Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Motorola Sticks To Guns On Locking Down Android

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the take-it-or-leave-it dept.

Android 600

jeffmeden writes "'These aren't the droids you're looking for' proclaims Motorola, maker of the popular Android smartphones such as the Droid 2 and Droid X. At least, not if you have any intention of loading a customized operating system. According to Motorola's own YouTube channel, 'If you want to do custom roms, then buy elsewhere, we'll continue with our strategy that is working thanks.' The strategy they are referring to is a feature Motorola pioneered called 'e-fuse', the ability for the phone's CPU to stop working if it detects unauthorized software running."

cancel ×

600 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

What a great way to die (5, Insightful)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935062)

Hundreds of thousands of potential costumers go "ok."

Re:What a great way to die (2)

Aerorae (1941752) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935086)

Right. Hundreds of thousands.

Not millions. So an enormous company like Moto can do without them no problem.

Re:What a great way to die (1)

Daniel Phillips (238627) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935100)

And I go to all my friends "Samsung".

Why U.S. Galaxy S Phones run Android 2.1 Still (1)

Vandil X (636030) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935140)

http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=913045 [xda-developers.com]

Samsung isn't exactly treating their Android phone customers well either.

Re:Why U.S. Galaxy S Phones run Android 2.1 Still (1)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935186)

While their froyo rollout in America has been delayed, and far from smooth in Europe, that thread you linked to is complete utter bullshit. [androidspin.com]

Re:Why U.S. Galaxy S Phones run Android 2.1 Still (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935336)

So root and install it yourself. This is about locked bootloaders not if they give swift updates.

Re:Why U.S. Galaxy S Phones run Android 2.1 Still (1)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935474)

Root isn't even needed If you're still on 2.1, you can flash unsigned update.zip files on Galaxy S 2.1 using recovery 2e

Re:What a great way to die (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935316)

ah, yes, Samsung, the company that charges for updates.

Re:What a great way to die (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935102)

cue Apple fans showing us the light talking about "teh fragmentation"

Re:What a great way to die (4, Insightful)

chaffed (672859) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935112)

However, for that to happen, people need to care.

For the vast majority of the smart phone crowd, they do not care. Just as long as they can get that "urgent" work email, post a picture of their lunch and tweet about how tired they are in the evening.

Re:What a great way to die (0)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935178)

Actually, for the most part what I see are 2 types of people buying phones like these: The actually tech savvy type that would never buy this Motorola garbage... and those that think they are tech savvy but deep down really aren't. The latter go to the former to figure out what to buy. Even a basic Google search on the phone is going to bring up a treasure trove of people complaining about the phone being locked down.

Re:What a great way to die (2)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935124)

Most consumers don't even have a clue what is being discussed, or care. As long as they can make calls, surf and buy stuff they wont know the difference.

Sticks to guns? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935160)

Why not throw "target" in there with a surveyor's mark! Did Palin take over /. while I wasn't looking?

You are promoting an atmosphere of fear and hate.

Re:Sticks to guns? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935302)

Why not throw "target" in there with a surveyor's mark! Did Palin take over /. while I wasn't looking?

You are promoting an atmosphere of fear and hate.

It was a knife fight anyway, so he brought a gun.

Obama brings a gun to a knife fight [politico.com]

“If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun,” Obama said in Philadelphia last night.

June 14, 2008.

Oh, and the Arizona shooter? A full-fledged US-flag-burning, Bush-hating, 9/11 Troofer MORON [nytimes.com] :

He became intrigued by antigovernment conspiracy theories, including that the Sept. 11 attacks were perpetrated by the government and that the country’s central banking system was enslaving its citizens. His anger would well up at the sight of President George W. Bush, or in discussing what he considered to be the nefarious designs of government.

Yeah, a flag-burning, Bush Derangement Syndrome-addled 9/11 Troofer gets his cues from Sarah Palin. More likely Keith Olbermann and Daily Kos, no?

So sorry to blow your meme up with facts.

Re:Sticks to guns? (-1, Flamebait)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935330)

"If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun," Obama said in Philadelphia last night."

It's the Chicago way.

Re:What a great way to die (1)

whiteboy86 (1930018) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935164)

This approach works for some fruit related company, anyway I do not see how that fact affects average Joe Consumer, you know the 99% of all buyers.

Re:What a great way to die (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935188)

Hundreds of thousands of potential costumers go "ok."

Your numbers are a little off. The Droid brand sells tens of millions of devices a year.
And the people who buy it to install custom OS on it or even know what an "OS" is, are tens of thousands.

Also there's one more irony here. You seem to suggest that the community should shrug and give up on Droid devices. But in the same breath the number of Droid phones sold is always included when Android fans talk about market share of the "free and open Android OS". If it's really so "unfree" that you'd suggest people ban Droid phones, it shouldn't be counted, isn't that right.

Re:What a great way to die (2)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935460)

Your numbers are a little off. The Droid brand sells tens of millions of devices a year.

Someone else said 99% of the people wouldn't care.

But yeah, maybe the 1% who do care and the 0.25% who would had eventually bought the Motorola and the 0.05% who decided they won't now when Motorola decides as such won't kill it :)

Bad suicide attempt? =P

And the people who buy it to install custom OS on it or even know what an "OS" is, are tens of thousands.

Ah, ok.

Re:What a great way to die (4, Informative)

TheRealGrogan (1660825) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935220)

I despise Motorola and their rubbish. My parents had motorola phones previously, and they were so proprietary they wanted $90 for a program just to let us transfer pictures from the phone to the computer.

I dicked around (for hours) trying to get a home grown solution working and finally just gave up. It involved installing a driver from motorola (deeply buried on their web site), and a third party app for accessing it. All it did was hang. What I learned (but wasn't sure if I believed) was that even the USB cable was proprietary and while it was the same connection as a camera cable, it was wired differently.

So I don't particularly care what they say and do, there will be no more Motorola devices in this household anyway.

The folks have since switched to Blackberries.

Long before this, I hated Motorola for their shitty modems. Some of the worst rubbish that I have ever had the pleasure of tossing in the garbage.

Re:What a great way to die (2)

Asten (674521) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935362)

I've pretty much exclusively had motorola phones since high school. Not always great, but always well built... The phones that required Phone Tools were in a time where everyone's was proprietary. A long time ago, I was trying to coax another charger into charging my razr faster. I read that the 'official' USB cable has an extra pin which is required for accessories, but any normal USB cable worked once they went to MicroUSB... I've used random cables on my RAZR, V3XX, Q9h, and Milestone and they all work fine. It was the old weird flat wide connector that was proprietary.. but then again, so was everyone's at that point. Pretty much everything these days is super easy. Plugging in the latest android phones are awesome - you simply use a web browser, or a file manager and can get to everything on the phone. That said - I'm a hacker, so I probably won't go with motorola next time around as I want to put my own roms on. This attitude of theirs doesn't really seem to have any point to it. Taking it off hurts nothing at all. Leaving it on costs them sales. Maybe not tons, but a sale is a sale. Why go out of your way to lose sales?

Re:What a great way to die (2)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935300)

Hundreds, probably. Thousands, possible. Hundreds of thousands? Delusions of grandeur much?

Re:What a great way to die (4, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935444)

There are something like a million downloads of cyanogen mod. Even if that is the same folks downloading each release you are still looking at hundreds of thousands. That is one ROM, not all of them.

Re:What a great way to die (2, Insightful)

udoschuermann (158146) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935402)

At least they're not pulling a Sony on us, selling the things as open and then revoking the ability, after they scammed us out of our money. But it looks like I will not be buying from Motorola again from now on.

I wonder what company wants to go on my (permanent) blacklist next...

Is that a challenge? (2)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935068)

Don't test the masses, especially the ones that know what they're doing.

Re:Is that a challenge? (3, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935106)

The ones who know what they're doing aren't the masses. They're the ignorable minority.

Re:Is that a challenge? (1)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935132)

The /. masses, though..

Re:Is that a challenge? (5, Informative)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935246)

The e-fuse has a 1024 bit RSA key. Good luck trying to brute force that.

But if you want to waste electricity, you can sign up for the efforts to brute force Motorola Milestone [xda-developers.com] - their first phone to feature this draconian lockdown.

Re:Is that a challenge? (1)

rebot777 (765163) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935478)

No mod points so I thought I'd just give a thumbs up! I'm signing up.

Dump your Motorola stocks (4, Insightful)

Ariastis (797888) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935082)

A company who tells its clients to go buy from someone else is usually on the way out...

Re:Dump your Motorola stocks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935154)

That isn't what they are saying, it is just what the 0.0000000000000003% of users that might want to install their own OS on a PHONE hear.

If you aren't part of the masses, then nobody really gives a damn about what you want to buy, the money to be made is in selling to the masses.

Re:Dump your Motorola stocks (5, Insightful)

Bogtha (906264) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935388)

Apple have this exact attitude and they just posted a record revenue of $26bn for this quarter, beating Wall St estimates by $2bn. Looking at their iPhone sales alone, they are the largest mobile phone vendor in the world by revenue. They have $60bn in cash reserves and no debt.

All other things being equal, sure, more customers = more profit. But all other things are rarely equal, so summing an entire company's future up into one single factor is idiotic.

"Then buy elsewhere" (5, Informative)

SquirrelDeth (1972694) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935096)

Fine I will.dumbasses

welcome to the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935098)

99.997% of people don't care about this kind of thing. In a decade or two it'll be almost impossible to buy computing devices that aren't locked down. There are advantages for the vendor, and whatever disadvantages there are for the customer require specialized knowledge to even understand, so there is no market force to balance.

Thus dies the freedom that led many into computing in the first place. It was a good run while it lasted.

Thing it sounds crazy? Well not that long ago, the very *idea* of such a locked down device was crazy. Today they are all over the place and people snap them up.

Re:welcome to the future (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935142)

Remember that we are talking about PHONES here, traditionally a locked down *appliance* for several reasons, not desktop or laptop computers. Just beacuse they are now much more functional doesn't mean the market mentality has changed.

Once they start locking down general purpose computers,then we can talk.

Re:welcome to the future (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935356)

And remember that you can still get an OG droid, or a brand new Nexus S.

Re:welcome to the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935372)

Ok... TPM [lafkon.net] , and trusted computing [wikipedia.org] and la grande chipset and vpro [wikipedia.org] .. not to forget the current Sandy Bridge chipset... with this stuff implemented in the name of "protecting video streams".

Re:welcome to the future (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935432)

Once they start locking down general purpose computers,then we can talk.

I don't think the prospects are anything like as dire as the GP post suggests, but things aren't looking entirely rosy.

Take the iPad, for example. However much Apple want to classify it as a new device, it's still a tablet computer, and we had them running general purpose OS's for a good few years before its release.

Re:welcome to the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935472)

> Once they start locking down general purpose computers

*Ahem* iPads.

Re:welcome to the future (1)

Renegade Lisp (315687) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935198)

99.997% of people don't care about this kind of thing. In a decade or two it'll be almost impossible to buy computing devices that aren't locked down. There are advantages for the vendor, and whatever disadvantages there are for the customer require specialized knowledge to even understand, so there is no market force to balance.

Thus dies the freedom that led many into computing in the first place. It was a good run while it lasted.

Thing it sounds crazy? Well not that long ago, the very *idea* of such a locked down device was crazy. Today they are all over the place and people snap them up.

Understand your sentiment, but keep in mind that one of the reasons Android is selling so well these days is because it is considered an open system, even by those who don't really understand the implications, as opposed to iOS. So, in a world where everything is totally locked down, a product that is not locked down might actually appeal to enough people that they would vote with their wallet, and ensure at least a niche for that product, if not more.

The "market" is just not something that will stay in any one corner for eternity.

Re:welcome to the future (1)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935270)

Well true. But the lock down feature will appeal to the corporate types. So a few individual customers walk and instead they pick up Megacorp.

Not a bad exchange.

Re:welcome to the future (3, Insightful)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935310)

That's why the GPLv3 is so important. There are two trends going on here: there's locking down of software to prevent hacking and keep monopoly control on the devices, but there's also the use of free software components.

Without free software to do the heavy lifting, the phone manufacturers wouldn't be able to compete at the same price point in the market, so free software developers actually have some leverage to prevent lockdowns in the future.

But for that, the community must be smart and use the right kind of license, eg GPLv3, but not BSD. If the Linux/embedded systems developers drop the ball and continue to use the wrong kinds of licences (GPLv2 is not good enough), then the future you talk about will certainly happen.

Re:welcome to the future (4, Insightful)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935412)

Without free software to do the heavy lifting, the phone manufacturers wouldn't be able to compete at the same price point in the market, so free software developers actually have some leverage to prevent lockdowns in the future.

Here's a newsflash for you: Google created Android to make sure they have a presence in the lucrative mobile market and could care less about "open" and "free." The reason Android was released as open source is to take advantage of the geek word-of-mouth (or geek internet press) and the geek anti Apple backlash. There won't be any "leveraging" done. I guess this is the point where a a bunch of disillusioned geeks get together and vow to create a 100% pure open(tm) alternative (ETA: 2015.)

Re:welcome to the future (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935458)

So then why do they release the Nexus line of phones that are the most open smartphones on the market?

Re:welcome to the future (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935470)

create a 100% pure open(tm) alternative (ETA: 2015.)

oooh! The Hurd is almost done!?

Motorola Xoom (1)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935116)

Hopefully, Xoom won't be the same. Andy Rubin said that Google are using a Motorola device to build honeycomb, and it's likely the Xoom. If it is, it won't be e-fused.

Re:Motorola Xoom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935244)

You're a bit too hopefull.

First, the Xoom isn't out yet. It doesn't exist. While Google uses development hardware from few companies, including Motorolla, we're talking about prototypes costing about 10-20 thousand dollars the piece, and which heavily differ from the eventual production units in terms of lockdown and customization.

Second, what part of "we're not abandoning a strategy that works" was not clear?

Re:Motorola Xoom (1)

green1 (322787) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935262)

I second that, I have a Motorola Milestone right now, and because of the valiant efforts of others, and despite Motorola, I have it rooted and love it.

I have been drooling over the Xoom and hope to be able to buy one as soon as possible... but if I can't have root, I may have to try for a different tablet.

I'm sick and tired of companies who think they can tell me what to do with MY hardware after I have purchased it from them, it isn't theirs anymore, I'm ok if they won't support any changes I make, but I'm not ok with them actively blocking them.

Re:Motorola Xoom (1)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935346)

Root is fine. Root access exploits are a dime a dozen.

A locked bootloader is - for me anyway - unacceptable, hopefully they don't half ass their new policy on it: http://moto.ly/bootload [moto.ly]

Re:Motorola Xoom (1)

green1 (322787) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935416)

I'm a practical person, and as much as I love the theory of truly open, I also buy the best tool for the job. If I can get root, I'll likely buy it, even if I can't install something other than Android. If I can't have root though, they can't have my money. (and they tried that on the Milestone, but people managed to get around it)

Re:Motorola Xoom (1)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935464)

Root is not the issue. A locked bootloader is. With a locked bootloader, you're stuck with whatever version of android Motorola leave you with. If they decide that Atrix will only be updated to Gingerbread, and not Honeycomb/Icecream, you can't do anything about it. Unless someone cracks their 1024 bit RSA key... (very very very unlikely. Think billions of years of computation time.)

Re:Motorola Xoom (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935364)

This has nothing to do with root.

This has to do with loading another OS via the bootloader. Your Milestone is locked down the same way.

The More You Know....

Re:Motorola Xoom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935348)

Hopefully, Xoom won't be the same. Andy Rubin said that Google are using a Motorola device to build honeycomb, and it's likely the Xoom. If it is, it won't be e-fused.

Why does that imply that it won't be e-fused?

That just implies that the ones Google uses to develop on will have an Engineering SPL with the e-fuse stuff disabled for them. That doesn't imply that the end user device will not have the e-fuse stuff.

Re:Motorola Xoom (1)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935410)

Google will probably want to release a tablet version of Nexus, and that is the device that they designed the system on. So, it'll be in conjunction with Motorola.

It'll be the Xoom, unless Motorola release two tablets. The Xoom, and whatever the Nexus tablet is.

Great! (3, Insightful)

fotbr (855184) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935122)

Let 'em fail. It wasn't that long ago that motorola could barely GIVE their phones away.

Dumbfounded...... Can anyone explain? (2)

Proudrooster (580120) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935126)

Why would Motorolla do this? Are they experiencing warranty returns on bricked phones? Are carriers pressuring them not to allow unlocks? What is the driver behind this decision? I think it is reasonable to put in a warranty void e-fuse if the phone gets bricked by another O/S, but why do they care?

Re:Dumbfounded...... Can anyone explain? (2)

LBArrettAnderson (655246) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935138)

Carriers who don't want you using more bandwidth than you are paying for.

Re:Dumbfounded...... Can anyone explain? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935206)

Carriers who don't want you using more bandwidth than you are paying for.

Sorry, but this is silly - carriers with really unlimited plans are... ehm... scarce - most give you a monthly cap even on the "unlimited" plans, and after that either they disconnect you, or make you crawl around 64kbs speeds, or simply charg a lots os isk for your data.

VOiP is not an issue too, since you have SIP and Skype apps for non-rooted Android phones - and carriers simply drop voip calls after few seconds if they don't want you to use them (again, thank you so much for the so-called "unlimited" plans...)

Re:Dumbfounded...... Can anyone explain? (5, Insightful)

Spykk (823586) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935306)

e-fuse doesn't stop you from rooting your phone and installing wireless-tether. e-fuse is there so that Motorola can stop releasing kernel updates when the droid 3 comes out so that you are forced to buy a new phone if you want the latest version of android.

Re:Dumbfounded...... Can anyone explain? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935426)

Carriers who don't want you using the bandwidth that you are paying for.

There, fixed that for you.

Re:Dumbfounded...... Can anyone explain? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935182)

I'm gonna go with planned obsolescence. At some point, Motorola will stop supporting a phone. Normally enthusiasts like the folks at the XDA might take over and cook up a custom ROM to keep a device running with the latest android OS drops. With a signed bootloader, your options are either to live with outdated software, or upgrade to a newer model of phone.

Re:Dumbfounded...... Can anyone explain? (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935446)

Probably legal reasons. Maybe if somebody loaded a custom OS on their phone and caused mayhem on a cellular network in some way they could be held liable because they didn't take reasonable precautions to prevent it ?

Minority Opinion... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935128)

I know my opinion on this matter is in the minority (especially on slashdot), but I don't have a problem with this. Carriers get to decide which devices are allowed on their network. Motorola makes devices and partners with carriers. You could argue about 1s and 0s just being 1s and 0s, but these carriers want to know what a standard user will use on their network.

If you want an unlocked device, go elsewhere, or make your voice heard so that they know there's a market for them. Perhaps you could suggest the idea that they'll let you unlock it if you agree to subscribe to a tethering package.

Re:Minority Opinion... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935380)

or maybe just buy a Nexus S.

Fuck them, they are dumb pipes and should not have a hand in what is on my phone. If they want to sell me 5GB of data they should have no say in what device I use it on or how I use it.

Re:Minority Opinion... (2)

stoborrobots (577882) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935386)

Carriers get to decide which devices are allowed on their network.

In the GSM world, carriers don't get to decide which devices are allowed on their networks. They get to issue subscribers (people) with identification modules (SIM [wikipedia.org] ), which can be placed into any compatible device (phone, computer, or otherwise) and the device can then authenticate and talk to the network.

Which smartphone for OS development? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935134)

Which smartphone for OS development, then?

Re:Which smartphone for OS development? (3, Informative)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935434)

Nexus S

Pfft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935144)

This is *exactly* why I exchanged my Droid X for the Incredible...

Who should I buy from? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935148)

So who is more ROM friendly? Samsung? LG? HTC? Someone else?

Re:Who should I buy from? (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935208)

I hear the Samsung are alright if you can get past the RFS (not Reiser) issue.

Re:Who should I buy from? (2)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935292)

RFS is only the beginning of the problems, and has been eliminated. (Voodoo, speedmod, z4mod, tegrak etc)

Propitiatory drivers and Samsung messing around with the code are the main problems

Re:Who should I buy from? (4, Informative)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935272)

Go for the Nexus S - they're the most dev friendly. You'll also find that HTC phones are also supported pretty well, even though they have a similarly draconian nandlock in place. It's just been cracked :)

Misleading Headline. (5, Insightful)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935150)

This is not locking down Android, this is locking down a Motorola Handset.

Hardware lock down, not software. Pretty big distinction.

But Motorola has jumped the shark. HTC are offering better handsets and MotoBlur is a complete joke. I liked my Milestone too, but due to Motorola's insistence on locking it down I wont be buying the Milestone 2. HTC Desire Z looks a lot better.

Re:Misleading Headline. (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935452)

This is not locking down Android, this is locking down a Motorola Handset.

To a great degree it is locking down Android, as you cannot upgrade to a new version of Android that requires a new kernel, not to mention that this could easily be extended to defeat pretty much any permanent root process.

This is why I'm sticking with my N900 until I see where these shitty companies fall out. At this rate I'll never buy Motorola hardware, and supposedly Samsung is rolling out something similar in Galaxy Tab devices (though only reported in Europe so far.)

Obligatory post about android "Openess" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935156)

Score:-1, Flamebait

Buy elsewhere. (1)

crhylove (205956) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935162)

For all of you who are tech savvy at all, the message is clear "Buy Elsewhere". I for one fully plan on joining MOTO in their boycott of..... MOTO. Smart move guys!

Re:Buy elsewhere. (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935342)

That's the opinion that most companies have. Your ISP doesn't want a bandwidth heavy advanced tech savvy user. They want grandma to pay $60/mo to get her five emails and read the church newsletter online. Companies want the overwhelming masses of users who don't put a strain on services, are happy with what they get, and won't play around with firmware, roms, torrents, etc.

or not (1)

richie681 (1979778) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935172)

Http://on.db.me/dEwySY maybe Moto has seen the light.

Re:or not (2)

richie681 (1979778) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935218)

Http://on.fb.me/dEwySY is what that's supposed to be.

you cannot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935176)

say the word "guns" anymore. You are also not allowed to describe a company as "targeting" a demo.

Atrix (1)

data2 (1382587) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935190)

The Atrix looked exactly like what I needed, especially with the netbook like dock. But if they are so intent on not getting my money, then they won't. I was already doubting my decision, because I would like the Android version after the current one, and now the risk is just too great for not getting it.

i have a custom rom on my D2G (1)

jupiterssj4 (801031) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935192)

See their forums about the push email not working, huge problem for a supposed "Business Phone". Also, my Droid 2 Global is rooted and has a custom ROM installed, seems to work just fine except for the email issue, even with TouchDown for email.

Re:i have a custom rom on my D2G (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935406)

You don't have a real custom rom, you are using kexec if you even run a non-stock kernel.

So what should I buy? (1)

rsilvergun (571051) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935194)

It's tough to keep track of which phone's a Motorola, since the companies tend to brand stuff weirdly in the Cell phone world.

Well (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935212)

I always have liked Samsung and HTC products, never had a problem with Motorola since Ive never owned one, but now I won't ever buy one. Congrats Motorola.

Bootloader Feedback Policy (5, Interesting)

Vap1d- (461834) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935226)

Seems that sentiment was pretty quickly retracted. http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=495971028278 [facebook.com]

Re:Bootloader Feedback Policy (2)

BabySledge (756467) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935252)

As well as a compromise mentioned...http://www.androidcentral.com/motorola-disavows-youtube-comment-says-its-working-bootloader-compromise

Redundant (1)

Rennt (582550) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935238)

It doesn't take a statement from the company. Just look at the devices they are offering. Users who want to run custom firmware aren't the kind to walk in and say "one android please". You do basic research. You check if custom ROMS are known to work. You don't buy Motorola.

Guess ill be shopping elswhere (1)

corvax (941506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935240)

all those people lined up to buy the xoom tablet just got the major incentive not to. This is what they call artificial obsolescence, they used to do it with feature phones youd have to get the newest hardware to have the newest software.(the old phones end up in landfills) But we all know now that our old hardware is more than capable of running the newest software. This is done to drive sales and to force you to keep lousy things like moto blur. The the votes are in motorola and no one wants motoblur they want stock android!

I see little point in posting this article here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935242)

If half of the comments are going to be just copied/pasted from the article also. It's like, you know? Fuck Motorola! Who gives a damn?

Saved me a lot of time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935264)

I was planning on waiting for the motorola bionic... hearing this news I think I'll be getting the HTC Thunderbolt. Thanks for the heads up Moto.

WTF?! (1)

thisnamestoolong (1584383) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935276)

What are they hoping to accomplish here? What do they have to lose by people installing other O/S'es on their hardware? They are spending all this time and money engineering a solution to... what? Keeping legitimate consumers from wanting to buy their product? I have a Moto Droid, and was planning on upgrading to the Droid X, but I will most certainly be going HTC for my next phone purchase.

migamix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34935318)

so, when the droid x I'm typing on right new goes put prematurely EOL in march, I'm SOL, until someone cracks the efuse, so I can load a ROM,SAD that this is the first, and last, motorola phone I'm buying.
question is...and I already know the answer...will motorola release the code for the X letting us have a device usable for more than one year via custom roms

Re:migamix (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935424)

No. The whole point is to force you to buy a new one. Next time do a little research before buying a smartphone.

I'll vote with my wallet (1)

peloy (26438) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935324)

What a dumb move. "Buy elsewhere". Like if anyone can afford to be elitist these days of bloody competition.

But of course I'll vote with my wallet and buy elsewhere; they don't deserve my money.

Why didn't Google make Android GPLv3? (1)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935344)

Sure, the kernel must continue to be GPLv2, but the user mode components can still be GPLv3, and it is compatible with the Apache license.

The word 'e-fuse' doesn't mean what you think (5, Informative)

pslam (97660) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935370)

The strategy they are referring to is a feature Motorola pioneered called 'e-fuse', the ability for the phone's CPU to stop working if it detects unauthorized software running.

Oh not this bullshit again. This was first published by an ill-informed "hacker" a while back and regurgitated by every blog in the world with no fact checking.

  • Here's what an e-fuse is: a write-once programmable bit.
  • Here's what they're typically used for: unique IDs (serial number), RAM repair (mark bad rows etc), feature selection, keys, miscellaneous factory config things.
  • Here's what you find with e-fuses in them: almost every CPU in the world, probably all of the SoCs used by Motorola's competitors, probably every SoC in every cell phone.
  • Here's what they're not used for: bricking devices.

Motorola has even stated very clearly that they never intend to completely brick a device if it detects an unauthorized ROM. It'll just need restoring. The SoCs Motorola uses are in no way pioneering e-fuses. Someone just read a gigantic amount of conspiracy into the tiniest of press release. This is OLD technology. Can this lie please go away?

Re:The word 'e-fuse' doesn't mean what you think (5, Informative)

Tacvek (948259) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935422)

Correct. The actual technology here is TI's M-Shield, a feature of the OMAP processors. Motorola was just one of the first to use it in a noticeable application. M-Shield which lets OEMs burn a public key into a set of ordinary e-fuses, which the processor will use to verify a boot-loader signature, falling back on a recovery firmware if the signature is not valid.

And, (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935408)

i will buy elsewhere. thanks. though, you didnt need to give the advice. the expression of your stubbornness in locking down your customer, was all that i needed. next time, dont waste sentences in your precious press release - realize that saying one thing may directly imply another and economize words.

Bad news (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935420)

... for this guy. Software is increasingly detaching itself from the hardware is bundled into. Open enough operating systems, like Meego, or Android, are start to being installed in phones that had something else bundled, like Android on the N900 or some Windows phones, or Meego in the HTC HD2 or Samsung S. Would not be surprised if the same trend become for other open enough operating systems, like WebOS, Bada, or even future Symbian releases. Phone makers should focus in making the best hardware, bundle a reference system, but let users decide how to use it better, if it becomes more useful because what others do, they will sell more.

WTF (1)

atari2600a (1892574) | more than 3 years ago | (#34935442)

Are they TRYING to make HTC look attractive, affordable, & overall a good investment!? Guess what'll make my HTC Aria (Liberty) awesome!? In 2 years when my contract expires, I'll have a sleek, affordable phone running Cyanogenmod Android 5.0 "Generic Food", retaining any resale value a 600MHz (825 when on-demand OC'd) will still have!
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>