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Behind-The-Scenes Superbowl Tech

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the shiny-new-toys dept.

Networking 154

jfruhlinger writes "You might be a hardcore sports fan or might think of jocks with disdain, but if you're a geek you'll probably be intrigued by the tech behind the brand-new stadium where this weekend's Superbowl will be played. 84 Cisco access points, 70 wiring closets, 40,000 wired ports, 8 million feet of Ethernet cabling, 260 miles of fiber, 100 TB of storage — all on a single network."

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884 APs (3, Informative)

zn0k (1082797) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085796)

There are 884 APs, not 84 as the summary claims.

84 APs would be pitiful. Cisco recommends no more than 35 users per AP radio. You can probably push that up to 50 for public access WiFi, maybe - if you're thin stretched - a little bit more as long as many clients are 5GHz devices. Given that many APs will be back of the house and not accessible to the public you wouldn't be able to serve more than one to two thousand users on 84.

Re:884 APs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086018)

Where is my next anti.microsoft article? I need to waste my mod points!!

Re:884 APs (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086650)

Gee, I bet it will be very exciting to see which group of overpaid multimillionaire jocks will win a game that doesn't fucking matter! I'm on the edge of my seat really.

God damn. If only the scientists and doctors who improve our quality of life and bring new meaning to our existence got half this much attention. What a fucking waste. If space aliens exist and they find us, they might be obligated to sterilize this planet in case our madness and our pathological priorities are contagious.

This is what sanity would look like: after all the poor are fed, clothed and sheltered, after all disease is eradicated, after all tyrants are ousted from power ... then and only then does it make sense to put our excess resources towards worrying about which group of overpaid athletes can most efficiently chase a football. We are far from sanity, folks. We don't have time for it. We're too busy worrying about money, power, money, power, wealth, coercion, money, power, MONEY AND GODDAMNED POWER that's all we care about and have time for. The jocks and their fans, the jock-sniffers, well they made a huge market out of something that doesn't fucking amount to anything, and that's what matters.

Ever wonder why state and municipal governments will spend millions of dollars to build and maintain stadiums? Bread-and-circus, or at least that's what the Romans called it...

Re:884 APs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086758)

Lemme guess: you're in 10th grade and can't get laid because the jocks got all the girls, right?

Why are you singling out sports? Shouldn't we also decry books, movies, video games, music, Broadway shows, theme parks, cruises, model airplane flying, and every other thing that makes life fun?

Re:884 APs (0)

Mean Variance (913229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086982)

What about: Charlie Sheen, David Letterman, Rush Limbaugh, Tom Hanks, Michael Moore, Mark Zuckerberg, J. K. Rowling, Jay Leno, Katie Couric, Oprah, and many other ultra rich non-jocks. Are you mad at them too?

Re:884 APs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087530)

tl;dr

I do this for fun, to see guys like you lose their head over a comment that smart people just ignore or laugh a bit. I left this firefox tab open all the day and honestly it was worth it, so thank you very much.

Re:884 APs (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086074)

Honestly 84 would most likely be enough for the superbowl, sure there are thousands of people there. But probably less then 1,000 of them 1. are geeky enough to want to be on their laptops at the superbowl. 2. Think it's a good idea to even bring a laptop into a heavily crowded chaotic area filled with screaming crazy people holding beverages, and who knows how many thieves wanting to take advantage of the situation. Sure smart phone usage is way up, but considering most all of them have a data plan anyway it still seems a little overkill to me, I'd imagine 2,000 reporters commentators etc needing the internet access. But I can't really fathom why more then 5% of hardcore football fans would be using wifi during the superbowl

Re:884 APs (1)

zn0k (1082797) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086174)

If you read the article, "ATT WiFi is everywhere in the building". That is referring to ATT augmenting their 3G network via WiFi. All their WiFi enabled smart phones look for an SSID named attwifi. The layer three gateway of that network triggers the phones to submit their phone number to that gateway, which looks it up in the ATT subscriber database and grants access if you have a data contract with them. That alone will account for many, many thousands of users. Doing that is significantly cheaper for ATT than bringing in a huge number of additional cell sites (which they have to do, anyway, to augment their voice network) and provide a lot of bandwidth to the sites to allow for increased data usage. You can cram a lot of phone calls into not a lot of bandwidth, but if the NFL is running interactive apps on smart phones as outlined in the article it's a lot cheaper to use the existing WiFi network than to temporarily augment the physical infrastructure beyond what is required for increased voice usage.

Add to that the media areas where the press will be using laptops and smart phones, as well as all the VIPs running around demanding network connectivity in some form.

During the game usage possibly won't be all that high. But the hours before and after where there's still plenty of people in the stadium (more than just a few thousand) there'll be quite a lot of users.

Sure, that is just an opinion, but - I know, fallacy of defective induction - I have provided public WiFi at some rather large events, including recent ones. The trend in data usage is clearly going up, and sharply so. The number of clients is increasing fast, and clients are consuming more and more data.

Re:884 APs (1)

Qubit (100461) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086348)

All their WiFi enabled smart phones look for an SSID named attwifi. The layer three gateway of that network triggers the phones to submit their phone number to that gateway, which looks it up in the ATT subscriber database and grants access if you have a data contract with them.

Wait, so if I just set my SSID to "attwifi" and mess around with some no-op challenge/response stuff when phones connect, I can pretend to be an official AP for AT&T cell phones? I sure hope all of the data flowing over that network is encrypted...

Re:884 APs (1)

zn0k (1082797) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086536)

Don't know how hard it is to become a gateway. But it's distributed via unencrypted, public WiFi. The SSID is active at any Starbucks - go to one for a half hour and play with a packet sniffer.

Re:884 APs (1)

KingMotley (944240) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087510)

Probably not. But if you really want to watch me reading slashdot by sniffing the network, go right ahead. All the important stuff is done over SSL.

Re:884 APs (2)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086280)

Laptop? It's 2011 dude. Cell phones are WiFi capable these days. People will be watching the game on their phones while they stand in line for food, or are sitting in the bathroom stalls getting rid of the food.

Mixed Units... (2)

cmseagle (1195671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085804)

8 million feet = 1,515 miles, in case anyone was wondering.

Re:Mixed Units... (5, Funny)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085818)

8 million feet = somewhere between 4-8 million people.

Re:Mixed Units... (1)

ocdscouter (1922930) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085958)

8 million feet = somewhere between 4-8 million people.

In terms of height or intestinal length?

Re:Mixed Units... (1)

gnapster (1401889) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086006)

In terms of counting their toes and dividing by ten.

Re:Mixed Units... (1)

PNutts (199112) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086868)

In terms of counting their toes and dividing by ten.

And then round up to the next whole number.

Re:Mixed Units... (2)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086852)

"...somewhere between 4-8 million..."

Based on the numbers here: http://www.amputee-coalition.org/fact_sheets/amp_stats_cause.html [amputee-coalition.org]
  I'd estimate that the figure would be *much* closer to 4 million than to 8 million.
  In fact, you could have said "between 4 million and 4,020,100". (4 million * 200/199)

Hey, look! (5, Funny)

msauve (701917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085810)

A Cisco ad!

Re:Hey, look! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086140)

Oh come now, There's a major difference between a simple access point and a Cisco access point.

Now, the minuscule difference between the generic and brand-name versions of all of the other instruments listed is another thing.

Re:Hey, look! (2)

zn0k (1082797) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086220)

That's not entirely fair, either. You don't have 884 stand alone APs deployed, you have them centrally controlled either via an appliance (Cisco's WLC/WCS) or via cloud based controllers hosted on the APs themselves.

Sure, there's a lot more than Cisco out there, but most gear than can handle balancing power and channel assignments to counter interference for that large a wireless network is a heck of a lot more expensive than a cheap, off the shelf AP. And there are few non-brand manufacturers out there than can handle a deployment that large, though there's a heck of a lot more brands than Cisco.

Hacked in 3..2..1..0 (-1, Troll)

slasher153 (1988730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085812)

Any bets that these 'wireless' displays will display porn as already have had happened once [tinyurl.com] ?

warning: tiny url is goatze on parent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087390)

teh scr1pt k1dd3z 4re h4v1n th31r funz0rs

884 access points, not 84 (1)

Ed Peepers (1051144) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085816)

From TFA

Also, they have their own 5,000 sq ft data center in the stadium. Pretty cool, but I think I'll still wait until the game's over so I can watch the commercials online in one go!

Re:884 access points, not 84 (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085872)

That's the only reason I watch the Super Bowl. Although lately the ads haven't been too great. We don't get the cool "Bud. Weis. Er" ads of the past.

Re:884 access points, not 84 (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085912)

We don't get the cool "Bud. Weis. Er" ads of the past.

"Doctor, this patient has money coming out the wazoo..."

Re:884 access points, not 84 (1)

gnapster (1401889) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086376)

5,000 square feet of data center and only 100TB of storage? Those hard drives must feel like they are princesses!

Re:884 access points, not 84 (1)

Aldenissin (976329) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087060)

What could they need 100 TB of storage for?

Re:884 access points, not 84 (1)

gnapster (1401889) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087388)

Most of the data is probably video. They have a gazillion cameras, recording in HD and 3D, and they may well need to store it raw/uncompressed, compressed, before and after editing. I do not have any intuition about how much space one game's video might take up, but they probably have seasons-worth of footage stored there, probably from thousands of games where commentators might refer during play. Someone else in another thread was talking about the Cleveland Indians being able to recall statistics and video of the pitcher's previous games, to be viewed in the dugout by upcoming batters, which would mean that there is a plethora of metadata attached to these files. I would have no doubt that football managers would have access to similar information.

The article also said that the data equipment is consolidated from other Cowboys data centers around Dallas, so who knows what data was migrated with that equipment.

Re:884 access points, not 84 (2)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087560)

Pretty cool, but I think I'll still wait until the game's over so I can watch the commercials online in one go!

It'll be more entertaining to watch you act them out for us at the water cooler on Monday.

Buncha fuckin' nerds (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35085822)

Where's my beer

A single network? (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085830)

A single network you say?

Am I the only one seeing an unexpected sacking by the angry geeks?

Re:A single network? (1)

zn0k (1082797) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085856)

Sadly most people assume that if something shares physical infrastructure, it must be on the same network. I guess that's why it's IT world, not Network World.

Re:A single network? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086350)

can we stop the ad whoring links to idiot
rags like *world already? i know that the /. crowd has gotten old, and, well, basically
management material. but we don't have
to *advertise* it.

Re:A single network? (2)

mug funky (910186) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086616)

remember what management get paid...

Re:A single network? (1)

dave562 (969951) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085866)

Isn't that convenient. Guest wireless access on the same network as the POS terminals and EVERYTHING else. I'm all for VLAN segregation and ACLs, but come on now? How hard is it to isolate the network that handles transactions from the network that the fans are using to update Facebook?

I am going to give these guys the benefit of the doubt and assume that the reporter is just an idiot. There is no way that everything is on the same network. That would be security stupidity. I can imagine it now, "No you silly switch, THIS is what your ARP table is supposed to look like."

Re:A single network? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086000)

To be fair to te Cowboys IT, it was a pretty poorly written article. But then they dropped the line about patching their wireless access points (which I assume at least some of the point-if-sale stuff hooks to since a lot of that is wireless as well) during half-time (when they also state is one of their highest traffic times). I'm not sure who to believe...

On second thought, damn that article was poorly written... I'm gonna rule in favor of the Cowboys IT

Re:A single network? (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086166)

Why not? Amazon and others handle millions of secure credit card transactions over the open internet every day, why should a shared physical infrastructure be inherently less secure?

You lost me at... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35085850)

100 TB of storage — all on a single network.

Color me completely unimpressed. I have half of that sitting in a third of a rack myself.

Re:You lost me at... (1)

hvm2hvm (1208954) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086104)

So... you have that and a half in a rack? Why the extra operation? Btw, how many racks? Why the extra division into racks?

Re:You lost me at... (1)

PNutts (199112) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086904)

100 TB of storage — all on a single network.

Color me completely unimpressed. I have half of that sitting in a third of a rack myself.

I have almost a tenth of that at my house.

100TB? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35085890)

Really? That number seems pretty low.

No cheerleaders? (3, Interesting)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085936)

This weekend's Super Bowl clash between the Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers will be the first in the game's 45 year history sans cheerleaders. [foxnews.com]

Re:No cheerleaders? (3, Funny)

Bratmon (1649855) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086662)

You know nobody will click an outbound link to that website.

Re:No cheerleaders? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086880)

Nobody will ADMIT it. But when geeks have a chance to see babes with minimal clothes they will click on anything.

Re:No cheerleaders? (1)

mallyn (136041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087330)

Not all. Some will look for guys with minimal clothes. Or other will look for these clothes [allyn.com]

Re:No cheerleaders? (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087570)

I don't know what made me click that link. I seldom do so if I don't recognize the domain. But thanks, friend. I really enjoyed it. Things like that give me hope for mankind.

Jerry Jones has 100 TB just on his mp3 player (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35085964)

He uses a one-off 100TB diamond-encrusted microsdhc.

And the stadium seems like one hell of a place for a lan party.

Hell of a lot more potential for fun then watching those fucking cowboys play.

What's the super bowl? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35085966)

Am I the only one who has no idea what the article is talking about? What's the super bowl and why should I care?

Re:What's the super bowl? (1)

ThePeices (635180) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086246)

Yes, we get it, you are not American. But the majority of Slashdot readers are, you can tell by the assumptions in most Slashdot article summaries, and the extensive use of Imperial units in said summaries.

Im not an American and live on the other side of the world from them, and even I know what the Superbowl is. The fact I ( and presumably you) have no interest in American Football whatsoever is completely irrelevant ( body armour, padding and helmets are for girls, real men play Rugby )

If you truly don't know ( yeah right ), then use Google to find out.

I'm American and I don't care either (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086960)

I don't follow any sports and I don't enjoy commercials so the super bowl offers nothing for me.

Re:I'm American and I don't care either (1)

mallyn (136041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087342)

Sports to me is riding a bike to work. Watching sports is what I don't do because I am too busy sewing, welding, doing lapidary, glass engraving, and playing with LED's and electricity.

Re:What's the super bowl? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086294)

It's an American celebration of closeted homosexuality, the blind obedience to thousands of rules, the absolute authority of big macho men wearing special uniforms yelling into oversize headsets, the distraction of constantly stopping the play and huge, HUGE advertisements. In other words, the perfect tool to create obedient, burly, stupid men that can't think for more than 10 seconds at a time. Perfect for the type of society America wants.

Re:What's the super bowl? (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087574)

What's the super bowl and why should I care?

As an American, and a football fan, I can honestly say there is no reason for you to care.

I stopped caring after the NFC championship game when the Bears broke my heart. Again.

The storage is cool (3, Informative)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35085990)

One thing I found interesting is that the Cleveland Indians are a big user of storage. When the player is in the hole (second next to bat) they can bring up any and every pitch they have ever received from the current pitcher and likely relievers. That means the metadata has to be fast enough to find the pitches and then the streaming media server has to be able to serve it up basically instantly if they want to view a couple of different at bats in the time they are in the hole, pretty cool IMHO.

Re:The storage is cool (2)

swb (14022) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086204)

There was an article in the NY Times about Major League Baseball doing this for EVERY CAMERA ANGLE for EVERY PLAY, with full metadata for everything happening, including what crazy shit people write on signs.

Apparently it was all in queryable database so that you could find out, say, what happened when Batter X faced Pitcher Y on Team Z in Stadium 2.

Re:The storage is cool (2)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086258)

Yeah, found the article [nytimes.com] , it's interesting that they talk about the pitch thing like it's a future possibility, talking to the guys from the Indians they were already doing it in production this year.

Re:The storage is cool (2)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086260)

I have a friend who runs the booth equipment that does titles on sports events, with the NFL games being the biggest gig.
The thing that strikes me about it is how low-tech the process really is. The stats data is available for pretty much the entire history of the league, and they can pull up whatever they want, but beyond that it's really simple, a director says what they want in the headset and the operator looks it up, and it gets displayed in whatever format was defined in the couple of hours they have to set up before the game. It's a required skill for the operators to be able to anticipate what's going to be requested, and mistakes just plain don't happen, if you want to ever sit in that chair again.

It really is pretty cool to watch, but it's also very obvious that it's a stressful job, the bosses are uniformly complete a-holes, and it's such a specialized skillset that it doesn't translate to *any* other profession.

Re:The storage is cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086568)

It really is pretty cool to watch, but it's also very obvious that it's a stressful job, the bosses are uniformly complete a-holes, and it's such a specialized skillset that it doesn't translate to *any* other profession.

Sounds like being a Litigation Paralegal in court having to display exhibits. Turns out some attorneys can be difficult to deal with, too.

Oh look (0)

McTickles (1812316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086022)

Americans going overboard with entertainment networking/broadcast appliances for a sport nobody in the rest of the world gives a fuck about.

Americans are so deep into their own entertainment industry (be it movies, sports, porn) they just don't stop, EVER!

and no I am not jealous of their "freedom", their freedom is to just sat zombified in front of their JumboTron 3D TV when they actually are knee deep in debt and shit...

But does it run GNU/Linux? (1)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086046)

All those miles of cat6, fiber, and aps are great but tell us more about the software! The only software mention in TFA was mobile apps. Me so sad.

So what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086058)

Most of us have that in our homes!

It's all good stuff (2)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086084)

A friend of mine from high school was a sociology major at Tulane. However, he did work in the computer labs as his work-study job. Senior year rolls around, and the Super Bowl comes to New Orleans. The NFL asked the Tulane computer labs for a few student assistants who they could hire to help out. He ends up impressing the guys enough that they offer him a job doing some basic IT work for them - at NFL headquarters in Manhattan.

He ended up parlaying that into a job with the WHO, and then moved to Geneva, where he's been ever since. Probably the most successful sociology grad they've had in a long time.

NFL database tech (2)

TheCodeFoundry (246594) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086116)

I, for one, would love to see the UI that the techs use to run the queries on obscure NFL statistics during games.

"This is only the second time 3 consecutive 3rd down conversions have occurred between 11-3 rated AFC teams in outdoor stadiums with 2nd string quarterbacks using a QB option play"

And they are able to run these queries quickly...usually within the time of the next play. How do they do that? Is it raw TSQL styled queries or do they have some kind of UI for that?

Re:NFL database tech (1)

Metrathon (311607) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086706)

I have wondered about that too. The way I would do it would be to have a number of canned queries that become relevant as the game progresses, each able to flag itself if something "unusual" should occur. Surely they are able to query on the spot but there has to be a somewhat large pool of "interesting" things preprogrammed - just waiting to happen.

IPv4 + football (2)

ben_kelley (234423) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086150)

the stadium has thousands more TVs, each with its own IP address

The truth is out: Football is driving the IPv4 address space exhaustion!

Power Sucker. (1)

mistapotta (941143) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086164)

The Super Bowl will take as much power as a medium sized town. [cafemom.com] Good news for those Texas doctor's offices and schools who got power outages of 2-3 hours. Clearly we're not as important as JerryWorld.

Re:Power Sucker. (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086236)

Well I think the answer is simple. Texas should simply cut back on selling power to California as needed. Maybe then they'll get around to building a nuke plant or two.

Re:Power Sucker. (1)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086302)

Yeah, won't somebody think of all those poor schoolchildren sitting in the dark. At 5 PM. On a Sunday.

Re:Power Sucker. (1)

mistapotta (941143) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087126)

Nobody thought about those poor children at 10 AM. On a Wednesday. Because their cameras were all at the Media Day. Or whatever NFL was doing at the JerryDome today

Re:Power Sucker. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087340)

That's some long detention.

100 TB is impressive how? (1)

sdguero (1112795) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086206)

2TB drives are $100
$100 x 50 = $5,000 worth of storage. $10k if you include the cost of the file servers. Not very impressive.

My friend just put together a 8TB NAS for ~$1000...

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (1)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086268)

How long does it take from start to finish to write a terabyte of uncompressed digital video?
If you need to improve that dimension, the price goes up steeply.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (1)

sdguero (1112795) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086436)

True. I'm not an expert in how the HD cameras transfer the data to the storage but I'd imagine its done somewhat cheaply with COTS equipment. Streaming raw HD video is heavy duty but I'd be surprised if those cameras don't put it in a much more efficient format.

1080p H.264 only needs a 20mbit pipe to stream right?
I think a decent RAID card and gigabit NICs should be able to handle several of those streams at once...

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086810)

Because they aren't dealing with 1080p H.264 streams that they downloaded off some torrent, they're dealing with the raw video that they are getting from the cameras.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086326)

Hahah... yes $5k for the file servers only only $3k for the magical unicorn rides that go along with it. You are a few orders of magnitude off bro!

Enterprise storage is EXPENSIVE. Far far far far far more expensive than raw consumer-level SATA drives off Newegg. The cheapest I've seen anyone get to raw drive pricing is backblaze... and that's with a low-throughput home-grown solution without any vendor support... and AFAIK even they aren't at $10K/100TB.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (1)

bongey (974911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086330)

Yes cheap off the shelf drives are $100, but what if you want real enterprise level drives . 10k RPM 600GB SAS drive is 600 bucks, no $100.
Car analogy:
My friend bought a car , a Toyota Carola and it only cost him 10k, it is just as good as your Ford Mustang Shelby Cobra.
See your broken logic.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (1)

fotbr (855184) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086442)

In all fairness, if the intended use is merely to get from point a to point b in accordance with all appropriate motor vehicle laws, then you can make the case that either is sufficient.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (2)

sdguero (1112795) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086696)

That was my thought. If the NIC is the limiting factor (likely if you are streaming video) then there is no need for faster, hotter, less efficient hard drives (which is very similar to the Cobra vs Camry comparison:).

Of course, people like to have the bad ass hardware, myself included, and it is hard to ask for a six figure salary when you are managing $10k worth of equipment...

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (1)

bongey (974911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087026)

Don't think that is even true. I can take the my mustang and follow all motor vehicle laws and get from point a to b faster than you in your Toyota. (seek time==acceleration), especially in traffic.
Now another weird thing that is off topic a bit, for some reason when I drive my mustang, people get out of my way, but for some reason when I drive my little 4 door saturn. Everyone seems to cut me off , get in my way , attempt to race me when I pass them, it is like I have kick me sign on the back of my car, but in the mustang, people literally get out of my way. My wife has been in both cars and witness this phenomena, she likes to ride in the mustang just because people aren't dicks for some reason.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086394)

My friend just put together a 8TB NAS for ~$1000...

That's great, Sparky. Now host 100,000 people, several thousand journalists, multiple channels of live Hidef video, and 100 million people expecting you to not fuck up.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (1)

sdguero (1112795) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086708)

I love it when you call me Sparky. :)

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087276)

Ultimately, these numbers you trot out present scaling issues that vary linearly with short term investment. What exactly is impressive about that?

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086444)

Yeah...$100 for a 7200rpm SATA drive...This is the big-leagues. Huge data-centers don't screw around with that consumer grade crap. They're likely using 10k-15k FATA drives (fiber-channel ATA). You won't touch a 1TB drive in that format for under 2-grand. Also, that's 100TB of storage space. You will also need additional disks for parity. Yeah...I don't think you'll be duplicating the setup down there for $12k.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086798)

Your inability to understand specifications and requirements is very impressive.

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087128)

2TB drives are $100

You honestly think they are using SATA drives?

Re:100 TB is impressive how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35087146)

2TB drives are $100

$100 x 50 = $5,000 worth of storage. $10k if you include the cost of the file servers. Not very impressive.

My friend just put together a 8TB NAS for ~$1000...

Comparing the "enterprise" class drives they are sure to be using to your "consumer" class drives, is like comparing a brand new performance vehicle to a $200 rusted out shitmobile that was gutless when it was still new.

Does this sound like a bad idea to anyone else? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086238)

"Everything operates on a single network, including the point-of-sale terminals at the concession stands, 185 security cameras and access control doors, entrance ticketing stations, the scoreboards, and the public Wifi network..."

This seems kinda dumb to me. Granted a good sysadmin should be able to keep this safe, but why take the risk. They should've AT LEAST separated the public wifi from the internal network.

Disappointed (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086368)

I wanted to see some of the tech they use on the field, specifically the "flying" camera, the scrimmage line painter, and the 3D stuff.

Re:Disappointed (1)

kent_eh (543303) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087016)

I wanted to see some of the tech they use on the field, specifically the "flying" camera, the scrimmage line painter, and the 3D stuff.

That stuff doesn't belong to the stadium, it's in the TV network's truck. Like the guy in the video said "the TV networks have their own equipment in trucks downstairs"

American Rugby (1)

X_DARK_X (1881648) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086392)

The one thing currently not retired from office that makes me embarrassed to be an American. There's got to be a better way of beating the brains out of our children.

Re:American Rugby (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086534)

There *is*. We call it religion.

Why no pictures? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086456)

Like so many articles these days on the Internet there are no pictures (hello Seattle PI). Journalists are still living in the 1970's.

How much does all the DHS/Echelon stuff cost? (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086496)

I'd like to see numbers on the cost of all the "spot the terrorist" cameras and facial identification and over-head blimp/uav monitoring stuff the DHS/FBI/whatever does at this event.

Re:How much does all the DHS/Echelon stuff cost? (1)

bobstreo (1320787) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086858)

Actually cisco sells that too. Check their physical security products.

Connection ? Dinosaurs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086530)

On first reading it, I wanted to see what external links the system had to the outside world. Got to make a good lan/wan location if passable.

Though on reading the details about the doors and all the IP equipment, Jurassic Park came to mind. Just need some dinosaurs and a nerd with self interest.

It's Super Bowl, not Superbowl (1)

DavidinAla (639952) | more than 3 years ago | (#35086850)

There's no such thing as a "Superbowl." It's two words. Super Bowl.

Re:It's Super Bowl, not Superbowl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35086948)

It is OK, you can turn in your geek card on your way out!

Re:It's Super Bowl, not Superbowl (1)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35087142)

Since you're not an authorized sponsor of the NFL, that would be, "Big Game [nytimes.com] " . . .
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