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Sony Wins Restraining Order Against Geohot

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the do-you-defend-him-to-your-death? dept.

Encryption 397

tekgoblin writes "The courts have just issued a temporary restraining order against George Hotz (Geohot). Sony filed this lawsuit because they were unhappy that Geohot had released the Playstation 3 decryption keys so other people could play unsigned games on it. [Geohot is prohibited from] 'offering to the public, creating, posting online, marketing, advertising, promoting, installing, distributing, providing, or otherwise trafficking' in any software or methods for circumventing the PS3's protection methods. No longer can he 'provide links from any website to any other website' relating to such matters, or publish any information obtained by hacking the PS3. And more to the point, he can no longer 'engage in acts of circumvention of TPMS in the PS3 System to access, obtain, remove, or traffic in copyrighted works.' Pretty much he can't talk or think about the PS3 for some time."

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397 comments

No.. that would be silly. (5, Insightful)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025214)

This just means he won't be attaching his name to anything PS3-related for quite some time.

(something he likely should have just done in the first place)

Re:No.. that would be silly. (4, Insightful)

TENTH SHOW JAM (599239) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025412)

If I were Geohotz, I wouldn't even be doing that. I might do some research on the PS3 in my spare time, but nothing would be published until the court case is over. Then, once the cheque comes form Sony paying his legal bills, release that research. His lawyer is probably telling him (for his own good) to STFU for a bit.

Having had a read through the court docs that have come to light thus far, I'd say Geohotz has this case in the bag if his legal representation can stand up.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (3, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025428)

Modification of your OWN property is not a crime. (Searches US Constitution.) I can not lay my hand on any part of this document which gives Congress the right to block you or Geohot from making mods.

On the contrary part 10 of the Bill of Rights reserves that power to the Member States of the union. And part 9 reserves to the People the right to make said modifications.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025612)

Yah, the Constitution doesn't mention bank robbery either, but I think we can both agree you'll go to prison for that.

Violation of the DMCA by trafficking in a technological prevention method (TPM) workaround

He won't have to worry about keeping a low profile online. Every computer, hard drive, USB stick, CD, DVD, PDA, and magnetic media he owns will be boxed and siezed.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (0)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025672)

>>>Yah, the Constitution doesn't mention bank robbery either, but I think we can both agree you'll go to prison for that.

That is a function of the STATE government not the central government, per the 10th amendment. It is the state that arrests & prosecutes you.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025732)

He won't have to worry about keeping a low profile online. Every computer, hard drive, USB stick, CD, DVD, PDA, and magnetic media he owns will be boxed and siezed.

And how exactly do you figure that will happen?

Re:No.. that would be silly. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025792)

It's in the TRO

Re:No.. that would be silly. (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025816)

Violation of the DMCA by trafficking in a technological prevention method (TPM) workaround

I think you could make a pretty good case that the US Constitution prohibits the DMCA, though.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (5, Interesting)

Moryath (553296) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025814)

The answer is "interstate commerce clause."

No, seriously. Our fucked-up senile delinquents on the Supreme Court have ruled that everything under the goddamn sun falls under the "interstate commerce clause."

Want to grow your own wheat to feed to your own chickens, which means you didn't have to buy someone else's wheat? Sorry. ""Interstate Commerce." [google.com]

The same crap comes up in just about any argument. Want to regulate guns? Well sure, they might conceivably be sold across state lines. Even if the original factory won't sell them out of state, a rebuyer might, or someone might buy one and ship it to someone later or someone from out of state could buy it and transport it themselves or or.... yeah. You get the picture. Regulate food, regulate clothes, everything under the damn sun can be regulated under the "interstate commerce clause"... a clause originally intended to merely stop the various states from erecting tax stations and charging "import tariffs" on each other's borders, as was happening under the Articles of Confederation....

Re:No.. that would be silly. (4, Interesting)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025930)

I've wondered if a criminal defendent could use the interstate commerce clause against a state law.

For example, someone is prosecuted under state law for some offence. Criminal defendent says: "but this affects interstate commerce, hence it is the province of the federal governement to regulate it -- and, by the way, there isn't a federal law prohibiting this offense". Since the Supremes have completely gutted any limit to the interstate commerce clause, it's hard to imagine any activity that could not be described as affecting interstate commerce. Unless there is a federal law that specifically allows the states to regulate that activity, it seems like it would be an interesting tactic.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (1)

exomondo (1725132) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025826)

Modification of your OWN property is not a crime.

Like this hasn't been covered a billion times before...you don't own the software, you own the hardware. You can modify the hardware all you want but the catch is that it's pretty much useless without the software.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (1)

MooseTick (895855) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025846)

The constitution doesn't say anything about it being illegal to travel in a vehicle greater than 30mph, but try it in a school zone and that can also land you in jail.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (1)

camperslo (704715) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025564)

Perhaps the next-generation products will get a new name, like NGP, giving him a loophole? If they really are launching a quad-core ARM-based product later this year, some might like to run unrestricted Linux on it.
Chances are it'll be expensive. And if Sony gets quad core CPUs / GPUs, others most likely will also.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sony-computer-entertainment-announces-its-next-generation-portable-entertainment-system-114703879.html [prnewswire.com]

(admittedly I'm biased against Sony at this point; not a serious gamer and not too quick to forgive Sony for the rootkit fiasco)

Re:No.. that would be silly. (1)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025758)

(admittedly I'm biased against Sony at this point; not a serious gamer and not too quick to forgive Sony for the rootkit fiasco)

No kidding.

Brain drain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025716)

geohot, if you decide to leave the united states, i'll follow.

Re:No.. that would be silly. (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025856)

This just means he won't be attaching his name to anything PS3-related for quite some time.

Listening to advice like this explains why the bank foreclosed on your mortgage and your divorce papers were served in the county lock-up.

It is a mistake to be too clever. To try to sneak around a court order. Because someone will be watching.

This makes me sad (4, Insightful)

Octopuscabbage (1932234) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025274)

Coporations should not be able to do this...

Re:This makes me sad (3, Insightful)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025528)

Why not? He's doing something that may, or may not be illegal. Asking the court to knock it off until the status of his actions is quite reasonable. Now, IMO there isn't much question and what he's doing should be legal, but the court obviously thinks it isn't that obvious.

It's not as if Geohot makes his living hacking PS3s to run pirated games (which is all the restraining order prevents him doing). This is costing him his hobby, and only temporarily if what he's doing is determined to be legal.

Don't like it? Find a politician who will fight to have the law overturned or clarified. Can't find one? Then make one. The Tea party didn't exist 3 years ago. If that particular group of people can become a political force overnight I would hope the geeks of the nation could manage as well.

Re:This makes me sad (0)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025636)

At this point though the cat is thoroughly out of the barn and quite possibly spilling milk.

Re:This makes me sad (1)

ifiwereasculptor (1870574) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025684)

Your opinion may or may not be illegal. I'll prohibit it while I check. How does that make any sense?

Re:This makes me sad (1)

Anonymous Psychopath (18031) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025868)

Your opinion may or may not be illegal. I'll prohibit it while I check. How does that make any sense?

Replace "opinion" with "actions". This is fairly common in civil cases.

Re:This makes me sad (1, Insightful)

billcopc (196330) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025874)

It's a lot easier to find tens of thousands of stupid people to form a "political" party, than fill a courtroom with intelligent and non-corrupt lawmakers.

Re:This makes me sad (4, Informative)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025910)

It's not as if Geohot makes his living hacking PS3s to run pirated games (which is all the restraining order prevents him doing). This is costing him his hobby, and only temporarily if what he's doing is determined to be legal.

That would be true if the TRO didn't have an order of impoundment attached:

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that within ten (10) business days of this Order, Defendant Hotz shall deliver...for impoundment any computers, hard drives, CD-roms, DVDs, USB stick, and any other storage devices on which any Circumvention Devices are stored in Defendant Hotz's possession, custody, or control. http://www.scribd.com/doc/47676627/50-Order-GRANTING-TRO [scribd.com]

...and I'm pretty sure that those devices are his trade tools which means this TRO places a significant and disproportionate burden on him as the defendant.

Re:This makes me sad (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025760)

Actually this move is counterproductive for Sony since the information is already too widely distributed for it to go back in the bag.

/TLDR
streisand effect

It only sues everything... (5, Informative)

seebs (15766) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025288)

So other people will invite him to work on their products, which he'll do, and that'll generate buzz and excitement for those products. And they'll win, and Sony will lose. This is awesome! I really have to say, I am amazed at the skill and precision with which Sony has managed the PS3. They've got some kind of dream team working on this. There's a cycle. First, identify the largest clearly identifiable remaining demographic. Second, piss them off. Repeat.

PS3: Buy it for the Other OS feature, keep it because no one will take it off your hands. (No, really. I have a launch 60GB which I bought entirely for the Other OS feature. It's now useless for playing games because games require "updates" that disable the only functionality I got it for, but no one's gonna buy the old loud monster to play video games...)

Re:It only sues everything... (1)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025418)

So other people will invite him to work on their products, which he'll do, and that'll generate buzz and excitement for those products.

Sure if he wants to face contempt of court and legal issues. Did you fail to read the part that said:

he can no longer 'engage in acts of circumvention of TPMS in the PS3 System to access, obtain, remove, or traffic in copyrighted works.'

Re:It only sues everything... (1)

sqlrob (173498) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025468)

Did you fail to read the part that said:

he can no longer 'engage in acts of circumvention of TPMS in the PS3 System to access, obtain, remove, or traffic in copyrighted works.'

Re:It only sues everything... (2)

francium goes boom (1969836) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025508)

The original 60GB with the EE chip? I know several people who would buy it just for that. I've often thought about getting a PS3 but at this point i'd only buy a used one to get the EE chip.

If the price is right I might even take it off your hands.

Re:It only sues everything... (2)

CTU (1844100) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025560)

So other people will invite him to work on their products, which he'll do, and that'll generate buzz and excitement for those products. And they'll win, and Sony will lose. This is awesome! I really have to say, I am amazed at the skill and precision with which Sony has managed the PS3. They've got some kind of dream team working on this. There's a cycle. First, identify the largest clearly identifiable remaining demographic. Second, piss them off. Repeat.

PS3: Buy it for the Other OS feature, keep it because no one will take it off your hands. (No, really. I have a launch 60GB which I bought entirely for the Other OS feature. It's now useless for playing games because games require "updates" that disable the only functionality I got it for, but no one's gonna buy the old loud monster to play video games...)

I would, but then again I like the backwards compatibility and I want a blue ray player :)

No big deal (2)

Scott64 (1181495) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025302)

So he can't make available what's already been mirrored countless times all over the internet...Oh no :o

Re:No big deal (3, Insightful)

RingDev (879105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025334)

Agreed, and:

he can no longer 'engage in acts of circumvention of TPMS in the PS3 System to access, obtain, remove, or traffic in copyrighted works.'

So he CAN still engage in acts of circumvention of TPMS in the PS3 System to access, obtain, remove, or traffic in NON-copyrighted works.
-Rick

Re:No big deal (0)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025442)

So he CAN still engage in acts of circumvention of TPMS in the PS3 System to access, obtain, remove, or traffic in NON-copyrighted works.

Which compromises what? 1% of the users that will be using these decryption keys whereas the vast, vast majority will be to play pirated games and cheat?

Re:No big deal (2)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025606)

From the presentation I saw, it looks like roughly 80-90% of the work in completely pwning the PS3 was unrelated to piracy or cheating. That is, roughly 10-20% of what they did could've been used for piracy, the rest was for the complete and permanent ability to run any homebrew they like without restrictions, including (say) Linux with access to the PS3's GPU.

Also, note that the PS3 was pretty much left alone until Sony killed Other OS. So long as people were allowed to run Linux on the PS3, it was left alone. From the date Sony killed Other OS until it was completely pwned is about the same amount of time it took to pwn other systems (Wii, 360) from when they were initially released.

Essentially, if Sony had left Other OS intact, it's very likely people wouldn't be able to pirate stuff today.

You have to read the PDF (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025916)

No. You have to read the PDF. The summary takes a strongly pro-Sony position by saying Geohot is not allowed to .. do things we already know are prohibited by DMCA. The actual restraining order, though, has some key "including but not limited to" and "and/or" wording, such that it not only prohibits doing some things related to copyright infringement, it also prohibits him from doing some things that it isn't disputed he's done. There are actions that anyone can legally do (without violating DMCA) to defeat the TPMS in the PS3, but if he (or other people acting in concert with him) do it, he'll be violating the order.

He could even win his case, but if he does what you suggest he can do, he'll end up with a contempt charge that he'll lose.

A life lesson I learned years ago (3, Insightful)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025304)

It is very hard to stuff a cat back into a cat carrier. It is even harder to stuff a cat back into a bag.

Re:A life lesson I learned years ago (4, Insightful)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025450)

It is very hard to stuff a cat back into a cat carrier. It is even harder to stuff a cat back into a bag.

I guess it depends on whether or not you want to keep the cat alive. ;-)

Re:A life lesson I learned years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025712)

It is very hard to stuff a cat back into a cat carrier. It is even harder to stuff a cat back into a bag.

I guess it depends on whether or not you want to keep the cat alive. ;-)

Shut up, Schroedinger. We heard what might've happened to your cat, and we don't want any of your quantum nonsense on the way to the vet.

Re:A life lesson I learned years ago (1)

MachDelta (704883) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025904)

It's ok, he can teleport the cat to the vet by throwing it out the window.

Re:A life lesson I learned years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025924)

Still a challenge, what with the 9 lives and all.

Re:A life lesson I learned years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025530)

It's much easier to put the cat somewhere and reassemble the carrier around it. Of course, Sony will just produce a new cat-filled bag, and completely stop feeding the old one / release it into the wild.

Re:A life lesson I learned years ago (3, Funny)

Zelgadiss (213127) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025804)

Oh I doubt this is an attempt to our the cat back in the bag.

This is just trying to slow the cat down temporary for as long as possible and shoot the guy who let it out of the bag.

Misleading summary/article? (1)

Shaterri (253660) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025314)

'Pretty much he can't talk or think about the PS3 for some time.'

I wasn't aware that the only things one could say about the PS3 were related to cracking its protection schemes and pirate! (or, okay, 'traffic in copyrighted works'). He can talk about the games, he can talk about the OS, he can talk about the hardware, he just can't, y'know, talk about how to circumvent any of it. Really, this seems like a relatively reasonable restraining order all around, at least by the metrics for such things; it stops the specific (alleged) infringing behavior and doesn't strike much more broadly than that.

Re:Misleading summary/article? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025616)

You say he can talk about the OS. But there's precious little he can say about the OS other than a list of adjectives. Even describing how the OS interfaces with hardware could be seen as contempt of court, even if there isn't any direct or indirect reference on how that could be used for an exploit. I'm sure his lawyers gave him the same advice as the summary, "just don't say anything about it at all for any reason." It's much easier to follow that than to talk about it extensively and be 100% sure that no one could misinterpret anything you said being related to any crack, weakness, or otherwise related to the restraining order.

Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (4, Insightful)

Daniel Phillips (238627) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025330)

Just don't buy anything from Sony for some time. Like forever.

The way Sony treated me over the faulty PS3 hardware they sold me makes this decision easy, never mind the other horrible things Sony does on a regular basis.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (1, Interesting)

Dayofswords (1548243) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025504)

At one point I wanted a PS3... Then this crap that has been coming from them since other OS removal

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (1)

jack2000 (1178961) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025878)

Same, Sony actually changed my mind after I had committed to buying a ps3, I was just waiting for a good time to get one. After the other OS and the related shenanigans( I wanted to play ps1/2 games on it ) screw em!

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (1)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025538)

Frankly, the initial $599 price for the PS3 was enough for me to avoid them in the first place.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025850)

I once thought the same. Now that $600 cell phones are the norm though, $600 for a gaming console feels ridiculously cheap.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (2, Insightful)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025628)

The rootkit wasn't enough?

The better solution is to actually stick to your boycott. Don't buy anything Sony, ever. Making it only "for some time" makes it clear that Sony can do whatever they want so long as they're willing to take a short-term financial hit, and that's assuming there are enough people to even make that point.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (1)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025774)

Sony made pretty good portable cassette players, so I'll buy those (though as I already have two I probably won't buy another one for quite some time). However, as Sony does not make them anymore (and I am buying them used), Sony still sees none of my money.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (1, Insightful)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025640)

With the possible exception of the PS3, when is the last time Sony marketed a product that you might actually want to buy (for it's features and/or price)? Ok, maybe some movies they market.

Sony has made it very easy to not buy their products. It's a great example of how to destroy a huge company:

  1. 1. Stop making great products that people want to buy.
  2. 2. Sue your customers
  3. 3. Repeat until you're out of business

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (2)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025680)

I stopped buying from Sony after they started installing rootkits into their products.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (1)

rock_climbing_guy (630276) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025730)

I just bought a 46" LCD TV a few days ago. I made *sure* it wasn't a SONY branded TV because of their involvement in suing downloaders.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025890)

Sadly, the other mfgs are so shitty you'll be wishing you had a Sony TV before the end.

- ditto for Bluray players.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (1)

Fry-kun (619632) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025780)

Easy for you to say if you don't want to play a game that's only available for PS3, for instance MGS4.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025962)

If you're willing to sell out your rights as a consumer, as well as your principles, for a $50 computer game, you deserve to get the fisting Sony are serving, no lube necessary.

Re:Don't buy anything from Sony for some time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025832)

Already on the Sony boycott.

After 15 years of being burned by their products breaking prematurely, contrary to their documented expected lifespan( the latest was a 46" TV) Sony is no longer an option for as long as I live. I gave them a chance repeatedly. And in turn, they repeatedly failed.

Good riddance to them and may their stock plummet to nothing!

Oh yea. Sony. If you're reading this, I let everyone I know to avoid you at all costs. I'm the local IT guy, so my word trumps your brand recognition any day of the week.

Alrighty then... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025356)

Unless Sony is prepared to issue a restraining order against the entire global Internet and everyone on earth with offline copies of said key it leaves one wondering what precisely is the point?

You lost, your key is compromised, game over. GET OVER IT.

protected like iPone? (5, Insightful)

sunjay (1536185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025372)

It baffles me that this is not protected like jailbreaking of mobile devices. It is near identical, Full hardware access in order to add features, which some low-lifes use for piracy. You cant blame him for thinking he was within the law on this one, since he is when he does the same thing on his iPod.

Re:protected like iPone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025440)

It is not identical.

PS3 licensing for software is largest revenue stream for Sony. The keys are hardwired and cannot be changed.

Apple can disable iPhone jailbreaking by fixing their remote security holes. Apparently these holes exploitable by simply going to a website!

Re:protected like iPone? (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025686)

Doesn't matter if that's there largest revenue stream, they're screwing over their customers and reducing the functionality of hardware they've already sold. If they were incompetent enough to assume that the system couldn't be broken, then they deserve what comes to them.

Re:protected like iPone? (-1, Troll)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025456)

You cant blame him for thinking he was within the law on this one

Then maybe he shouldn't have been hacking on the game OS and causing all this to come on his head to begin with?

Re:protected like iPone? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025630)

Well, he was hacking on the OtherOS, but they turned that off, so he turned to the only OS left.

Re:protected like iPone? (1)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025676)

You cant blame him for thinking he was within the law on this one

Then maybe he shouldn't have been hacking on the game OS and causing all this to come on his head to begin with?

I fail to see how your reply follows from the line you chose to quote. You might as well said "Then maybe he shouldn't have drank soda that day!"

Low lifes, eh? Ever heard about poor countries? (2)

Kartu (1490911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025622)

Where people earn like 200-400 buck per month? Exactly how do those evil "would never buy it if I had to pay for it" "pirates" harm Sony please?
Oh, and by the way, try to find out how many of the hackers out there have actually payed for IDA license. Someone on #ps3test already tried, quite fun to read:

http://pastie.org/1476525 [pastie.org]

Screw 'em, I say! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025382)

Sorry, a bit off-topic, but Screw Sony with a high-speed drill.... I bought a camcorder and a nice DLSR (separate times) from them and both died just after the warranty ran out. Then Sony wanted to charge me over $200 just to troubleshoot them! I will never buy another Sony product!

This is suprising why? (1)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025404)

I can't believe it took this long.

Re:This is suprising why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025546)

It's surprising because Sony was attacking George Hotz in the California courts on completely made up charges. The greatest of the flaws in their case is that George Hotz has no association with the state of California.

Re:This is suprising why? (1, Insightful)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025642)

It's more surprising that they think this will accomplish anything other than harassing this one guy. The damage is done -- everyone who wanted the keys has them, and there's nothing Sony can do about that.

This is worse than the MPAA trying to stop 09 F9.

protection methods (1)

Dayofswords (1548243) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025466)

So now companies just have to put in minimal protection and the rest is legal protection?

Re: protection methods (3, Informative)

Saxophonist (937341) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025756)

So now companies just have to put in minimal protection and the rest is legal protection?

Yes, it's been that way since 1998. See this [wikipedia.org] and, more generally, this [wikipedia.org].

Re: protection methods (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025946)

I would hardly call the PS3 restriction system "minimal" -- just take a look at the combination of hacks that was needed to finally crack it. Frankly, the way Sony screwed up ECDSA signing was just dumb luck -- had they not screwed up (i.e. had they implemented ECDSA signing correctly), it would have been significantly harder to crack the PS3.

I do not agree with the DMCA or the way it is abused by companies like Sony, but this is not a case of minimal effort.

World wide Smurfing links (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025470)

Next headline should be world wide Smurfing Links

People world wide smurf George Hotz name linking to PS3 jailbreak decryption keys in protest of ruling.(substance of rest of story)

Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025512)

Cat's out of the bag, the horses have bolted - and I haven't bought a sony product or even from a sony partner (that I could identify).

It's a shame, cos I was in there looking at TV's the other day - I could easily afford a bravia...

Guess the irony is... wasn't really that long ago that sony was on the other side of this argument...

But, they did it to themselves... I only bought my PS3 for linux/media center tinkerings... now all I use it for is watching downloaded films and tv shows on.

Too little, too late (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025544)

There's a saying here in México about late reactions like this one:

"Ahogado el niño, a tapar el pozo"

or in english: "drowned the kid, let's cover up the well".

Sony can't claim this as a victory. They already lost. The code is out in the wild.

just the 3? (1)

ohzero (525786) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025624)

Seems kinda short sighted to only limit him to talking about PS3 when Sony is so far down the road on the development of a new platform (ie 4)

Selfish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025670)

Lets be clear. Geohotz doesn't give a damn about the PS3 or running Linux on it. He didn't even own one till someone gave him one to hack. I am not looking forward to the PS3 winding up like the PSP because of the selfish publicity seeking of these hackers. Lets not pretend these people are noble.

Re:Selfish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025870)

You are pissing in the wind man.

Look at the comments on this site, they hate Sony and only see one side of things.

Save your breathe and karma (which I see you have wisely done by posting as AC).

How about the rest of the web (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025674)

the rest which is distributing those keys like there's no tomorrow as of this moment ?

Self-important judiciary (5, Insightful)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025694)

From TFO [psx-scene.com]:

Paintiff has submitted substantial evidence showing that defendant George Hotz has violated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. 1201(a)(1)(A), 120(b)(1). Plaintiff has also submitted evidence demonstrating that plaintiff is likely to suffer irreparable harm in the absence of relief, and that the balance of hardships favors plaintiff.

Once the keys were out there, the irreparable harm was done. There is no "relief" whatsoever provided by this order. It's vindictive intimidation, plain and simple.

I'm also disappointed that the judge decided to assert jurisdiction despite the obvious fact that it's well within SCEA's means to file suit in New Jersey, and clearly places a significant burden on the defendant to appear in California. The fact that SCEA wanted this case heard in Northern California has nothing whatsoever to do with the fact that it's the "proper venue" and everything to do with forum shopping. I can only surmise that the judge was rationalizing her decision to participate in what will undoubtedly be a precedent setting case should it go to trial, which doesn't speak highly of either her integrity or judgement. Signing her name to a paper stating that the plaintiff's case is "likely to succeed on the merits," shows either a bias in favor of SCEA, ignorance of the facts, or both. Mr. Hotz has repeatedly stated that he does not condone piracy, none of the PS3 tools he has released directly facilitate piracy, and in fact, none of the tools he's ever released on any platform has directly facilitated piracy. Sony's keys, while ostensibly a trade secret, are not subject to IP law protections, and even if they were, they were obtained through lawful reverse engineering of property sold to the defendant(s).

In summary, we have some really crappy laws, and those charged with upholding them don't seem to be much better.

Re:Self-important judiciary (2)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025834)

In summary, we have some really crappy laws, and those charged with upholding them don't seem to be much better.

He who enforces an unjust law is no better than he who breaks a just one.

Sony steals features. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025720)

I want the "Other OS" feature back that was stolen! erk: C0 CE FE 84 C2 27 F7 5B D0 7A 7E B8 46 50 9F 93 B2 38 E7 70 DA CB 9F F4 A3 88 F8 12 48 2B E2 1B riv: 47 EE 74 54 E4 77 4C C9 B8 96 0C 7B 59 F4 C1 4D pub: C2 D4 AA F3 19 35 50 19 AF 99 D4 4E 2B 58 CA 29 25 2C 89 12 3D 11 D6 21 8F 40 B1 38 CA B2 9B 71 01 F3 AE B7 2A 97 50 19 R: 80 6E 07

Innocent until proven guilty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025752)

I'm no longer buying any PS3 games. I hate corporations who think they can buy justice because they have lots of money. And to think I had bought about 100 games for my PS3... Sony lost customer.

Counter-order ? (2)

KreAture (105311) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025768)

Can he file a counter restraining-order for Sony to not apply the protection to any new releases untill the case is over? Or in some other way be prevented from persuing their interests?

Sloppy Court Documentation (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025778)

This order really doesn't say much about the ability of courts in the US to follow even basic procedures.

"Hotz is ordered to appear before the court at 10:00am on January __ 2011."

There's a scribble about parties arranging their own hearing date after that, but this is simply unacceptable. Hotz is supposed to engage with a team of Sony legal sharks and the court expects them to act honestly? They could arrange one date with the court and give him another.

I don't know where courts get off sending things like this out.

You don't understand how IP law works . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35025798)

Is the U.S., the sad fact is that the winner is almost exclusively determined by which party has the most money to pay for the most legal time and research. It's as simple as that. I should know, I do it for a living.

Doofus! (1)

sillivalley (411349) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025800)

The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it. ... John Perry Barlow

When will these people figure that out?

Sony have gone to great expense to prove that they still don't get it!

Should have left the "Other OS" feature on (4, Interesting)

coolsnowmen (695297) | more than 3 years ago | (#35025884)

Sony should have left the "Other OS" feature on and just "unsupported." There was a link on /. last time this came up to a black hat conference on the trend of gameOS hacking. Sony PS3 enjoyed the longest time in recently history from launch till being compromised to be able to run custom "home brew" and pirated software (3.16 years). If you date it from when they removed the "Other OS" feature, it falls right in line with every other hacked game system (Xbox/360, game cube, wii, ps2, dreamcast...). Bottom line, if you don't allow people to install linux, enough people will be motivated to break your system to do just that, also opening the can-of-worms that is pirated software.

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