Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Piracy Boosts Anime Sales, Says Japanese Government Study

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the eyes-bigger-than-stomach dept.

Japan 199

An anonymous reader writes "A new study seems to confirm what a lot of the Slashdot crowd thinks, and the opposite of what the **AAs say: 'A prestigious economics think-tank of the Japanese government has published a study which concludes that online piracy of anime shows actually increases sales of DVDs. The conclusion stands in sharp contrast with the entertainment industry's claims that "illicit" downloading is leading to billions of dollars in losses worldwide. It also puts the increased anti-piracy efforts of the anime industry in doubt.' More specifically, '(1) YouTube viewing does not negatively affect DVD rentals, and it appears to help raise DVD sales; and (2) although Winny [a popular P2P program in Japan] file sharing negatively affects DVD rentals, it does not affect DVD sales.'"

cancel ×

199 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Remember (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108026)

Correlation does not imply Causation. They even mention this in the article.

This is a correlation. Misleading Title/Summary.

Re:Remember (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108056)

Lack of correlation however is a good indicator that the opposite view is full of it.

Re:Remember (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108388)

Lack of correlation however is a good indicator that the opposite view is full of it.

Not at all -- you're trying to affirm the consequent [wikipedia.org] here.

Re:Remember (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108700)

Let me rephrase that, lack of correlation precludes causation in the given data set.

Re:Remember (5, Interesting)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108158)

And legalizing everything [scientificamerican.com] and handing out heroin [economist.com] to addicts actually reduces drug addicts.

Don't expect Americans to actually take notice. They'll start imprisoning file sharers along with the drug users and promise it'll reduce piracy.

Re:Remember (5, Insightful)

marcello_dl (667940) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108406)

Ask ten people if having an mp3 is to be considered a penal offence, and then work out the probabilities that such laws passed around the world represent the opinion of the people.

I must have said it here already. RIAA and all the others do studies too. They know that their public position on piracy = theft is utter BS. They don't fear pirated stuff, they fear the cropping up of alternative channels for the fruition of media. Because then the market fragments and the consumer becomes the Chooser.

From a numeric point of view, that should not matter to them if they spend 10 million to produce and promote a band or spend them producing and promoting 10 bands, as long that they make up more than 10 millions in record sales. On the other hand, Art has often been about entertainment on the receiving end, about influence on the producing end, and I see no reason why this should have never happened after WWII propaganda efforts.

Re:Remember (1, Offtopic)

Smauler (915644) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108608)

I'm a former cocaine and other substance user.... I got caught with cocaine, got a caution, and decided not to do it again (though I may have transgressed once or twice). I switched to mephedrone when it was legal (which is a very good drug, no matter what anyone says. No one has died because of it, the media circus around it was flat out wrong). I've dropped back to alcohol more since mephedrone was made illegal, and it's killing me. The only drug that has done me serious long term harm is alcohol...

The only drug I've abused is alcohol. That's entirely my own problem, I know. The point I want to make is that I've used other drugs to have a good time, and not abused them at all. Weekend is weekend, once every so often harms no one.

Re:Remember (1)

Smauler (915644) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108694)

Crap... mod me down to oblivion O/T. This is what comes from posting while drunk.

On topic : Correlation _always_ implies something. Most of the time, correlation and causation go hand in hand, which is why some people cite it as a common fallacy. Correlation without obvious alterior similarities _does_ imply causation.

Re:Remember (1)

Daniel Phillips (238627) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108764)

Don't expect Americans to actually take notice. They'll start imprisoning file sharers along with the drug users and promise it'll reduce piracy.

When everyone is in prison, who will pay the taxes?

Re:Remember (2)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108998)

Occupied territories?

(disclaimer: I am a US citizen)

Re:Remember (1)

louic (1841824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108308)

Sounds like your statistics class helped. http://xkcd.com/552/ [xkcd.com]

Re:Remember (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108328)

Correlation does not imply Causation. They even mention this in the article.

Exactly my thoughts. Sadly the article is in Japanese, so I can't make any judgement as to how well the researchers controlled for this, but it's not rocket science to realise that a highly popular work (=more youtube exposure, more piracy) will be both bought more and pirated more than a less popular work. This does not mean that the people who are pirating are also buying, nor does it mean that the piracy is creating extra publicity (though it might).

The best argument I've seen for downloads creating extra sales is still Janis Ian's article [janisian.com] on the subject, but note that this was a call for free downloading, not piracy. And irrespective of what the Japanese article shows, it's worth remembering that even helping to increase sales would not make piracy any less illegal. Personally, I think a lot of people want to have their cake and eat it too, here -- they want to have all the benefits of piracy whilst at the same time arguing that they're not committing any offence. Sorry, but it doesn't work like that.

Disclaimer: I pirate stuff, and probably a lot more than I should. Doesn't stop me recognising it's wrong, though.

Re:Remember (3, Informative)

zalas (682627) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108738)

Disclaimer: I am not very well versed in statistics and have only just read the Wikipedia article on Instrumental variables.

On page 14, the report discusses the model they use, which is a linear system of the log of the four variables they're trying to find relationships between. They then discuss 4 instrumental variables as well as two dozen or so dummy variables that describe aspects of the actual show, like when it is aired on TV, whether they have related drama CDs, net broadcasts, whether the anime was an original work or based on manga, novels, games, etc., who the target audience was and how many regions the show have been broadcast in. Table 3 has the full list, and also includes what I assume to be slopes in log-log space from their analysis as well as a "t" factor for which I'm not sure about. The four main instrumental (non-dummy) variables are: DVD price (number of thousands of yen per episode, how long a video on YouTube persists ... while the series is airing, within 1 month of that particular episode airing, and after the series is finished airing).

Table 4 is a chart highlighting that there is a negative correlation with DVD price and DVD sales, but a positive correlation of DVD price and YouTube views. There were also positive correlations between how long a video managed to stay on YouTube after airing of the TV show has been completed and DVD sales, rentals and YouTube views, but a negative correlation with Winny downloads.

According to Wikipedia, use of instrumental variables is one way to see if there is actual causation between two variables. However, I'll leave it to someone more well-versed in the subject to see if the report is accurate or not.

I believe it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108048)

I pirated a documentary called "Eating," since it wasn't available to rent on Netflix and I didn't want to just buy it.

Well, while I never did buy the documentary, I did buy the book the book associated with it, that was written by the same guy that made the documentary. So yeah, if it weren't for piracy, that's a sale that never would have happened.

What's funny is I ended up putting the documentary on YouTube, with links to the guys website. However the creator of the documentary messaged me after a week, demanding I take it down. I complied, of course, but I know for a *fact* that he's losing out on sales and attention. Oh well.

Re:I believe it (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 3 years ago | (#35109000)

At least he reached out to you instead of calling the copyright "police" immediately.

Has anyone ever seen a decent study on this? (1)

alexander_686 (957440) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108052)

I wonder if this is generally true or a special case.

Otaku are odd people. My kind of people – but still – not what I would call a representative example.

And from a western perspective – I hear the arguments about fan subs. Do they steal revenue? Do they help indentify shows that should be professionally dubbed and released. Or is it a non issue because the shows would never have been released? Probably a mixture of all 3.

Has anyone ever seen a decent study on this? Have not had the time to read the article.

Re:Has anyone ever seen a decent study on this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108358)

Do they steal revenue?

No. They lost that revenue when they ruined the show. The western market seems to think ALL anime is written for young school-children.

Do they help indentify shows that should be professionally dubbed and released.

This is the main reason I wont buy an anime. Most of the anime dubbed into english is awful. They use voice actors that just ruin it.
The main character in the One Piece dubs sounds about 7 years old. They also remove any signs of blood or anything even remotely questionable.
The last time I looked the US version of One Piece had lost about 30 episodes of action due to censoring. I prefer to buy the original Japanese releases then just watch fansubs.

Or is it a non issue because the shows would never have been released?

Very few of the shows I watch get released here. The ones that are end up being the bastardized crap that gets converted into a cartoon for the US market.
Because of this it sells so poorly over here that they bump up the price so you end up paying as much as $10 per episode.

Re:Has anyone ever seen a decent study on this? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 3 years ago | (#35109008)

In general the quality of the fansubs is worlds beyond what get's "sold."

If you want me to buy it, put some money/time/talent/effort into your dubs or subtitles. Otherwise, I'm just going to go find a fansub and enjoy it that way.

anime may be a bad sample subject (3, Interesting)

v1 (525388) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108090)

due to the very large crowd of fansubbers and their fans. Almost universally, fansubbing groups place recommendations at the start/intercession/end of their subs urging their audience to buy the anime when it becomes licensed in their area. Many also suggest that everyone cease distribution of the series at that point as well.

Hard to say how many listen to that, but I know I've ordered box sets when they became available in my area, entirely because I was able to watch the fansubs and enjoyed the series and wanted higher quality and the extras they tend to ship with, and I know many others like me that way.

I'll hit up the anime fansubbing sites every week or two, and download a few eps of what's popular, and I go from there to decide what series I follow. It's too bad more things can't work that way normally.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108132)

Almost universally, fansubbing groups place recommendations at the start/intercession/end of their subs urging their audience to buy the anime when it becomes licensed in their area. Many also suggest that everyone cease distribution of the series at that point as well.

Which largely amounts to nothing. The number of fansub viewers so wildly outweighs the number of buyers it's ridiculous and shows keep getting distributed no matter what.

The worst part are people who whine about what is being made, have shows they enjoy, but never buy them. Then they have the audacity to wonder why more shows they like aren't being made.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Necreia (954727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108236)

Which largely amounts to nothing. The number of fansub viewers so wildly outweighs the number of buyers it's ridiculous and shows keep getting distributed no matter what.

Really? Source? That's almost shocking to hear, as my experiences have been so drastically different. I'd be interested to see that survey or study. Additionally, it would go pretty counter to the article above as well.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108268)

Well I can't read the article in question, as the site is blocked here at work. However others I know who are reading it state that the article contradicts the headline.

And my statement is primarily derived from my experience in the community, which seems to largely consist of whiny fans who hate to spend money on their hobby because "they show it on TV for free!"

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (2)

Necreia (954727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108304)

Perhaps it's an age or regional thing then. The last fansub circle I was in was in the mid-20's to mid-30's demographic which had a pretty stout "Buy it when it comes out in the states" stance.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (2)

VirginMary (123020) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108558)

I will download anything I like and then immediately buy it when it becomes available in my region. I have been known to even buy multiple editions and will always buy special editions should they be available. I use online and/or pirated material primarily as a screening resource. Since there is so much material out there there is no reason to watch anything that I don't greatly enjoy and if I greatly enjoy it, I want to support the creators and very likely watch it again and/or loan it out to some friends! I already own 400+ animé DVDs and blu-ray discs. Of course I am not likely to be a part of the typical target demographic as I am almost 52 years old.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108918)

See, that makes sense.

The whiny kids belong to the cross section that is too young to have any income and wouldn't spend their allowance no matter what. They don't hate spending money per say, but they'd rather spend it on tangible things they can't get anywhere else for free short of much riskier illegal maneuvers, like junk food, clothes or game consoles...

Eventually they grow up, get jobs and manage their disposable income, at which point they will be much more likely to buy the dvds than if they hadn't been exposed, even if they were technically downloading things for free with no intent to remunerate the authors at some point0.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108582)

How much does the condition the professional releases are in impact this?

Often the shows are edited into childrens' cartoons or at the very least drastically changed.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108658)

How much does the condition the professional releases are in impact this?

Often the shows are edited into childrens' cartoons or at the very least drastically changed.

I tend to see the opposite. I have a number of series here that were censored when originally broadcast, having either small parts of a scene removed, or sometimes entire scenes. Those are present on the DVDs however. (Onegai Teacher is one example)

One thing that annoys me there is that the fansubs are often more accurate or make more sense than the retail subs. But I tend to watch then in Japanese with english subs, and a lot of anime fans can't stand subtitles and go with dubbed, which is a shame. Very few titles are dubbed well.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108760)

Really these people like dubbing?
I do not watch anime really, but in foreign films I much prefer subtitles. Dubbing always looks distractingly wrong.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Christopher Fritz (1550669) | more than 3 years ago | (#35109004)

Really these people like dubbing?
I do not watch anime really, but in foreign films I much prefer subtitles. Dubbing always looks distractingly wrong.

Keep in mind, it's a little easier to dub an animated character's mouth being closed, open, closed, open, closed, open, closed from "ohayo" into "good morning" than it would be in a live action film, where the character's mouth and face have many frames of muscle movement.

This is actually an area where it seems (anime) dubbers sometimes cannot win. There will be a line said, and the only way to reasonably get the line to fit the mouth movements is to tweak it a little, changing the line while still retaining the same meaning, and fans will complain about it. But if they left the line as a direct translation, it wouldn't have fit the mouth movements, and fans will complain about that.

Granted, I haven't been a part of any anime forums in years, so maybe fans don't complain anymore?

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Christopher Fritz (1550669) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108986)

Very few titles are dubbed well.

I'm as much a sub purist as the next sub purist, but there have been many very decent dubs by a number of companies in the past five years. Probably a few years even before that, but that goes beyond the start of my disposable income.

Anything that shows on daytime TV will probably be censored and reworded. However, many straight-to-DVD series I've seen were well dubbed, counting translation, voices for characters, voice acting, and even lip syncing most of the time.

I realize that whether a dub is liked or not is subjective. I loved the English dubs for "Princess Tutu", "Petite Princess Yucie", "Haibane Renmei", "Azumanga Daioh", "Bamboo Blade", and more. But I also had trouble tolerating the "Kanon" dub (due to voices), and "DNAngel" had some voices that were difficult for me to get used to. And I'm sure there are others I didn't care for in English that I simply don't recall offhand.

There will still be bad dubs out there, or (technically) decent dubs with bad voice actors (for the roles they're playing). That said, this isn't 1996. "Sailor Moon" and "Dragon Ball Z" are not representative of dubs from the last five or more years.

I'm saying this generally, not directed at v1 specifically for saying these are few well-dubbed titles. I'm going to assume v1's given a few dubs a proper chance in the past five years, but if anyone else is sour on dubs and hasn't, you could be missing out.

As for me, I'll continue to watch shows in Japanese first. It helps keep my meager Japanese vocabulary from worsening, and I get to enjoy the characters as they originally were. But I'll also enjoy it in English (if the dub is tolerable) as I can better sit back and relax while watching, not having to worry about giving each subtitle a one-second glance to take in the translation of each line.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

izomiac (815208) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108142)

There's also the trend that the more you watch/read/listen to a certain type of entertainment, the bigger fan you are. Bigger fans spend more money. IOW, even if you don't buy the box set of the series you just downloaded, you're far more likely to buy the sequel, or another series in the same genre.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108220)

I'll hit up the anime fansubbing sites every week or two, and download a few eps of what's popular, and I go from there to decide what series I follow. It's too bad more things can't work that way normally.

Ah but thats exactly what the government study is saying. Traditional logic says that a popular show that gets "pirated" by being posted on Youtube will make people less inclined to buy the DVDs. The problem is, what if you DIDN'T know what was popular? Would you be willing to spend money on a show with no knowledge of whether or not a show is popular?

Stop hitting the anime fansubbing sites, stop downloading episodes of whats popular, stop using Youtube to "preview" anime and then see if you'd still be willing to order anime box sets.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108226)

This was in japan ... Why would anything having to do with subtitles matter?

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108250)

Plus, most of the people who watch anime are gay males, not that there's anything wrong with that.

But if I were to point you to a study that showed that gay males are more likely to buy copyrighted works after pirating them, would you/we then extrapolate that study out and say that it covers the rest of the world's (non-gay) population and their post-piracy buying habits? Of course not.

The price of tea in China (5, Informative)

PPalmgren (1009823) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108296)

The article specifically mentions Japanese releases and sales within Japan. I don't think fansubbing has any relevance in this specific case.

Re:The price of tea in China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108584)

Mod parent up. The article is about sales within Japan; fansubbing is mostly irrelevant there.

Re:The price of tea in China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108806)

They may or may not have studied it (articles being so comprehensive and accurate). However, fans established a significant market through fansubbing culture which wouldn't have existed otherwise or which would have optimistically been orders of magnitude smaller. Strict copyright enforcement is not good for culture or business, while loose enforcement often benefits both.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Chardansearavitriol (1946886) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108334)

Bad sample or not it really doesnt matter. This statistic is true in basically every case. The only times when it isnt is when the distro companies try to force an outdated medium on us; CD sales drop because everyone hates CDs. Who wants to pay $20 for two songs you like an 10 songs that amount to little more than filler? Trying to gouge us by making us buy huge packages of channels we do not want and will not watch is what's hurting TV, not piracy. And if piracy is hurting games, which I doubt, its only because of the ridiculous crippling DRM and the inability to try a game in a reasonable manner before you buy in most cases. When I download something in such a manner, the moment im sure i'll like the game, I hop out and buy it. Civilization 4, Age of Mythology, Age of Empires 2, ROller Coaster Tycoon..I wouldnt have bought any of these if I hadnt tried them first. Money can be tight and at $50 a game, I cant afford to buy games im not sure i'll like.

Sampling (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108346)

Personally I like to sample an episode or two before I buy a box set, but the quality of anime viewing on YouTube just sucks. Video is far too low bandwidth to be clean. But it's good enough for a preview to decide if you like the writing and voice acting.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108360)

If you check the .nfo of many scene releases for all kinds of stuff, you'll see the same type of words usually, about supporting the software authors/content creators if you like it.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

loufoque (1400831) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108606)

I've ordered box sets when they became available in my area, entirely because I was able to watch the fansubs and enjoyed the series and wanted higher quality

If you want the highest quality, you'd better stick with the fansubs... They're generally much better than the commercial subtitles, both in the translation an in the typesetting/editing.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

GiveBenADollar (1722738) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108834)

I dunno, without pirated copies of Eva and Trigun I would never have gotten into anime. I've purchased a few box sets that I would otherwise have not known about. Same is true with music. Without MP3s I would never have gotten interested in music. I dunno if I'm the norm or the exception, but in my own life pirating things has directly led to purchases that otherwise would not take place.

Re:anime may be a bad sample subject (1)

shakesoda! (1132089) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108906)

+1

If it wasn't for having pirated music/games/anime/programs/etc there are countless things I wouldn't have ever bought or even known about.

Pirated copies are good for viewing... (1)

Mage66 (732291) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108124)

But, for a permanent place in a collection, the better produced DVDs with extra content are much preferable. I buy the DVDs of the shows I like as soon as they are released. Pirated stuff isn't good enough to be a "keeper".

Re:Pirated copies are good for viewing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108262)

If you look carefully you'll probably find 4 gb ISOs of the DVDs you want. It's hard to argue that a flawless copy isn't "good enough".

Re:Pirated copies are good for viewing... (1)

guardiangod (880192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108316)

Exactly. A good analogy would be geeks who buy the Blu-ray edition of Star Trek TV series- the shows are exactly the same as they were 50 years ago. The fans aren't buying the 'new edition' so that they can watch it for the 10th time. They are buying it for collection sake.
 
Anime are aired on TV weekly, and if you missed that, there are always online illegal streaming sites that you can catch. Downloading the episode is just another way to watch.

Re:Pirated copies are good for viewing... (1)

loufoque (1400831) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108620)

Optimal media still exist? They're a thing of the past. They're not practical and they take place.
You can put thousands of them on a hard disk drive with easier access.

Also DVDs have crappy subtitles compared to what software softsubs can do.

Re:Pirated copies are good for viewing... (1)

stemcel (1074448) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108660)

But, for a permanent place in a collection, the better produced DVDs with extra content are much preferable. I buy the DVDs of the shows I like as soon as they are released. Pirated stuff isn't good enough to be a "keeper".

Not actually true in my experience. I've found that, at least for content released in the US, you can usually find a fansubbing group who did a magnificently better job than whatever group got the US license. There's still worth in buying the US versions to support the industry, but the industry is often producing in months or years a worse product than you can get for free hours after the episode airs in Japan.

Good fansubbing groups are much more conscientious about typography, timing, translation, and explanation than I generally see from the industry. AND I get the whole thing in an easily portable, easily convertible format with neat soft subs. What's not to love?

Buy the DVD and if you're not subjected to horrible voiceovers from the same five people who seem to do every anime ever produced in the US* then you'll have horrible, solid yellow or white, aliased, blocky, poorly-wrapped subtitles that make all kinds of weird decisions about what to translate and how. And I've never seen a U.S. industry release that will translate signs, messages on cell phones, blackboards, notes, etc., much less in the right location on screen and in a font that matches the spirit of the original writing.

If the anime industry in the US ever wants to complain about sales these are the things they should fix. *Disclaimer, there may be some slightly irate exaggeration and/or hyperbole in this statement. Viewer discretion is advised.

Re:Pirated copies are good for viewing... (1)

Mage66 (732291) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108844)

Fansubbing isn't the issue. The article talks about Japanese productions in Japan. I'm talking about English language productions in english speaking countries, comparing like to like. All the talk about fansubbed unauthorized copies is off-topic.

Target Audience problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108126)

I'm not sure you can apply the idea to the typical US film being pirated by English speaking people.

There's a lot of anime which never get a US release, so the only way for non-Japanese speaking viewers to watch it is via "fansubbing" (which is a form of piracy).
In essence, the Japanese companies aren't really losing much as their target audience isn't outside Japan.

As for the Japanese, most of these early fansubs are just subtitles added to TV recordings, so they could grab the same content from TV for free.

Whether this affects US releases of the anime is another thing.

What a lie (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108130)

Piracy doesn't boost anything. It takes away jobs from well deserving people. I know because the RIAA told me so.

Re:What a lie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108318)

Please read the headpost before posting, you find your answers there.

Re:What a lie (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108320)

I need to read better. I seriously had 3 big paragraphs ready for you and then I read the end. You win the battle, but I will win the war. And Knowing if half the battle

Re:What a lie (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108578)

So did you fail the "knowing" part of the battle, or the rest?

Well... (3, Insightful)

msauve (701917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108140)

so what? Whether it's good or bad, it's still copyright infringement. The most this study could argue for is to encourage copyright holders to ignore piracy. It does not provide an excuse, or even a rationalization, for piracy. If you're looking for an ethical out, this isn't it.

It says nothing about the real problem with copyright, the continual extension of terms. Disney got rich copying from Mark Twain, Bros. Grimm, Aesop, etc., yet wants to prevent others from doing the exact same to them. THAT is the problem. As Lawrence Lessig [lessig.org] has (unsuccessfully) argued, copyright exists to encourage the creation of works ("promote the progress of Science and the Useful Arts," in the US), and extending copyright on existing works does nothing to achieve that.

I have no problem with laws protecting IP for limited periods (relative to the useful lifetime - longer for philosophical works, shorter for technological ones), but I do have a problem with keeping those works from the public domain indefinitely.

Re:Well... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108164)

because they copyright holders use the fake number to create stricter laws, and harsher punishment They sue them in order to get the FBI to storm peoples homes.

That's why it matters. So people can be informed and shoot down those BS arguments.

Most people pay for what they get. Every song on iTunes can eb found, quite easily, on a torrent somewhere. all of them. Yet Apple sells Billions of songs.

I Agree with you the copyright is far too long. I'm not argue that at all.

Re:Well... (2)

Sparx139 (1460489) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108448)

I'm not sure what can really be done to change copyright duration. At this stage, nobody is talking to anyone else and the situation is only getting worse as the views of the most vocal out of both crowds become increasingly polarised. The *AA's stance on copyright is well known, and opposing it we have "Operation Payback is a Bitch". I have to wonder what would happen if instead of this escalating 'war' - some new, draconian way to prevent infringement, which is cracked within a week - record companies had accepted piracy was going to happen and attempted a rational response.

The current state of copyright protection and laws isn't helping anybody, and the only people who are getting hurt are the honest customers - Various company's (most recently Ubisoft)'s game-breaking DRM, the Sony rootkit, the heavy handedness of the *AA's response when they find someone they can accuse of copyright infringement*, they're driving their own customers away, in what appears to be the death throes of a failing business model. On the other side we've got Anonymous. Enough said.

The only hope I can see is for the various Pirate Parties to gain some sort of influence. I mean, we occasionally hear about it, but I've never once seen them mentioned in the mainstream media (In countries such as Sweden it might be different, I don't know). That, and the *AA need to stop this crusade and start considering the idea of rational discussion. Of course, the day that happens is the day unicorns will frolic in the grass whilst it rains beer.

Re:Well... (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108382)

Whether it's good or bad, it's still copyright infringement. The most this study could argue for is to encourage copyright holders to ignore piracy. It does not provide an excuse, or even a rationalization, for piracy. If you're looking for an ethical out, this isn't it.

The only justification for the existence of copyright is to "promote the progress of science and the useful arts". If copyright fails to do that, then any claim to moral legitimacy of copyright law is null. It may not provide a legal excuse, but justice is never an excuse under unjust laws.

Re:Well... (2)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108574)

>>>If you're looking for an ethical out, this isn't it.

I have an ethical out: Hollywood won't let return these that are crap. Even candybar makers advertise, "Satisfaction guaranteed or return for a refund." Why can't CD and DVD sellers make the same promise? So I download to avoid throwing-away my money on shit movies (like transformers 2). I would buy this stuff legally if T2 was returning, but since it isn't, and I don't want to throw-away $20, I watch it first before buying.

And don't try to argue that I should read reviews. Those things are bought-and-paid-for by the companies, and therefore worthless.

Re:Well... (2)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108552)

You're looking at it the wrong way, I think.

A business, which manga and anime production are very much, is into it for the money, not for some philosophical goal of obtaining a 1 viewer to 1 buyer ratio at any cost.

So if ignoring piracy makes more money then a good business would ignore the piracy and make more money.

so what? Whether it's good or bad, it's still copyright infringement. The most this study could argue for is to encourage copyright holders to ignore piracy. It does not provide an excuse, or even a rationalization, for piracy. If you're looking for an ethical out, this isn't it.

Well, and why is it a bad thing? In my view, the main reason why piracy could be said to be morally wrong is that it economically harms the people who make the anime. If however it turns out it benefits them, then there's no harm and for me without harm there's no moral wrong. There's your ethical rationalization.

Re:Well... (3, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108598)

And what exactly is wrong with copyright infringement?

Re:Well... (1)

msauve (701917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108912)

Tell me why a person has no right to profit from their labor, and I'll answer your question.

Re:Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108894)

"Whether it's good or bad, it's still alcohol. Who cares if it boost the economy and we're adding to crime by making it illegal? The law is the law." /If the prohibition era had not ended because of thinking like yours.

Re:Well... (1)

Holyflame (1990160) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108948)

Ethics aside, i would not know about 95% of the anime out there that i do enjoy watching with out getting them off fansub/torrent sites. I have around 100 dvd/dvd sets of series i like, i would have exactly 0 if i did not download them to see if i like them. The only anime i would know that exists would be pokemon and sailor moon and a few others like that, not exactly programs i would watch. What tv station(in canada) has good anime on it that i could watch and see if i do enjoy it? That would go a long way to helping get more sales as well, but till they do that, torrents work just as well.

Re:Well... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108994)

> I have no problem with laws protecting IP for limited periods

Please refrain from using such an expression ("IP") for the following reasons:
1) It encompasses too different things (e.g., copyright and patents) and thus causes a lot of confusion because one can be misled to apply the same reasoning (and decisions!) to apples and oranges;
2) It opens an even larger breach to allow inclusion of even future, unconceivable legal constructs, thus leading society to a situation which can be frontally contrarian to our very human nature;
3) The words themselves are an oxymoron of sorts... "intellectual" being something related to both ingenuity and art (two very different areas) and "property" (something which one gets to keep to oneself and deny others)... as the old adage goes, what is said cannot be taken back, because it pertains to everyone. No idea, once put on paper or discussed, can be "property". If one wants to keep something to her/himself, one must not say it. Ever.

There's a harsh fight between a working capitalist system, which has served well the public till now, and some deviant corporations with monopolistic/antisocial behaviour which would stop at nothing to achieve whatever objectives they have. It's not about profit anymore, it's about "total control". Controlling ideas is a necessary step in such strategy. "IP" is the materialization of a non-existent concept which, if allowed, could become a powerful weapon to restrict Freedom.

A Japanese government study? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108146)

Was it done by the Department in Charge of Gundam?

Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was none (5, Insightful)

Bonker (243350) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108160)

You think U.S. fans would know what to expect from a title like Bakemonogatari [wikimedia.org] is without having seen a fansub first?

Turns out that the aforementioned title is a popular romantic fantasy story about a young ex-vampire and the various supernatural girls he meets. Its title is probably best translated as 'Ghost Story'.

Despite the relative obscurity of both the story and the source material, It has a fairly strong U.S. fanbase that will likely make publishing a run of Region 1 DVDs profitable for both the Japanese and North American companies involved.

Without fansubs, that market simply wouldn't exist and everyone would miss out.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108192)

It has a fairly strong U.S. fanbase that will likely make publishing a run of Region 1 DVDs profitable for both the Japanese and North American companies involved.

You can say that but I suspect the fanbase is, like most show-specific fanbases in Anime, small, vocal, and won't hesitate to find any excuse to not buy.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108712)

Perhaps the original article proves you wrong.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (2, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108232)

Turns out that the aforementioned title is a popular romantic fantasy story about a young ex-vampire and the various supernatural girls he meets... Without fansubs, that market simply wouldn't exist and everyone would miss out.

I don't think Americans being unexposed to what sounds like a Japanese version of "Twilight" qualifies as "everyone missing out."

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (2)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108302)

Thankfully, nothing in Anime, even the worst stuff, is as bad or as outright shitty as Twilight.

Oh and what's with the damned FIVE MINUTE DELAY between posts, Slashdot? Are you trying to kill the site?

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108958)

No, it's us who are trying to kill the site.. ;)

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (1)

PitViper401 (619163) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108322)

He did a poor job of describing the show, it's nothing like Twilight. The vampire aspect is mainly used to explain why he knows about ghosts, demons, and other "aberrations". The romance is not overbearing and stupid like Twilight, it actually portrays a fairly healthy and normal teenaged relationship. The show is mainly about him helping others overcome their problems with ghosts and curses, with a sprinkling of amusing romance on top.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (1)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108372)

That's cause the OP is a twit that didn't actually watch the show...

Main guy isn't an ex-vampire, he is the living food dispenser for a depressed loli vampire. And most of the girls he meets aren't supernatural, they're possessed.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (1)

Bonker (243350) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108510)

Well, EXCUUUSE ME
</SteveMartin>

First, how the hell is 'supernatural' not the same thing as 'possessed'? Y'wanna quibble on fine points or personal definitions?

Second, anyone who wants the long version of the story is more than welcome to click the link. I didn't feel the need to discuss the merits of loli-vampires, loli-snakes, the almost-entirely conversation-driven nature of the story, its light-novel origins, or even Studio Shaft's over-the-top psychedelic animation. This is a discussion on the merits of breaking copyright for the greater good.

If you want to pit Araragi-kun against Mr. Cullen, or want to talk shit on the story, /a/ is on a different website.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (2)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108724)

Main guy isn't an ex-vampire, he is the living food dispenser for a depressed loli vampire. And most of the girls he meets aren't supernatural, they're possessed.

You do an even worse job describing the show. He WAS an ex-vampire, and he only used the loli-vampire as a way to strengthen himself physically in a single story arc of the show, other than that she's just a side-character whose history is left as more a mystery to the viewer. The girls aren't possessed in the classic sense except for Hanekawa and possibly Hitagi. Hachikuji isn't even human to start with. It's more like they're being harassed by spirits.

Really this show has more in common with Mushishi than Twilight.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (1)

xenapan (1012909) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108612)

Bakemonogatari is probably one of THE best animes to come out in YEARS. Instead of the large amounts of same forumla stuff that comes out constantly. It isnt another harem of girls falls in love with weakling guy kinda thing. The animation style is very unique.

Ironically, I still refuse to buy box sets of anime I love. 99.9% of the time the english dub versions they release are just plain bad and their subs are worse than fansubs. I find it hard to justify paying for something of lower quality than I can get legally (before its licensed in the US). I mean if they did a better job of the subs and dubs and released it along the same time as the Japanese version sure. I wouldn't hesitate to buy. But when all they are offering is lower quality stuff that I can't stand listening to... hardly gives any incentive to buy. Only anime I have a box set of is Hellsing because the dubs aren't total trash.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (1)

magus_melchior (262681) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108414)

Without fansubs, certain series (*cough*Macross 7/Frontier*cough*) wouldn't even possibly be seen here, full stop.

I'm told that there are so many US copyright SNAFUs and licensing hurdles associated with the "Macross" title, that no Macross title aside from Plus and possibly the original can be distributed in the US unless people pay hundreds of dollars per disc.

Then there's the ADV Films licensing brouhaha not too long ago that locked away several series from the early 2000s until recently.

I would agree with the producers that they should be fairly compensated. But something must be done about media companies who either want total control or who want more money than anyone is willing to pay, and immediately hide behind the excuse of "piracy is ruining sales" whenever they're called on these.

Re:Anime FANSUBS create a market where there was n (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108780)

You think U.S. fans would know what to expect from a title like Bakemonogatari [wikimedia.org] is without having seen a fansub first

Yes they could get an idea by going to the link you pr

Anime is priced beyond casual interest (1)

wrook (134116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108898)

This is a really good point. However, as someone else pointed out, the study seems to be talking about piracy in Japan affecting Japanese sales.

For me this is an even easier "duh". Japanese anime DVDs are ridiculously expensive. A single DVD (which might only hold 2 22 minute episodes) can be as much as $70 US. Nobody is buying these to watch them. They are buying them to have them. Downloading and burning a disk is *not* the same thing.

I once saw a an interview with Karl Lagerfeld . He was asked if knockoffs of his fashion designs affect his sales. He said his customers would never buy an imitation and that those who buy an imitation could never afford the real thing. He was completely unconcerned with knockoffs.

Recently a new Anime was just released called "Houkago Pureadisu" (After school Pleiades). It was released online. It is sponsored by Subaru and the main character's name is Subaru. While not a very good anime, I wonder if this kind of thing will become more common. I think it makes sense to use product placement to generate ad revenue and then distribute for free (without commercials). Well, nothing is stopping you from putting some ads on a download page as well. Again, it won't even make a dent in sales to people who simply have to have the authentic disc (which are the only people buying anime in Japan today).

The **AA is actually right (2)

erroneus (253617) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108210)

The **AA doesn't want to sell CDs and DVDs any longer. They are too expensive. They are already making like 1000% profit, but those costs of publishing are eating into their ability to get even more money. They want to "sell" content that expires in a short time so that people have to buy it over and over and over again while at the same time, the publishers don't have to manufacture anything at all!

They want their money for nothing and having to spend money to make it is a highly limiting factor... the difference between limited and limitless.

This is what they want. Make no mistake about it. And as long as digital copies without limits and expirations, there will be perceived losses.

Re:The **AA is actually right (1)

thestudio_bob (894258) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108430)

They want their money for nothing...

...and your chicks for free!.

Piracy only negatively affects BAD expensive media (1)

nigeljw (1968314) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108288)

There would be zero proliferation of Japanese animation in the western world, without the mass fansubbing era. The groups seem to be becoming satisfied with current pricing schemes by sites such as Crunchy Roll, so they have been showing due respect (call out to Dattebayo!). I myself am an avid watcher, though the chrunchy roll player is a bit dodgy. On linux, the player stops swapping in new frames if I interact with the browser functions (fullscreen, etc), which is why I would MUCH rather be able to download a high quality version and watch it from my own hd using a solid video player. Or at least provide feeds that we can watch with remote players like VLC (though I always prefer mplayer). The commercial world is still slagging behind technology.

Note: Fansubbing does not affect the sales of cheap bad anime. People will always buy bad cheap stuff, its in our nature. It only affects overpriced poorly adapted animations of respected manga. Even then, the affect is marginal as this article would make it seem.

1337 lawsuits? (2)

reilwin (1303589) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108312)

The results of the study come at an interesting time. For years anime distributors where considered quite lenient towards piracy, but last week the American anime distributor Funimation announced lawsuits against 1337 alleged BitTorrent downloaders.

Wait, really?

Re:1337 lawsuits? (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108348)

Yes, really. I think it says a lot about how serious they are about it.

I agree (1)

Scared Rabbit (1526125) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108354)

I haven't really been into anime for the past 6 years or so, but back when I was into it I routinely bought things that I had watched previously for free, though typically it was through fansubs (which I imagine they're including as a type of piracy).

artists are not doing bad though (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108396)

You ever watched MTV Cribs? Do you realize how much some of the cast of Jersey Shore gets paid per episode? 50,000. That's right. I have a degree in comp sci, 4 years of experience, worked with multiple languages in my job (yes, I know I am still new in the industry, don't ruin my story) and I make less than them a year and all they do is act retarded. The big companies can complain all they want, but if they are hurting so much for money, then stop paying Will Smith 20mill per movie. Pay him 100,000 since he has years of experience and call it a day.

What does this have to do with pirating Anime? I don't know. I like to rip into the *AA's at any chance I can get my mits on.

Because of Pirating I found out about Samurai Champloo, Lupin, Bubblegum Crisis (I think it is called that, I have seen 2 or 3 eps), Tri-Gun, Cowboy Bebop, and I now own the DVD's for most of them. I found out about some Anime movies through pirating as well (everybody knows about Akira regardless), but Voltage Fighters, X, Ninja Scroll. If it was not for piratting, I would have never bought these DVD's. I am not into the weird Japanese Anime version of Twilight stuff. Not my style kid, but yeah, yay for piratting since it openned my eyes to a bunch of mainstream anime I would not have known about previously

It's pretty incredible that anyone buys anime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108402)

I don't know how anime is priced in the US, but here in Australia you would generally pay the same amount for a DVD with 3-4 episodes as you would for a complete season of any western show. Rather bizarre considering anime isn't made for the western market, per se. It's mostly just gravy. American publishers do a bit of translating and hire the worst voice actors possible (yeah, I'm being cynical, but I've been hurt so many times), and this costs several times more than million dollar western shows being made from scratch?

Not just expensive either, but also a massive waste of shelf space. Granted, the distributors eventually realised this and started to release them afterwards in smaller container box sets, but still on the same painful number of DVDs, making avi files on your computer so much easier. I mean, would anything actually compress better onto DVDs than anime episodes? Large areas of identical colour, minimal movement...

"A new study seems to confirm..."? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108418)

WHAT new study? Where's the article link? What news organization?

It's true. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108576)

I'm a long-time anime fan. I collect merchandise. I attend conventions. I've been known to dress up at said conventions.
 
So why do I still pirate anime? Exposure. Plain and simple. Any idea how much a dvd box set costs these days? The majority of my favorite series have never aired on tv in the united states, and I'm constantly looking for new material.
 
On occasion, new anime series are described to me via word of mouth from friends in my area, acquaintances I see irregularly at conventions, and online acquaintances. Unfortunately, I can't (financially speaking) put enough stock in a friends recommendation to spend a big chunk of cash on a dvd box set, only to find out it SUCKS and I'm out a big chunk of the months entertainment fund. Moreover, actual recommendations are relatively few and far between, and the signal to noise ratio isn't the best by a long shot.
 
I primarily look into new series by checking out, say, the pirate bay, or kick ass torrents, or any number of other sites. In so doing, I can quickly and freely download the first 2-3 episodes of a series and give it a try. Not only can I specifically look for recommended series, I can find interesting series with a properly formed search query.
 
With zero exceptions thus far, if I like the series enough to continue watching past the third episode, I purchase at least one set of dvds, if not significantly more merchandise. In other words, the anime series that I don't contribute to fiscally are the ones that I don't watch. My purchases aren't even about supporting the creators of the work, it's pure avarice on my part. If I'm into it, I want all of it. If I'm not, I want none of it.
 
I have a number of friends who are the same way, more than one of which sold portions of their collection to pay for college- It's not that I can't imagine I'm alone, but I know firsthand that I'm not alone in my line of thinking. And insofar as my admittedly not statistically significant experience with anime fans has revealed, there are a significant number of anime fans who do just as I do.

Posted as AC for reasons that are obvious, extremely obvious, and not so obvious. In that order. Kthx.

Anime sure... (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108616)

Piracy may boost the sales of niche markets, but that's not what the media industry cares about. Piracy definitely doesn't help the sales of movies like Pirates of the Caribbean. When everyone already knows about the movie, then the advertising potential that piracy offers doesn't help at all. In fact, if the media industry wants anything, it's control over their market. A zillion niche markets appealing to every audience imaginable is a threat to their 1 movie everyone has to buy business model. But then again, their one movie everyone has to buy business model is what makes 10k+ seeded torrents that download in 10min possible.

Re:Anime sure... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108968)

Then again, it would be extremely difficult to argue that movies like Pirates of the Caribbean don't make astronomical amounts of cash at the box office, or even that they don't sell craploads of DVDs. If piracy is really hurting such movies, then why are their revenues increasing year-over-year (to record levels!) with the increase in piracy? Possibly because the assertion that piracy simply hurts such movies is flawed, and the equation is much more complex than that.

...Uh, okay. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35109058)

niche markets

Anime hasn't been a 'niche market' since the 90s.

This calls for the Obligatory Correlation... (1)

Derekloffin (741455) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108632)

...is not Causation. Although I have no doubts, particularly when it comes to anime, that piracy may well be positive rather than negative at times, it is a VERY difficult thing to actually prove (or disprove).

Re:This calls for the Obligatory Correlation... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108746)

The first and last word on the subject.

The problem is, which led to this article being posted, is that most slashdotters completely fail any and allb critical analysis. Anime has almost nothing in common is software and mass appeal music.

The truth is, piracy likely does help obscure bands find a slightly wider audience. And in very rare exceptions, perhaps a much larger audience can be found. But for popular bands, publushes, and developers of all sizes, they are absolutely losing massive dollars.

The problem with pirates is they lie to themselves and anyone dumb enough to listen that you can freeload on society and deprive others of their income and no one losses. In fact, they argue that not being paid is a win. Worse, they all parot the non vetted, non authorative studies as if they are authorative and then ignore hundreds of years of economics which says they are all full of shit.

fansub fan for years (decade now?) (1)

Nyder (754090) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108794)

I love fansubs. Sheesh, I wouldn't of ever gotten into most the anime I have without it.

But besides getting new Anime fast with fansubs, there's another reason I like it better then dub versions.

American dub versions usually suck dog shit. They will dumb the plot down, change stuff to fit "american kids". Not cool with that.

Of course, i rely on the fansubbers to give me an accurate translation of what is said, which doesn't seem to always happen. But it's free, and I forgive them.

I have a buddy who likes dubs, but i think it's because he has crappy eyesight and can't read what the fansubs say. or public school education, so he can't read too good. never can tell. But he stuck back some years behind what i'm watching. He's talking like Naruto Shippuden (sorry for bad spelling) episode 63, and I'm talking like episode 200.

Okay, i'm going to bust some truth about me here. I'm not really a consumer. I've always been happy with copies of stuff. Music? I used to make cassette tape copies of my friends stuff. Mp3 just made it easier and more convient (and better copies, oddly enough) for me. Would I buy all that music? Hell No. I'm cheap.
Same for movies/video games/everything. If i can get it cheap, or free, count me in.

But that being said, i have a bunch of friend who have to own the item. They must own the DVD, or the CD, collectors edition? hell ya, they fork over the extra money for it. I don't know what's difference between them and me (besides probably $40k a year) because even when we were broke kids, they still had to own the shit.

And those peeps? I've introduced more Anime, music/movies to them over the years that they would of probably never found without me (until they have kids, lol) and my internet downloading ways.

In closing, I will say, thanks Fansubbers, you rock.

Oh, and this. What the fuck is up with all the god damn fluff episodes? Take bleach. You have a story. You then pause the current story, do some fillers, then do some back stories, start another mini story series, finally get back to the main story, start up some more back stories, throw in some fluff for good measure, then finally get back on the main story. wtf? And you tend to do that for other series, Bleach just seems to have it the worse. As an american who does NOT buy your stuff, please keep it on the stories please. thanks! =)

see tagline (1)

night_flyer (453866) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108822)

been saying it for years

Go to www.rieti.go.jp/en/ and see for yourself (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108832)

I used google translate and scrolled to the conclusion of the study. It does indeed say that despite youtube and torrent sites contributing to piracy of animated shows, sales have increased. Direct link [rieti.go.jp] to PDF of study.

Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35108856)

Thats strange TF reported the summation as youtube & piracy do hurt rentals but boost dvd sales. Although they did say they got a third party translation.

The study is frighteningly nerdy. (1)

zioncat (632849) | more than 3 years ago | (#35108966)

While seeing word like 'fujoshi [wikipedia.org] ' in government study was kind of funny, I had to stop reading it after the author introduced something he calls 'voice actor/actress points variable". It's supposedly calculated from number of threads dedicated to voice actor/actress at 2chan. Seriously, he got to be joking.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>