, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803544)

So they are demanding the personal information of a Non-US citizen, that's not in the country and did not access Twitter from within the United States? Nor did any of them commit any sort of crime on US soil. Could a middle eastern country charge my wife for wearing a bikini to the beach in Florida and then demand her personal information from Twitter?

Re:What??? (1)

Demonoid-Penguin (1669014) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803876)

So they are demanding the personal information of a Non-US citizen, that's not in the country and did not access Twitter from within the United States? Nor did any of them commit any sort of crime on US soil. Could a middle eastern country charge my wife for wearing a bikini to the beach in Florida and then demand her personal information from Twitter?

You could test it by painting a picture of the Prophet on her belly and posting the video on Youtube.... is Saudi Arabia in the middle east?

Re:What??? (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803920)

Ive used this same argument before, Im not surprised no one has responded.

Double standard in the US of chinA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803590)

Isn't this the kind of thing done by a repressive, communist or fascist government?
Would not our government denounce any other government for doing this?

"Yes you have the right to free speech but only the speech approved by the speech police."

Wikkileaks outing the illegal and criminal activities of our and any government is good.
Government and large corporations need to be held accountable for the criminal, immoral and evil they do.
those who make and enforce the rules need to be held to a hire standard.
If the government does not obey the law it loose all credibility and the legitimately enforce it.
Wikkileaks however should take more care in what the released and spend more time with redaction.

amazing (1)

Dolphinzilla (199489) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803650)

I love how a document marked "Limited Official Use" makes it onto the internet and then here, I guess the biggest problem with our government is apparently nobody can read....

c0m (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803666)

they are C%ome on Found out about the handy, you are free

The need for psychiatric evaluation of gov... (1, Insightful)

3seas (184403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803678)

What is happening here is the application of war tactics applied by the US defense department, only Wikileaks has no WMD's only words. Perhaps the defense department can justify its military spending by using its stock of WMD's???

There is a genuine and serious need for psychiatric evaluation, constraints and care of what is apparently many in government, specifically the defense department and defense contractors like Halliburton.

Consider the following and how so far out of line it really is, to the point of insanity. Who are we ever going to go to war with that would justify this level of military spending? Add to the US spending that of allies that the US would not go to war against. And then consider what the last link presents.

Clearly, absolutely, without doubt, there is solid evidence of insanity of some in very dangerous positions. They need to be identified, removed from their positions and treated for their mental disorders.

What's wrong with this picture?
http://bit.ly/ey8svA [bit.ly]
http://bit.ly/hHIwSs [bit.ly]
http://bit.ly/9BDHA7 [bit.ly]
http://bit.ly/hsrMaE [bit.ly]
vs.
http://bit.ly/8iTYUu [bit.ly] (even if adjusted for inflation [x2]) Maybe the way to deflate so called terrorism is, instead of acts of destruction. correct real problems.

Re:The need for psychiatric evaluation of gov... (5, Insightful)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803928)

What's wrong with this picture?

The fact that you posted shortened urls, that no one is gonna look at?

Re:The need for psychiatric evaluation of gov... (4, Interesting)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804156)

I think Slashcode should auto-detect these idiotic URL shorteners and either just refuse to accept them like it does for "all caps" posts and the like or preemptively down-mod the post by 2 points at least...

It was coming sooner or later (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803696)

I, for one, welcome our new fascist overlords.

Does anyone need more reason to quit social media? (4, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803808)

Everything you say or do can and will be used against you in a court of law. The connections you make, the things you read, everything. The government has too much power and by indulging in these useless social media activities, people are making themselves into potential targets by participating in them. Say you were curious about wikileaks and subscribed to Assange's twitter. Well guess what, now the government knows who you are, you are on yet another list and only because you were curious about what he had to say.

I'm not condemning social media as much as I am condemning this sort of behavior from government. But while the government IS behaving this way, people should be more careful in response.

Re:Does anyone need more reason to quit social med (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34804106)

An unknown, over funded, non IPO (private) internet entity that spreads massive amounts of expensive freedoms and democracy - for profit entrepreneurship at its best.
The potential targets is spot on. Flush people out by helping their generations "Pentagon papers" via the anonymity of the internet.

Mountain out of a molehill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803852)

Isn't this normal? I mean if the government is building a case against Manning, they are probably going to subpoena companies that they think have evidence that will help their case. The three are hardly just "supporters" of Wikileaks, they were named producers of the "Collateral Murder" video.

If this were the police state people think the US has become, they wouldn't need subpoenas. The government would have just raided the place.

another straw on a mountain of straw (1)

Demonoid-Penguin (1669014) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803938)

Isn't this normal? I mean if the government is building a case against Manning, they are probably going to subpoena companies that they think have evidence that will help their case. The three are hardly just "supporters" of Wikileaks, they were named producers of the "Collateral Murder" video.

If this were the police state people think the US has become, they wouldn't need subpoenas. The government would have just raided the place.

Normal for a hypocritical government perhaps - but other countries were denied access to US records and personnel when they were investigating serious crimes that actually did involve deaths (Nugan Hand coronial inquest and inquiry). When we want information - US says fuck you, when the US wants information the US says fuck you. This is not going to end well.

Re:another straw on a mountain of straw (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804038)

But this isn't the US demanding records from another country. It's the US government subpoenaing the records of Twitter, an American company that follows American laws. These messages where from people who agreed to Twitter's terms of usage when they signed up.

Rememeber 2007! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34803862)

When Yahoo executives grilled by US Congress over giving up private info of email accounts to China, which was linked to two guys jailed for "leaking state secrets."
May be twitter can use that as a defense?

Quash (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803926)

If Twitter doesn't move to quash this, fuck them.

U.S. Department of Comedy _ (2)

ego centrik (1971902) | more than 3 years ago | (#34803978)

The Order states among other things, that _

"IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the application and this Order are sealed until otherwise ordered by the Court, and that Twitter shall not disclose the existence of the application or this Order of the Court, or the existence of the investigation, to the listed subscriber or to any other person, unless and until authorized to do so by the Court"

_ and within a couple of hours you can find the copy all over the Net, as usual. Another bright action from the U.S. Department of Justice? Hey guys, it is a joke, isn't it?

_nice!

Shi7? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804008)

Prefeerably with an luck I'll find You loved 7hat It. Its mission is

Define WikiLeaks Supporters... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804160)

The article sounds like they are after info from key people known to be affiliated with Wikileaks.

The headline makes it sound like they wanted information on everybody on Twitter who has ever posted anything supportive of Wikileaks.

There is a rather significant difference between the two.

Rob (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34804184)

Rob Gongrijp is on the list. He is a famous Dutch hacker. One of the first to bring internet to the masses in the Netherlands (with XS4ALL). He was, allegedly, involved with Wikileaks in releasing the Iraq movie in where two reporters where killed.

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