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The Rise and Fall of Graphic Adventure Games

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the mind-the-alligators dept.

Classic Games (Games) 134

The Opposable Thumbs blog has a detailed retrospective on almost three decades of history in the graphic adventure genre. While this type of game has fallen from favor in recent times, many classic titles made indelible marks on the memories and preferences of an entire generation of gamers. If you played video games in the '80s and '90s, you'll probably see something you recognize. Quoting: "In its sometimes-turbulent thirty-year history, the graphic-adventure genre has driven technology adoption, ridden at both the crest and trough of the graphics and audio waves, touched the lives of millions of people, and shaped the rise (and, in some cases, fall) of several big-name people and companies in the gaming industry. It's a genre that has often been held back by its own insularity, suffering from an unwillingness to adapt to changing market conditions or to further push the boundaries of interactivity. Adventure games certainly did these things, but the efforts to truly innovate seemed to peak in the mid-'90s, before rapidly falling off—with only a few exceptions. The improving fortunes of adventure game developers in recent years may at least in part be attributable to their efforts to innovate—Telltale with the episodic structure, Quantic Dream with a new control system (for better or worse), and Japanese developers such as Cing with Nintendo DS titles that introduce elements from visual novels.

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Phoenix Wright doesn't count? (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017784)

The Ace Attorney and the spinoff Perfect Prosecutor doesn't count?

Re:Phoenix Wright doesn't count? (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017792)

Oops I accidentally the whole series.

Re:Phoenix Wright doesn't count? (2)

dintech (998802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017816)

Also Day of the Tentacle only gets a passing mention. However, as stated, this article is more about the key developments of the genre rather than necessarily it's greatest games.

Re:Phoenix Wright doesn't count? (4, Interesting)

rainmouse (1784278) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017986)

Just because the adventure games being currently produced are not the focus of the AAA developers does not mean a decline. My partner and her friends sit and play a seemingly endless stream of very creative looking new adventure games produced by indie developers and sold on steam. I'd recommend anyone to check them out and they are usually very cheap to buy.

Also worth noting about the article is that on each of the 6 pages there are up to 4 separate web tracking networks sending my blocking software haywire.

Re:Phoenix Wright doesn't count? (1)

Ephemeriis (315124) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018716)

Yup. My wife is a big fan of adventure games. There's still a steady stream of them coming out...

Big Fish Games seems to have a nearly endless supply of them. I routinely see new stuff from various small developers popping up on Steam. And I think The Adventure Company is still turning stuff out.

FPS titles may be the hot thing going... But that doesn't mean the graphical adventure game is dead.

Re:Phoenix Wright doesn't count? (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019472)

The Adventure Company and Dreamcatcher Interactive are more publishers than developers.

However, they do publish a number of titles we would not otherwise see here outside of their home (usually European) countries.

Re:Phoenix Wright doesn't count? (1)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018242)

I scanned the article quickly but I didn't notice any mention of Tex Murphy either. Sad because I thought Under A Killing Moon mixed live acting with CG very well for the time.

Atari, Commodore doesn't count? (1)

commodore6502 (1981532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018556)

The most glaring omission I see are Atari, Commodore, and Amiga graphic adventures. The topic discusses Apples and IBMs, but nary a word about the other machines.

Some of the Best graphic adventures were on the Ataris/Commodores because they had 128 and 4000 colors respectively. If you wanted to play Activision's Mindshadow or the graphic-adventure Zork Zero, you didn't waste time with a black-and-white Mac or 4 color IBM. You played them on the Atari or Commodore or Amiga so you could get near-photo-realistic graphics.

Re:Atari, Commodore doesn't count? (0)

commodore6502 (1981532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018604)

For example the images of Leisure Suit Larry & Maniac Mansion look like shit compared to how the game appeared on my 1985 Amiga. By ignoring the Atari/Commodore machines they've skipped-over some of the most innovative games (because of 4000 color graphics and/or near-CD quality sound).

Please, change the link color! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35017794)

I can't be bothered to login to complain, but please, change the link color in the story summary or at least underline it or something...

Right now links are invisible and you have to go pixel hunting to find them, which is strangely appropriate for a comment in a story about graphic adventures...

Re:Please, change the link color! (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018020)

Well said, I hadn't even realised there was a link in TFS.

Re:Please, change the link color! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35019190)

Either it's changed since this morning or something very odd is happening - on my screen the link in TFS is green and underlined and is quite obviously a link.

Re:Please, change the link color! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35018404)

and there's not enough contrast between the grey colour of the collapsed comments' backgrounds and text.

and the ajax submission still takes an age....

Re:Please, change the link color! (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018554)

Think of it as a graphical adventure!

(One about as successful as Zork Nemesis, I might add)

A lot on GOG.com (4, Informative)

owlman17 (871857) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017800)

I recently purchased Myst, since I missed it the first time around. My machine back in the 90's wasn't up to the task. A ton of classic graphic adventure games on GOG.com [gog.com] ! Worth checking out for those who missed the classics the first time around. Cheap too!

Re:A lot on GOG.com (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019870)

I just recently picked up "Simon the Sorcerer" from GOG.com to play with my kids... one, because those old games were clever and funny with great artwork, and two, because one of my kids is a huge Red Dwarf fan and the title role in that game was voiced by none other than Chris Barrie.

I'm hoping GOG.com can get ahold of the original "Monkey Island" game... we don't need no steenking 3D when the original VGA artwork was so beautifully made.

I've got the floppies somewhere, but that would be an adventure in itself to find them and transfer them to a machine and get them working with DOSBox.

Re:A lot on GOG.com (2)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020032)

I'm hoping GOG.com can get ahold of the original "Monkey Island" game... we don't need no steenking 3D when the original VGA artwork was so beautifully made.

The Monkey Island remakes can be converted to the original graphical and musical style by pressing a key (F8? F9? F10?) in the game. Strangely, Monkey Island 2 keeps the spoken dialogue when you switch.

Re:A lot on GOG.com (1)

Hortense Yaya (954830) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020324)

The new Monkey Island has an option to play with the original graphics, instantly switching back and forth with an F-key, if memory serves.

Creativity (4, Insightful)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017802)

There are a lot of GAGs (graphical adventure games) I remember fondly. Of course there's Monkey Island, Maniac Mansion and Indiana Jones (sorry, I missed some of the other big names of that time) and a bit later, Ripley's Believe It Or Not: The Secret of Master Lu (or whatever it was called in the US).

Then there's modern adventures and even modern instalments of some of those I have named. I did see a fall from grace. It's the same fall from grace a lot of other games had: While graphics, gimmicks, gadgets and gizmos skyrocketed, creativity withered and died. What games, in general, nowadays often lack is a good story, humour, interesting characters etc. A combination of those things, any combination, will do to keep one interested.

This is, of course, a matter of opinion, but frankly, I think game makers should rethink their business strategies. Even though Indiana Jones was just a bunch of pixels in Fate of Atlantis, I still felt the somewhat oppressive and clammy atmosphere in the maze, trying to avoid encounters with similarly pixelated Nazis. That is called immersion, folks. It is what makes any kind of entertainment enjoyable. This proves that you don't need high class graphics to obtain a high level of immersion. It's not the photorealistic artwork, that will enrapture your audience. It's the story you are telling.

If the story sucks, if you don't care about the characters when planning the game, how can you expect us to care when playing? Perhaps I just haven't found the right games for me, but lately it feels like these studios are 60% management, 40% development and one dude in a basement to whom the script has been outsourced. Then again, that one dude in the basement just might produce better work than what I've been seeing...

Re:Creativity (2)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017858)

While graphics, gimmicks, gadgets and gizmos skyrocketed, creativity withered and died

That's the key. They were, IMHO, first person shooters of their time. The background story and gameplay were often simply atrocious.

But their GFX looked shiny. Of course that didn't matter when PCs suddenly could render something nice in real time, and another "show off" type of game took over. Which, funnily enough, deep down has basically the same game mechanics - also revolving around pointing at things...

BTW, while TFS hints a bit at Japan, it doesn't mention one important thing - "graphic adventure games" flourish there, generally. AFAIK they form more than half of PC titles! (but - different mechanics, no pointing, usually menu-driven)

Re:Creativity (1)

Keill (920526) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017880)

I haven't played any CAG's since I had a Sinclair Spectrum 48k back in the early/mid '80's. I did have a look at a couple on the Amiga - (my brother played a couple while I watched), but decided I wasn't interested.

After all the research I've done over the past two years, (I've been studying games as a matter of linguistics), however, I've come to understand why I've never really liked them much.

My problem, is that I've always recognised, (though only recently fully understood, due to my research), the difference between a game and a puzzle. Adventure games have always been a bit of a mixed bag as far as being games are concerned, and this is what put me off them - they're a mixture of games, puzzles and art, - (I don't think they have anything to do with competitions? I might be wrong, though, since I can't say I've played that many). Since when I play a game, I expect and want it it BE a game, however, and not a puzzle/work of art/competition, I never really liked CAG's, (or any other games that contain puzzles especially at the expense of the game itself). (Puzzles and games have limited compatibility in such a manner).

Re:Creativity (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35018170)

It depends on what you define as the "game". Ultimately, for a story-driven game, what you do in the game serves to drive the story forward. In adventure games, it's convincing someone to let you into the building by donning a pizza delivery outfit, or finding some clever combination of objects that'll let you sneak by. In action games, it might be killing all the guards and shutting down a doomsday device while being assaulted by aliens. Both can be incredibly fun.

On the flip side, there will also be the tedious parts. In action games, you might trudge through a long level where nothing interesting happens. In RPGs, you have to grind to get your level up, against even more repetitive enemies.

In adventures, usually when the developer got lazy, there's sometimes stupid puzzles where you have to find the right combination of switches to unlock something. Pure puzzles, however, should be uncommon in a good adventure; most of the time it's just exploration and experimentation (and yes, you'll probably need a walkthrough for some parts). Personally, I think the difficulty level of adventure games is a little steep at times, but it's a little better with Telltale games which have a built-in hint system.

Anyways, to each his/her own.

Re:Creativity (1)

Keill (920526) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019134)

Game, art, puzzle, competition, (and even work and play as nouns), all represent different applications, of often different behaviour. Puzzle and game represent different applications of completely different behaviour, and so cannot, technically, be compatible, let alone the same thing! (Things someone DOES for themselves, versus things that happen TO someone). Puzzles CAN be applied in a manner that enables and promotes something for a person to do, yes, but it has to be VERY specific, in order to ENABLE something for a person to do FOR themselves - and most adventure games are NOT so specific, (merely enabling a player to do something FOR the game itself), and therefore the puzzle essentially replaces what the player does, with something that happens to them, which is the opposite of what the word game represents...

Note that this is NOT the best possible way of using the English language to explain this matter - but that way is not currently consistent with the recognised English dictionary...

Re:Creativity (2)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017910)

I grabbed the Simon the Sorcerer games from GoG.com over Christmas. They were on sale for $2.99. It's the only game I've played where other people in the room have laughed just from hearing the audio, and for $2.99 they were astonishingly good value. I'm not sure how many hours I spent enjoying them, but it was definitely more than one hour of fun per dollar.

Some of the games fell into the trap that killed text adventures - letting a decision that you made early on make it impossible to complete the game. I'm sure a lot of people here remember getting almost to the end of H2G2 and discovering that, because they didn't feed the dog near the start, they can't continue. Games like Monkey Island made it impossible to die (unless you left your character standing underwater for about 10 minutes in one scene) and made it impossible to proceed until you'd done everything that you needed to, while others simply killed you quickly (and, hopefully, restored you from a checkpoint) if you did something badly wrong. Sure, this detracted from realism, but no one was playing escapist games for the realism.

I think the most recent one that I've played with Grim Fandango, which was also superb. It had a great story, witty dialog, an inventive setting, great graphics (for the era, at least - I've not played it for quite a while), superb music. I'm not sure what happened to the genre after that.

Another game I played over Christmas was Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project. I don't think I've played any platform games made since about 1995, but here was one from 2003. It used a modern 3D engine, but still recreated the feel of a 2D platformer. Game designers should be forced to play it for a while and learn that you can use new presentation techniques without discarding working game structure.

Re:Creativity (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018158)

You obviously never played games like
Runaway, Gray Matter, Black Mirror or Whipsered World do you?

Just an example of exceptionally well done new school adventure games.
Btw. Gray Matter is the new game by Jane Jensen who did the Gabriel Knight series.

Re:Creativity (2)

Warma (1220342) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018632)

What games, in general, nowadays often lack is a good story, humour, interesting characters etc. A combination of those things, any combination, will do to keep one interested.

This is, of course, a matter of opinion, but frankly, I think game makers should rethink their business strategies. Even though Indiana Jones was just a bunch of pixels in Fate of Atlantis, I still felt the somewhat oppressive and clammy atmosphere in the maze, trying to avoid encounters with similarly pixelated Nazis. That is called immersion, folks. It is what makes any kind of entertainment enjoyable.

I grow tired of having to read this same drivel each and every time there is a game article in Slashdot. Again, I also feel obligated to point out that you are simply plain wrong. Games haven't gone anywhere, it's just that you've taken the wrong train. I have carefully analyzed my own perception of the matter, accounting for my limited ability to experience games nowadays (time), and come to the conclusion that the release rate of culturally important games with a strong story has either remained constant or increased. I could simply paste you a list hundred names long, but anybody can do that - since you've already decided that modern games suck, it probably wouldn't even do any good either.

Yes. Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis was and still is an excellent adventure game. On the other hand, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade always was and still is a lousy adventure game. What a surprise you didn't mention it. This is a simple case of a selection bias arising from your poor knowledge of recent releases and excellent knowledge of releases during your childhood. You simply choose not to correct for the effect of this bias when evaluating modern digital art.

I said I won't paste a list a hundred names long, but what about two? Let's say only from the year 2009.
Machinarium [wikipedia.org]
The Void [wikipedia.org]

Re:Creativity (1)

DiegoBravo (324012) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018782)

Your comments made me think on Star Wars 1/2/3...

"visual novel" (0, Flamebait)

Elbereth (58257) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017812)

The quickest way to cause me to roll my eyes and discount anything else you have to say is to use terms like "visual novel" or "genre film". It says to me that you're so insecure about the subject's ability to stand on its own two feet that you have to invent overwrought euphemisms (seriously, "visual novel"? Does anyone call a movie a "motion novel"?).

God. It's a comic book.

I was iffy on reading the article in the first place, as it seemed too self-congratulatory and nostalgic, but I lost all motivation once I ran into that stop phrase.

Re:"visual novel" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35017922)

If you don't want to think, I can't make you.

Re:"visual novel" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35017948)

'Visual novel' is a term used for a certain genre of (primarily Japanese) games.

The quickest way to cause me to roll my eyes and discount anything else you say is to dismiss something because you don't understand what it actually means.

'Visual novel' is an accurate, non-euphemistic description of games in that genre. It consists of a large amount of text (novel), seasoned with illustrations to provide the impression of presence and character (visual). Not exactly a picture-book, because of the interaction between text and image, but that's probably the closest other term. There's not exactly a great deal of 'game' in there because the decision points are limited in number and scope, but it's essentially a half-way house between an illustrated novel and a scripted adventure game.

For someone with a Tolkein reference as your name, you sure seem quick to judge fringe forms of entertainment.

Re:"visual novel" (1)

Schadrach (1042952) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018272)

The best comparison I could think of would be to compare it to one of the old Gamebooks (like Choose Your Own Adventure, Wizards Warriors & You, or Lone Wolf), but with somewhat fewer branching points and many more illustrations.

Examples are things like the Ace Attorney games, 9 Hours 9 Persons 9 Doors, or Disgaea Infinite.

Re:"visual novel" (1)

Mcgreag (957526) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018018)

So something with 1-3 pages of text for every image is a comic book? They are heavily illustrated novels, not comic books in any sense of the word. Why visual was selected over illustrated can be discussed but one has to remember that this is actually a game genre, and a large one to boot. I bet you that there have been more Visual Novels released than there have been Adventure Games, so why do the later deserve their own unique name but not the former? Why don't we call "The Secret of Monkey Island" an Interactive Comic Book instead, because IMHO you can't argue one without the other.

Re:"visual novel" (1)

shish (588640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018096)

If you were complaining that graphic novels should be called comic books, you might have a point (though IMHO they are sufficiently different -- most graphic novels aren't really comical enough to be called "comic"; and most comics aren't novel enough to be called "novels" -- arguing that they should be one is like suggesting we get rid of "novel" and "film script" and just call both "stories"); but then visual novels are actually something different entirely -- see Phoenix Wright for an example of one that's gained popularity in the west.

Re:"visual novel" (1)

Ephemeriis (315124) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018776)

The quickest way to cause me to roll my eyes and discount anything else you have to say is to use terms like "visual novel" or "genre film". It says to me that you're so insecure about the subject's ability to stand on its own two feet that you have to invent overwrought euphemisms (seriously, "visual novel"? Does anyone call a movie a "motion novel"?).

God. It's a comic book.

Didn't read the article, so feel free to tell me I don't know what I'm talking about...

And you may very well be referring to something you've personally experienced that I haven't... For example, I generally hear the term "graphic novel" rather than "visual novel".

However, there does seem to be a use for that term. There does seem to be a distinction to be made.

Your typical "comic book" is a periodical publication, and each issue is relatively short - on the order of tens or dozens of pages. Kind of like a magazine, or a short story.

Your typical "graphic novel" is a one-off, or maybe part of a much shorter series (trilogy). It's typically much longer, as well - on the order of hundreds of pages. More like a novel than a short story.

That's always been, in my mind, the difference in terms. If somebody says they read a great "comic book" I have an image of a large series of short stories, constantly being released, in a very long (possibly ongoing or never-ending) story arc. If somebody says they read a great "graphic novel" I have an image of a single, large book comprising a relatively short or discrete story arc.

I've obviously never heard a movie referred to as a "motion novel"... But we distinguish between a made-for-tv movie, and a mini-series, and a tv series. We distinguish between novels and short stories. We distinguish between short films and feature-length films. Why wouldn't we distinguish between a comic book and a graphic novel?

Re:"visual novel" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35020876)

Didn't read the article, so feel free to tell me I don't know what I'm talking about...

You have no idea what you're talking about.

Re:"visual novel" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35020494)

(seriously, "visual novel"? Does anyone call a movie a "motion novel"?).

God. It's a comic book.

sure they do, they call it a film if they want it to be taken seriously, they call it a movie if you're allowed to check your brain at the door. You won't hear most people call transformers a film, but you'll hear No Country For Old Men called a film.

Names and labels are important, but sometimes you come across something that doesn't fit neatly into one or another. I would hesitate to call a lot of the Japanese games being talked about "Adventure Games" because even if the concept is the same, the implementation is radically different and it doesn't fit the usual notion. The fact is, there haven't been any big-title "Adventure Games" that fit what most of us think of as that catagory. That is the point of TFA, and people saying "Oh, well you just don't know about x or y, it behaves totally different but it's similar at heart" are missing the point to some extent. Rather they are missing the point completely but bringing up their own interesting point.

I would love to see another Lucasfilm adventure game in the classic style. I think that's not going to happen, and I'm willing to settle for something that behaves differently but is similar at heart, but it's not what I REALLY want. Again, that's what TFA is about.

Old Man Murray's Death of Adventure Games (5, Insightful)

Hunter-Killer (144296) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017818)

Old Man Murray made a compelling argument explaining the decline of adventure games:

http://www.oldmanmurray.com/features/77.html [oldmanmurray.com]

Re:Old Man Murray's Death of Adventure Games (1)

Adambomb (118938) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017840)

classic and correct. Mod this man up

Re:Old Man Murray's Death of Adventure Games (1)

orange47 (1519059) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018668)

I think the problem is that FPS and action games also have excellent gfx these days. In the past, it was major advantage of point and click adventures.

Re:Old Man Murray's Death of Adventure Games (1)

Pluvius (734915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020222)

This is a great article that I've always recommended to people who wondered what happened to Western-style adventure games in the late 90's. I always disagreed with their flippant dismissal of the "Myst destroyed adventure games" argument, though; I don't see why both can't be true at the same time. While it's obviously true that traditional adventure games got ridiculous with their "lateral thinking," it's also obviously true to me that Myst was a lifeless and uninteresting series of puzzles with almost no characters and little more than an excuse plot, and the vast majority of adventure games that came out for the next ten years shamelessly copied it.

That said, for those people who don't know, the writer of this article is also the co-writer of Valve's Portal, so he has some clue of what he speaks.

Rob

Did not recognise any of these titles... (1)

johnsnails (1715452) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017822)

Clicked through all 5 pages and decided I must be young... none of these bring back any memories. What about Alex the Kid?

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (2)

Elbereth (58257) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017860)

Maybe the problem is that you're not a girl.

The main consumers of graphic adventure games (Myst, Monkey Island, King's Quest, etc) were girls. The boys got violent, blood-soaked action games (DOOM was released the same year as Myst), and the girls got nice little story-based games, where you uncover a wacky adventure. That's not to say there weren't also violent graphical adventure games (Police Quest) or lewd ones (Leisure Suit Larry), but it was basically dominated by female-demographic titles.

Eventually, the genre died, as puzzle games took over the female demographic.

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (3, Insightful)

angus77 (1520151) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017994)

Citation needed. Adventure games were my favourite genre 20 years ago. I didn't know a single girl who could bear them.

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35018488)

I didn't know a single girl.

TFTFY

Remember, this is slashdot.

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35018216)

I'm sorry, but that is absolute bullshit.

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35017866)

I'd say you should be around 30+ Years old to know these.
The first sentence alone brought back some memories of the "old days".

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35017926)

You must be young, indeed - if nothing else, go find Monkey Island (there's probably cheap bundles with all of them) and give it a shot.

It may very well be that these point-and-click adventure games are an acquired taste, though. Those of us who grew up with them are more likely to go back and play them than somebody coming from the world of PS2 and XBox.

I did miss a few games in those pages as well, though...
I'm thinking of these...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countdown_(video_game) [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dig [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_Memorandum [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_Wars [wikipedia.org]

They did mention..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rise_of_the_Dragon [wikipedia.org] ..but didn't really go into detail on how it differed from e.g. Space Quest, King's Quest, Monkey Island, etc.

Then again, it's not a retrospective article, just an ad-laden bunch of jibberjabber.

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018568)

The Dig was a work of pure sci-fi art.

I still have the CD-ROM and I STILL play it today.

Re:Did not recognise any of these titles... (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019396)

It may very well be that these point-and-click adventure games are an acquired taste, though. Those of us who grew up with them are more likely to go back and play them than somebody coming from the world of PS2 and XBox.

There's no excuse for the XBOX generation not to go enjoy Monkey Island - it's been available on XBOX Live Arcade for a while. The graphics even got a fresh lick of paint to make them more bearable on big modern TVs (although if you want the true experience there's the option to play "old shool" with the original graphics).

Primitive graphics an advantage (1)

zr-rifle (677585) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017870)

I loved adventure games when I was a child and have fond memories of Deja Vu, Leisure Suit Larry and Zak McKraken. My young age and the new technology made those virtual environments so fascinating. The primitive graphics added to the charm of those games, as you had to use your imagination to believe that the wobbly mass of pixels was actually Indiana Jones (The Last Crusade, Amiga).

With no Internet and solutions being published only in some computer magazines, those games could last months, which you would spend on analyzing every single pixel for clues, trying every possible item/action combination and pestering your friends about hints.

Good times.

Re:Primitive graphics an advantage (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017912)

I loved adventure games when I was a child and have fond memories of Deja Vu, Leisure Suit Larry and Zak McKraken. My young age and the new technology made those virtual environments so fascinating. The primitive graphics added to the charm of those games, as you had to use your imagination to believe that the wobbly mass of pixels was actually Indiana Jones (The Last Crusade, Amiga).

With no Internet and solutions being published only in some computer magazines, those games could last months, which you would spend on analyzing every single pixel for clues, trying every possible item/action combination and pestering your friends about hints.

Ah, the good old [CENSORED] pixel blob. I never did figure out if there was a way to peek at the pixels behind the blob....

Tutututu-tuh-tutututuh! Tututututuh-tutututuh! Tuh! Tu-tu-tu-tu-tutututuh-tuh-tututu-tutu-tu (etc)

Re:Primitive graphics an advantage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35018606)

With no Internet and solutions being published only in some computer magazines, those games could last months, which you would spend on analyzing every single pixel for clues, trying every possible item/action combination and pestering your friends about hints.

I also remember these days
fondly
now I get an "adventure game" and when I get stuck I look for a walkthrough on the net
silly me
no joy no more

Re:Primitive graphics an advantage (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019444)

Back then it seemed enjoyable games were less frequent (or maybe it's just that I didn't have the disposable cash back then to buy too many) and good games had to be milked for all the enjoyment they could give. These days I usually have four or five games in the queue waiting for my attention, if I get stuck I don't mind so much looking up the answer (after I've spent a reasonable amount of time pulling my hair out trying to figure it out myself). I wouldn't say I enjoy them less, but my patience is definitely thinner than it was!

The adventure Genre is thriving (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017882)

It is just not the multi million dollar market anymore. The good news is, the big publishers have left the market but small studios thanks to better development tools have entered it and crunch out game after game.
The adventure game market is alive and kicking, and looks brighter nowadays than ten years before.

The funny thing is publishers currently tarket Europe first and then the US because most of the dev studios are european and the market is bigger there.
Also there is the success story of Telltale Games which have found a nieche of their own.

So it is a natural development, as soon as the dinosaurs are extinct or have left, the small animals are taking over again
and everything is thriving again.

Re:The adventure Genre is thriving (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35018010)

So true. Machinarium was an excellent indie GAG, and I hope we see more like it.
Flash has made it easier for people to make them without building the engine from scratch.

Al Lowe please save us! (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017890)

You want to save graphic adventures? Simple, have whoever owns the Leisure Suit Larry trademark hire Al Lowe and have him get cracking on a new, *GOOD* Larry, that actually stars Larry and not his nephew or whatever shit was in the past few games.

Re:Al Lowe please save us! (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017962)

And let's not forget the two guys from Andromeda. That was a seriously funny duo...

Harder and harder (2)

McTickles (1812316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017898)

Its getting harder and harder for me (and not just me apparently, youngsters too are complaining) to find really genuinely fun games.

Last stuff I was looking into was Deus Ex 3 (not an adventure game tho) and they seemed to have turned the whole thing into yet another Prince of Persia meets Mass Effect sort of thing, it looks like its going pure action and "wow" effect. This is in itself getting old, and even people from a younger generation can see it is
going to be a bad game and would rather play Deus Ex 1 even if it doesnt have new fangled graphics.

Last night I was discussing Under a Killing Moon with my girlfriend and we agreed that definetely fun games, and adventure games doubly so, are a rarety now.
She thinks, and I agree, that game developers nowadays take themselves way too seriously and forget to have some humour.

I can't wait for Episode 2 of Back To The Future adventure games, I bought the whole lot of them after playing Episode 1. I genuinely had fun on this one; and I can't wait for the rest of the episodes. (yes I actually paid for video games, I usually pirate the hell out of everything because I know I'll play it for no more than an hour before I get bored and no I dont have ADHD/ADD, I just like my games to be really fun; but I do not mind paying for good games like that)

Re:Harder and harder (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019566)

Heck you should really check the adventure game centric sites there currently are coming out so many adventure games that I have a hard time to keep track of them. The genre has mostly gone independent, but some of those games are pure gems.

The Rise And Fall of a Niche Market in Video Games (2)

fleeped (1945926) | more than 3 years ago | (#35017906)

Adventure games were *the* genre in a time when the non-console gamer market was composed from people who bothered to do stuff and spend some time to solve a problem. Back in the day, software wasn't as friendly, hardware wasn't as friendly, and in general you needed to think about stuff. And internet wasn't as prevalent as it is. Adventure games needed that seclusion and focus, and without internet and the gazillion other distraction factors that we have today, it was possible.

Now we have 2011. Adventure games market is a niche of PC market which is a niche of the video gaming market which is dominated by "casual" and "social" games. It's niche^2, and as niche is less than 1, that doesn't look good for companies. Also the seclusion, focus, and unavailability of solutions within 10 seconds is really difficult nowadays. So yes, in their standard format, adventure games are as good as dead. Innovation for the genre won't easily come, as companies with budget wouldn't take the risk. It might come as a byproduct of an innovative game from another genre, who knows..

Re:The Rise And Fall of a Niche Market in Video Ga (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019594)

And yet more adventure games are coming out as in the Sierra heydey. The trick is that all those game studios are not multi mega corporations who would sniff at sales numbers below 3 mio but are small companies which make a living on selling 30.000 copies of a game maybe 60.000 worldwide.
And so far it seems to work for them. Sometimes it is a good thing if a genre is below the radar of EA, Activision and co.

Brute force pixel hunt... (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018014)

I would suspect that one factor in the death of adventure games as a genre(or at least their relegation to "smells funny" status) is that bad adventure games are absolutely fucking awful; but comparatively easy to make, while things like shooters, RPGs, and RTSes, tend to have a vast stretch of mediocrity to fall into.

Without tough-to-quantify-or-demonstrate-in-a-ten-minute-tech-demo-to-the-suits stuff like wit, good puzzle logic, and a dash of elegance, it is all to easy for an "adventure" title to fall into the morass of being a mixture of grindingly dull and unrealistic pixel hunts(You need a stick for reasons that make no sense. Go to the 'forest' area and move your cursor from right to left, line by line, until it changes to the 'action cursor' icon when you have found the one stick in the forest that is actually an inventory item, rather than painted background.) and dialog trees that read like the bastard spawn of a choose-your-own-adventure book and the worst tech support call ever endured by man. Extra credit for puzzles that make up for their childish simplicity by tacking on utterly arbitrary requirements that can only be fulfilled with fanatical inventory management and the prescience of the Kwisatz Haderach. The technical requirements of making such a game are minimal, so the barrier to entry is low; but the result is utterly unplayable dreck.

By contrast, with the exception of the "baby's first 3d engine" horrors that no sane human pulls out of the bargain bin(Extreme Paintbrawl anyone?), the world is full of utterly generic; but playable enough, Doom Clone N+1s, illegitimate children of either C&C or Warcraft, and Diablo clones of assorted stripes. Most are not good; but the more action-oriented genres seem to have a much wider band of playable adequacy. This both makes them lower risk to produce, and makes the average endurability of those genres higher. Ergo, more are churned out.

It's like humor vs. generic summer splatterfests. Humor well done is excellent. Humor ill done isn't simply dull, it is downright painful(I find this odd; but it seems to be the case). Your basic run-and-gun action fest or hyped horror vehicle, on the other hand, has to work much harder to be downright painful, even if its odds of being excellent are basically nil. For whatever curious reason, there is just a broad band of "OK" in some genres; but much sharper division between "superb" and "painfully worthless" in others...

Re:Brute force pixel hunt... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35018850)

Oh, one other(somewhat related) factor: Replayability and Multiplayer.

With adventure games, most of the content has to be produced manually and typically isn't all that replayable(as with books, some people might come back to an old favorite, and completionists might grind out every last possible plot twist just because that is how they are; but the game itself is finite and you have to make pretty much all the length the hard way). Our AI skills are not nearly to the point where we can simply code up a few entities and some world rules and let emergent behavior do its thing(much less on a game budget).

By contrast, map, spawn, and item randomization in shooters and action RPGs is much simpler. You still need to script the occasional in-engine cutscene, just to tell the player why they are clicking on stuff; but, from there, you can take a few tilesets and enemy templates and generate as much filler action as the player can stomach. Plus, assuming your combat rules don't totally suck, you can often make the entire game replayable nearly "fresh" by adding another character type with different stats or guns or spells.

Then, of course, there is multiplayer: The holy grail of cheap added value. Hard to add to an adventure title, eminently natural in shooters, RTSs, and action RPGs. Even if your single-player component is 5 hours of schlock voice-acted in a broom closet from a script written by monkeys, a good percentage of players and reviewers will forgive you, ignore that, and go shoot each other online. Dozens to hundreds of hours of apparent value, just by getting the netcode and weapon balance some semblance of correct.

Re:Brute force pixel hunt... (1)

grumbel (592662) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020170)

it is all to easy for an "adventure" title to fall into the morass of being a mixture of grindingly dull and unrealistic pixel hunts

That problem has been mostly solved for modern point&click adventures, as most of them allow you to simply highlight all interactive objects with the press of a button, quest logs also seem to have become far more common and some even come simply with a build in walk through.

I played Beneath a Steel Sky for the first time (3)

mykos (1627575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018016)

Last year, I got Beneath a Steel sky for my iPhone. It was the first graphic adventure I ever played to completion.

Without the aid of nostalgia, I can honestly say it's among the ten best games I've ever played. Anyone who loves a good story should take a look into adventure games. You can actually own it for free just by signing up at GOG [gog.com] Highly recommended for anyone wanting to give it a spin.

Re:I played Beneath a Steel Sky for the first time (1)

unapersson (38207) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018498)

It's also in the Ubuntu repositories along with Flight of the Amazon Queen.

Re:I played Beneath a Steel Sky for the first time (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018538)

I.E This means it's free to distribute and download, just gotta find a mirror for your OS.

(They are both good games, worth a look at least.)

Re:I played Beneath a Steel Sky for the first time (1)

Limburgher (523006) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020048)

Fedora as well, which also has Drascula and Lure of the Temptress.

Re:I played Beneath a Steel Sky for the first time (1)

das_io (1320349) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019414)

You can even get it without signing up from the ScummVM project [scummvm.org] - completely legal.

Re:I played Beneath a Steel Sky for the first time (1)

KnowledgeKeeper (1026242) | more than 3 years ago | (#35021354)

You can actually own it for free just by signing up at GOG

Actually, you can own it for free by apt-getting it in Ubuntu, too ;)

I'm still waiting for... (1)

tangent3 (449222) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018026)

Full Throttle 2 and Warcraft Adventures: Lord of the Clans.... :(

Re:I'm still waiting for... (1)

dskzero (960168) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018354)

Oh dear. I watched some videos of the latter, and I certainly didn't want to play it back then. As for Full Throttle 2... that's painful.

Re:I'm still waiting for... (1)

Machtyn (759119) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020194)

To each his own, obviously. I enjoyed Full Throttle 2 - I can see how others would not like it. I enjoyed the Sam & Max series more. And I thoroughly enjoyed Grim Fandango. I do believe the Sam & Max series are getting steady updates through Steam.

Good but missing Magnetic Scrolls (2)

Mr_Silver (213637) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018062)

A good article although I was a little disappointed to see that they didn't mention Magnetic Scrolls [wikipedia.org] who developed several adventure games in mid 1980s and early 1990s.

The amazing thing about them (at the time) was the language parser. Previous adventures games could only handle verb-noun commands (eg. "hit box") but it could cope with more complex things such as "go right, open the door and look out of the window".

My personal favourite game was Corruption [wikipedia.org] which I first saw on an Amstrad PCW [wikipedia.org] although it was available for a lot more platforms. Although I never played them, The Guild Of Thieves, Pawn and Jinxter were considered some of their finer efforts.

You can get a Magnetic Scroll emulator [if-legends.org] for a wide variety of platforms to run many of their games.

Re:Good but missing Magnetic Scrolls (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018130)

It's just a rewrite of the many many such articles you can easily find on the web if you look for them. Nothing new in the article. Why this is on /. I have no idea.

Re:Good but missing Magnetic Scrolls (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019470)

Actually while the article itself covered the early times really well, I had the gutsy feeling that the author did not investigate the last 10 years properly. The genre was at a hiatus from 1995 til lets say 2001 or so when The Longest Journey came out. Since then there has been a steady stream of adventure games coming out with a few dozends every year. Some of them really bad some of them already considered classics by the community.
It seems to me that the article focused mostly on adventure games being released by the big US and japanese publishers instead on the genre hence. But the genre has moved mostly towards independend studios.

Re:Good but missing Magnetic Scrolls (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020232)

A good article although I was a little disappointed to see that they didn't mention Magnetic Scrolls [wikipedia.org] who developed several adventure games in mid 1980s and early 1990s.

The amazing thing about them (at the time) was the language parser. Previous adventures games could only handle verb-noun commands (eg. "hit box") but it could cope with more complex things such as "go right, open the door and look out of the window".

My personal favourite game was Corruption [wikipedia.org] which I first saw on an Amstrad PCW [wikipedia.org] although it was available for a lot more platforms. Although I never played them, The Guild Of Thieves, Pawn and Jinxter were considered some of their finer efforts.

You can get a Magnetic Scroll emulator [if-legends.org] for a wide variety of platforms to run many of their games.

So, Wikipedia was wrong about Corruption being a text adventure game? Or did you miss that the article was about graphic adventure games?

Re:Good but missing Magnetic Scrolls (1)

Mr_Silver (213637) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020518)

So, Wikipedia was wrong about Corruption being a text adventure game? Or did you miss that the article was about graphic adventure games?

Some of the early games given in the article had text entry with pictures - which is also what the Magnetic Scrolls game had. However the parser made it the next stepping stone before you got to point and click based interfaces and, you could argue, it actually was almost a step back because you had to drop the flexibility of language parsing and go back to a simple verb-noun construct to make it easy to use.

I thought it might have been worth a mention, even if it was only a sentence or two.

(or to respond directly to your snark, yes Wikipedia is wrong because at that time it was considered a graphical adventure game - because it had pictures in it)

Adventure game? (1)

Tromad (1741656) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018086)

Depending on your definition, the "adventure genre" is more alive than ever. There are 23 Nancy Drew games for the PC. BigFish games has almost or as many. Go look at the PC selection at target, about a quarter of it is Nancy Drew/BigFish/other adventure games. These might not be as polished as Myst or King's Quest but there certainly is a lot of them.

Ignorance (2)

tsa (15680) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018120)

Yet another story about how adventure games are 'dead,' in a time when more adventure games are coming out each year than in the ten years or so after Sierra and Lucasarts stopped making them. Small, dedicated companies are doing a great job of keeping the genre alive, and there is so much on the market now that it's impossible to play all the games that appear.

Re:Ignorance (1)

afallowhorizon (1179233) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018222)

Yeah, there's a lot of these games still coming out. The Dark Fall series, Lost Crown, Barrow Hill, Darkness Within, Rhiannon... all these have come out in the past few years and were thoroughly enjoyed by me.

Ideal for Mobile Gaming (3, Interesting)

bhunachchicken (834243) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018152)

You know, I'd have thought that graphical adventure games would've found a new lease of life on touch-screen mobile phones.

The interface is ideal, almost on-par with a mouse: tap to click... er... and that's about it (no right click, though).

Games like Monkey Island, Beneath a Steel Sky, etc., would be very easy to play on them, far easier than most arcade-style games. The ability to save at virtually any time would also make them perfect for the nature of the phones. How many people do you see tinkering with them on their daily commute? Play for 20 or 30 minutes. Save, continue tomorrow or after work.

I know that ScummVM is available for Android, but it's rather strange that there aren't more commercial point-and-click adventure games available.

(note: I neither own an iPhone or an Android phone)

Re:Ideal for Mobile Gaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35019908)

Actually, both Monkey Island I and II have been ported to the iPhone (with updated graphics) and are available for download for about $6 each, last time I looked. Don't know about the state of other games.

Re:Ideal for Mobile Gaming (1)

no1nose (993082) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019926)

Long Presses can largely replace right-click, right? These new mobile phones are going to become huge gaming platforms over the next year or so.

I am anxious to get the Verizon Wireless iPhone 4 when it is released. I like some of the mobile games Epic is putting out. Does anybody know how the dual on-screen joypads work in FPS views when it comes to strafing? They are using one for movement and one for "looking". Maybe the "movement" joy pad doesn't turn you if you don't use the "look" joypad?

Re:Ideal for Mobile Gaming (1)

torako (532270) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020822)

Some of those, like Monkey Island and Benath a Steel Sky, are available for iOS and work quite well, although IMHO the iPhone is a bit too small for the kind of pixel hunting they sometimes require. The iPad is ideal for adventure games, though.

Try Magicka (1)

Ricken (797341) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018240)

Magicka is a new adventure game that is quite original. If you don't know what it is, check the video "WTF is Magicka?" by Totalbiscuit/Halibut(?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_XP9OBWGKo [youtube.com] The only negative thing right now is that there are quite a few bugs in the game, but the devs are on it.

Re:Try Magicka (2)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 3 years ago | (#35019456)

That game is awesome but that's the wrong type of adventure the article is talking more about the point and click variety

Perhaps they can arise again. (1)

SniperJoe (1984152) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018318)

Perhaps the adventure games can arise again thanks to new devices and formats. I was pretty excited when I saw that a number of Sierra Online games were made available on the iPad. http://www.joystiq.com/2011/01/15/sierra-on-line-games-playable-on-ipad-via-web-app-for-now/ [joystiq.com]

Re:Perhaps they can arise again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35020240)

I'd love to see some of the old stories from the defunct "Epic Illustrated" revived as video games. Talk about entertaining.

Adventure & the internet are incompatible (1)

franciscohs (1003004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018768)

I remember when I was playing Monkey Island 2 in hard mode, all my high school class was playing the same and it took a LONG time to solve in a group effort. Today people are lazy and want instant satisfaction, they go to the internet and download the solution right away and the game is spoiled.

Even I would think that maybe this could happen to me, some of this games where damn hard, but what a great satisfaction when you solved it on your own.

Graphic Adventure Games are dead? (1)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018830)

Someone needs to tell the guys that wrote Dragon Age.

In fact, Gamespy's "Top 25 games of the 2000s"
http://pc.gamespy.com/articles/114/1145626p1.html [gamespy.com]
(they only have #25-#11 so far)
includes the following games that I would consider graphic adventure games:
23. Thief II: The Metal Age
16. Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic
14. The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind ...and later columns will most certainly include the Mass Effect games and Dragon Age as AAA titles, but most certainly will miss a whole host of excellent indie titles like Machinarium.

So yes, perhaps the "click all over the still screen looking for the "thing" you can manipulate cryptically" style 'adventure/puzzle' game is gone, replaced by graphically gorgeous, artistic, complex, deep, and engaging interplayable stories.

I'm cool with that.

Some of the best memories . . . . (1)

TheReij (1641099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018928)

of my gaming childhood was playing some of the second-rate graphic adventure games that usually came in the giant 10-15-20 CD packs of software, or the CDs that were usually included with new PCs. You'd have your standard Grolier's Multimedia Encyclopedia, productivity software and whatnot. Then you'd have some FMV gems like MegaRace. However, the ones I really remember are the Tsunami graphic adventure games, notably Police Quest clone Blue Force.

I was very disappointed to see just a small name drop for Full Throttle (and then even only mentioning the cancelled sequel). I understand Tim Schafer is know for a more milestone game, but FT was definitey one of the best of that genre IMO. Seeing the screens from Deja Vu and Maniac Mansion made me smile as well. That Phantasmagoria was mentioned made me chuckle. One of my friends bought the game and had to give it up due to parental issues. I remember getting that massive 7-CD wallet that the game came with and slowly working my way through it.

Genre very much alive (4, Interesting)

multimediavt (965608) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018934)

Is it me or did the author of that blog, and most commentors so far here, miss the mark entirely? So, games like Grand Theft Auto, Uncharted, Infamous, etc., etc. don't count? Bunk! The graphic adventure game is quite alive and well, it has just evolved. I remember playing Myst and a bunch of others over the years and if the technology and expertise had been affordable/existed then, those games would have looked like GTA or Uncharted.

Re:Genre very much alive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35019600)

You make a good point - arguing that jus because games that look identical to the 80's/early 90's no longer exist means that graphical adventures don't exist is like saying nobody's making shooters because modern games don't look like Space Invaders (or indeed, if someone in the classic graphical adventure era had argued that adventure games were dead because nobody was writing text adventures). The technologies move on and the games evolve.

Re:Genre very much alive (2)

Pluvius (734915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020618)

If a game is a graphical adventure because it has graphics and adventure in it, then Super Mario Bros. is an RPG because in it you play the role of a plumber who jumps on turtles. Genres are used to refer to games with specific attributes (in the case of graphical adventures, attributes like a relative lack of reflex-intensive gameplay, an indirect control of the player character if applicable, and a reliance on solving complex puzzles which usually involve inventory manipulation or some sort of thought beyond "put the square peg in the square hole") because if genres just referred to any old game that we could possibly shoehorn into them with minimal justification, they would become meaningless descriptors.

So no, GTA, Uncharted, and Infamous are not graphical adventures, and Myst and its ilk most certainly would not have looked like any of them today. GTA and Infamous are sandbox games while Uncharted is a third-person shooter with action-adventure elements. And as for the games that some others mentioned, Thief II is an action-adventure with heavy emphasis on stealth and the others are Western-style RPGs (with third-person shooter elements in the case of Mass Effect). You all might have been better served by mentioning a game like Resident Evil, but even that is more of a shooter than a straight adventure game, especially in more recent installments.

Rob

Dropped from favor? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35018968)

So Dragon Age, Fallout, and Mass Effect are complete failures and sold no copies?

Those two are "Graphic Adventure" in every sense of the word with added goodies like combat. It seems that the author refuses to look at what the graphic adventure has turned into.

Re:Dropped from favor? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#35020530)

In every sense except of the word except for the one in which it defines a game genre anyway.

Adventures not dead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35020508)

They are the perfect genre for all those new iPads and other touchscreen tablets out there. Game companies are missing the chance!

Re:Adventures not dead! (1)

sh00z (206503) | more than 3 years ago | (#35021142)

Myst and Riven have both been ported. I'm sure there are more.

MMOs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35021318)

Does the grind component of MMOs make them not adventure games? Hrm.

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