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Magnetic Brain Stimulation Makes Learning Easier

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the it-also-causes-love dept.

Education 208

cylonlover writes "Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technology that temporarily activates – or inactivates – parts of the brain using magnetic stimulation. Its ability to selectively turn areas of the brain on or off allows the functions and interconnections of the brain to by studied in a noninvasive and painless manner. Now researchers have shown that the technology can be used to enable rats to learn more easily. While smarter rats probably aren't high on anyone's wish list, the technology shows potential for allowing TMS to better treat a variety of brain disorders and diseases in humans, such as severe depression and schizophrenia."

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Terminology is relative (1)

tm2b (42473) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077324)

I know what it means in the medical sense, but still - directly manipulating my brain is not what I would term "non-invasive..."

Noninvasive? No. Physically noninvasive? Maybe. (1)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077326)

Yes, the researchers are not jabbing a needle into your skull, but that doesn't mean TFA should refer to the process as "noninvasive." This method of studying the brain is as "noninvasive" as an electron's position and momentum may be simultaneously known.

Alternate technology (1)

moteyalpha (1228680) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077328)

TMS is dandy, but liquor is quicker.

News? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077338)

Really? News? Where?!

Sooo... (4, Funny)

dmomo (256005) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077368)

Can I just wear a hat with magnets in it? Or would that kind of be like stabbing yourself in the face and calling it acupuncture?

Not really noninvasive, but okay. (0)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077374)

Yes, the researchers are not jabbing a needle into your skull, but that doesn't mean TFA should refer to the process as "noninvasive." From my perspective, any external process that changes anything in or on my body is invasive, including flipping the on/off switch to various regions of the brain. This method of studying the brain is as "noninvasive" as an electron's position and momentum may be simultaneously known.

As seen on TV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077378)

So those magnetic bracelets they sell on TV late at night are not actually %100 bunk? Somehow, I see a new infomercial on the horizon.

JIT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077382)

Just in time for Giffords' rehabilitation!

Use in schools? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077394)

And is the learning permanent or temporary?

I saw a special on this on science/discovery -- and a guy was able to draw remarkedly better but only for 15 minutes...

first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077396)

no!

derr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077402)

i thik i ned this

Gotta Love This Site... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077404)

"Its ability to selectively turn areas of the brain on or off allows the functions and interconnections of the brain to _by_ studied in a noninvasive and painless manner." (emphasis mine)

Lazy ass, ignorant editors....

magnets also good for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077414)

just about every ailment you can think of... flat feet, impotance, infertility, nausea, head aches, joint pain, muscle weakness... yessireebob, step right up and try and buy these magical healling magnets... now with Aptitude Booster!!(tm)

iTMS + iPAD + PMS = 0 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077428)

The article also mentions interruptions TMS (iTMS)--I'm sure this will complement my wife's iPAD during her PMS.

Obligatory x2 (4, Funny)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077430)

If somebody can find an xkcd about Pinky and the Brain, we can wrap this one right up.

Better get some TMS! (1)

SnakeEater251 (872793) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077456)

that temporarily activates – or inactivates

Looks like OP can use that technology...

Smarter rats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077462)

While smarter rats probably aren't high on anyone's wish list,

Speak for yourself: I'd appreciate the help in trying to take over the world.

(Preferably before dawn).

TMS (1)

SnakeEater251 (872793) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077470)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technology that temporarily activates – or inactivates...

"Inactivates"? Looks like the OP could use it.

Oh dear god, have they learned nothing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077482)

Do they not remember NIMH? We must stop this experimentation on Rats before they learn to use more powerful tools!

Magnets... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077486)

...how do they work?

Although I'm not a fan of experiments on animals.. (1)

Casandro (751346) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077492)

... I'd consider paying for the National Institute of Menthal Health to do those experiments.... :)

iTBS? (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077498)

From the caption on the pretty picture in TFA:

Brain slice of the frontal cortex of a rat showing nerve cells before and after treatment with the iTBS protocol

When I read that, the very first thing I thought of was this ITBS [uiowa.edu] , which pretty much just made learning more obnoxious.

Caution is in order in my opinion (4, Insightful)

shadowofwind (1209890) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077500)

The body has evolved to reward beneficial behavior with feelings of pleasure, and to punish detrimental behavior with pain. Its an imperfect system, and it can go awry. But start mucking around with the feedback mechanism, bypassing it by stimulating the brain directly, and you can get into a lot of trouble. Similarly, other aspects of brain functionality tend to be as strong or weak as they are for reasons that have evolved over a long period of time. Almost anything that can be done to stimulate some aspect of brain function is at the expense of something else. The tradeoffs are many and poorly understood, and harmful effects aren't always very easy to detect externally. If it feels good enough, or produces compelling enough short term benefits, how does a person resist the temptation to do something that may have non-obvious long term penalties? By altering your brain function, your altering the one thing that is capable of warning you when you're going in a bad direction. In that regard its a highly unstable undertaking. A person can try to add a safeguard by handing the reins over to another person, like is done with prescriptions for therapeutic drugs. But that other person's judgment is almost unavoidably colored by their own self interest.

Medical technology is great for stuff like repairing busted knees. But if a person adds up all the human carnage caused by devices aimed at helping or correcting brain function, I wonder how its stacks up against the benefits.

Yes of course some people are going to explore this sort of thing anyway. I'm not in favor of banning it, and maybe I'm not even in favor of regulating it. But I still think its worth pause for thought.

Research abstracts (4, Informative)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077508)

It wasn't linked to in the article, so here's the actual abstracts for the two papers:

http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/content/abstract/31/4/1193 [jneurosci.org]
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07425.x/abstract [wiley.com]

Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters Cortical Inhibition

Human cortical excitability can be modified by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), but the cellular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we show that the pattern of delivery of theta-burst stimulation (TBS) (continuous versus intermittent) differently modifies electric activity and protein expression in the rat neocortex. Intermittent TBS (iTBS), but not continuous TBS (cTBS), enhanced spontaneous neuronal firing and EEG gamma band power. Sensory evoked cortical inhibition increased only after iTBS, although both TBS protocols increased the first sensory response arising from the resting cortical state. Changes in the cortical expression of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin D-28k (CB) indicate that changes in spontaneous and evoked cortical activity following rTMS are in part related to altered activity of inhibitory systems. By reducing PV expression in the fast-spiking interneurons, iTBS primarily affected the inhibitory control of pyramidal cell output activity, while cTBS, by reducing CB expression, more likely affected the dendritic integration of synaptic inputs controlled by other classes of inhibitory interneurons. Calretinin, the third major calcium-binding protein expressed by another class of interneurons was not affected at all. We conclude that different patterns of TBS modulate the activity of inhibitory cell classes differently, probably depending on the synaptic connectivity and the preferred discharge pattern of these inhibitory neurons.

Continuous and intermittent transcranial magnetic theta burst stimulation modify tactile learning performance and cortical protein expression in the rat differently

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate cortical excitability in a stimulus-frequency-dependent manner. Two kinds of theta burst stimulation (TBS) [intermittent TBS (iTBS) and continuous TBS (cTBS)] modulate human cortical excitability differently, with iTBS increasing it and cTBS decreasing it. In rats, we recently showed that this is accompanied by changes in the cortical expression of proteins related to the activity of inhibitory neurons. Expression levels of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) and of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) were strongly reduced following iTBS, but not cTBS, whereas both increased expression of the 65-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase. In the present study, to investigate possible functional consequences, we applied iTBS and cTBS to rats learning a tactile discrimination task. Conscious rats received either verum or sham rTMS prior to the task. Finally, to investigate how rTMS and learning effects interact, protein expression was determined for cortical areas directly involved in the task and for those either not, or indirectly, involved. We found that iTBS, but not cTBS, improved learning and strongly reduced cortical PV and GAD67 expression. However, the combination of learning and iTBS prevented this effect in those cortical areas involved in the task, but not in unrelated areas. We conclude that the improved learning found following iTBS is a result of the interaction of two effects, possibly in a homeostatic manner: a general weakening of inhibition mediated by the fast-spiking interneurons, and re-established activity in those neurons specifically involved in the learning task, leading to enhanced contrast between learning-induced and background activity.

PTSD? (1)

markass530 (870112) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077510)

As an Iraq vet with it (mild case), who has friends who suffer a lot more, I hope this can offer some hope.

When can I buy a $$$ brain stimulator? (1)

lyk (788106) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077514)

Somehow I have never fallen for the magnetic wrist bands, insoles or other magnetizing, energy-stimulating devices even though 'scientific studies' claim they work.

"Activates?" "Stimulates?" Real articles please. (2)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077518)

Can we get the actual paper(s) linked to in the summary rather than just this "Scientists somewhere found something cool and that's about all we'll tell you" crap? Occasionally, I'm interested in details that are lacking. For anyone interested, Trippe et al 2011 J neurosci [nih.gov] and Mix et al Euro J neurosci [nih.gov] seem to be the articles they're talking about.

Having said that, they're behind paywalls, and people understandably hate that too...

I've seen a few papers like this one [nih.gov] that suggests magnetic fields cause new neurons to form in rats. The research here suggests it "modifies electric activity and protein expression in the rat neocortex." I don't see why the two would be mutually exclusive when it comes to learning in the short term, but I'd also be interested in what the longer term effects are. Skimming over the newer article, it only tracked the rats 7 days, the paper about neurogenesis seems to show effects after nine weeks.

As I said, I only skimmed the articles, and I don't really have a clear understanding of the brain architecture, but it will be interesting if this treatment proves to have short and long term beneficial effects, or at least good short term effects and no bad effects from the increased neurons in the brain.

If this turns out to be a "flowers for algernon" situation though, I've read that book, it's sad, and I want no part of it.

Magnets! How do they work?! (1)

Grapplebeam (1892878) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077520)

But seriously, how does this work?

Links to the actual papers... long term effects? (0, Redundant)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077524)

Can we get the actual paper(s) linked to in the summary rather than just this "Scientists somewhere found something cool and that's about all we'll tell you" crap? Occasionally, I'm interested in details that are lacking. For anyone interested, Trippe et al 2011 J neurosci [nih.gov] and Mix et al Euro J neurosci [nih.gov] seem to be the articles they're talking about.

Having said that, they're behind paywalls, and people understandably hate that too...

I've seen a few papers like this one [nih.gov] that suggests magnetic fields cause new neurons to form in rats. The research here suggests it "modifies electric activity and protein expression in the rat neocortex." I don't see why the two would be mutually exclusive when it comes to learning in the short term, but I'd also be interested in what the longer term effects are. Skimming over the newer article, it only tracked the rats 7 days, the paper about neurogenesis seems to show effects after nine weeks.

As I said, I only skimmed the articles, and I don't really have a clear understanding of the brain architecture, but it will be interesting if this treatment proves to have short and long term beneficial effects, or at least good short term effects and no bad effects from the increased neurons in the brain.

If this turns out to be a "flowers for algernon" situation though, I've read that book, it's sad, and I want no part of it.

learning... and consumming... (1)

Adolf Hitroll (562418) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077526)

a publicist's wet dream, then.

wait a minute... (1)

Narcocide (102829) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077528)

Does this mean that the EM radiation from all these computers and old CRT monitors actually *is* making me smarter?

Long term effects? (-1, Redundant)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077530)

Can we get the actual paper(s) linked to in the summary rather than just this "Scientists somewhere found something cool and that's about all we'll tell you" crap? Occasionally, I'm interested in details that are lacking. For anyone interested, Trippe et al 2011 J neurosci [nih.gov] and Mix et al Euro J neurosci [nih.gov] seem to be the articles they're talking about.

Having said that, they're behind paywalls, and people understandably hate that too...

I've seen a few papers like this one [nih.gov] that suggests magnetic fields cause new neurons to form in rats. The research here suggests it "modifies electric activity and protein expression in the rat neocortex." I don't see why the two would be mutually exclusive when it comes to learning in the short term, but I'd also be interested in what the longer term effects are. Skimming over the newer article, it only tracked the rats 7 days, the paper about neurogenesis seems to show effects after nine weeks.

As I said, I only skimmed the articles, and I don't really have a clear understanding of the brain architecture, but it will be interesting if this treatment proves to have short and long term beneficial effects, or at least good short term effects and no bad effects from the increased neurons in the brain.

If this turns out to be a "flowers for algernon" situation though, I've read that book, it's sad, and I want no part of it.

Side effects? (2)

tsa (15680) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077534)

I can't believe that magnetic stimulation will have no side effects whatsoever, as they claim. I won't let anyone go near my head with such a thing until more is known about the influence and long-term effects of this technique, or I have no choice but to try it.

Side effects (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077538)

I won't have anyone go near my head with a magnetic stimulator until I either have no other choice or more is known about long-term side effects.

wow so cool link (1)

WSOGMM (1460481) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077546)

MAG-VIAG-NET makes give you erection! you simply put this special magnetic helmet on and...

...

...

but seriously... I wonder.

Maybe there is a DIY? (1)

pablo_max (626328) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077548)

Really, I am now learning German and at my age..what a pain in the butt. Would be great to pop on my magnet hat for my lessons.

Long term effects? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077550)

Can we get the actual paper(s) linked to in the summary rather than just this "Scientists somewhere found something cool and that's about all we'll tell you" crap? Occasionally, I'm interested in details that are lacking. For anyone interested, Trippe et al 2011 J neurosci [nih.gov] and Mix et al Euro J neurosci [nih.gov] seem to be the articles they're talking about.

Having said that, they're behind paywalls, and people understandably hate that too...

I've seen a few papers like this one [nih.gov] that suggests magnetic fields cause new neurons to form in rats. The research here suggests it "modifies electric activity and protein expression in the rat neocortex." I don't see why the two would be mutually exclusive when it comes to learning in the short term, but I'd also be interested in what the longer term effects are. Skimming over the newer article, it only tracked the rats 7 days, the paper about neurogenesis seems to show effects after nine weeks.

As I said, I only skimmed the articles, and I don't really have a clear understanding of the brain architecture, but it will be interesting if this treatment proves to have short and long term beneficial effects, or at least good short term effects and no bad effects from the increased neurons in the brain.

If this turns out to be a "flowers for algernon" situation though, I've read that book, it's sad, and I want no part of it.

I for one, welcome our new super inteligent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077552)

rat overlords...

(sorry)

The interesting part (1)

ruseweek (1923416) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077558)

...is that the study shows the superiority of interrupted TMS (as opposed to continuous TMS). The interruptions somehow create a more general reduction in cell inhibitor activity. What is unclear from the article is whether these researchers tested only the inactivation of brain regions, or whether this iTMS "gating" technique is also plausible for the activation of brain areas. It seems to me that the latter would be more useful in the treatment of depression, since depression is caused by low concentrations of reward hormones.

Cue scams in 10... (1)

ikkonoishi (674762) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077612)

I see thousands upon thousands of magnetic "performance enhancing" headbands in the near future.

Let me be the first to say (2)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077614)

That I'd love to have something like this to help learn skills and languages faster and to remember things better.

It's not quite the Matrix's "I know jujitsu.", but we're getting there. Baby steps.

Forbidden Planet Her We Come :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077624)

For some reason the Brain Enhancer [imageshack.us] scene in Forbidden Planet [imdb.com] springs to mind :-)

hm (1)

atsabig10fo (857922) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077626)

i've wondered if the reason i spend so much time on the computer is because the whirring hard drives give off some weird magnetic field. maybe this shows promise:)

Really? (1)

thaddeusthudpucker (1082657) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077628)

Makes learning easier? I WANT ONE!!

errrrr (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077630)

NEO: Can you fly that thing?

TRINITY: Not yet.

TANK: Operator.

TRINITY: Tank, I need a pilot program for a military M-109 helicopter.

magnets, how do they work? (1)

jappleng (1805148) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077632)

fucking magnets, it even helps us learn better and yet we don't know how they work.

Funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077638)

I just had one of my physics professors tell me about a time he put his head into a 1T magnetic field. He estimated the current induced in his head was something on the order of .1mA, and then he said, "And what did I see? Well, I saw colors. It was stupid, but when you are a student you do stupid things when your advisor isn't looking."

Do we really know what large magnetic fields (really, large changes in magnetic flux, leading to electric currents) in the brain can do to people? Seems a bit like electroshock therapy to me.

All well and nice (1)

Etrai (1014023) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077648)

This all well and nice, but when do I get my thinking cap?

Also, first first post. Yey me.

I for one.. (1)

Kiraxa (1840002) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077654)

welcome our new rodent overlords.

Turning parts of the brain on or off... (1)

Insaniak (1003913) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077662)

"What the scientists have in their briefcases is terrifying." -- Nikita Khrushchev This quote was at the bottom of the page, I think it fits.

sledge hammers are not precision tools (1, Interesting)

nido (102070) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077664)

The Iraq Vet Stress Project [stressproject.org] uses very precise & minute magnetic fields - those generated with fingertips - to help soldiers with PTSD. The procedure involves tapping on specific locations on the skin while thinking about a specific distressing thought or emotion. They don't know exactly why it works, just that it does.

Leadership in the American Psychological Association is actively subverting continuing education credit for Energy Psychology for unknown reasons:

"The APA’s criteria for appropriate CE content are clear and straightforward. By any reasonable reading of our applications or of our 80-page appeal brief, we have met these criteria many times over. In blocking the dissemination of this approach, the APA is following a different agenda than its own rules. I have no idea what that agenda might be, but the bottom line is that it is hampering one of the most important clinical interventions for treating trauma that has appeared in recent years from reaching those who are in desperate need and could benefit from it most." -http://energymed.org/pr2.htm

Also see Truthout's Energy Psychology: Mental Health Experts Say It's Time to End the Ban [truth-out.org]

These "transcranial magnetic stimulators" look barbaric - why bother when there are already better techniques?

neat (1)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077670)

So sticking hard drive magnets on my tinfoil hat will be making my smartness more better? Horay!

Smarter rats (1)

geoskd (321194) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077678)

Smarter rats are definitely on my wish list. With the possible exception of the tails, Rats are damn cool pets, especially if you can get ones the size of small dobermans.

-=Geoskd

I will be able to know Kung Fu! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077688)

I can't wait to wake up and say it.

I know Kung Fu!

Are you thinking what I'm thinking, Pinky? (1)

zodar (141552) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077700)

n/t

new age ftw! (1)

Nyder (754090) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077702)

Sweet, new age is making a come back.

Amateur Hour (4, Funny)

Rollgunner (630808) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077716)

My wife has been using Transcranial Sonic Stimulation to temporarily deactivate my aural, pleasure, empathy and impulse control centers for years now.

Yeah but, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077726)

Ef'ing Magnets, How Do They Work?

FIRST POST! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077734)

FIRST FROST PROST POST!

Magnets (2)

Dexter Herbivore (1322345) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077774)

When I read that headline my immediate reaction was, "Uh oh... pseudo-science incoming". However this comes from a paper published in the Journal of Neuroscience [jneurosci.org] and the European Journal of Neuroscience [blackwellpublishing.com] . So perhaps we can enhance our brain through the (in a 1950's movie scientist voice) POWER OF MAGNETS!

no (1)

juasko (1720212) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077780)

ratts are smart enough as it is, fooling their traps allready. Know of a rat that always got his peiece of bait from the trap. He learnd how to trig the trap first and then take the bait. So smarter rats, no not on our wish list.

I'm scared (1)

cool_arrow (881921) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077798)

Anyone ever read Vernor Vinge's "A Deepness In the Sky"? Sounds like "focus" :D

I knew it! (2)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077804)

I knew it! They can deactivate my brain with magnets and stuff!
*proudly wears tin foil hat*

Almost there. (1)

Israfels (730298) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077814)

Phase one of building our own monolith to nurture the growth of intelligent life is complete.

Prof. Funke (1)

axonis (640949) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077822)

need we say more

Ohh yea, fp! (1)

lordmetroid (708723) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077836)

The borg side of me want to make use of this technology for evil purposes such as programming people. While my benevolent side think this is really exciting cybernetic tool to enhance the human capabilities.

let's get some innovation on the go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077874)

Welcome the brand new, 5000 dollar, iLobotomy by Apple.
Their new product will _actually_ turn parts of your brain off.

just in time for my exams (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077898)

I'll try with neodymium magnets on the head

Can it treat (1)

zlel (736107) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077908)

stupidity?

Brave New World (1)

olafura (539592) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077924)

How long until this is used for thought control. Imagine turning of any critical brain center and planting things right into the unconscious. But at least we will have more knowledge :)

ADHD... (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077936)

Any possibility of turning of.... hey do you want to go ride bikes?

obligatory (1)

buruonbrails (1247370) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077940)

I for one welcome our new intelligent rat overlords

Magnets, snake oil or legit? (1)

pspahn (1175617) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077950)

In 2001, I was living with a friend briefly and slept on a bed with one of those magnetized mattress top things. I'm not sure if it was coincidence or not, but soon I began to dream quite vividly each night, often lucid, and my friend said it was the magnets.

I did some brief research and found information about the effects of magnets on the brain, specially Melatonin (if I remember correctly). I'm not sure if this stuff was fact or fiction, but the claims seemed logical.

You fucking with me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077960)

This has been up for hours and 0 comments?

Then let me be the first to say: BULLSHIT! THIS IS BULLSHIT IF IT WAS THAT EASY IT WOULD HAVE BEEN DONE BEFORE!

stupid filter, I am yelling.

Citations, Citations Nowhere!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077970)

The article ends with "The Ruhr University Bochum team has published studies on their research in both the Journal of Neuroscience and in the European Journal of Neuroscience."

No name of study. No author. No way to look up the research. This is science journalism 101 people. But don't worry, even print press gets it wrong.

magnets (1)

gargamelo (1044456) | more than 3 years ago | (#35077976)

how do they work ?

Spooky (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077982)

"the technology shows potential for allowing TMS to better treat a variety of brain disorders in humans, such as the desire for privacy or being dis-satisfied with the government "

There, I fixed that for ya.

someone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077992)

Probably this could be really dangerous...

smart rats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35077996)

Not on anyone's wish list? You are so wrong! *mwahahaha*

Magnets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35078036)

How do they f'n work?

Electroshock! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35078042)

...is the new ritalin.

Evolution! (1)

louic (1841824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078082)

So now all we need to do is deploy this technology everywhere by putting GSM antennae on top of schools.

Evolution! (1)

louic (1841824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078088)

So now all we need to do is put GSM antennae on the roof of all schools.

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35078152)

In soviet russia, super intelligent overlord rats welcome YOU!

Obligatory (1)

Conanymous Award (597667) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078206)

"Pinky, are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"I think so Brain, but I can't be sure... That magnet has temporarily inactivated my pondering section."

Computer games and marketing (1)

sven_eee (196651) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078210)

This could be a good technology to use with computer games and product marketing. Game developers and marketers could use it to de-activate the part of the brain that make you think "Hey this is crap" and activate the part that makes you think "I love you man"

Algernon! (2)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078234)

Diary entry:

Algernon the Mouse writing. I don't feel so good any more. Miss Kinnian says she is worried.

ouch! (1)

sjwt (161428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078240)

With out reading the more detailed description with the pictures, it looks more like a destructive treatment, though apparently its not.

But thankfully the closing paragraph seems to indicate they aren't trying to describe this as a guaranteed new amazing treatment, but rather something that warrants future works.

I went and read the article... (1)

Rubinstien (6077) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078246)

...and there's still no first post? I can't believe *everyone* is reading the article!

Why are all articles taged "slashdot" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35078248)

Has the taging system stopped working? Slashdot is getting more boring by the hour.

energy boost (1)

bzipitidoo (647217) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078250)

What is really going on here? Might this magnetic stimulation be nothing more than a crude way to pump energy directly into the brain? Or dampen it? Same sort of idea behind why vibrations help surgery patients recover faster.

I'm wondering how easy it is to cause damage with too much stimulation.

Doubt it would do anything for Alzheimer's patients.

That explains it... (1)

Rubinstien (6077) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078254)

...posted a comment and it did not appear. Slashcode 3.0 appears to be broken.

They can read my mind man! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35078266)

Good luck trying to get a paranoid schizophrenic to subject him/herself to put a machine to their skull.......

Uh, oh ... (1)

thomst (1640045) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078318)

... Don't let Bender hear about this ...

Magnetically stimulated overlords (1)

tonique (1176513) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078350)

I, for one, welcome our magnetically stimulated overlords.

Yay for research (1)

tonique (1176513) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078358)

This is why I love science -- new discoveries are made, and hopefully can be put into use!

Is this science or "Science"? (1)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078366)

A peer-reviewed publication [jneurosci.org] in The Journal of Neuroscience suggests that it is, in fact, science.

Despite that, I have watched too much Star-Trek and know too little about neuroscience to be able to read about "cortical excitability" via "theta-burst stimulation" or about "enhanced spontaneous neuronal firing and EEG gamma band power" and not feel that I'm reading a sci-fi screenplay.

Old but limited (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35078368)

There's a doctor in the NE US that has been using this to treat a host of issues including Parkinson's.
The guy charges a fortune for the treatments and is considered a quack by others in the field.
His patients don't care and swear that it works.
He has patents and refuses to license them and won't accept peer review because he doesn't want to publish.
The guy is getting older and may begin to get more reasonable about things but he's bitter because he knows traditional methods for treating these types of disorders rarely work.

fucking magnets (1)

frizzantik (944615) | more than 3 years ago | (#35078382)

how do they work?
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