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Facebook Opens Up Home Addresses and Phone Numbers

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the 1600-pennsylvania-avenue-should-do dept.

Facebook 459

An anonymous reader writes "Do you really want third-party app developers on Facebook to be able to access your mobile phone number and home address? Facebook has announced that developers of Facebook apps can now gather the personal contact information from their users. Security firm Sophos describes it as 'a move that could herald a new level of danger for Facebook users' and advises users to remove their home address and phone numbers from the network immediately."

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459 comments

YAY !! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899580)

I wanted this. Now to post when Ex is on vacation, and let THEM CLEAN HIM OUT !!

Nice! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899978)

Hopefully this will hurry along the end of Facebook, condemning it to live out its days with AOL and the like. It's truly an annoying entity since so many people use it, and so many people are dumb.

Message from Facebook (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899602)

Dear users:

Fuck you.

Cordially,
Mark Zuckerberg

Re:Message from Facebook (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899634)

Yet more proof that jews are not to be trusted with anything.

Re:Message from Facebook (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899908)

Dear Mark,

Fuck you.

I wonder if this is a tactic to see just how much bullshit people will put up with.

Duh? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899614)

You would be FUCKING STUPID to put your home address and phone numbers on facebook at all..

3rd party devs want access to people who are that stupid. they are worth money. alot of money.

I don't see any issue here.

Re:Duh? (4, Insightful)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899844)

Phone numbers and home addresses are public knowledge already — it's called a phone book.

If you want to be ex-directory, then you wouldn't put this info on your Facebook profile in the first place.

Re:Duh? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899950)

Mobile phone numbers are public? Since when?

Re:Duh? (1)

Carewolf (581105) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900096)

Since phonebook where invented. I estimate for 50-100 years. Of course you can ask to be delisted..

Re:Duh? (1)

Calydor (739835) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899966)

No. Just ... No.

Unless you have a very, very unique name (like M. Zuckerberg, probably) your Facebook profile can't easily be linked to your appearance in a phone book. No one will know if the Billy Smith they see on Facebook living "somewhere in Oregon" is B. Smith #36 in the phone book. If they can actually get that information off your profile the game changes completely.

Re:Duh? (1)

Chaonici (1913646) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899994)

If Facebook is a phone book, it's the first phone book to record everyone's numbers and addresses, no matter where they are. It is not a local source of information, as actual phone books are.

Re:Duh? (4, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900044)

If you want to be ex-directory, then you wouldn't put this info on your Facebook profile in the first place.

You might put it there for your friends, especially if you were promised that this info would remain private or shared only with people you authorize.

To then suddenly have the rules change is just unconscionable.

But as long as people like you jump in to defend every privacy violation facebook comes up with we can all pretty much expect it to continue.

Or maybe it will just die when people finally realize the meat market isn't helping them or making them any happier.

Anonymous Coward (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899622)

First post!

Another option (5, Informative)

Ariastis (797888) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899646)

Easier option :

Account - Privacy Settings - Apps and Websites (Bottom) - Turn off platform apps

Bye bye Farmville / Cafe World / Fortune cookie notifications.

Bye bye info sharing with ueseless apps.

I have yet to find anything I miss from that pile of junk.

Re:Another option (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899674)

And you trust FB to honor your choice of options?

Re:Another option (5, Insightful)

rudy_wayne (414635) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899746)

And you trust FB to honor your choice of options?

Which is the real problem.

Facebook is no longer just a website run by a couple of college kids. It is a business - a big business - and like any business their number one priority is making as much money as possible. This is especially true now that Goldman-Sachs has invested $500 million and is trying to get others to invest another Billion or so. No matter how much lip service is given to "privacy" it is no accident that their privacy settings are hard to figure out, don't really do anything and completely deleting a profile is difficult, assuming that they actually delete anything at all. This is by deliberate design because Facebook's business model demands that they must be able to sell your personal information to advertisers.

Re:Another option (5, Interesting)

fishexe (168879) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899800)

And you trust FB to honor your choice of options?

Which is the real problem.

Facebook is no longer just a website run by a couple of college kids. It is a business - a big business - and like any business their number one priority is making as much money as possible.

Sadly, this is one big business that was probably creepier when it was just a website run by a couple of college kids, one of whom once said about people's Facebook data, 'People just submitted it. I don't know why. They "trust me". Dumb fucks.' At least now he has investors to sometimes keep him in check, a little bit, maybe.

Re:Another option (2)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899996)

Sadly, this is one big business that was probably creepier when it was just a website run by a couple of college kids, one of whom once said about people's Facebook data, 'People just submitted it. I don't know why. They "trust me". Dumb fucks.' At least now he has investors to sometimes keep him in check, a little bit, maybe.

I'd argue this story is proof that his investors aren't keeping him in check. I don't doubt the fact that he's suppose to be worth billions has done nothing in his own mind but vindicate him and boost his already inflated ego.

Re:Another option (1)

fishexe (168879) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900110)

Sadly, this is one big business that was probably creepier when it was just a website run by a couple of college kids, one of whom once said about people's Facebook data, 'People just submitted it. I don't know why. They "trust me". Dumb fucks.' At least now he has investors to sometimes keep him in check, a little bit, maybe.

I'd argue this story is proof that his investors aren't keeping him in check. I don't doubt the fact that he's suppose to be worth billions has done nothing in his own mind but vindicate him and boost his already inflated ego.

Yeah, but he knows he's only worth billions on paper and that could all vanish in an instant the moment the investors get unhappy with him. And honestly, having stuff that you've already posted for "friends" to see be available to apps when you click "authorize" isn't nearly as creepy as having the stuff that no human was ever supposed to see (like your password) potentially being made available by the people running the site to whoever they want to give it to, on a whim. But yeah, you're right, the difference in Zuck's behavior is probably slim if any.

Re:Another option (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900070)

The investors probably hold such a minuscule portion that FB can continue doing what they want.

It will take a couple major stalking cases and a congressional investigation before any of this changes.

Re:Another option (-1, Flamebait)

Ariastis (797888) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899792)

I don't.

My data is safe (ie not on facedouche) ; I'm just pointing out solutions for Mr. McDouche who "needs" to have his info on facebook so "hot biatches" can call him after seeing his mirrored pictures.

An even better option... (5, Insightful)

mfearby (1653) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899698)

...delete your account! Well, at least do your best to delete as much of it as you can. As soon as I learnt years ago that you could never delete your Facebook account I knew never to sign up to that rubbish. And Facebook have vindicated my decision every step of the way ever since.

You'd be a complete nutjob to be using Facebook. I hope that Diaspora is made available to the public in some form this year, though I'm reasonably content with Twitter.

Re:An even better option... (2, Insightful)

cyn1c77 (928549) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899890)

...delete your account! Well, at least do your best to delete as much of it as you can. As soon as I learnt years ago that you could never delete your Facebook account I knew never to sign up to that rubbish. And Facebook have vindicated my decision every step of the way ever since.

Actually, the best solution is to probably replace all your personal information in your account with fake information. Maybe then, at least, Facebook will think you moved. Maybe you will get even luckier and they will lose your old data in a backup failure. If you just delete your account, I am sure they know you are on to them and try to sell your info to the highest bidder!

Re:An even better option... (4, Funny)

wgoodman (1109297) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900078)

My current city: Constantinople.
But I'm from Istanbul.

They can use all of my info they want to, it's all lies.

Re:An even better option... (5, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899952)

You'd be a complete nutjob to be using Facebook.

You'd be a "nutjob" to trust any vital information to Facebook. But I submit to you that there are millions of highly educated and/or computer savvy facebook users. Classifying them all as "nutjobs" is silly. I have a facebook account. I don't post anything on my profile or anywhere else that I consider to be important. I don't post pictures of my children on Facebook (and nor does my wife).

Re:An even better option... (1)

stephathome (1862868) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900052)

That's how I handle it too. It's nice to have an easy way to be in contact with family and friends I don't see much, but if I don't want it out there, Facebook doesn't get it.

The only thing I consider nutty about using Facebook is sharing too much information. Don't share when you're going on vacation. Don't share your address or phone number. Don't share embarrassing photos or any other photo you don't want other people to see. Don't share information that could get you in trouble down the line.

Same as with any other website.

Re:But my connections place me in. (2)

Isaac Remuant (1891806) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900024)

The problem still is that you will STILL appear on facebook. Your friends and family will end up posting your pictures no matter how many times you remind them not to.

Those same people will play farmville, take quizzes and use any other useless application, giving out their and, by proximity, your information.

Even if I have no facebook account. Faceboook can still connect the dots and know sufficiently about me to merchandise, inspect, etc.

Am I being overly paranoid? Maybe.

Re:Another option (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899706)

Or: Account -> Close -> Regain real social life and privacy
 

Re:Another option (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899930)

Easier option :

Account - Privacy Settings - Apps and Websites (Bottom) - Turn off platform apps

Bye bye Farmville / Cafe World / Fortune cookie notifications.

Bye bye info sharing with ueseless apps.

I have yet to find anything I miss from that pile of junk.

Easier still:

Account - Account Settings - Deactivate Account - Confirm.

This is a seriously bad idea! (3, Insightful)

Freaky Spook (811861) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899648)

Giving any App developer access to peoples contact details is just an insane move if FB is meant to be making things more secure for their users.

Having someone's address and phone number makes identity theft so much easier.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899696)

Not to mention:

"I'm on a holiday to the North Pole!"
*click*
Lives at : "My House". 3.142 Street, Homeville.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (5, Informative)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899718)

It seem not jut your information, but also you friends.

I noticed this for some apps:

Access my friends' information
Birthdays, Religious and political views, Family members and relationship statuses, Significant others and relationship details, Home towns, Current locations, Likes, music, TV, movies, books, quotes, Activities, Interests, Education history, Work history, Online presence, Websites, Groups, Events, Notes, Photos, Videos, Photos and videos of them, 'About me' details and Facebook statuses

Why on earth would Facebook want to give this information to third parties, and worse to ones you have not given permission to, but your friend has.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (1)

Chucky_M (1708842) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899744)

It seem not jut your information, but also you friends.

I noticed this for some apps:

Access my friends' information Birthdays, Religious and political views, Family members and relationship statuses, Significant others and relationship details, Home towns, Current locations, Likes, music, TV, movies, books, quotes, Activities, Interests, Education history, Work history, Online presence, Websites, Groups, Events, Notes, Photos, Videos, Photos and videos of them, 'About me' details and Facebook statuses

Why on earth would Facebook want to give this information to third parties, and worse to ones you have not given permission to, but your friend has.

Because you cannot sell what nobody want's to buy, information is what they can sell, the real question is why do people want to buy this information.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (5, Informative)

Freaky Spook (811861) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899754)

It really is a gold mine for identity theft in the wrong hands.

Most phone support for companies only need Phone number, address and DOB for an identity confirmation and all it takes is for someone to get access to someone's credit card account for them to be able to completely steal their identity for dodgy bankloans or being able to get drivers licenses/passports.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899928)

It seem not jut your information, but also you friends.

I noticed this for some apps:

Access my friends' information
Birthdays, Religious and political views, Family members and relationship statuses, Significant others and relationship details, Home towns, Current locations, Likes, music, TV, movies, books, quotes, Activities, Interests, Education history, Work history, Online presence, Websites, Groups, Events, Notes, Photos, Videos, Photos and videos of them, 'About me' details and Facebook statuses

Why on earth would Facebook want to give this information to third parties, and worse to ones you have not given permission to, but your friend has.

You can turn off sharing all information via your friends - there are a number of checkboxes that you have to uncheck. It will only share what you have checked, if your friend adds an app that has the "Access my friends' info" requirement.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (4, Interesting)

paeanblack (191171) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899774)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_directory [wikipedia.org]

I grew up when phone numbers were public information. Everybody had a book where you could look up the phone number and address of anyone in the area. A few people were unlisted at their own request, but this was the exception.

Phone numbers and addresses were treated as public knowledge.

When cell phones first arrived, receiving calls cost money, so cell phone numbers were kept private. Now that the cost of incoming calls is much, much lower, there's little need to keep treating these things as private, especially with people replacing land lines with cell phones.

The problem lies not with facebook making this data available; the problem lies with everyone who pretends this is secret information to begin with. Some companies consider your phone number to be a unique identifier. Other (idiotic) companies treat it as an authenticator...something nobody else knows. Mix those two and BAD SHIT HAPPENS.

SSNs are treated the same way. Some places use them for identification and others use them as a freaking password. Frequently an individual bank or credit provider will be using a SSN as both a username and password simultaneously. THAT is the heart of the problem.

Would knowing the address for the White House help you steal Obama's identity. No, because everybody knows that is public knowledge. The problem is the people who think "wow, this guy knows his own address, so he obviously must be who he claims to be, because nobody else would know that"

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (1)

Chaonici (1913646) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899876)

A phone book is a local directory of information. Sitting in Chicago, I could not look up the phone number and/or address of someone who lives in New York, unless I had access to a New York phone book.

Being on the Internet, Facebook transcends such obsolete things as state or national borders. You can see the phone number and/or address of anyone, anywhere in the world, so long as they've listed it. There's the difference, and the danger.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899976)

Where I live, the phonebook is country-wide. However, if you try to look up the phonenumber of private individuals, more and more often you're in for a little disappointment. People can specify whether they want to be listed or not, and since the government didn't manage to clamp down on telephone marketing, the telcos have started making unlisted the default option.

Re:This is a seriously bad idea! (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899992)

Except with this phone number and address now comes, how often I talk to friends, what my status is, what books, movies and television I like, etc, etc, etc.

What the f***, do you work for facebook, or are you just the volunteer who makes the kool-aid?

why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (4, Insightful)

sakura the mc (795726) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899650)

How about you remove all of your posts, pictures and delete your account immediately?
If this doesn't wake people up, absolutely nothing will.

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (4, Funny)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899716)

Why is this modded funny?

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (4, Informative)

Chucky_M (1708842) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899762)

Why is this modded funny?

Because you are asking addicts to give up their crack and expecting them to say "oh ok sorry about that".

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (5, Insightful)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899768)

Maybe the moderator considered it funny that someone thinks if he removes all his data from Facebook, it is no longer stored there?

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (1, Insightful)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899752)

Why stop there? Why leave your house in the first place? If you go outside, you're just -asking- for your organs to get sold on the black market. And having a computer is just begging someone to steal your identity and infect you with computer viruses.

Alright, that's a hyperbole, but my point is that a lot of people actually like facebook. Deleting information like your home address and phone number is an easy step, and then they'll still be able to use it.

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (4, Informative)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899780)

Reduction to the absurd is itself absurd. By shooting any woman who gets pregnant of course we can eliminate all of society's problems, including facebook "privacy", within 100 years. But exactly how useful is that as an argument?

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899764)

I have a Facebook account, but I gave it no address, phone number, posts or pictures. If you give it absolutely nothing other than your list of friends (unavoidable) and set all privacy options to 'hidden' or 'closed' or whatever (including disabling applications) it's still a nice way to send private messages to old classmates.

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (4, Insightful)

rudy_wayne (414635) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899808)

How about you remove all of your posts, pictures and delete your account immediately?.

You're assuming that closing your account actually deletes all your information and Facebook no longer sells it to advertisers. This is not necessarily a valid assumption.

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (1)

6Yankee (597075) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900074)

You're assuming that closing your account actually deletes all your information and Facebook no longer sells it to advertisers. This is not necessarily a valid assumption.

I closed mine, and they're quite welcome to sell my profile information to any marketers interested in "102-year-old" "lesbians" in "Burkina Faso".

Re:why stop at addresses and phone numbers? (2)

jaf0 (1689558) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899822)

keep in mind that accounts aren't deleted immediately; rather they're in limbo for 3-4 weeks and will then (supposedly) go to /dev/null.

Never had them there in the first place (5, Insightful)

coolmadsi (823103) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899652)

I never put information that detailed up there in the first place. Partially for this sort of reason, but also partially because not everyone on my friends list needs to know all of it (or would care if it was there). Anyone who would want to know, already does.

Sophos: "New level of danger for Facebook users" (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899668)

Share this Article on Facebook.
Comment by signing in with your Facebook Account.
Like us on Facebook.

Re:Sophos: "New level of danger for Facebook users (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899974)

Like us on Facebook.

That one is the one I hate worst. Yes, it's a short way to say you like or hate a comment, but when you need to post a "Facebook like" to a person or company to get a warm fuzzy it's time to admit your social skills are all but gone.

Closing the barn door too late (3, Insightful)

mauriceh (3721) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899676)

Quote:
"advises users to remove their home address and phone numbers from the network immediately"

I think it may a bit too late for that..
If FB will share that data, then I suspect they will share their backup data as well..

Re:Closing the barn door too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899760)

IIRC in the UK (I'm not sure where the servers are based) but I'm sure you have to have a security clearence of secret+ to host this level of information?

Re:Closing the barn door too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899998)

not if they need to confirm to the uk data protection laws... you have to keep your information accurate & not longer than required, and not share when you don't have permission... that would break all 3 of those.... but then it's been a while since I studied anything about that.. might be wrong.. but I don't think I am.

Re:Closing the barn door too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34900088)

A $50 billion company isn't going to worry much about some slap-on-the-wrist "data protection law" in some other country.

Who didn't see this one coming? (5, Insightful)

waddgodd (34934) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899682)

I mean, really, did anybody actually expect facebook to not sell your information to the highest bidder? If you put up real information, expect it to be used. The solution: LIE like a rug! Tell them your home address is 1060 W Addison, Chicago, IL (yeah, that one's kinda lame, copying SNL is good only for laughs). Tell them your phone number is 555-1212. Whatever, be creative.

Re:Who didn't see this one coming? (3, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899796)

I suspect that even poisoning the database with garbage data won't stop the demand for said data because the marketing people who buy it are far to lazy to actually CHECK said data; and so long as a reasonable percentage of the data is legitimate and they make their numbers, who cares? The cost of buying the data is insignificant when compared to other costs.

Sad but true.

Re:Who didn't see this one coming? (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900036)

I thought 1060 West Addison was what the blues brothers put down as their address. It's Wrigly field if I'm not mistaken.

Re:Who didn't see this one coming? (1)

Chaonici (1913646) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900084)

And the hundred-dollar question: From what popular comedy show did the Blues Brothers originate?

Re:Who didn't see this one coming? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34900046)

I mean, really, did anybody actually expect facebook to not sell your information to the highest bidder? If you put up real information, expect it to be used. The solution: LIE like a rug! Tell them your home address is 1060 W Addison, Chicago, IL (yeah, that one's kinda lame, copying SNL is good only for laughs). Tell them your phone number is 555-1212. Whatever, be creative.

Better yet, set your address and phone # to those of FB headquarters. Let their mailroom and switchboard deal with the spam.

Forest Gump was a wise man ... (3, Insightful)

tgd (2822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899684)

Stupid is as stupid does.

If you a) put your address and phone number online and b) click to specifically allow an application to access them, too fucking bad if something bad happens.

I'm so tired of the complete lack of personal responsibility these days.

Re:Forest Gump was a wise man ... (2)

Chaonici (1913646) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899772)

You speak as though this absolves Facebook of any responsibility in the matter, when it does not. People have a reasonable expectation that they can limit who sees what they post on a social networking profile. For Facebook to decide that personal info is open by default, such as in this case, is nothing short of an appalling lack of personal responsibility on /their/ part.

You are correct in that people need to be more careful with what they put online, but companies like Facebook also have duties to responsibly handle what users post on their services. As far as I've seen, Facebook frequently fails to live up to its expectations.

Re:Forest Gump was a wise man ... (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899878)

Did you even RTFA? Or have you ever actually used Facebook?

No app can access information you haven't authorized. For an existing app to access that, you'd have to re-authorize it.

Facebook clearly believes there is some subset of apps in which that information is useful, and has made it available. Considering no one can access it if you (as I said) haven't a) added it and b) authorized it, I fail to see an issue.

Re:Forest Gump was a wise man ... (1)

Chaonici (1913646) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899936)

Ohh, so users have to authorize it. Meaning they get an extra line on an app confirmation screen that they probably won't notice because such screens get mindlessly skipped all the time, much like EULAs. I guess that makes it okay, then!

Re:Forest Gump was a wise man ... (2)

netsharc (195805) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899958)

Actually I used to have my contact info in my profile because I trust my friends (actually, lately I have people I barely know that I've stupidly approved) and I thought it would probably be convenient for them to have said information, and I don't have any privacy-violating apps installed. But disgustingly, apps your friends installed can also access your information, and this is the default setting unless you go in that mysterious region known as "The Settings" and disable that option.

So yeah, fuck you Facebook. Fuck you to hell...

Re:Forest Gump was a wise man ... (1, Interesting)

rudy_wayne (414635) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900066)

Actually I used to have my contact info in my profile because I trust my friends

My friends already know my name, address, phone number, e-mail address, where I work, etc...... There would be no need to ever put it on Facebook.

How far do you go? (3, Insightful)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899686)

I image facebook development to be like a gameshow. They place bets on what changes they need to make to ruin privacy, until an amount of people actually leave.

I'm sure the next step will be medical records, legal records or naked pictures.

Re:How far do you go? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899766)

I'm sure the next step will be medical records, legal records or naked pictures.

Ah, so you've gotten a preview of the "Facebook doctor, lawyer, and glamor photography" apps.

What did you expect? (1)

paiute (550198) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899688)

Knowing the origins of Facebook, did anyone expect MZ to be a beacon of ethical behavior?

why enter that info at all? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899690)

Why exactly would you enter that information into Facebook in the first place? I don't have an FB account so I don't know whether it's useful for anything. Anyone? Perhaps the city you're in, but what would your street address be needed for when sharing photos and such?

Similarly with your mobile number: is there some crucial functionality that needs valid data and not something like 111-555-1212?

Huh? (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899694)

But it's right there on the app install warning page. FB isn't silently doing this.
"THIS APPLICATION WILL COLLECT YOUR MOBILE PHONE NUMBER AND ADDRESS."

and so on...

If you are the kind of user that ignores warnings, you have much bigger problems than this on your hands.

Clueless people like the guy in the Twitter screenshot setting his phone number to the FB customer support is an idiot. Why? Just. Do. Not. Approve.

Re:Huh? (2)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899734)

Who is putting their home address and phone number up there anyway? Same goes for birthdays. Even before this I wouldn't trust FB with any important info.

Currently my info is 555-5555 123 Fake St.

Just you wait (5, Interesting)

tiberiumx (1221152) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899704)

Yeah, delete all you want now. Next Facebook will open up the history for every field. Think of the cool 'dating/breakup timeline' an application could build.

Wow!! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899720)

Yet another example of why facebook is a sack of shit company that doesn't care about their user privacy.

Some one should post the personal and banking info for every employee of facebook online.

I am glad I have never used that steaming turd ... zuckerface is a lying asshole.

and? (4, Informative)

mayberry42 (1604077) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899724)

Troll me if you want, but, while i do find this appalling, i cant feel sympathetic to people who post up their personal, private information for their "friends" to see and then later become victims. There's no valid reason for people to put it up and just leaves them vulnerable to exploitation (see previous facebook slashdot story), especially if you're not required to post it (and if you were, use fake data). Someone wants your address? let them ask it you for it.They want to call you? let them ask you for your phone number in person. Or by private email. At the very least you'll have control over who gets it and who does not, rather than people you randomly friended over time and have no idea who they are (yes, it happens).

I've kept my profile (almost) empty for over a year now - believe me when i say you won't miss your data not being up there for the world to see...

Re:and? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899798)

I've kept my profile (almost) empty for over a year now

Well, I've kept my profile nonexistent. I can live quite well without a Facebook account.

Re:and? (3, Interesting)

FuckingNickName (1362625) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899818)

It's the old "then they came for me" thing. Even if Facebook users are insufferable cunts, they are the cool crowd and any legislation or standard corporate policy (but I repeat myself) concerning privacy will be determined by how they react to what might hitherto have been regarded as an offensive breach of privacy.

IOW, if Facebook is allowed to continue behaving like this, people will just go, "oh you don't have any privacy anyway, get over it!" with your viewpoint being drowned out. In fact, I've heard a lot of younger people say this. (And a small subset of older guys who always end up having been involved in some way in their employment history with processing large amounts of personal data.)

Your friends tell on you...accidentally/on purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34900080)

I don't even have a facebook profile... but facebook is tracking me via the friends who have invited me to join facebook via the same email address. Eventually facebook combines the information from two of my email addresses to get an even better idea of my social network.

Of course, google is doing this in a multitude of ways as well with every website I visit that contains adwords, google analytics etc... all those free services they offer websites. See, they do get something out of it.

The scary part is when Google and Facebook start ASKING YOUR FRIENDS ABOUT YOU. A big social faux-pas.. but on the internet maybe not so bad? Facebook already encourages this with face identification in pictures as does google ( who hides their face id because it's too spooky ). Check out face.com and tell me they aren't allowing paying customers more access to facebook face recognition over their database. If this was the government we'd be crying bloody murder... heck, maybe this is the government? Doesn't matter.. they can get access whenever they want.. or will eventually. Google and Facebook will fight publicly about it but higher powers will find a way ( as will criminal elements and spying countries).

My concern is that I'm being left behind technologically and even socially by not buying in to the social networks. Heck, I hear companies are less likely to hire you if you aren't on Linked-in.

On the hate for Facebook... (1)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899730)

I will ask this again: Why didn't MySpace gain from the hate for Facebook here on Slashdot?

Re:On the hate for Facebook... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899816)

Because MySpace is the replacement of Geocities.

Re:On the hate for Facebook... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899820)

"MyLackOfComfortableCSSUseSpace with a SWF streaming a mp3 from some poor sap's server" isn't in favored.

Re:On the hate for Facebook... (1)

fishexe (168879) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900060)

I will ask this again: Why didn't MySpace gain from the hate for Facebook here on Slashdot?

Because their software was crap and their site was noisy (in more senses than one).

Never trust any online service (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899806)

Don't ever use any personal information on any service except a throwaway e-mail address.

Don't ever subscribe to any social web service.

Personally, I have never subscribed to any social web service and i still enjoy a decent personal life. Any information I want to share with friends or family is on a personal webpage on a private server.

 

That would be the straw for me. (1)

i58 (886024) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899846)

I'm sick of them taking liberties as they see fit.
1. Friends Un-Friended
2. Profile gutted of everything
3. Account deleted
4. Profit for Z! *not from me*

The real problem (1)

Andy Smith (55346) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899864)

This isn't a problem for me because I don't put my address or phone number on Facebook. And within 2 minutes of me reading this on Slashdot, the good lady was informed and now she has removed her phone number.

I also don't allow ANY apps. I use Facebook to keep in contact with people, not as a pass-time.

What I see as the real problem for the greater Facebook population is when, inevitably, Facebook allows advertisers (or anyone else who will pay) carte blanche access to people's profile information without their permission or knowledge.

There are two facts here:
1. Facebook's business model relies on advertisers being able to access people's information.
2. Generally people do not want advertisers to access their information.

I am sure there will come a time when Facebook decides that the siter's users don't need to be involved in the decision about who has access to their information.

Why give out private info? (1)

jroysdon (201893) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899884)

What would make you want to give Facebook your address in the first place? I don't mind ZIP code, but nothing more specific than that.

Further, why give out your phone number? Unless you are a business, why does Facebook need it? Worst case, get a Google Voice account number and have your calls forwarded.

Even more foolish is giving out your complete birthday. I can see how it is nice to get greetings on your birthday, but it's not worth the extra info for identify fraud. Put in 1900 (or whatever they first allow) and the 1st day of the week you're born. You still get nice birthday wishes at about the right time.

Time to make a popular app (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899892)

Does Facebook have a fart app yet? Maybe I should make one and just watch the address & phone numbers roll in.

mod doiwn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34899968)

That hAs grown up

European clients? (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 3 years ago | (#34899982)

I wonder if this company has a Safe Harbour agreement with the EU for clients from that jurisdiction.

I know this agreement is voluntary and not monitored until after the fact but EU citizen have contrary to their US brethren far more privacy protection.

Would these third parties misuse the gained information on EU citizen this could bring them grief, the ex-competition officer [europa.eu] has a few months ago taken on the responsibility of the digital agenda.

People really don't care about their information (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900002)

I was at a gathering yesterday. Met a few new people, nice guys, and I asked one of them for his phone number. I handed him my phone (with the "new contact" sheet open) to type his number, and after a few minutes I started to wonder what kind of novel he's typing in my phone. I'm kinda wary of people snooping through my contacts, so I asked him for the phone back. His response "one sec, I gotta fill in the work place".

Usually, I expect a name (not necessarily the real one, some handle to identify a person with) and a phone number. What I got from this person was name, address, 2 phone numbers, work phone, workplace, address of work and a few more tidbits that I wouldn't even give a fuck about if I tried to go for ID theft.

People really don't give half a shit about their personal data. And I honestly wonder whether my work makes me simply overly paranoid. Am I? Most people that know me know me by some nickname or handle, few acquaintances outside of work have my real name. I also rarely "reuse" a nick, usually different groups of people know me by different names (and hence, Opportunist is not used anywhere else).

So am I too paranoid or are people too careless?

Does this change anything? (0)

angus77 (1520151) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900006)

If people were stupid enough to put that shit up in the first place, what makes anyone think that they'd be smart enough to take it down now?

Hello 21st century... (1)

ritzer (934174) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900012)


You can already get most of that information online. Last time I used 411.com they gave me phone number, complete postal address and even a handy map. Google the person's name and you get everything else they've done on the 'net in the past couple decades. So curse facebook if you must, then back into the sand with that head...

Privacy is the KILLER APP (1)

lamapper (1343009) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900016)

They can not release any personal information that you DO NOT PROVIDE to them.

I too hate this crap, but too many people do not take privacy seriously and provided the information in the past, therefore, they (companies) have no reason not to expect you to follow and give them information like you have in the past. They believe we are all sheeple!

Too many social networking sites want to lock you into bad OAuth sites, like Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. Too many people forget that as soon as they have any piece of information related to you and a single phone call, monthly bill, purchase, email account, etc, they know exactly who you are.

Are you willing to stop using a site that violates your privacy? Most are not, therefore giving a nod to the company that wants to violate our privacy.

Security and privacy go hand in hand. Privacy requires you to maintain a singular mind set to maintain your privacy and not get lazy. If you give up and provide the information because someone says you should not have anything to hide, its game over from a privacy perspective. Once you slip up and give out any private information, its just one small step from putting the pieces together and identifying who you are, what you are looking at in order to market to you. Of course who besides marketers are using this info for what other purposes will never be fully disclosed to you, ever.

Our Credit information, another privacy sink, which contains all our personal information is too tightly inter-twined with our lives now, as if your credit determines what type of driver you are and should relate in any way to increasing the amount you pay for insurance. Pathetic.

Is your browser secure? Can you tightly control not just regular cookies but Flash cookies as well? With Firefox + Linux (Banish Flash cookies forever under Linux [slashdot.org] ) you can. Chrome is in bed with Adobe and Flash so they will never provide a viable option to delete tracking cookies. Internet Explorer was never meant to keep information about you private, ever. What other browsers let you delete Flash cookies on a regular basis? Even with Firefox, a reboot of my PC is required to delete the stupid Flash tracking cookies, but at least I can do that with Linux!

In all cases, a company can not reveal what you do not provide to them. Do they really need your phone number? Really, REALLY, grow a pair and say NO! Where else might you get the info, there are always other options. Do they really need your email account info? Do they really need a credit card? There are always other options, granted some might not be as convenient, but they are out there if you are willing to expend the energy to seek them out.

If you are not willing to spend some time to protect your privacy, than you are probably not reading this right now.

While all sites should OPT OUT by DEFAULT, we know they do not and we know why. Of course you do not have to use that site! You have choices. If you only have two choices, you have no real choice. Sometimes you just have to say NO! Sometimes, as in this case, you have to say H8ll NO!

This story is such a load of Horses#@t (1)

DanTheCanadian (1977682) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900018)

First, I am totally in favor of keeping my info that I've added to FB under the same privacy controls I used when I setup my profile. Unlike what most of the print/television media has reported, users aren't storing their SIN number's or credit card info within their Facebook profile, and I would hope as a user you wouldn't list your full proper home address on your FB profile page. So really what type of info could someone seriously gather from your profile (on a public website) if everything you had listed on there today was made public? The reason for my subject title, is it seems whenever its a slow news day the media will simply start a new defamatory story about some aspect of the FB privacy controls. Also, please try and remember that just like browsing the web, you dont simply just click on any pop up that comes your way. Why should adding applications to your FB page be any different? The "rogue applications mentioned in the article sound somewhat ominous, and one hopes users are somewhat intelligent and stick with the more well known and more mainstream applications (farmville/cityville/etc) when selecting which applications to add to their profile

Lots of FUD (1)

nilbog (732352) | more than 3 years ago | (#34900108)

It seems like there is a lot of FUD going around about this and things like it. Facebook got its act together mostly on the privacy thing and if you actually take the time to configure your privacy it offers you very good control. It's also up front about what information is accesible to applications when you install them. Pretty much you just need to not install anything that you don't trust - it's no different than installing software on your computer.

Personally I would like if everyone used Facebook for their contact information. That way my contacts stay up to date automatically on my phone. Just, again, be careful who you give that information to. I think they've struck a good balance between privacy and usability at this point.

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