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EMC Engineer Steals Almost $1 Million of Kit One Piece at a Time

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the and-it-didn't-cost-me-a-dime dept.

Data Storage 235

aesoteric writes "An EMC test engineer has pleaded guilty to stealing almost $1 million worth of kit from his employer. He reportedly stole the unspecified goods from the storage giant's North Carolina factory using 'a small bag' to smuggle the kit out before selling it on the internet under a pseudonym."

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Im sorry - define Kit (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817798)

Im sorry - define Kit? thanks

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (1)

dwarfsoft (461760) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817816)

I was wondering more how he got caught, considering that the company he sold it to is also under investigation.

Did the "kit" call home and therefore alert EMC to the location of its whereabouts? TFA was light on details.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (4, Funny)

DWMorse (1816016) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817820)

A highly-developed and technological Knight Industries Two Thousand series motor vehicle.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817856)

Damnit, you beat me to it. Michael Knight will not be impressed!

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817894)

Shit. They better redefine "A small bag". And I'd hate to see a large.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (5, Informative)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817850)

In the electronics industry, "pulling a kit" is compiling all of the discrete components that you need to get your job done. It's compiling all of the resistors and ICs and other things you need to build a batch of something, or it's compiling whatever you need to fix something.

The article is ridiculously scant on details. It makes no sense. A million bucks worth of kit, smuggled out in a "small bag?!" That's a lot of "small bags" to be taken in and out over a period of time. Might as well held up the loading dock at gunpoint and ran off with the crates.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (5, Funny)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817904)

Well, Johnny Cash stole an entire car one piece at a time over a couple decades, if his music is any indication.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (1)

donotlizard (1260586) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817996)

Radar O'Reilly supposedly mailed home a whole Jeep one piece at a time.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (2)

scottv67 (731709) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818830)

>Radar O'Reilly supposedly mailed home a whole Jeep one piece at a time.

So I guess that wouldn't qualify as a case of the "five finger discount"...

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818326)

I'm pretty sure that such things used to happen. A car would be an extreme example, but imagine guys on an assembly line making radios back in the 1930's. Damn right you could steal a radio on piece at a time.

I do know that in the 1980's some guys working at Rohm stole an entire PBX system, assembled it in a garage, then sold it to a hotel in South America along with a service contract (They had a guy in support that was in on it and took all the service calls). They got busted when the thing went down over a long weekend and someone else took the service call.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818714)

the FrankenCaddy!

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (2)

Glonoinha (587375) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818206)

A million bucks worth of kit, smuggled out in a "small bag?!"

I'm guessing they are using 'cop math'.

My bet : they calculated that the small kit can be reproduced and / or reverse engineered, and the resulting copies will result in an overall loss to the original company over the sales life of the product, equaling one million dollars in losses.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (2)

flappinbooger (574405) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818302)

A million bucks worth of kit, smuggled out in a "small bag?!"

I'm guessing they are using 'cop math'.

My bet : they calculated that the small kit can be reproduced and / or reverse engineered, and the resulting copies will result in an overall loss to the original company over the sales life of the product, equaling one million dollars in losses.

Cop math? I was thinking RIAA math.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (4, Funny)

3vi1 (544505) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817862)

Kit = pieces of equipment.

If he'd taken it all, it would have been kit and caboodle.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (5, Informative)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817864)

It's how the English say equipment.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (2)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818008)

It also means "clothes", as in getting one's kit off [urbandictionary.com] .

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818082)

I'd sure hate to lose my equipment while getting my kit off.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (4, Insightful)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818332)

Zippers can be a bitch.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (2)

BluBrick (1924) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818810)

I'd sure hate to lose my equipment while getting my kit off.

That will happen if it's cold enough.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (2)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818522)

j0 ... you can't really call yourself nerds unless you head over to http://theregister.co.uk/ [theregister.co.uk] every once in a while and take in some of the wry British take on tech.

Start with the BOFH archives and you'll be fully conversant in no time! (OK, I'll give one small hint: PFY = "pimply-faced youth" )

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (1)

kiwimate (458274) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818828)

Not saying the cultures are 180 degrees dissimilar, but the BOFH stories were written by Simon Travaglia [wikipedia.org] , who is a New Zealander.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817912)

I was posting earlier on Slashdot about how much game I gots, by describing how much ass I got last night, in the hopes that it would net me even more karma, but now there's this "kit" shit I gotta get me some of too?!?

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818066)

Im sorry - define Kit? thanks

It is spelled KITT. And it refers to a car with AI and lots of neat tech. I'm sure the hard part was sneaking out the engine block.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (5, Funny)

rkww (675767) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818132)

Here's a link to the same story in American [pcworld.com]

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818546)

Here's a link to the same story in American [pcworld.com]

Now, if only the summary or the articles told what the heck EMC makes...it's not at all clear from their jargon filled company website, although I did find that they employ 40000 people making whatever it is...

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (2)

compgenius3 (726265) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818886)

uhhh, from the original article, and the summary (this is slashdot after all), emphasis mine:

stole US$930,000 of goods from the storage giant's North Carolina factory

Storage. They make storage.

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (1)

mcheu (646116) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818474)

British slang for "stuff"

Re:Im sorry - define Kit (5, Insightful)

keeboo (724305) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818532)

Dude, it's EMC we're talking about.

Most likely the $1 million kit consists of:
- A 250GB 5400 RPM SATA EMC-certified HD
- A pair of official EMC plastic brackets.

What happened to copy and paste? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817802)

I was going to paste something relevant but the paste feature no longer works on slashdot. Is it time to stop coming here?

Re:What happened to copy and paste? (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817842)

Is it time to stop coming here?

For you, yes :-)

Hello editors: Are the story aggregators on full automatic now? Is "kit" some Australian slang for something? How about filing us in? Don't hold out on us.

Re:What happened to copy and paste? (5, Informative)

NEDHead (1651195) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817902)

'kit' is a well known and old term for 'stuff'. A kit bag was what (may be still is) military used for their personal stuff - razor etc. In any case, this reminds me of the story about the guy working at the factory who was seen taking wheelbarrows of trash from the premises day after day. Security could not figure out what was going on. Finally confronted the man, who eventually confessed to stealing wheelbarrows...

Re:What happened to copy and paste? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818064)

It means routing equipment. Specifically that.

The estate of Johnny Cash is suing him... (4, Funny)

EXMSFT (935404) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817804)

for copyright infringement.

Re:The estate of Johnny Cash is suing him... (1)

beamin (23709) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817874)

And it didn't cost him a dime...

Re:The estate of Johnny Cash is suing him... (1)

ksheff (2406) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818760)

No, it was improper use of a patented business process. They're using the same reasoning Amazon did in their 1-click lawsuits. I hope Amazon doesn't find out and sue the Cash estate for copying them.

One Piece At A Time (0)

zonker (1158) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817808)

Reminds me of the old Johnny Cash song [youtube.com] ...

Oh come on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817812)

Who hasn't stolen at least a million bucks worth of kit from work?

No support contract is a crime? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817818)

BL Trading is also being charged with sale and receipt of stolen property, wire fraud and the installing and selling on of products with EMC firmware that didn’t have support contracts to take care of them.

WTF?

Re:No support contract is a crime? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817896)

EMC firmware license requires a support contract to be valid. Yes, it is illegal to use the hardware you purchase from them, if you don't keep paying them for support.

Considering how much they mark up hardware as well, there's no way he actually had more than $50k of gear.

Re:No support contract is a crime? (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818026)

Are you absolutely certain it's illegal? Sure, it could be a breach of contract, perhaps. But illegal? As in criminal? C'mon.

Re:No support contract is a crime? (2)

Cylix (55374) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818084)

You mean contractual violation which is a civil suite and not a violation of the law. This would be the dictated by the terms agreed to when the equipment was purchased. However, I have known several organizations that had their old EMC equipment limping about. While unsupported and essentially useless for it's role they can often be relegated to test or dev environments where stability and uptime isn't paramount. In fact, I've known production environments that were still running out of warranty EMC equipment and really needed to migrate and refresh.

I suspect they only get really upset if you attempt to update the firmware on out of warranty hardware. However, I haven't dealt with that particular storage vendor much beyond a handful of cases.

Re:No support contract is a crime? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818578)

This kind of thing is pretty typical with a lot of gear...though it's not my area, I think Cisco has similar wording in their fine print and enterprise storage vendors in general have strong feelings of attachment to their gear and to their customers' ongoing dollars.

In practice, they don't particularly care if you keep the software up to date...as long as you're not trying to get support on it OR it's not phoning home and reminding them to bill you....

Funny story...many years back, we had EMC gear on lease...when the lease was up, we had the conversation and they arranged for freight to come pick it up...movers came and took a look at it and decided they didn't have what they needed to get it out of the building (stairs, corners, etc.). Said, "We'll be back in a couple days."

2 years later, some new kid in the DC powered it up and it phoned home...nobody realized until we got invoiced by EMC for a lease extension & support! HA!

Don't get me started or I'll tell you all my EMC stories...like about the time they put in a bid on a job with set specs and fully disclosed budget...their bid was 2.5x the budget and they wanted to keep revising it...tried to resubmit twice more with (slight) additional discounts and then cried "unfair" to the PM when they didn't get the job.

Re:No support contract is a crime? (1)

Megahard (1053072) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818252)

Probably tough to get a support contract for a '89-90-91-92-93-94-95-96-97-98-99 router.

Re:No support contract is a crime? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818304)

Not true. We have several CX3-80's that are not under a contract. When get invoices for T&M when I call them in to EMC for service.

Re:No support contract is a crime? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818422)

ACTUALLY, what law do you think it violates? He didn't copy it, so there is no copyright violation. What some of these companies think they can get away with is downright criminal.

Toss the book at him for the real theft, but this one thing is BS (assuming the story is accurate).

Re:No support contract is a crime? (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817944)

If he implied that there was a support contract, probably.

Re:No support contract is a crime? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818636)

It's not clear to me that the lack of support contracts is what made the equipment stolen though, as others have noted, there are often legally binding contracts and agreements in place that require a support contract.

The fact that there was no legal chain of possession is what makes BL guilty of the sale and receipt of stolen property and it well could be the "selling on" of the gear to others that blew this scheme up...I buy some equipment...I go to register with EMC for support or buy a support contract and bam. "Wait ... according to our records those units have not been sold. They are supposed to be sitting in the warehouse in NC."

Obligatory dumb question: (3, Insightful)

Announcer (816755) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817822)

What is "kit" in this instance?

"Kit and kit! What is kit?!" - Spock's Brain

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (2)

drooling-dog (189103) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817836)

Gear.

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (3, Insightful)

fotbr (855184) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817844)

equipment

And because slashdot requires me to wait a certain amount of time before replying with what should be a one word answer, and because one word isn't a good enough answer, you get this annoying run on sentence of complete crap before I can post so I'll just keep typing random stuff to kill some time.

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (1)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818654)

The key to what "kit" obviously is what EMC does. EMC is world-wide and into lots of stuff but specializes in data storage, recovery, and asset management solutions. I'm guessing like SAP but with specialize hardware to go with it.

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (5, Insightful)

migla (1099771) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817946)

What is "kit" in this instance?

Could be any number of things, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kit [wikipedia.org]

In this instance, I think it's most likely referring to baby ferrets.

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818010)

Baby ferrets have firmware?

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818194)

"psst! wanna buy a server?"

/obscure?

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818126)

Please learn to speak English.

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818202)

It's far from a dumb question. I doubt anyone who wasn't familiar with the stupid British term had a clue what it means. Probably assumed it was some tech jargon they weren't familiar with.

I swear... sometimes it really makes me smile that the Brits are OUR colonists now.

Oh yeah.

Re:Obligatory dumb question: (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818812)

I swear... sometimes it really makes me smile that the Brits are OUR colonists now.

That really doesn't make sense. The European settlers of the Americas were the original colonists, but what new lands are the British "colonising" on "your" behalf?

You really didn't think that one out... did you? :-)

Anyway, while I think it's very likely that English will continue to be *the* global language, it's fairly apparent that the days of it "belonging to", or even being primarily shaped by the US (and/or the UK and the Commonwealth's remaining influence) is numbered. It's one of India's two main languages, and there are a *lot* of Indians, but Indian English [wikipedia.org] has its own idiosyncracies, and as India becomes more powerful, expect *them* to have more influence on the language.

Similarly, expect the pidgin-esque utilitarian bastardisations (*) of English used in Africa and South East Asia to make their way into English and parts of them become more commonly accepted.

What I'm saying is, enjoy your domination of American English while it lasts, because the language is going global and won't belong to you- or anyone else- after that. (^_^)

(*) Not an insult per se; English *is* essentially a bastardised language, which some might say is its strength.

wire fraud (3, Insightful)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817838)

wire fraud? seriously? These tack-on charges make a mockery of the law.

Re:wire fraud (1)

DWMorse (1816016) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817876)

Not necessarily. If you run a red light to hit and kill someone with a car, you're going to have multiple charges as well.

He received a wire transfer of money under a fake name. Doesn't that count?

Re:wire fraud (2)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817954)

Wire fraud is the de-facto "internet ecommerce" law since around 1980. If it involves craigslist, ebay or amazon.com it's probably got a wire fraud charge tacked on.

Re:wire fraud (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818036)

Craigslist? So those Indonesian ho fees under the name John Smith are.....oh shit

Wire fraud makes it a federal case. (5, Informative)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818266)

Wire fraud, in the United States Code, is any criminally fraudulent activity that has been determined to have involved electronic communications of any kind, at any phase of the event. The involvement of electronic communications adds to the severity of the penalty, so that it is greater than the penalty for fraud that is otherwise identical except for the non-involvement of electronic communications. As in the case of mail fraud, the federal statute is often used as a basis for a separate, federal prosecution of what would otherwise have been a violation only of a state law.


The crime of wire fraud is codified at 18 U.S.C. 1343, and reads as follows:


  Whoever, having devised or intending to devise any scheme or artifice to defraud, or for obtaining money or property by means of false or fraudulent pretenses, representations, or promises, transmits or causes to be transmitted by means of wire, radio, or television communication in interstate or foreign commerce, any writings, signs, signals, pictures, or sounds for the purpose of executing such scheme or artifice, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both. If the violation affects a financial institution, such person shall be fined not more than $1,000,000 or imprisoned not more than 30 years, or both.

In the case of United States v. LaMacchia, a student of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was charged with wire fraud when, because he had not profitted personally from online distribution of millions of dollars' worth of illegally copied software, he could not be charged with criminal copyright infringement. The United States District Court, District of Massachusetts, dismissed the charges, noting they were an attempt to find a broad federal crime where the more narrowly defined one had not occurred. Congress then amended the copyright law to limit further use of this loophole. Wire fraud [wikipedia.org]

The reference is to the NET Act of 1997. "No Electronic Theft."

Re:wire fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818394)

wire fraud? seriously? These tack-on charges make a mockery of the law.

Law makes a mockery of human rights, so why not mock the mockers for mocking and beat law down.

Common name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817860)

At first I wondered whether they were talking about polywell fusion or linux cncing.

reminds me... (5, Funny)

neokushan (932374) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817878)

...of a tale my dad used to tell me when I was young.

I don't know the full details, so it could be made up, the details could be wrong or it might have actually been like a TV show or something, but anyhoo.

A guy who worked in a factory would leave every day with a wheelbarrow full of rubbish. One of his bosses was sure he was stealing something, so every now and then he'd search the wheelbarrow and come up dry - rubbish, rubbish and more rubbish. The manager got so frustrated, he started searching every single day and still found nothing.
Eventually, the guy figured out what he was stealing - wheelbarrows.

Re:reminds me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817928)

I know a different version of this story:

Jose arrives at the Mexican border on his bike with two huge bags over his shoulders. The guard stops him and asks, "What's in the bags?"

"Senior, it's only sand," replies Jose.

"Sand? Well, we'll just see about that - get off the bike!"

The guard takes the bags, rips them open, empties them out and finds nothing in them... except sand. Jose is detained overnight, and the sand is analysed - only to discover that it is in fact simply sand.

Jose is released, the sand is put into new bags and placed on Jose's shoulders, and he is let across the border.

Next day, same thing happens. The guard asks, "What you got there?"

"Sand," says Jose.

A thorough examination of the bags again shows there to be nothing but sand, and subsequently Jose is allowed to ride across the border.

For a whole year this continues until one day Jose doesn't show up, and the guard discovers him in a Cantina in Mexico.

"Hey, Bud," says the guard, "I know you're smuggling something. For a year it's driven me crazy. It's all I can think about... I can't get sleep, the kids are getting neglected... heck, even the dog senses I'm beginning to lose it! Between you and me, just what are you smuggling?"

Jose sips his beer, smiles and replies, "Bicycles..."

Re:reminds me... (1)

indiechild (541156) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818176)

The story doesn't make any sense -- why would he be smuggling bicycles?

Re:reminds me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818308)

Why, they're made of cocaine, of course!

Re:reminds me... (1)

indiechild (541156) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818186)

So the EMC engineer was actually stealing small Prada bags?

Re:reminds me... (2)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818258)

In my version, a guy crosses the border on a bicycle, carrying a brick on the rear rack. The item being smuggled is the bicycle, of course.

So I guess, it's just an invented story, in either case.

Re:reminds me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818454)

My grandpa spoke of a similar case by multiple workers, only it was used sand from blasting.

makes no sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817908)

From TFA
He has been charged with identity theft, fraud and transport of stolen property and has already agreed to pay back US$929,891 to EMC.

I get where the theft comes from but the identity theft ? Is that just to give him a longer sentence ? And 32 years for that , this just shows how screwed up our courts are where you can get less time for murder then for theft . Maybe he should have killed someone when stealing the HW may have gotten a shorter sentence .

Re:makes no sense (2)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818340)

And 32 years for that , this just shows how screwed up our courts are where you can get less time for murder then for theft.

In the American federal system, crimes of violence are almost always prosecuted under state law. Economic and property crimes with a significant interstate or foreign dimension are a federal responsibility.

If the feds do have jurisdiction in a murder case, don't expect anyone to get off lightly. It happens so rarely that there is little incentive to bargain.

Idea by Johnny Cash (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817914)

"I'd get it one piece at a time
And it wouldn't cost me a dime"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIuo0KIqD_E

One Piece At A Time (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34817950)

Johnny Cash - One Piece At A Time [youtube.com]

Ha ha, my captcha is "pilfer"!

Small thefts add up (3, Interesting)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817966)

It's amazing how much you can get if you steal constantly.

For example, Salim Kara made several million dollars stealing coins from light rail boxes

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/thief+stole+nearly+million+coin+time/4028648/story.html [edmontonjournal.com]

Re:Small thefts add up (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818134)

Related story, at my telecom company an installation kit used to include gold plated screws. An installer knew this and when they weren't used/needed instead of scrapping them (throwing them in the trash) he put them in the box. When he retired he reported the box and supposedly it had many thousands of dollars worth of gold in it. Course we also have stories of savvy installers trying to sell surplus equipment on the open market.

Re:Small thefts add up (2)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818152)

I particularly like the section about the employee who KNEW he was stealing...

One co-worker who recorded Kara on a video camera reaching into a fare box in an incriminating fashion a year before his arrest later said he erased the video because he didn't want to get involved.

"I did not want to be the one responsible for pointing out to superiors or anything that there was anything wrong going on," he testified. "The thing was I didn't want to be involved in it." He was later fired.

Emphasis mine. Guess it doesn't pay to not get involved.

Re:Small thefts add up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818246)

It's amazing how much you can get if you steal constantly.

This is how politicians retire wealthy, even if they spent their entire career on a "public servants" salary.

Goldman Sachs made several billion ... (1)

hildi (868839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818506)

from credit default swap contracts with AIG that got payed off 100 cents on the dollar when the taxpayers were forced to bail it out. the biggest theft in history was the credit bubble of 2005-2007, but people are too busy refreshing fark and watching live at 5 to care.

Re:Goldman Sachs made several billion ... (1)

MrQuacker (1938262) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818728)

And even if joe q american does care, so what? Individually I cant change anything, and as a group nobody gives a fuck. Anyone who could do something is already in on it.

Re:Small thefts add up (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818560)

$1 million in EMC gear probably translates to only about $50,000 worth of real-world computer equipment at market prices. They're pretty notorious for charging ridiculous amounts more than NetApp et. al. for their junk.

Heh, the customers probably thought of him as Robin Hood.

what a stupid article (0)

mestar (121800) | more than 3 years ago | (#34817980)

What exactly is:

-kit?
-EMC?
-BL trading?

Re:what a stupid article (3, Informative)

rkww (675767) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818098)

TFA was originally published on a UK website, so this is British English speaking. 'kit' in this context means 'equipment'. EMC presumably refers to www.emc.com; and BL trading would be www.bltrading.com

Re:what a stupid article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818406)

It is way more likely that EMC refers to Electromagnetic compatibility [wikipedia.org]
This is related to electronic engineering, not software development and/or network administration.
It would also explain the $1M value. Equipment for EMC testing is quite expensive. (As in; No thanks, I'd rather buy a new house.)

Re:what a stupid article (1)

russ1337 (938915) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818626)

kit is the same word used in the acronym SDK [wikipedia.org] .

wait a second (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818016)

wasn't this a johnny cash song?

Huh. Guess that explains . . . (3, Funny)

Hero Zzyzzx (525153) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818028)

this EMC Celerra NS model 120-121-122-123-124-125-126-127-128-129-130 NAS I just bought off craigslist.

Sentence. (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818050)

I'm not sure I agree with a prison sentence, if he's agreeing and able to pay the amount back. No need to further feed the prison industry with non-violent criminals. If he receives anything even approaching a significant portion of the 32 years, it would be a travesty. Plenty of people have done far more horrible things and paid far less for those crimes. Crimes which were not merely about some cash. I would hate to think that we think it's okay to essentially take the rest of a man's life for something like this. We just went through several years of far worse white collar criminals getting away with far worse (and covered by the tax payers, even!) in this country.

Re:Sentence. (1)

ThomasB1 (1722382) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818492)

So if you steal and get caught you just pay back the stolen amount? Brilliant! Be right back, gonna steal some stuff.

Eh? (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818060)

What kind of market is there for dodgy EMC gear? I always got the impression that EMC were the chaps you talked to if you didn't mind paying too much; but really wanted to have the vendor breathing down your neck for the duration of the (expensive) support agreement. Are there companies that shell out for that, and then start buying replacement parts on Ebay? Or, like Cisco, is there an active market of people trying to put together certification study kits on the relative cheap?

Yes... (2)

Junta (36770) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818572)

I company I used to work for was operated by someone too naive to understand it was the support and not the intrinsic equipment that mattered. I came in and they were using some Cheapo NAS box that used 4 drives on two IDE channels as the storage in RAID5. Of course one drive failed and took out a channel, so after I recovered the data (it was backed up, but I recovered data off the three working drives), it was time to look for a replacement. I was told a very very very puny budget, so I priced out basically the same thing except with 4 IDE channels and bought as a new, supported, warrantied server. After a few days, the President announced he found the perfect 'enterprise' Dell enclosure on eBay and that was going to be the solution.... Even off random ebay guy, as an enclosure only (excluding controller and server to drive it), at much reduced capacity it was about twice as much as the server I suggested (President was willing to stretch the budget he dictated because he found himself such a 'good deal').

Of course, after two weeks of operation, the midplane somehow glitched in a way to corrupt drives and lose all data. Dell charged quite a bit for the service call to come in and fix the stupid thing since there was no support or warranty remotely associated with the thing, and the enclosure still had no warranty associated with it. He never admitted that it was a mistake. My second-worst job didn't last too much longer after that (got fired because they decided they needed to open a position to afford to look for a person with MCSE at the time).

I'm confused (5, Informative)

TimHunter (174406) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818116)

This is a story about an crime committed in Apex, North Carolina by a man from Sanford, NC and tried in a Boston, Massachusetts court. Why does the summary link to a story in an Australian web site? Why not, say, to this: http://www.myfoxboston.com/dpp/news/crime_files/crime_watch/nc-man-pleads-guilty-to-stealing-from-emc-corp-25-apx-20110107 [myfoxboston.com] or this: http://www.abc6.com/Global/story.asp?S=13800798 [abc6.com] ?

Re:I'm confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818370)

Just to make everybody click through and figure out what the nine hells a "kit" is, I guess? I've read every comment on this page, and TFA and I'm still not entirely sure what EMC sells or why I should care that some employee of theirs stole a bunch of equipment. Maybe they didn't pay him enough?

A million bucks worth of EMC gear? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818418)

So two hard drives?

$109 profit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818428)

"He has been charged with identity theft, fraud and transport of stolen property and has already agreed to pay back US$929,891 to EMC."

But he made $109 profit, apparently? Win! :-)

So he stole a couple screws (1)

Nicolas MONNET (4727) | more than 3 years ago | (#34818584)

Considering how EMC's crap is overpriced, it doesn't take much to make $1 million.

There's one thing that's more astonishing than how expensive their crap is: how crappy their software is. It looks like it's written by deranged apes. Not just because of the million bugs, the offensively useless help files or the fact that their appliances are running on Windows 3.11 (true fact!). No, there's something to it that's simply _wrong_.

One piece at a time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34818734)

I bet it didn't cost him a dime.

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