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Competition Aims To Make Cybergeeks Cool

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the good-luck-with-that dept.

Education 134

itwbennett writes "The organizers of the Cyber Foundations program have some lofty goals. In addition to identifying a new generation of security experts, they want to make cybergeeks as cool as sports stars, said Alan Paller, director of research at the SANS Institute, a sponsor of the competition. The competition includes tests in computer networking, operating systems and systems administration. Registration is open until Feb. 18. and prizes include four full-ride college scholarships sponsored by the U.S. Navy, gift certificates, and letters of recognition from governors and members of the U.S. Congress."

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You can start with the name (5, Insightful)

jack2000 (1178961) | more than 2 years ago | (#35084970)

Stop plastering "cyber" everywhere.

Re:You can start with the name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085034)

Stop plastering "cyber" everywhere.

YES PLEASE! I sincerely hate it that it's become so popular (or hasn't it always been...?) to use "cyber" whenever something "computer-y" is involved...

It sounds really dorky from this side, guys! If you actually want to sound interested and informed into this subject, you don't use "cyber".

Re:You can start with the name (2)

Dayofswords (1548243) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085112)

I vote 'tech guys'
short
understandable
and guys is basically unisex now

Re:You can start with the name (4, Interesting)

I8TheWorm (645702) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085124)

Technosapien?

Re:You can start with the name (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085702)

Are you referring to this guy [blogspot.com] ?

Re:You can start with the name (1)

Cryacin (657549) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086230)

Are you referring to this guy [blogspot.com]?

Man, he may not by a xybernaught, but he sure looks like a space cadet!

Re:You can start with the name (2)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087178)

Well, one important thing...will all of this lead to the said 'geek' get laid???

THAT will be the major determining factor!!!

Re:You can start with the name (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086574)

I heard the sorta-clever portmanteau "techsperts" once. It ain't TOO too bad and it's actually real ungendered instead of pretend.

Re:You can start with the name (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085048)

It's a necessary clarificative. Without it, how would you know if you were talking about just plain geeks, vs geeks who like to cyber all the time. This is a competition for cybergeeks.

Re:You can start with the name (1)

noobermin (1950642) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085092)

>> computer networking, operating systems and systems administration

They should call them what they are, skiddies. ;)

Re:You can start with the name (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085568)

I hope anonymous will derail their competition.

Re:You can start with the name (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086218)

Why bother? Anyone deluded enough to think geeks will ever be in any way cool is destined to fail. I love their 'solution' - 'I know how to change the general publics opinion of us geeks as ivory towered computer obsessed losers with no life that live in their parents basement, we'll hold a contest involving computer networking, operating systems and systems administration where they can win scholarships (totally not a nerdy prize!!) and letters from politicians (everyone loves them!!)' Even the geekiest ubercybergeek knows a scholarship is the nerdiest nerd prize nerdable. Nerds.

So what you're saying is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085136)

...we need to come prepared with lube, a horse size dildo and a picture of the goatse.cx guy? :D

C'mon, someone had to make the reference.

Re:You can start with the name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085122)

A year that didn't reveal its number, but sounded kind of last millennium, called and asked to get their complaint back.

Re:You can start with the name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085196)

But all the cool geeks are using it.

Yours,
Cyber Tom

Re:You can start with the name (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085266)

This story reminds me of the Sliders episode (season 1?) where being a geek/nerd makes you a superstar. They even have sports where bonus points are scored for answering questions while shooting a ball into a hoop.

Re:You can start with the name (4, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086160)

Back to reality of course, the want to scam a bunch of really smart students who are most likely to be marketing resistant into believing they can be as 'cool' as their jock strap counter parts, even though career prospects means they'll be getting paid 1/10th as much, be shunned by mass media and women that pursue cash or fame will still have no interest in them.

Reality is, if they want to convince suitable types, they will have to convince them there is a solid well paying career. That they won't get dumped or their salary package screwed with by politicians, whenever it's politically convenient. That they will have a pleasant work environment and will not be stood over by administrative political appointees seeking to claim credit for the work and blame them for the idiot political appointees mistakes.

For the cybergeeks (argh, just die already) there are already very popular places to work for, be it google type private corporations, high tech corporations like boeing and when it comes to security, well, take your pick of multinational banks. If security is your thing not only will pay and conditions be far better at the banks but there are also many opportunities for overseas postings. Basically as you work your way through the list, only the anal left overs end up at government, except of course the main professionally paranoid government institutions which can still manage to snag a few top flight types.

Want to promote the security industry, then sponsor a TV series targeted at mid-teen sci fi types, that isn't dumbed down and creates a false 'er' exaggerated impression of career desirability. Sponsor computer games that also give a false 'er' exaggerated impression of rewards for security success.

Re:You can start with the name (2)

treeves (963993) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085436)

Yeah, but you're telling the CYBER Foundation to stop putting "cyber" on everything. Do you really think they're gonna listen?

Re:You can start with the name (1)

noobermin (1950642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086042)

They can start with _their_ name.

Oh great, this thread again (2)

definate (876684) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086306)

Oh great, this thread again. Seems like every time a cyber word is used, a cyber-bully rears their head, and cyber-comments about how cyber shouldn't be used all the time. This always just turns into cyber-rage.

Stop cyber-hatin', and start cyber-lovin'!

Why? (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086332)

Don't you want to be radical/rad. like CYBERjack2000? [grin]

Re:Why? (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086588)

Dude, don't you know what happens when you type CYBERjack?
Cuz I don't but from the rumours it ai^X
NO CARRIER

Yeah, right. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35084974)

If geeks were cool they wouldn't be geeks. Part of being a geek is the whole uncoolness thing.

Re:Yeah, right. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085708)

If geeks were cool they wouldn't be geeks. Part of being a geek is the whole uncoolness thing.

Besides which, "performing useful/important work" will disqualify you from being cool and popular. We'd rather pay people millions of dollars to chase a football around and thousands of dollars to secure vital infrastructure.

Our priorities are so fucked up like that. If we had severe natural selection competition from a competing species, we'd deserve to die out. We idolize and worship our most useless elements while oppressing and ridiculing our most useful.

Re:Yeah, right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086272)

That's exactly the kind of speech that cements the fact we will never be cool.

Re:Yeah, right. (1)

mug funky (910186) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086526)

THIS

Re:Yeah, right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086262)

Cool is a state of mind. Cool is an interpretation. What's cool to him may not be cool to me, what's cool to me may not be cool to you, you understand? Cool is cool, and cool ain't cool man.[1]

Problem is geeks will never be cool enough to attain that state of mind.

Refrences:
^[1] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yth7H-YDnMI [youtube.com]

Also included: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085004)

By registering you'll also be guaranteed to:

Have your privacy invaded for being a cyber terrorist
Be subject to additional searches at the border(s)
Have your name put on various lists of differing levels of evil by certain three letter organizations
Etc, etc, etc...

Already cool (4, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085032)

Linus Torvalds is already cooler than any football player.

Re:Already cool (2)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085118)

You need to update your sig, we're now on Slashdot 3.0.

Re:Already cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085342)

It's a long shot, but maybe he likes 3.0.

Re:Already cool (1)

definate (876684) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086286)

I believe Billy Joel is writing a song about Slashdot 3.0 entitled "The day the comments died".

Seriously, where the fuck did they go?

I've just gone through my settings, increasing any values which might give me more comments, but it still doesn't seem right.

Anyone know what has to be done to get comments back?

Slashdot needs to pay more attention to how comments work, since that's literally their best service. I can get day to year old articles and summaries many other places.

Re:Already cool (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087154)

Back on 2.0 even with every setting set to show as many comments as possible and filter none at all slashdot would STILL automatically block a lot of comments, completely silently so the only way to find them was by clicking "parent" on a reply that was indented a little more than normal, and often for no reason at all since they weren't even modded down most of the time.

Odds are they just upped the ante on that game.

Re:Already cool (1)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085632)

Nobody pays millions of dollars for 30 seconds of ad time during a Torvalds speech.

Re:Already cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085654)

That's what makes him cool..

Re:Already cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35085892)

Damn, I got ripped off then!!

Re:Already cool (1)

Ranguvar (1924024) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086066)

Nobody pays millions of dollars for 30 seconds of ad time during a Torvalds speech.

Nobody pays millions of dollars for 30 seconds of ad time during a Roger Goodell speech either.

The answer is clear -- Linuxians vs. GNUheads in Hacker Bowl 2011!

Re:Already cool (1)

Comhack (978088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35088130)

+1 No doubt!!

As cool as sports stars? (2)

Oxford_Comma_Lover (1679530) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085036)

Sports stars, sadly, are often rich, objectifying substance abusers. While some few compete legitimately and are gentlemen, most do not embody fair competition or the kind of behavior that I, at least, think we should be encouraging in our communities, our nation, or our species. Shouldn't our real objective be to teach that accomplishments and respect for others are what make people cool, rather than to make one group cool by heightening their profile?

Re:As cool as sports stars? (1)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085132)

I'm pretty sure that most folk's standard for cool is how much drama something solicits. That said, trying to make respect and accomplishment cool is probably an exercise in futility.

Re:As cool as sports stars? (1)

Elviswind (1959800) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085840)

I'm pretty sure my standard for cool is impregnating both an actress and a supermodel.

Re:As cool as sports stars? (0)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085288)

You have your most and often backwards.

Dont forget you will almost never here of someone being kind a friendly. AS soon as one gets drun in public it's palstered all of the media.

Re:As cool as sports stars? (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085476)

He has "netfo dna tsom"?

Re:As cool as sports stars? (1)

mug funky (910186) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086572)

i, for one, would take my millions and go party where nobody knows me, or they don't have cameras.

but then, these people would be ordinary people and thus not have the same pulling power. if they were competing for a girl with julian assange, he'd probably get her.

Re:As cool as sports stars? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35088090)

Would you submit code as poorly-written as your posting to a compiler? I doubt it.

So why do you inflict it upon humans?

Here are some correctly-spelled words for your next posting:

Don't
hear
and
drunk
plastered

Re:As cool as sports stars? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085516)

Jesus Christ, how many pro athletes have you known?!? They're very typically hardworking people and nice folks who are well aware that they're being paid to play a game. Like anything else, you're just talking out your ass about the 1% of the top who get money with no wisdom and succumb to humdrum everyday human character failings. Stop accepting distorted media stories as real!

Re:As cool as sports stars? (1)

slackbheep (1420367) | more than 3 years ago | (#35088194)

And those nice hardworking athletes are being paid orders of magnitude more than they deserve, like most entertainers.

CSA's? Cool? (1)

noobermin (1950642) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085044)

Like any true athlete, the joy should be in the sport, not the glory.

That's nice, but (4, Insightful)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085140)

Really if we want to improve the image of a group of people, I would like to see a conscious effort to get people to look up to scientists. We try to say that we encourage great scientific research but we can't even bother putting great scientists on stamps? Mickey Mouse has been on how many stamps, yet I don't recall ever seeing an Einstein stamp.

But postage aside, we really end up - consciously or not - marginalizing scientists in our country. We don't give them the prestige they deserve, and we make them fight like American Idol contestants (to say nothing of the fact that many people can name more living Idol contestants than living scientists) for the kind of money that professional athletes would laugh at. Other countries hold their top researchers in great prestige; this may end up being just another sign of the decay of our empire here.

Re:That's nice, but (1)

I8TheWorm (645702) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085182)

Now you've seen lots [google.com] . There were at least two in the US.

Re:That's nice, but (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086592)

That search almost makes it worse, really. Vietnam has Einstein on a stamp, we haven't had him on a stamp since stamps were 15 cents?

Re:That's nice, but (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085286)

I thought about doing a kickstarter project to collect $50-100K to do billboard adds in Chicago, LA, and NY with various high-profile scientists, their name, and a small snip next to their name regarding what they do (think Intel's "Our rockstars aren't your rockstars" commerical). Haven't gotten around to it though.

I don't have a problem with athletes. I have a problem with (and find it disgusting) how much they're paid and praised to entertain compared to those who are working for peanuts saving lives/the world.

To quote XKCD, "Science, it works bitches."

Re:That's nice, but (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085322)

I thought about doing a kickstarter project to collect $50-100K to do billboard adds in Chicago, LA, and NY with various high-profile scientists, their name, and a small snip next to their name regarding what they do (think Intel's "Our rockstars aren't your rockstars" commerical). Haven't gotten around to it though.

My only concern with that approach is that it would be like giving people who are vehemently opposed to specific research disciplines their own hit lists. I once worked near a lab where some nutjob scaled the (18 story!) building to hang a tent off of so he could camp out in protest of (his misinformation on) animal research that was (not) being done in that building. Eventually we had to get the fire department (who later proclaimed that they would have never considered his equipment safe) to lower him down safely after he had lost too much strength from his hunger strike.

Then imagine if you put up a billboard that showed a researcher and said "human stem cell research"; you would probably need to hire security for that person afterwards, or pay for them to find a new identity.

Re:That's nice, but (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085392)

Maybe stick to generic definitions? "Curing Cancer", "Solving energy problems", and so forth. I am, indeed, very open to ideas before pursuing this.

Re:That's nice, but (1)

noobermin (1950642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086146)

That's like saying you shouldn't advertise athletes because readers/seers may be from a rival team...the number of people so opposed to care to do physical damage are much less than those who wouldn't.

Re:That's nice, but (2, Interesting)

ljw1004 (764174) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085506)

Just from last year's stamps alone in the UK --

Boyle, Newton, Franklin, Babbage, Rutherford: http://www.royalmail.com/portal/stamps/content1?catId=115800796&mediaId=116600770 [royalmail.com]

Flemming, Ross, Hounsfield: http://www.royalmail.com/portal/stamps/content1?catId=127200772&mediaId=128800767 [royalmail.com]

Darwin: http://www.royalmail.com/portal/stamps/content1?catId=91400755&mediaId=91500749 [royalmail.com]

Watt, Stephenson, McAdam: http://www.royalmail.com/portal/stamps/content1?catId=93000750&mediaId=93000754 [royalmail.com]

Re:That's nice, but (2, Funny)

Nazlfrag (1035012) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087196)

Hell yeah! Now science will be the latest fad with the stamp collecting crowd, bringing us cybergeeks into the spotlight! Finally we get recognition from those cool, trendy, hip & streetwise philatelists!

Re:That's nice, but (1)

Bigbutt (65939) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086620)

Who uses stamps nowadays?

I'm for it, but I can't tell you the last time I used or even saw a stamp.

[John]

Re:That's nice, but (2)

CodeBuster (516420) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087544)

we really end up - consciously or not - marginalizing scientists in our country.

Indeed, I have even heard it said, possibly here on Slashdot but I'm not sure, that pursuing a career in science is similar in some respects to entering the priesthood. In order to do either, one must make a serious long term commitment, and one not easily broken, to a job which requires nearly complete devotion to the work and lifestyle at relatively low rates of remuneration. It takes a certain kind of person, whether priest or scientist, to make that sort of long term commitment to advance in their chosen profession. Many people who could do science chose instead to do something else because the sheer levels of commitment and mental effort involved are just too harsh to seriously contemplate as a profession without relatively comparable compensation, advancement prospects or job security. They may remain interested in scientific and technical topics as a hobby or side interest, but they choose a different way of earning their living.

Scientists rock! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35088158)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uw39qxcjiMk

They seem to be confused... (1)

hellkyng (1920978) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085176)

The only "cyber-skilled" (that word if from tfa, not my creation) high schoolers I can think of that would be interested in this competition, and in being cool for their leet security skills are the same people frequenting 4chan... They have plenty of experience with LOIC ddos tools, but I somehow doubt they are going to be viable candidates long term.

If the gov wants more "world class" security professionals how about offer some free training to those already established in the field. Oh and offer pay that is competitive with the industry.

Re:They seem to be confused... (1)

noobermin (1950642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086062)

Well, it's all noobish, csa stuff, the thing you can learn from reading the manual after 5 seconds.

Um... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085198)

No, that won't work. Something more along the lines of battle bots would have a much better chance of accomplishing their goal.

we dont need that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085204)

some monkeys climb down from their trees and talk about bullshit they'll print on toiletpaper

while nerds post photoshops of their pathetic monkey-lives on 4chan for the lulz

this article is absurd

FANTASTIC!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085290)

I liked "Gamer" too.

Russell Crowe was great in it.

Re:FANTASTIC!!!! (1)

slackbheep (1420367) | more than 3 years ago | (#35088216)

Seriously? You have brought shame upon your clan unsuccessfull troll.

FBI Watch List (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085312)

"prizes include four full-ride college scholarships sponsored by the U.S. Navy, gift certificates, and letters of recognition from governors and members of the U.S. Congress" ... and a permanent position on the FBI watch list?

Re:FBI Watch List (1)

kmdrtako (1971832) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085430)

Most U.S. Navy scholarships come with a six year hitch after graduation.

Apart from the tongue in cheek added-to-the-FBI-watch-list I have to wonder if there isn't a similar catch to these "scholarships."

Geeks should stay "geeks". (0)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085332)

I don't give a fuck what the jock-worshippers I already despise think so long as they stay out of my way.

I don't WANT every dumbshit out there to be a wannabe geek. We don't need to flood the market, we don't need any more noobs.

Exclusivity benefits people who provide services, be they a pipe weldor or a geek. Barriers to entry are fine.

Re:Geeks should stay "geeks". (2)

Bieeanda (961632) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085424)

You seem bitter. Wedgie riding up today?

Re:Geeks should stay "geeks". (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086510)

Regarding attempts to flood self-selected groups with noobs, fuck yes I'm bitter. It just pollutes (groups) with non-serious people and adds noise.

Remember when Slashdot wasn't just 4chan with a green color scheme?

No wedgie though. Underwear is just a way to turn perfectly good white fabric brown and yellow.

Re:Geeks should stay "geeks". (1)

Bieeanda (961632) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087204)

Was that time supposed to be before or after the reign of naked and petrified Natalie Portmans, pants filled with hot grits, Beowulf clusters of unlikely objects, and the GNAA? Because I've been here like ten years between this account and its predecessor, and I don't recall this golden age at all.

Seriously dude, listen to yourself. You come off as a parody of the vicious nerd that everyone knew in high school, ranting about noobs and jocks-- and that's just embarrassing. Tragic, at worst.

Your example is ridiculous as well, I'm afraid: pipefitters deal in tangible structures, and it's much cheaper to engage one that's local to your project; coders can work from virtually anywhere. When demand outstrips supply, companies aren't going to offer blank checks to angry, entitled, self-styled geeks: they're going to hire coding houses in China or India, where people have realized that's where the money is currently, and aren't so wrapped up in their high school identities.

Re:Geeks should stay "geeks". (1)

slackbheep (1420367) | more than 3 years ago | (#35088236)

This is exactly why I dislike the slow mainstreaming of geek and to a lesser extent gamer culture. The Big Bang Theory, Numb3rs, and the other terrible shows milking geek culture have really proven to be absolute garbage.

Party like... (1)

fenring (1582541) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085344)

...a security expert!

re: cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085376)

The competition includes tests in computer networking, operating systems and systems administration.

That doesn't sound especially cool. How can one show off one's creativity by taking a test?

prizes include four full-ride college scholarships sponsored by the U.S. Navy

That part is cool

It's about damn time!!! (2)

Freaky Spook (811861) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085378)

When I hacked my first Gibson using an Osborne 1 and its Modem Peripheral all I got when I bragged about it to the captain of the high school football team was an atomic wedgie.

Wrong approach for the wrong problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085426)

We already have a whole "sub-culture" of obnoxious shouty louts, by name of the IT security industry. We really don't need more of that shallow self-serving snake oil salesmanship. They even hijacked the term "hacker" and hung variously-coloured hats on it. They often even behave just like a spotty 16 year old, if they aren't any longer! How much more hollywood-y or sports-y do you want it?

The "cyber" thing, by the by, is usgov-ese for itsnakeoil's "hatted hacker". It is analogously nebulous and ignorantly disrespectful.

I agree with the poster lambasting the looking down on scientists in general. Scientific method is the foundation of modern comfort, so that's now boring and, er, vital to retaining our creature comforts. Oopsie. More experts in plugging holes in swiss cheese with easy cheez isn't going to cut it. Fundamental research in how to prevent those holes in the first place even if your workforce of programmers consists of barely literate simians-in-all-but-a-name, now that would be useful. But nobody is funding _that_. Yuck no, not glamorous enough.

That's fine and all but.... (1)

Unkyjar (1148699) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085494)

making a high school aged competition won't make security "cool" any more than spelling bee's make good spelling cool, or academic quiz teams made academics cool.

Just because you got some high schoolers involved in a competition doesn't mean something is now "cool", and no, letters from congressmen or navy scholarships don't make things cool either.

This just shows a lack of understanding as to why people idolize sports/entertainment stars.

Re:That's fine and all but.... (1)

oracleguy01 (1381327) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086026)

Just because you got some high schoolers involved in a competition doesn't mean something is now "cool", and no, letters from congressmen or navy scholarships don't make things cool either.

This just shows a lack of understanding as to why people idolize sports/entertainment stars.

Well the letters aren't really that cool per-se but a full ride scholarship is. That is actually a lot of money and if you don't need to spend any money on school, it means while in school any money you earn you can spend on whatever you like. And when you graduate you will be part of the minority that don't have student loans to pay off.

People idolize sports and entertainment stars because they are famous and rich. This competition probably won't give you much fame but it will make you rich in the sense that you won't go massively into debt paying for school like your peers. And really I think it is much better to be rich than famous.

Re:That's fine and all but.... (2)

Unkyjar (1148699) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086560)

I got several full ride scholarships while I was in high school. And I'm pretty sure winning them didn't make me any cooler with any clique in high school but my own.

I also don't think the wealth is why people idolize sports and entertainment stars today, not that it isn't a factor, but there is money in plenty of professions where people aren't idolized. I think it's more the attention and in many cases respect, but they get attention and respect because people idolize them, which is leading me around kinda recursively.

The question I have is how did the entire industry go from being disrespected to being respected. That process could probably be the subject of an entire book that I wish I could read. I think it was partially due to the news looking for something to talk about, partially due to people escaping bad times by living vicariously through stories and games so they can taste a bit of victory and joy in their otherwise drab lives. There are probably plenty of other factors too that I'm not thinking of.

But whatever the change was, it wasn't from the changes of the attitudes of the kids but the attitudes of the adults that brought it about.

Statistician tries to make outliers common (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35085652)

It's fundamentally impossible. And yes, quit putting "cyber" everywhere. I feel funny even mentioning that. I thought "cyber" was the bane of the 90s. I feel almost like I'm complaining about people saying it's "groovy" too much.

The "Special Olympics" - even if you win (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 2 years ago | (#35085724)

"It's like the Geek Olympics - even if you win. you're still a loser."

Hint - if you do win, don't tell any women - The Big Bang Theory is not a reality TV show.

Mod post down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087248)

This is the same mistake Obama once made. He collected some shit for it, and he knew right away he was wrong.

Re:The "Special Olympics" - even if you win (0)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087824)

Obama never said that it was like winning the Geek Olympics, that even if you win, you're still a loser.

But if he HAD, he would have been correct.

Q: What's worse than entering the geek olympics?
A: Winning the geek olympics.

Q. What's worse than winning the geek olympics?
A: Bragging about winning the geek olympics.

Q. What;s worse than bragging about winning the geek olympics?
A. Passing the drug test afterward so you can't claim you were bombed out of your gourd and entered it as a joke.

Q. What's worse than passing the drug test afterward so you can't claim you were bombed out of your gourd and entered it as a joke?
A. Not a whole heck of a lot.

Q. At the first geek olympics, the two finalists had to get from the top of a tall building to the ground as fast as possible. They both jumped. Who hit the ground first?
A. Who gives a ****?

Seriously, there is no such thing as geek chic. Not in the real world. You can be a programmer without being a geek, without being a social misfit who can't talk about common everyday events with "the normals", without dividing the world into geeks and "the normals", without taking a perverse pride in self-diagnosed aspergers so you can continue to think that being an antisocial introverted jerk somehow makes you "special".

Even the kids who rode the short bus knew better. And they're often more interesting to talk with.

Geek Chic is as dead as Windows Phone 7. It's as uncool as saying you work for Microsoft in a room full of googlers. It's like saying you bought a zune because it's so cool. Or bragging that you haven't had a shower or bath in 5 days because you were too busy coding ... and nobody noticed anything different about you because you always smell like oka cheese and you always wear the same grungy black metal t-shirt for 5 days straight - but one person did note that you finally no longer looked like you had tghe worst case of bed head.

The geek olympics ... when being "special" is not enough :-)

Sure, let's make everything as cool as rockstars (1)

Musically_ut (1054312) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085854)

Starting with science [rockstarsofscience.org] and then this.

For once, should we not stick with just plain simple friendly neighborhood rocket-scientist?

F* that. (3, Insightful)

digitalhermit (113459) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085888)

I'm sick of this self-perpetuating bullshit that says geeks can't be athletic or interesting or cool (where "cool" means relatively unconcerned about what other people think about them) . Geeks are fascinating. They travel. They build things. They do interesting things with electricity and power motors. They make films, design cars, hike volcanoes, enter sporting events.

Being socially inept does not make one a geek. Certainly some geeks could give a rat's ass about how they appear to others, so they come off as anti-social, but that's often by choice. Boring chatter about the weather and the local sports team is fine, but boring is boring, and geeks often have better things to do.

Being non-athletic does not make one a geek. Yes, many geeks associate working out with some desperate attempt to impress others or the opposite sex (or the same sex if you swing that way) and just say no, but who can blame them?

  I may or may not be a geek, who the hell knows or cares. But I do know that labels are a sad attempt to compartmentalize *people*.

Re:F* that. (1)

Wannabe Code Monkey (638617) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086920)

(where "cool" means relatively unconcerned about what other people think about them)

Certainly some geeks could give a rat's ass about how they appear to others, so they come off as anti-social, but that's often by choice

I like how in the same post you say cool people don't care about what other people think about them. And you also say that not caring about what other people think is anti-social

Re:F* that. (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087232)

I'm sick of this self-perpetuating bullshit that says geeks can't be athletic or interesting or cool (where "cool" means relatively unconcerned about what other people think about them) . Geeks are fascinating. They travel. They build things. They do interesting things with electricity and power motors. They make films, design cars, hike volcanoes, enter sporting events.

"Cool" doesn't mean "relatively unconcerned about what people think about them". Lots of geeks have that. For a person to be "cool" means "people think well of them and would wish to be like them", though in a more specific sense. Of the things you've mentioned, I've travelled, hiked a volcano, and entered (and done well at) sporting events -- and non-geeks often think those things are "cool". But those aren't geeky things; those are just things this geek has happened to do. The geeky things I do generally are met with either blank looks or eye-rolls from non-geeks; building a Mythbox is probably the most likely to be "cool" to non-geeks once explained, and writing a MDL interpreter in order to play the original Zork is probably among the least.

Being socially inept does not make one a geek.

Of course not, and more to the point, being a geek doesn't require one be socially inept, but it tends to come with the territory; geeks who are highly socially skilled in larger society are the exception rather than the rule.

I may or may not be a geek, who the hell knows or cares. But I do know that labels are a sad attempt to compartmentalize *people*.

Such compartmentalization can be quite useful.

Re:F* that. (1)

cerberusss (660701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35088136)

Certainly some geeks could give a rat's ass about how they appear to others, so they come off as anti-social, but that's often by choice.

Funny thing is, if they choose to be social, then a geek would probably hit the mark. I've seen some friends of mine turn 30 and say, "I'm sick of this life as a single, I'm going out". Took a bunch of books on socializing, being yourself around women, etc, and they broke the code. They either have strained backs/hips or have found a woman for a stable relationship.

I'm convinced that geeks, who often have enough intelligence, can learn social skills very easily just by checking the available documentation.

Re:F* that. (1)

phillips321 (955784) | more than 3 years ago | (#35088248)

Agreed!

I'm a pentester and the lead maintainer of a pentest Linux distro based on gnome: gnacktrack.co.uk [slashdot.org] ........

Yet i also train in MMA daily and although what the Americans would term as a Rookie, i am yet to loose at the standard i'm fighting. I would say i'm both a geek and cool.

Mr. Uncool (1)

kenholm3 (1400969) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085992)

I'm a geek (non-uber). I seek to be uncool. I don't care to be what the world wants. Read a different way: Who cares what others think. IMO

Re:Mr. Uncool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086942)

By saying that you "seek to be uncool", you prove that you DO care about the what world want/think.

Geeks ARE cool... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086176)

Geeks ARE cool... among people who want to be (or see themselves as) geeks.

Sports stars are cool among people who would like to fantasize about being a sport star.

There isn't a lot of overlap, and it's not something that you can manufacture.

The only way you can make geeks "cool" is if, in fact, most people wanted to be a geek but just didn't know it yet. Then it's a simple matter of exposure.

But I think we're past the point now where we can say that this is not the case.

Not science (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086282)

This is a competition based upon skills in using consumer electronics, not science or engineering.

There are already a lot of famous and cool geeks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086636)

There are a lot of "cool" geeks already, and they're all famous. The guys who invented face-book and napster both had a movie made about them, so did Bill Gates and many others. There will never be anything like what football is in highschool for geeks. I know a lot of geeks want to be "cool" so they can get laid, but being a real geek isn't about that.

About damn time... (2)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087102)

I'm tired of being the only cool cybergeek ;P

More like XylonGeeks (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087362)

There's CYBERgeeks now? Damn I'm off the pace.

Honestly, apart from the obvious misconceptions, did the eds read the post at all?

Prizes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087478)

prizes include four full-ride college scholarships sponsored by the U.S. Navy, gift certificates, and letters of recognition from governors and members of the U.S. Congress

How about meaningful relationships girls? (Or guys, as appropriate.)

It's the same as it always been. (1)

Charcharodon (611187) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087668)

Want geeks to be cool?

Step one: bathe on a regular basis, as in daily, this includes brushing one's teeth.

Step two: include activities that might occassional result in eposure to UV and body perspiration (see step one).

Step three: partake in tribal ritual known as social drinking with people outside one's immediate peer group.

Step three.one: wear a shirt to said social gathering, that has buttons, is not black, and does not have a saying on it that only anime/manga fans would get.

Step four: save the high brow subjects for those who can apreciated them, such as in who shot first Han or Greedo or how string theory is important to our daily lives.

Step five: Go back to step one and repete.

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