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Egypt Shuts Off All Internet Access

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the why-not-call-their-skype-accounts? dept.

Censorship 840

h00manist writes "Several sources are reporting Egypt has shut off all Internet access. There is still no official confirmation. Blackberry, twitter and SMS seem confirmed off. So, if you were there, what would you do to get communications for everyone? Do you still have a POTS modem?"

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If you were there... (0, Redundant)

EEGeek (183888) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027072)

you wouldn't be reading Slashdot, and thus wouldn't be able to answer the question of "what would you do if you were there"...

Re:If you were there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027116)

Uh the question is hypothetical, so your point is exactly what?

Re:If you were there... (1)

by (1706743) (1706744) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027322)

Uh the question is hypothetical, so your point is exactly what?

Probably that the new /. hogs bandwidth...

Re:If you were there... (4, Insightful)

Facegarden (967477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027152)

you wouldn't be reading Slashdot, and thus wouldn't be able to answer the question of "what would you do if you were there"...

The question wasn't: "If you were there, how would you answer this question."

It was: What would you do if you were in Egypt and found that your connection had been cut off.

Me, I'd shout the packets.
-Taylor

Re:If you were there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027184)

So, if you were there, what would you do to get communications for everyone?

Does this seem like a question that is directed at people that are actually there?

Re:If you were there... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027214)

you wouldn't be reading Slashdot, and thus wouldn't be able to answer the question of "what would you do if you were there"...

reading comprehension fail

Re:If you were there... (4, Insightful)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027226)

If I was in Egypt, I'd be pretty pissed at them canceling my circuses and would probably go out and break stuff.

Re:If you were there... (3, Insightful)

exomondo (1725132) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027324)

you wouldn't be reading Slashdot, and thus wouldn't be able to answer the question of "what would you do if you were there"...

"what would you do if you were there."

You see it's the 'if' that makes the assumption that you are *not* there - which obviously can be made given that if you were there you likely wouldn't be reading this - therefore making this a hypothetical [dictionary.com] question.

HAM (5, Insightful)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027074)

Seems like this is the moment the HAM radio folks always shine. I don't know what kind of following they've got in Egypt but I imagine it'd be pretty useful. That and texting.

Re:HAM (1)

Facegarden (967477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027162)

... There is still no official confirmation. Blackberry, twitter and SMS seem confirmed off....

Seems like this is the moment the HAM radio folks always shine. I don't know what kind of following they've got in Egypt but I imagine it'd be pretty useful. That and texting.

Texting is tough without SMS.
-Taylor

Re:HAM (5, Informative)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027282)

Here is the website for the amateur radio operators of Egypt organization

http://www.qsl.net/egyptham/ [qsl.net]

Their call signs are - SUA-SUZ, 6A-6B, SSA-SSM
And wikipedia says theres about 113, really easy for the police and security forces to lock down.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_radio_callsigns_of_the_Middle_East [wikipedia.org]

CB! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027410)

We got a great big convoy rockin' through the night

Check out my great big chariot, ain't she a beautiful sight!!

CONVOY!

CQ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027078)

Amateur Radio?

Re:CQ? (1)

thehostiles (1659283) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027096)

gov can pretty easily triangulate on it. That wouldn't be too good unless you were in an apartment complex

Re:CQ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027314)

Uhmm, if they're willing to take the entire internet offline I'm pretty sure they wouldn't have a problem taking out an apartment complex to keep things from getting rowdy.

Re:CQ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027118)

Pigions?

Re:CQ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027368)

Yes RFC 1149 of course

Re:CQ? (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027144)

CQ?.. CB Time to stock up on those little Radio Shack walkie talkies

Ham radio (4, Insightful)

mapuche (41699) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027082)

This works until the soldiers come for you.

Re:Ham radio (1)

msauve (701917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027220)

Yea. All those soldiers with HF RDFs, which I guess you're claiming are standard issue in the Egyptian army.

This is unacceptable (2, Insightful)

Baseclass (785652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027086)

I've always considered Egypt to be on of the more progressive muslim states
Apparently I was mistaken.

Re:This is unacceptable (-1, Troll)

evanism (600676) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027148)

There. Is no such thing as a progressive muslim state. They are all horrendous in one form or another. Human rights, crime, despotism, corruption, justice, the works.

Re:This is unacceptable (1)

Baseclass (785652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027160)

I meant relative to the rest of the muslim world obviously.

Re:This is unacceptable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027206)

Actually it might be worse than that. For example your original assertion might not be wrong...

Re:This is unacceptable (2, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027168)

So pretty much like the rest of the world?
Most of the world is like that you know.

Re:This is unacceptable (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027170)

The U.K. isn't so bad.

Re:This is unacceptable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027384)

Yea right, the UK is worse then the US.
You guys are a stone's throw away from having telescreens installed in every home.

Re:This is unacceptable (0)

PopCulture (536272) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027204)

>There. Is no such thing as a progressive muslim state. Qatar. i lived there for a few years. less human rights violations, crime, despotism, corruption, justice irregularities than the USA under george w. bush. the facts are hard to swallow, but there you are.

Re:This is unacceptable (2, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027262)

Qatar is a Monarchy. They might be progressive compared to Saudi Arabia, but that is setting the bar mighty low.

Re:This is unacceptable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027370)

actually, i was comparing it to the USA under pres. Bush.

and you're right, that *was* setting the bar quite low.

Re:This is unacceptable (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027420)

Even under that president we had elections, freedom of speech, etc.

Re:This is unacceptable (1)

Exclamation mark! (1961328) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027266)

So... who won the last elections in Qatar?

Re:This is unacceptable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027254)

I know this is flamebait, but last time i checked, Egypt invented no wars, or has scary "world police" agencies, nor secret prisons, or laws. Nor permits torture, or sham elections.

Not an egyptian or muslim, but US people no business criticizing anybody these days.

Re:This is unacceptable (3, Interesting)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027334)

They do have sham elections, torture people for the USA even and have secret prisons.
Nice try though.

Re:This is unacceptable (1)

the gnat (153162) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027398)

last time i checked, Egypt invented no wars, or has scary "world police" agencies, nor secret prisons, or laws. Nor permits torture, or sham elections.

Check again. They haven't started any wars recently, but their police services are well-known torturers, and every election they've held for the last three decades has been a sham. You must not have been looking very hard.

Re:This is unacceptable (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027268)

I am not sure if I would classify Egypt as a muslim state in the traditional sense. The majority of the government, including the president, are actually Christian.

STEP RIGHT UP FOLKS! (5, Funny)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027274)

Parent poster is handing out two, that's TWO generalizations for the price of one.
If you comment now, he'll throw in FIIIIIVE unfounded accusations of your choice - PLUS "the works". Where else are you gonna get a deal like that?

Coming up next - all Catholics are secretly pedophiles, Jews are stingy, blacks are lazy and women can't drive.

Re:This is unacceptable (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027318)

You overlooked Turkey which wants to become a State of the EU, and has to prove itself to be tolerant of other religions and basic human rights (as required by the Lisbon Treaty).

And YES I have a POTS modem, but it isn't much good without the internet. It would connect to my ISP and then have no website to access. And of course all the old BBSes I used to call directly have disappeared.

Some of the old Usenet and Fidonet newsgroup BBSes might still be alive, but I have no idea what their phone numbers are.

And then there's the Catch 22 (4, Insightful)

DesScorp (410532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027320)

There. Is no such thing as a progressive muslim state. They are all horrendous in one form or another. Human rights, crime, despotism, corruption, justice, the works.

The reality of Egypt is that the choices are grim and grimmer; support Mubarek, and you support an oppressive regime. It may be an iron fist in a velvet glove, but the fist is still made of iron. However, if you support real democratic elections in Egypt, then you're almost certainly going to get an Iranian-style theocracy that'll never have real elections again. And that's the way the vast majority of Egyptians want it. Take away the secular despot, and you're almost guaranteed to get a country run by the Muslim Brotherhood.

Re:And then there's the Catch 22 (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027430)

Only because we propped up Mubarek for so long. Had we used this opportunity to build McDonalds and raise the standard of living of the locals this would not be happening.

The Iranians will have real elections again, we just slowed down their progress.

Re:This is unacceptable (3, Informative)

tayhimself (791184) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027180)

Egypt is somewhat progressive for a muslim state, but that's not saying much. That said, make sure you don't confuse America friendly with progressive. The two do not go hand in hand, at least in the muslim world.

That said, Egypt has a decent sized Christian minority (15%) that I think does OK which again is rare for a muslim state

Re:This is unacceptable (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027218)

Progressive?
They are ruled by a dictator who just happens to be US friendly.

Re:This is unacceptable (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027182)

Just keep in mind, President Obama is now seeking additional powers to give him the ability to shut off the Internet in the United States in the event of an "emergency".

We seem to be getting closer to States such as Egypt faster than they are becoming like us.

Re:This is unacceptable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027200)

Meet the new boss... same as the old boss.

Re:This is unacceptable (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027190)

Egypt is progressive religiously; it has a large Christian population.

However, its government has been holding its people under a "state of emergency" since 1980 [nytimes.com] .

Re:This is unacceptable (1, Insightful)

hnangelo (1098127) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027292)

And by progressive you just mean they let most of them live. Christians in Egypt are in a pretty bad situation with Muslims shooting them when they are leaving church and stuff like that. Also, trying to convince someone to convert is a crime (death penalty if I am not mistaken), unless you are converting them to Islam.

More 9/11 hijackers were from Egypt than... (5, Funny)

ron_ivi (607351) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027196)

More 9/11 hijackers were from Egypt than from Afghanistan and Iraq combined.

(but of course one shouldn't extrapolate too much from a sample of 1 data point)

Re:More 9/11 hijackers were from Egypt than... (2, Insightful)

Exclamation mark! (1961328) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027280)

That's ok, the press and most scientists do it all the time

Re:More 9/11 hijackers were from Egypt than... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027354)

Many more were from the USA (actually the ones who brought down the buildings).

Re:This is unacceptable (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027300)

"More progressive" is relative. Keep in mind that there are still entirely too many places where this shit still happens [youtube.com] . I don't know much about Egypt, but if they don't have honor killings, that puts them ahead.

I mean, yes, the Internet is important. Yes, it's probably what will prevent this kind of thing in the first place. But let's keep in mind what's really important here [youtube.com] .

Re:This is unacceptable (1, Insightful)

Goboxer (1821502) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027428)

Can you have a truly progressive state if it has heavy and deep ties to a religion? There are several states and religions that come to mind...

Learning from History (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027094)

We still had revolutions before the internet. What do they really think this will accomplish? If anything depriving these good people of essential services will just be like throwing petrol on a fire...

Re:Learning from History (0)

Zancarius (414244) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027276)

If anything depriving these good people of essential services will just be like throwing petrol on a fire...

Oooooh buuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurn.

(Side note: I'm not sure whether to laugh hysterically in extremely tasteless jest or simply stand with my mouth agape given what's been happening with self-immolation over there...)

Telegraphs (1)

Propugnator (1977328) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027102)

Old tech, but useful under these circumstances. Morse code anyone?

Re:Telegraphs (2)

thehostiles (1659283) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027198)

you might as well use tin can telephones.
You need a wire going between you and your audience, kind of a big deal

what about messages on bathroom stalls? It's the only thing I can think would at all replicate facebook

Re:Telegraphs (1)

Propugnator (1977328) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027260)

There is such thing as wireless telegraphy, though as mentioned elsewhere it would be easy to locate the user. As for bathroom stalls, awesome idea.

www.hughesnet.com (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027104)

http://www.hughesnet.com/
any other questions?

they don't cover Egypt. (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027298)

they don't cover Egypt.

I have a question... (1)

Qubit (100461) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027382)

Would the government be able to triangulate position of the send/receive devices?

If not, or at least not easily, we could try to get some tech into the right hands over there...

Helluva long distance call (2)

rudy_wayne (414635) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027108)

Do you still have a POTS modem?

Even if you have a dial-up modem, what are you going to connect to? Call the US and connect to AOL?

Re:Helluva long distance call (3, Funny)

luckymutt (996573) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027236)

Well...you can just use Skype to dial in to AOL and then you can avoid the long distance charg...oh, wait.

Well... (5, Funny)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027364)

They could patch into a Gibson, use that uplink to tunnel into the global GPS satellite network and then beam the (enhanced) signal down into the internet and thus successfully hack the plant.

Done in response to this video (5, Interesting)

juicegg (1683626) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027110)

It happened immediately after this was posted: http://video.ap.org/?f=None&pid=oT7qj_wiVHTbYae3scwok4_irYjJ2R8Z [ap.org] (warning: disturbing)

Re:Done in response to this video (1)

lul_wat (1623489) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027230)

Have you seen people around the Middle East when they protest? They get pissed. off.

Re:Done in response to this video (1)

Exclamation mark! (1961328) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027312)

They get like that about anything. Hot climates, hot heads, cool climates cool heads.

morning (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027114)

exelent post bro...blog walking feryirawan22.blogspot.com

Who is responsible? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027122)

We should find out which companies bowed before the dictators. Looks like Vodaphoe is one of them.

Re:Who is responsible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027194)

Before jumping to conclusions, double check these things. If it's backbone connections being shut down, it's entirely possible that Vodafone in Egypt don't directly peer to anyone outside the country and thus aren't responsible.

Re:Who is responsible? (1)

a.koepke (688359) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027212)

The telco may not be directly responsible. Vodafone would most likely purchase a link from one of the main telcos over there. If their provider cuts the connection then there is nothing they can do. Their network will function but traffic won't leave the network.

Internet kill switch (4, Insightful)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027132)

Doesn't this make you want to have an internet kill switch in the US?

Re:Internet kill switch (2)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027284)

I would be really surprised if we don't already have one.

Re:Internet kill switch (0)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027396)

No.
    An internet kill switch violates Amendments 1, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 14. Most importantly: 10. (Congress shall exercise no power not granted to it by the states.)

Just remember this (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027172)

When Obama or the next fascist President wants an "Internet Kill Switch".

Re:Just remember this (1, Funny)

gearloos (816828) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027278)

+1000 Mod this up!

This will help (4, Funny)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027176)

I'm sure that nobody will be angry or suspicious about the internet going dark. I expect nothing but butterflies and rainbows from this.

"Egypt Shuts Off All land-based Internet Access" (3, Insightful)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027178)

Satellite [iridium.com] ISPs [globstar.com] may be expansive, but they are the only solution in extreme cases such as this one.

The reason they had to do that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027192)

Is they are planning a massacre in the country, and don't want any information in or out...

Note: Disturbing video of sniper shooting demonstrator
see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XnhHzs91MY

Re:The reason they had to do that... (3, Insightful)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027330)

This is why we need a real media, instead of following the current trend of bloggers covering news while the established media cover entertainment and punditry. Because without real reporters over there, there's no way to figure out what happened during a blackout. Local bloggers can be cut off, and when the lights come back on, who's to say what happened? Whereas disappearing a reporter for the NY Times would just invite more scrutiny.

Of course, it's all contingent on the established media putting aside their profit margins for a moment. Reporters are expensive, and don't get the ratings that star watches and manufactured controversy pull in.

dupe (1)

kobach (803388) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027202)

why is this story on the front page like 4 times?

Wrote about this in 2006... (5, Insightful)

goodmanj (234846) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027208)

I wrote the following back in 2006. At the time, I was mostly writing about the invasion of Iraq, and the saber-rattling with Iran, but it turns out to say a lot about other places too.

==================

Suppose, for the moment, that spreading American values — by which I mean democracy, freedom of expression, and social mobility — throughout the globe is a good idea. How do we achieve that?

Let’s take a look at our enemies, and see what they fear about the U.S. Yes, our military might is kinda scary, but we’ve shown again and again that as a nation we lack the commitment (by which I mean “tyrannical jack-booted disregard for human life”) to use it effectively. What else have we got? A giant market economy focusing mostly on communication, entertainment, personal expression, and self-improvement, which the world’s dictators, religious fanatics, and thugs see as hedonistic, socially disruptive, and downright insidious.

Damn right it’s insidious. And we ought to be insidiating like crazy. The requirements for democracy and social mobility are communication, a sense of personal self-worth, and an active free-market economy. Our pop culture, and the stuff we sell, are our best tools for sneaking these values into societies, under the noses of the dictators and the zealots.

What better tools for personal expression than the cell phone and the Internet blog? What better way to get uncensored information about the world than the satellite dish? What better tools for demonstrating the joy of self-determination than the hit TV show and the Hollywood blockbuster? What better role model for oppressed women than the stars of CSI and ER? Hell, what better role model for what a police force should be than CSI? And what better motivation for starting your own business (black-market or legit), for getting a leg up, than the need to pay for all this crap?

Maybe the Cold War wasn’t won by geopolitics. Maybe it was won by black-market Levi’s blue jeans and bootleg copies of “Born in the USA” by Bruce Springsteen. Maybe our best hope for eliminating the Iranian nuclear threat isn’t B-2s dropping bombs, but FedEx cargo planes dropping cell phones and laptops. Actually, the world is doing a pretty good job in bombing Iran’s youth with pop culture; maybe all we need to do is sit back, sell more phones, and wait for their oppressive government to be swept aside, or simply ignored and rendered obsolete, by the new Coke generation.

*That’s* what they fear about us. Not that we’ll bomb them into oblivion, but that their own kids, raised on our pop culture, will vote them off the island.

================

I want to emphasize that this is about spreading American *values*, not American hegemony. The Egyptian riots are a problem for America as an empire, but if we play it right it can be a huge win for American ideals.

Re:Wrote about this in 2006... (1)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027390)

Cultural imperialism is just as bad as economic imperialism. And you know what makes economic imperialism possible in the first place? A free market economy.

satellite? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027224)

Tether a satellite phone?

Satellite based internet or satphone(thuraya) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027232)

I seriously doubt they could shut down a satellite based ISP or satphone based network. They could still RDF you and send the goon squad after you though. Sneakerneting microSD cards across the Sahara would be the safest route.

Ah well, the foreign supported thugocracy couldn't last forever......or can it.

The "Internet kill switch"? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027250)

I suppose Mr. Obama wants an "internet kill switch [cbsnews.com] " so that he can do the same?

Revolution will not be televised. (5, Insightful)

headkase (533448) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027256)

Or in today's language: the revolution will not be tweeted.

Does anyone think it is still a good idea to give the President an "Internet Kill Switch"?
Really, those in power tend to cling to it even if their forms are outmoded for the population they rule. I think our democracies only grow stronger through a little unrest and political replacement every once in a while. What do you think?

I knew it- (5, Funny)

gearloos (816828) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027270)

See what happens when you download too many copies of "The Mummy" ?

ham radio (4, Informative)

molo (94384) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027272)

There's a couple options here. POTS modem is a decent choice for data, until it gets blocked. Satellite internet should work also, but could be subject to jamming. Shortwave radio to listen to international broadcasts (BBC World Service, VOA, Deutsche Welle, etc.) is a good option for receiving information and news. They could still jam broadcasters that they don't like (but hard to get all of them).

Ham radio would be the best option, as it doesn't depend on anyone else's infrastructure, and equipment can be run from 12V batteries. Many frequency bands to choose from to avoid interference or jamming. Many digital modes can be used to relay articles, some with forward error correction. Voice modes are available for those without digital interfaces. Can be short range to arrange local protests if needed (VHF/UHF), possibly with a handheld transceiver. It can be long range on the HF bands (shortwave), potentially communicating over thousands of miles and across borders.

-molo

Yeah- It's Off All Right! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027336)

Looks like EVERYTHING is out. If you try to look at sites in Egypt, you get nothing. They don't even ping. I have to admit I enjoyed the irony of being cut off from Orascom's site, since they have built systems around the world for authoritatrian states, including North Korea.

How to help? (1)

gQuigs (913879) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027342)

How can we help the people of Egypt? What can we do to help them overthrow this tyranny? I usually post about what I'm doing to try help, but am coming up blank here.

Anonymous Has Stepped In (5, Interesting)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027348)

video [youtube.com] news [anonnews.org] guidance [guardian.co.uk]

Assuming the Egyptian govt. cuts off people (1)

baegucb (18706) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027356)

A better question would be, how can other countries be prevented from doing this? Let's assume the Egyptian government succeeds (my opinion atm). What could people in Yemen or Iran, for instance, do now to get around future blocks?

Well now all the young urban people will p** off* (1)

Coeurderoy (717228) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027358)

The question will be; what is the ratio of:
(people who didn't have/want access to the internet + people who had and probably still have priviledge access to internet (state/corp satelite, like you need in iran and saudi arabia to download some serious porn ...)) vs all the rest...

If the children of the cops and miltary start to violently yell at their parents because they cannot keep contact with their crew, the government is in bad shape...

It will be an interesting experiment, it shows the governement is deperate, in iran they just slow down the internet to make it boring when there are politicaly sensitive situation, but do not completely cut it...

hopefully de pharaon will be expulsed..

but do not hope too much between 85 and 97 % of the women in Egypt are still wictim of Female Genital Mutilation, it is illegal since 2007, but almost any egyptian woman who is older than 10..12 years and not member of a intelectual educated minority had probably been mutilated this way.

and do not expect the internet to "treat censorship as an error and route around" this died with operator consolidation and commercialisation of the internet...

International human rights violation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027362)

I hope no one in currently in Egypt is from France or Finland, otherwise they are guilty of violating human rights: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,525993,00.html , http://articles.cnn.com/2009-10-15/tech/finland.internet.rights_1_internet-access-fast-internet-megabit?_s=PM:TECH

United States likes dictators... (2)

emm-tee (23371) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027366)

The United States likes dictators if they serve it's interests. [csmonitor.com]

MUBARAK, LET MY PEOPLE GO !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027378)

Yeah, that's the ticket !! We will roam the desert to find the promised land !! What ?? Jews already there ?? OK, do overs !!

Well, that explains a few things... (1)

Pollux (102520) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027392)

I lived in Egypt for a year back in 2003. Used TEData as an ISP. Can't get to their webpage presently, and all DNS inquiries go unresolved.

And I wondered why my email's been down. (I terminated my contract w/ TEData back in summer '04 before I left the country, and the admins have yet to delete my POP account. I haven't sent them a check in seven years, but Egyptians are not so well known for being on top of things.)

Generational change in the Arab world (1)

PerformanceDude (1798324) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027394)

This move is showing the significant level of desperation within the Egyptian government. The desire to completely control information by only giving citizens TV, radio and "old" media is futile. Word travels fast in comunities that are under siege and all this will do is feed the rumour mills to a point where the slightest spark can create a wild-fire.

There is clearly a generational shift happening in the Arab world. The "old style" corrupt dictators, supported in large by a religious elite that is composed predominantly of old power-hungry zealots are facing the new (formerly) silent majority of a youth that is increasingly well educated, informed of world events and sceptical of the relgious indoctrination they are being subjected to. It was only ever a matter of time before the new generations in Tunesia, Lebanon, Iran etc., reached the tipping point where comformism is turned to resistance. And since most soldiers and police in those countries also belong to the younger generation, they are likely to also join in rather than turn their weapons on their friends and family.

As a side remark: If only this means that a change in Egypt's government also gets rid of that annoying Zahi Hawass who always want to get his face into every darn documentary on Egypt, then I'll think the uprising was a HUGE success.

RFC1149 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35027418)

I KNEW it would finally prove useful!

http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1149.html

This is fantastic news. (5, Insightful)

Darth_brooks (180756) | more than 3 years ago | (#35027422)

I love hearing this. In fact, I hope more countries undergoing political unrest opt to shut off 'net access. Specifically I'm hoping for similar occurrences in places like Syria, Pakistan. Go ahead and try getting your internet kill switch bill passed then ya jackasses. Every political talking head will blaze up a nice firestorm while the chickenshits dive for cover.

I just wish there was a way to help.

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