Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Android Tablets Were Born Too Soon

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the before-there-time dept.

Android 480

adeelarshad82 writes "When you look at the Apple iPad's sales figures, it's not hard to see why every technology company on the planet is jumping on the tablet bandwagon, a lot of which are Android tablets. Unfortunately though, some of these Android tablets were born way too early. They are haunted with a series of problems including flimsy hardware, low-quality resistive touch screens, serious display resolution issues, and old Android versions with limited or non-existent access to apps. Even the Samsung Galaxy Tab came well before its time. Even though it's fast, well-designed, and comes with a decent Android implementation, its functionality is limited to that of an Android smartphone. So here's to hoping that Honeycomb's functionality make up for the lost ground."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Thanks! (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124042)

For the opinion adeelarshad82, we'll get back to you on that one.

What's interesting about Android (2, Insightful)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124052)

Unlike the iPhone / proprietary equivalents, it will mostly be a non-issue to upgrade older hardware to the new stuff. Thus we'll see android acting as an insurance against near future obsolescence!!

Re:What's interesting about Android (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124068)

you're kidding right? Have you been hearing all the issues early adopters have been having with getting their Android devices updated? I'm no iToy supporter by any means, but Android is much more fragmented than iOS, both in hardware and software.

Re:What's interesting about Android (2, Interesting)

stiggle (649614) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124506)

But its OS so the community can support the hardware the manufacturers drop.

eg. Samsung dropped support for the original Samsung Galaxy i7500 while the phone was still under contract from some of the networks - the Samsung firmware is stuck on 1.6 with them saying that it won't support 2.2 (Froyo). Fortunately due to Android being OS there is a community GAOSP (Google Android Open Source Platform) build on it which means that despite Samsung's inaction the hardware does still have the latest release on it.

Thats definately a bonus.

Re:What's interesting about Android (4, Interesting)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124568)

The problem with this kind of "support" is that you are relying on the hardware being picked up by the community and developed for. What happens when your hardware isn't picked up by the community and the maker decides to EOL it before the contract ends? Or it ends up like the Motorola or Sony handsets where trying to root it is all but impossible?

Android tabs are a bit of a joke at the moment, and I'm advising all of my friends keen to get one to wait until their favourite flavour of manufacturer has Honeycomb tabs. Otherwise you're gambling on a possible update by the community should the manufacturer EOL it.

I was keen to get an Android tab mid last year, but there was nothing about. I got an iPad and have been pleased with my purchase. Sure, it didn't come with os 4.X, but it has it now and I know apple aren't going to drop support for the iPad when the iPad 2 comes out. Just as my iPhone 3G didn't lose support when the 3GS or the 4 came out.

Re:What's interesting about Android (0)

Cinder6 (894572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124074)

You can upgrade older iOS devices, though, up to a point. Even the iPhone 3G can get iOS4, albeit without multitasking.

Re:What's interesting about Android (3, Informative)

grrrgrrr (945173) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124080)

Are you joking? Look at the situation of android phones vs iphones. Iphones are getting updates the android phones are not doing very well in that regard.

Re:What's interesting about Android (3, Insightful)

HateBreeder (656491) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124234)

How can you compare 1 type of handset (the iPhone) with about a THOUSAND different handsets from different manufacturers running Android?

If anything, you should compare the iPhone to a specific brand or manufacturer for instance, the HTC Nexus One - which not only has been getting ALL the android updates officially, but also has INCREDIBLE community support and car run a host of custom ROMs!

It's sad that misinformation has to be the key tactic to make apple look good.

Re:What's interesting about Android (4, Insightful)

dafing (753481) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124286)

What the heck are you on about?

When a new computer update comes out, you get it day one, within the hour, surely? You dont have to wait for your internet provider to decide to give it to you, without your permission, you dont look up at your screen and see "hello, I'm downloading a major OS update in the background! I may appear to have frozen, please dont turn me off, ok?", do you?

It doesnt matter if you have an HP, or Dell, you get Windows X whenever YOU want to get it.

Lets face it, apparently only the Nexus One, and its successor the Nexus S, both "by Google" get updates... the rest are SCREWED. You buy a "top of the line device", and its instantly obsolete when a new model comes out with a slightly larger screen, 4.3 inches vs 4, with the new OS update. You feel like a fool when you device doesnt have some obvious new feature enabled through an extra few dozen MB being used.

Its not good enough, no matter what your brand loyalty.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

ProbablyJoe (1914672) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124358)

I don't recall Windows 7 downloading automatically when I was running Vista. I guess I turned that option off :(

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

dafing (753481) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124390)

I was of course meaning the Pre, which told you when it was getting the updates in the background, sent OTA ?

I sort of expect that we "should" be paying for mobile OS updates, dont you? Its nice to be getting them for free, but surely there is development cost etc? If you look at the original iPhone OS release, compared to even "iPhone OS" at the time of the 3G coming out, with the App Store...its incredible, bigger than XP to Vista say. And then all the way to the present day...

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124514)

This is down to the manufacturers rather than the Android OS. If your phone runs vanilla Android you can keep it up to date yourself (e.g. Nexus One, Nexus S). If you buy a phone with a custom Android ROM you have to wait for the manufacturer to release updates, or just replace it with a vanilla one.

Most popular Android phones can run custom/vanilla ROMs. Often the custom ROMs are better than the official ones, incorporating new features and bug fixes earlier.

I own a Galaxy S and since the Nexus S is basically the same phone I will probably switch to vanilla 3.0 when it becomes available. Samsung will probably update to 3.0 sooner or later (especially as the Galaxy Tab is pretty much the same hardware with a larger screen) but there is no need to wait.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

Ice Tiger (10883) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124290)

And comparing Apple with Motorola? Still misinformation?

Re:What's interesting about Android (2)

HateBreeder (656491) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124322)

No. That would be a much fairer comparison.

If motorola isn't updating their devices and engaging in "apple" tactics, then they are no better than they are.

They might even be worse.

What I object to is comparing the iPhone (software+hardware) to Android (Software only).

If you happen to make a poor consumer decision and buy crappy hardware - it's not Android's fault.
And if you happen to make a poor consumer decision and go with a manufacturer that will forget he ever sold anything to you - that's not Android's fault as well.

Currently, there's 1 handset "Line" on the market that is comparable to the iPhone in terms of software updates - and that's the Nexus line.

All other phones, while they might be superior to apple's phones, are not guaranteed the latest updates from the official channels.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

Ice Tiger (10883) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124438)

If motorola isn't updating their devices and engaging in "apple" tactics, then they are no better than they are.

What do you mean by Apple tactics as I know of 3G's that are running the latest OS albeit RAM constraints stop them multi-tasking.

I work on a team that at the company I work for is just starting to produce apps for the smartphone channel and the fragmentation of Android OS's will make things more complex for us as even though Apple will have devices that have never been upgraded the percentages are far less than corresponding Android versions. This means in order to reach a greater percentage of the installed base we have to support older versions of the OS which makes it more complex and expensive to develop for.

Don't get me wrong I think Android is fantastic as competition in the mobile space is awesome but non Google manufacturers need to break away from the upgrade the device to upgrade the OS model, only then will it really shine compared to iOS.

Re:What's interesting about Android (2)

HateBreeder (656491) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124496)

I don't think it's a real issue, considering that almost 90% of android devices are newer than 2.1.

http://developer.android.com/resources/dashboard/platform-versions.html [android.com]

This fragmentation argument is getting old and will become completely invalid after Android matures a bit more.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

grrrgrrr (945173) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124324)

That is what I call hard core fanboy-ism calling a simple fact misinformation and distorting the truth yourself at the same time. -the discussion was not about the HTC Nexus one (not officially on 2.3 yet) -almost nobody cares about community support or custom rom's - good luck to the person looking for that phone that will get all the updates out of those thousand different handsets. Those 999 other hand sets do matter even if you like to ignore them because they do not fit your argument.

Then revise market share (2)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124396)

If anything, you should compare the iPhone to a specific brand or manufacturer for instance, the HTC Nexus One - which not only has been getting ALL the android updates officially, but also has INCREDIBLE community support and car run a host of custom ROMs!

If you are saying only a handful of phones are "real" Android phones then the market-share figures need some serious revision to reflect the split between phones that will be kept up to date vs. those stuck at a past rev with no help from the carrier to advance.

You can't claim Android is making huge inroads with one hand while dismissing all but a tiny number of handsets with the other.

Re:Then revise market share (3, Insightful)

HateBreeder (656491) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124418)

All I'm asking is that you compare apples to apples.

iOS Market share vs. Android Market Share.

How many times do we need to repeat this: Android is an OS not a Phone!

iPhone market share is much greater than any single Android based handset.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

angularbanjo (1521611) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124278)

Traditional handset manufacturers have that old mindset that it's better for them if they keep you in the "shiny new handset and contract term" cycle, because that's how they make money and compete with each other. Combined with the idea that the destiny of the OS isnt directly in their hands from a trade competition point of view, so matching device R&D up with whatever Google do next is probably no mean feat. Given the strides taken in the OS in terms of performance requirements, manufacturers surely would have had to invest in a handset platform with such latent capabilities that the costs, if planning hardware takes at least a year or two, would have had too much risk associated with them within their traditional product development cycles. So one result has been that some manufacturers are guilty of squeezing old Android versions on stuff out of the parts bin, and if you buy that you're stuck.

Re:What's interesting about Android (5, Insightful)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124108)

Pardon? Are you serious?

It's hard to name android devices that even got the bump from 1.6 to 2.0, hell, 90% of them don't even get *minor* OS version updates from the one they started on, there are still plenty of 1.5/2.0/2.1 devices out there for exactly that reason.

Compare this against iOS devices that are guarenteed to get 2 major OS updates and all minor ones for those major versions. Sure, some functionality is disabled in the newer OSes, but that's typically because the older hardware can't deal with it (e.g. old 3G iPhones with a measly 128MB of RAM and multitasking).

Basically, you're comparing being at the mercy of {motarola | samsung | ...} to get OS updates (hahahahaha), against a guarentee written into the EULA that you'll get upgrades. I know which I consider to be the non-issue of those two ;).

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124166)

Not so much, given the latest statistics given by Google.
Android below 2.1 are just a mere 10% of the devices in use as of today.
http://developer.android.com/resources/dashboard/platform-versions.html

But it's true that the vendor (and carrier) lock that prevent upgrade is frustrating.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

thsths (31372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124242)

> Not so much, given the latest statistics given by Google.

The statistics are flawed, and Google knows that. The statistics are from app store, and obviously you access the app store when you have a new phone, because there are only the standard apps on it. Once you have found your set of apps, you are a lot less likely to visit the app store. So the statistics represent new phone rather than phones in use.

And even then I have my doubts, because there are still quite a few popular phones out there being sold with Android 2.1.

Re:What's interesting about Android (2)

EasyTarget (43516) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124432)

Unless you delete the appstore it will be a current measure, because the app store is accessed when you look for updates.

Re:What's interesting about Android (3, Interesting)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124204)

Pardon? Are you serious? It's hard to name android devices that even got the bump from 1.6 to 2.0,

I've got 2.2 on my HTC Dream, the first Android phone to be released. In my nation it was released with Android 1.1. Everything past 1.6 is a community ROM but I've still got 2.2.

When Apple decided not to release new functionality for the older Iphones and Ipads, what other choice do you have but to buy a new one to get that functionality. Not like you can run unsigned code on an Ipad.

There is choice (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124218)

hen Apple decided not to release new functionality for the older Iphones and Ipads, what other choice do you have but to buy a new one to get that functionality.

You jailbreak and load on whatever you like.

Not like you can run unsigned code on an Ipad.

Yes you can quite easily, if it's jailbroken.

You are no worse off than the person who has to fetch a custom Android build for whatever device the manufacturer is not updating, although at least with Apple you;ll be getting official updates for you device longer.

Re:There is choice (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124490)

Jailbreaking will only allow you to run unsigned code at the user level, currently there is no way to run unsigned bootstrap code which is necessary to run any other operating system.

Re:There is choice (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124534)

Isn't this whole debate academic anyway? Most people get their phone on contract so will replace it every couple of years. That is even more true for smart phones because without a data connection their functionality is severely reduced, meaning you can't easily switch to pay-as-you-go.

That is of course what the manufacturers want, which is why they don't provide updates indefinitely. I am somewhat surprised that Apple supported iOS4 on the older 3G models, especially as in the past with the iPod classic range they never back-ported any new features except extra DRM (so not really a 'feature' then).

Re:What's interesting about Android (4, Funny)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124240)

Wow, good thing you went with the open platform otherwise you might have had to compile your own hacked third party OS update together when the manufacturer bailed on you. Just think of the hours you could have not spent searching through forums and triple checking instructions. Good thing you didn't fall into Apple's trap. /sarcasm

Re:What's interesting about Android (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124388)

Im still waiting for 2.3 on my Nexus One.. which they have promised is just around the corner. That was 2 months ago now. talk about over commit and under deliver.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

thehodapp (1931332) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124298)

Basically, you're comparing being at the mercy of {motarola | samsung | ...} to get OS updates (hahahahaha), against a guarentee written into the EULA that you'll get upgrades.

At the mercy of Motorola and Samsung? Please. My phone's manufacturer (HTC) has as much power over my phone as they have over the hardware they sold me (and unless they put a remote detonator in my phone, I think it's safe to say they have none). When I bought it I immediately loaded a much faster and more feature-rich ROM than the one they provided me. One of the major reasons to open source Android was to encourage community-driven flavors of Android (like Cyanogenmod) that completely blow iOS out of the water.

Don't tell me that loading the custom ROM yourself is too much a pain in the butt. If you are a consumer who can't spend a measly hour or two reading and installing a custom ROM with well established, and easy to follow instructions, then you obviously don't care whether your phone has the latest and greatest version of Android installed. Most of the people I know who got "official" 2.2 updates to their phones barely noticed a difference other than a few more app selections and a few minor UI improvments. Not a big deal. What did iOS users get with their upgrade? A slower phone...and downgrading wasn't much fun either.

Combination of handset vendors and carriers (1)

Sits (117492) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124370)

There was an anonymous forum post earlier in the year talking about how the political situation between carriers and handset makers in the US works against major updates [xda-developers.com] . Basically feature updates can cause problems for carriers and certain handset makers also charge them extra for major updates.

Re:What's interesting about Android (0)

ghrom (883027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124144)

Mod this +5 Funny! Quick!

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

zlogic (892404) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124152)

Yeah, and that's the reason why manufacturers stop updating firmware less than a year after a phone is announced.
Yes, you can install custom firmware like Cyanogen, but the process is complex and the custom firmware often contains nasty bugs (e.g. a buggy battery monitor draining the battery in older Cyanogen versions)

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

halowolf (692775) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124154)

That doesn't sound like a modern, built in obsolescence, business model where they would rather have you buy new than upgrade....

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124184)

Same as you can upgrade Android smartphones ? oh, wait...

Re:What's interesting about Android (4, Interesting)

bemymonkey (1244086) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124190)

Are you joking? Don't get me wrong, I love Android and custom ROMs, precisely because with the right hardware I can enjoy all the newest features of Android for a long time to come, but pretending the situation with official updates is anything other than abysmal is, well, insane.

Froyo: HTC has updated most of their devices. Samsung is halfheartedly lagging behind, and Motorola, well, they've updated like one device (the original Droid), while deliberately sabotaging any chance other handsets had at home-cooked updates by locking up their bootloaders.

Gingerbread: Nothing to see here, folks. Even the Nexus One hasn't been upgraded yet, and I'm guessing most Nexus One owners are pretty pissed about that, what with having expected to buy a device that would be a supported Android dev phone for a few years (let's say two).

Sure, I'm enjoying Gingerbread (CyanogenMod 7 nightly builds) on my Desire right now, and I'm sure Honeycomb will be along soon, but Joe Sixpack is up shit creek... and outdated smartphones don't make great paddles.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

Ice Tiger (10883) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124194)

Now if only the phone manufacturers would let you actually upgrade instead of making you buy a newer model to get your phone upgraded to the latest OS.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

dafing (753481) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124268)

"upgrade older hardware"?,

You mean you want to swap out the CPU package? Good luck! :-)

Perhaps you meant updating the OS?

HA! Thats an even bigger laugh, look at the MASSIVE problems seemingly ALL non Nexus One/S devices seem to have with updates, barely ANY handsets seem to be automatically update-able, the hour the new OS comes out. Meanwhile, with iOS, the update comes out, you hear about it through Engadget, Gizmodo etc, you open iTunes on your computer and it will automatically ask if you want to update once you connect your device via USB.

True, it might be nicer being able to do it all over wifi...3G if you were insane and on an unlimited data plan... but I'd rather plug in the cable and have it in 10 minutes (being realistic, to install etc) than wait FOREVER for updates that never come, and from MAJOR companies too, Samsung, Sony, Motorola...

I dont quite buy into this "fragmented" thing, sure its true, but its not THAT bad, but the update releases for Android devices is just HORRIBLE. Its a joke! And its from the "open" platform too.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124274)

Unlike the iPhone / proprietary equivalents, it will mostly be a non-issue to upgrade older hardware to the new stuff. Thus we'll see android acting as an insurance against near future obsolescence!!

No Llinux por Mi, Ann Droid.

Re:What's interesting about Android (1)

blackest_k (761565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124382)

you can't change the hardware that is in an existing android tablet, and updating the linux core is difficult when bits of the source is missing. The biggest limitation is the limited ram, it always is.

However that isn't really a huge problem, because most of us bought our tablets knowing what they could do and not for the things that they can't.

I've got my android tablet right now and it has enough features for me to be happy with it. I honestly don't care for the ipad and it's walled garden. I like the galaxy tab but seriously it's way over priced.

One thing which does help extend my tablet is that I also own an android phone. This provides me with additional services for the tablet. If There isn't an app to do that I will write it if no one else does first. i have the android dev kit and eclipse installed on an sd card in my netbook. The emulator is horrendously slow admittedly but its all there in 3 gb of space.

Will I buy another android tablet? almost certainly and it probably will run honeycomb but thats going to be maybe in a years time. Till then I have already found my killer app ontrack diabetes
it lets me log my blood sugars and they are improving since I started using the app on android.

So i'm happy enough, I first started playing around with a zx81 with 1k ram many years ago and worked my way through lots of computers over the years. from 8086 Ibm compatibles several flavours of amiga's my first real hdd was a 52 meg quantum fireball in my A1200 my first netbook was a EEE701 which was a bit too small. Hardware becomes obsolete and better things show up
There is no perfect hardware that will be with me for the next 20 years. Honeycomb is a step forward but it is not the final destination not by any means.

Honestly it really doesn't matter if newer android tablets are better than older ones it is always going to be that way.

What? (2)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124054)

They didn't include an Archos product, even though their tablets are pretty common in the European entry-level segment?

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124410)

I have an Archos Internet 32, it is a bit like an Apple Itouch but doesn't feel quite so well built. It has just had an OS bump from 2.1 to 2.2. It it true that some of the older Archos tablets are stuck on 1.5 but the latest Archos devices are pretty good. You can get Android Market but with a hack due to Google wanting 3G connectivity in devices. I doubt it will run gingerbread but the Android 2.1/2.2 is fine for tablets.

It is nice to have a device that you can just mount on Unix and copy what you want. It also is much more flexible in terms of media that it can play, you can even download FLV straight from YouTube to the device.

wtf (1)

sjwt (161428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124064)

No I haven't read the article, but from the summery it's sounds more like shitty engineering and design killed that Android tables.

Re:wtf (2)

Chicken_Kickers (1062164) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124090)

So what? Early adopters will always pay the price for essentially mass-beta testing a product. Furthermore, the iPads and their ilk are hardly essential. No trains are going to have brake failures and plough into a 10 storey building full of war orphans because of a technical issue of Android tablets. It is a mass produced toy, nothing more. If manufacturers of a disposable electronic toy waits until it is "perfect" it is probably already behind the curve. Market forces will whittle down the low quality offerings until only the reasonably good ones remain.

Re:wtf (4, Insightful)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124270)

Not quite. Everyone else released a beta. Apple released a finished product. And they did it a year ahead of their first real competition's 'beta' products. And yes, while tablets are still more on the toy side of the product category that shouldn't be an excuse to release a half-assed product. The competition is releasing products that are neither ahead of the curve or polished. That's just sloppy and sad.

Re:wtf (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124118)

No I haven't read the article, but from the summery it's sounds more like shitty engineering and design killed that Android tables.

And you'd be right, I doubt the poster to writer of TFA has used Android tablets, I have and you're spot on, apart from the assertion that Android tablets are dead.

I haven't found any to be flimsy but definitely a product designed and made with cheap, low quality components end up as products that are cheap and low quality.

GIGO is a well known principal amongst engineers, unfortunately not that well known amongst engineering managers.

BTW, if Android tablets are dead, then the entire tablet market is also dead which may not be that far off. I'm not convinced the tablet thing isn't a fad that will wear off in 12-18 months. Tablets have been around for years yet have not found an actual purpose outside of niche applications.

Re:wtf (2)

halowolf (692775) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124212)

I think that the eBook market is going to help tablets to be a sustainable piece of technology. I got an iPad as an eBook reader for the fact that I don't get locked in to a single eBook service and so that I can do other things with it, not just read books. eBook providers like Amazon (though they have readers of their own) don't get all huffy and say its either their way or the highway and make apps for other platforms so people use their service that otherwise wouldn't. I suppose time will tell :)

Re:wtf (2)

Ice Tiger (10883) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124232)

I'm not convinced the tablet thing isn't a fad that will wear off in 12-18 months. Tablets have been around for years yet have not found an actual purpose outside of niche applications.

I would agree except I use my iPad with it's apps probably more than my gaming PC, XBox and Macbook Pro. Simple things like having all documentation to hand, being able to take notes in a meeting whilst recording the audio (Soundnote) through to using Numbers (Spreadsheet) to crack terminals in Fallout. Being able to stream video's from our NAS of all our DVDs and Blu Rays (Air Video) or using iPlayer works well too.

All in a package that is light and small and has huge amounts of battery life.

Re:wtf (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124244)

BTW, if Android tablets are dead, then the entire tablet market is also dead which may not be that far off. I'm not convinced the tablet thing isn't a fad that will wear off in 12-18 months. Tablets have been around for years yet have not found an actual purpose outside of niche applications.

They have, but not in the very slim, light form factor that things like the iPad enjoy. Mostly, they've been over-engineered laptops which are way too heavy to comfortably hold and use like a clipboard.

I don't deny it could easily wind up becoming a niche market, but I can see it being a bit odd among niche markets - I can easily see there being lots of niches into which they could fit.

Re:wtf (1)

halowolf (692775) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124172)

Oh don't worry, the actual article wasn't much longer than the summary anyway.

Re:wtf (0)

Carewolf (581105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124376)

Honestly the summary sounds more like a troll.

IPad sales numbers have not been impressive. They are decent, but not the revolution much of the hype expected. On top of that the criticism of Android tablets is that it doesn't do much the android phones doesn't... BUT the IPAD doesn't do much the iphones doesn't..

So, this story is mostly trolling. Android has one problem, and iOS has one really cool advantage over it: Battery life.. Well done Apple, but seriously, lay off the trolling.

You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (4, Insightful)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124066)

I don't think they were released too soon. They were the teething stage of tablets, the infancy where mistakes could be made. Thanks to this Google, Motorola and others have learned valuable lessons. Some of the previous Android tablets are hardly failures. Dell's Streak turned a profit, Samsung's Galaxy Tab sold well with a small return rate not to mention the Archos products which others have pointed out.

Basically the demand was there, proven by the 22% of tablets sold that were not made by Apple. So now armed with this knowledge, the multitude of manufacturers can create a truly competitive tablet market.

Personally I'm still not convinced tablets aren't a fad, much like an overpriced Tamigotchi or flares.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (4, Interesting)

Cinder6 (894572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124100)

If you can't match the quality of a competitor that launched eight months before you, then you probably rushed the thing. (Yes, it is an oversimplification, but it's also hard to excuse a latecomer that offers little to recommend it over the Other Guy's first-generation product.)

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124158)

If you can't match the quality of a competitor that launched eight months before you

When you consider that competitor was designed to crawl and never walk then that changes things.

The existing Android 2.2 tablets are orders of magnitude more complex than the Ipad. Sorry but the two just aren't compatible in terms of functionality. The tablets built out of old technology like the Ipad such as the Dell Streak and Galaxy Tab performed quite well. Amazing how good things can be when you lower the bar enough.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (3, Insightful)

Cinder6 (894572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124198)

Android may be more complex, but the summary specifically mentions hardware, which has nothing to do with what OS is running. You make a good point about where you set the bar, but it also raises the question: Which is more important--quality and lower-tech or bug-ridden and bleeding edge? There's no real answer to this, as it's a matter of perspective.

I used to revel in the latter category ("Yeah, there's bugs, but I'm using stuff other guys won't see for months, or maybe even YEARS"), but now I'm closer to the middle. I don't want to be hopelessly obsolete, but I still expect my stuff to work well most of the time, and that includes having quality hardware. It seems like many (certainly not all) Android-based manufacturers neglect the hardware side of things, which is puzzling.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124516)

Android-based manufacturers neglect the hardware side of things, which is puzzling.

Not that puzzling. Most of them are just out to make a quick buck by jumping on the iPad hype. They get the software side very cheaply (probably free if they don't add the Android market?), they do the hardware cheap, they sell at a 1/4 of the price of the iPad so that people feel they're getting a good deal, but in reality it's not that great an idea.

I did buy a cheap tablet to test out Android, it's annoying that I can't get an update to even 1.6 for it because it would work okay as an eBook reader. Happy overall that I got it though, as I was just wanting to test out Android, and it led me to buy a Dell Streak, which is a great device. It has a decent sized screen for viewing videos and browsing, yet can still fit in your jeans' side pockets.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124202)

The existing Android 2.2 tablets are orders of magnitude more complex than the Ipad. Sorry but the two just aren't compatible in terms of functionality.

Cite some specific examples how, many of us aren't following the releases that closely.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (3, Insightful)

dafing (753481) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124318)

We're waiting :-)

The problems with the Android tablets, you cant call them EARLY...when they were basically cancelled and restarted after the iPad was announced, which would have TROUNCED the intended designs even further....

seems to have been the hardware itself. They were all cheap ass plastic, the screens were TERRIBLE, darker, far lower resolution, viewing angles, overall quality...

The OS used may not have been intended for a tablet formfactor, thats fixable through a free update though...you know, when it comes out? Oh wait, the companies cant be bothered giving you future updates for your top of the line device :-)

The hardware sucked, lets face it. Having a camera or two did NOT make it "better" than the iPad.

I'm looking forward to seeing the competition for the iPad 2. As consumers, we win in the end.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (2)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124280)

The existing Android 2.2 tablets are orders of magnitude more complex than the Ipad. Sorry but the two just aren't compatible in terms of functionality.

Yeah, one works out of the box. The other needs to hit the ROM sites every couple months after the manufacturers get bored. I agree, not very comparable at all.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (5, Insightful)

MrDoh! (71235) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124222)

Very much so. It's amazing to see what a terrible job is being made, when really, there isn't a mad pressure on to come out with something that quickly.
We saw Android Tablets before the iPad was even officially announced, and a year and a half later, we're still seeing those same lousy specs being produced.
And when someone /does/ get something close to a decent competitor to the iPad, they either disable half the functionality in a market (no voice calling on the Galaxy Tab), or throw a bunch of carrier specific nonsense on (Verizon/AT&T), or disable simple features like sideloading apps/hotspot functionality.
Really looks like they're trying hard to fail.

They're pushing the Android Tablets with comms functionality when it appears /most/ customers would be happy with wireless and stock Android. Now, considering they're getting the fees for 2 years, how they justify a HIGHER cost than without that cost is... mad.

I keep waiting for a decent Android Tablet, only to be disappointed by /someone/ (and yeah, the telco's point to the hardware supplier, and the hardware suppliers point to the telcos. Android's getting out there because Google's backing off, but they really need to start throwing their weight around, perhaps that 'Approved by Google' stamp for stock Android?

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124564)

Really looks like they're trying hard to fail.

Maybe they are, from the telco side at least. They probably are freaked out by the "open" nature because it's easier for people to get around any stupid restrictions they put in place, ie trying to disable tethering.

MOD PARENT THE HECK UP (1)

dafing (753481) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124300)

It really isnt good enough, as you mentioned.

And to make it seem like the Streak, Galaxy Tab were somehow "pioneers" too, that we should give them a free pass, "well, I didnt want to buy that hipster iPad that everyone loves and talks about..." UNREAL~! :-)

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (2, Informative)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124114)

Samsung's Galaxy Tab sold well with a small return rate

16%? A small return rate? o.O. Compare this to other devices in the same sector having a 2% return rate. No, I don't think this is a small return rate at all.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (2, Insightful)

Duncan Booth (869800) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124136)

Samsung themselves say the return rate is below 2%. I guess it depends whether you believe Samsung who presumably have the figures but may be biased or some random bunch of Wall Street Analysts who have no figures and may or may not have a hidden agenda.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (4, Insightful)

joh (27088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124168)

Both the 2% and the 16% may be correct. Samsung could be relating the actual returns to devices they have sold into the distribution channels (but many of which are not yet in the hands of any customers), while the 16% returns are from those devices actually sold to actual users.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (2, Informative)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124162)

Compare this to other devices in the same sector having a 2% return rate.

You were saying, [zdnet.com]

It's best to check your sources, rather than believing every rumour on the internet.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (2, Insightful)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124430)

As was pointed out above, there's a difference between the number being returned to the manufacturer as faulty, and the number being returned to the shop as unwanted.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (1)

ghrom (883027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124156)

You may be right saying that those companies turned a profit - but the customers were screwed. Or rather, made a bad decision, IMNSHO. How many of those 5 tablets will get an OS upgrade to 3.0? My bet is on 20% but I may have to eat that when it doubles to 40% :P How many will get a supported upgrade to 4.0 in just over a year from now? None.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (3, Interesting)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124192)

Personally I'm still not convinced tablets aren't a fad, much like an overpriced Tamigotchi or flares.

From my experience, tablets replaced netbooks. Netbooks were all the rage 2 years ago, and it started what, in 2007? Now they are hardly mentioned anymore. They first came in the 7" screen size and quickly moved up, and for all intents and purposes quickly became your average 12" notebook albeit thinner and with a low-end CPU. My walmart used to have 3 on display a year and a half ago, and since thing chiseled it down to one. They replaced that space with iPads.

I don't think these type of tablets are fads. It's just a realization you don't always need a keyboard, a physical one at least. When I really want to type, I'm on my desktop with an ergonomic keyboard. It also depends what you're doing with it - a person with a budget for only one computing device probably will take a notebook that can do a little bit of everything. After that, it's all up to your needs. Something will come along eventually that merges these functions in something even more convenient, but that form factor could be at least a decade or two away (I'm thinking disposable sheets with printed on screens that can be folded, etc).

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (3, Insightful)

joh (27088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124208)

Personally I'm still not convinced tablets aren't a fad, much like an overpriced Tamigotchi or flares.

Judging from the earnest interest I experience from real (non-technophile) people, I'd say no. People are just yearning to turn their backs toward "computers". PCs still are glorified office machinery and except for work everyone hates them. The time has come for "computers" turning into mature appliance-like things for casual use you don't have to waste a single thought on before or after using them.

And Google should be very careful not to turn Android into another highly complex and confusing OS with an desktop-like interface. This is exactly what most people are running away from. They want something plain, pretty and "magic". There's only a very small part of the population wanting widgets and full customization abilities. For *these* users tablets may well be a fad anyway.

Well, we will see.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (1)

hairyfish (1653411) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124368)

Personally I'm still not convinced tablets aren't a fad, much like an overpriced Tamigotchi or flares.

I'm with you. I've had an iPad since they were released (work toy). I hardly ever use it, and have actually given it to someone else who now also never uses it. The cycle is the same. The "wow that's cool" lasts about a day or two at most, then there's the "I'm sure I can find a use for it" for maybe a few more weeks, to "ipad who?" all within the first month. I'm sure there's people out there that have the energy to keep playing with them, but for me (and everyone I've observed), tablets are just a casual use gimmick. The hype curve might last another year or two, then they'll disappear back into the niche market where they belong.

Re:You have to learn to crawl, before you can walk (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124378)

I'm not convinced either. So far, it seems to be little more than a communications and reading toy for use on a bus, train or in a coffee shop. They look awesome and I want one too... the draw is almost irresistible, but then I ask myself the important question: What would I use this for? After considering it, I would use it for pretty much the same thing I use my little Alienware M11xR2... only with more frustration due to lack of speed, power, keyboard, flexibility, versatility. Tablets are pretty. I like pretty but not that much and not when it seems to be its only redeeming factor.

I have an android phone and am pretty happy with it. It took some getting used to, but once I did I was okay with it. Still not actually comfortable with the touch screen keyboard -- I think it's a waste of screen space -- but if I were to buy another, I will keep that in mind.

Le Gasp! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124096)

Could it be that the general consensus then is that the iPad killers are, in fact, not?

We will sell no wine before it's time... (2)

Jonah Hex (651948) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124098)

Or more precisely we will sell no piece of technology before it's time. Doesn't matter how long it's languished in obscurity, hackerdom, or both; only when it is time does it reach critical social mass. What's interesting is we're now getting several basic world/computer interfaces in a relatively short period of time, the i-phones and android phones are that format complete and headed into the realm of 70% of the population will own them in n amount of years. And now possibly the "pad" format traveling in it's own time of being the right time. Although you will never convince me it's going to be necessary to really swoop your arms to drag shit from one screen/device to another, I'm too fucking lazy for that.

HEX

Beta release (1)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124134)

Look, for all the flack they get for the inevitable tweaks made in every X.1 version Apple is about the only tech company that doesn't make a habit of going to the market with beta products and fixing it afterwords. Sometimes you can get away with a paid public beta. Often the advantages of being first in and locking in the early adopters pays off. But in tablets (much like phones) Apple got a jump and did their polishing first. It's harder to get away with launching beta products when the competition has had a polished final product on the market for almost a year.

Re:Beta release (1)

ghrom (883027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124182)

Couldn't agree more. And what it directly translates to is the resale value of said products for the early adopters. Remember the pice which used iPhone 1.0 was able to fetch after a year from its release? Hell, there are still people willing to pay decent money for it now. I can't see those 5 tablets from TFA going for anything near it, percentage-wise.

Re:Beta release (0)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124186)

Apple is about the only tech company that doesn't make a habit of going to the market with beta products and fixing it afterwords.

Afterwards

Now awaken from your dreamy state and remove the rose coloured glasses.

Apple products have major flaws, just as big as other manufacturers. The Iphone 4 antenna, macbooks consistently overheating, the iphone music deletion bug and thats just from the last year. I do not berate Apple for having these issues, I berate Apple for not fixing them and their response to them. The response to overheating was just to ignore it, the Iphone 4 antenna was to first to pretend it didn't exist, then blame the users and finally hand out free cases without an admission that the problem was systemic.

Re:Beta release (2)

ghrom (883027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124284)

Because the problem isn't systemic. I own iPhone 4, got the free condom and even used it for a few days, but then I gave it (the used condom, not the iPhone) to my friend and never had regrets. There is no such thing as iPhone 4 antenna issue, get over it. As for the macbook, it does get a bit too hot when I put it on my lap in the bed... but then, you can at least put it in your lap in the bed without completely screwing the airflow like with my Dell. In any case when I'm in bed with my MBP I just use smcFanWhatsItsName to boost the fans and it sure will get noisy, but after a while the heat is gone.

Re:Beta release (1, Informative)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124296)

A single accidental homonym in a post made at 1:30 in the morning? Thank you for the correction, but honestly I feel no shame.

i believe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124142)

I believe in the Honeycomb's. He will make a breakthrough.

Still chasing Apple? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124174)

Born way too early, yet far after Apple's? So basically your admitting the rest of the industry can't keep up with Apple technology which is pretty sad. It's not like Apple was a visionary genius with the tablet idea, the concept was widely shown in media such as Star Trek TNG.

So a hastily thrown together free OS... (2)

thsths (31372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124180)

... is not as good at differentiating yourself from the competition as a system that Apple has been working on for over 5 year? (Let's not forget that the iPhone was just a spin-off from the tablet project.) Wow, I am surprised. I thought the blessing of Google would change everything. Are you saying that Google does not change everything?

As opposed to... (1)

Spykk (823586) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124210)

Even though it's fast, well-designed, and comes with a decent Android implementation, its functionality is limited to that of an Android smartphone.

It's kind of hard to take that seriously when the metric they are comparing against is essentially a scaled up iPhone...

Re:As opposed to... (0)

Netshroud (1856624) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124224)

Wrong way around. The iPhone is a scaled-down iPad. Android tablets are scaled-up Android smartphones.

Re:As opposed to... (3, Informative)

fredmosby (545378) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124320)

Apple re-wrote the built in apps to take advantage of the increased screen size. Android won't do that until Honeycomb comes out.

Not born too soon. (4, Insightful)

Renderer of Evil (604742) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124220)

Born out of wedlock.

None of these Android ODMs care about growing and nurturing the platform whether it comes to constant updates or application compatibility. It's only market growth in raw numbers with the thinnest of margins, but that's just a consequence of dumping bargain-basement hardware into the stores by truckloads to see what sticks. See: Augens, Streaks, Galaxy Tab, and whatever Archos is doing.

On the mobile phone front if you pick up any two Android phones you'll see completely different methodologies, bizarre UI conventions, half-done features that exist for no logical reason for the sake of filling out checkboxes on spec sheets.

Despite this, Android phones took off because a) there was a vacuum of other more coherent, non-iOS platforms and b) because carriers subsidize the cost of the hardware and everyone needs a phone. It's an essential device.

Tablets face a much harder battle because majority of consumers are unwilling to sign a contract for a non-essential, secondary devices. Note the historically flaccid Netbook sales coupled with subsidies. This is especially true when most people have prior contracts with their phones. Having 2 mobile contracts doesn't quite gel.

Motorola XOOM's pricing came out today at $800 USD with additional, carrier specific caveats. You'd be insane to shell out that much money for a 1st gen, untested device with no compelling app ecosystem vis-Ã-vis iPad/2.

My belief is that the market is wide open right now and the second place is still up for grabs. Could be HP, could be Microsoft's new WP7 thing (if they get their heads out of their ass), or Android.

But just showing up with a tablet is not enough. You need to have healthy margins, curated app ecosystem, and platform continuity. iOS provides that. Android is too fragmented at the moment to pull it off. Sad thing is, Google is unwilling to exert any control and clean up their cluttered, spam-ridden marketplace or force these manufacturers into shipping devices without silly skins.

It's been said before that Android is a meta-platform, and I tend to agree with that. This gives hope to other OSes into jumping into the fray and becoming second to Apple. I truly believe that iPad has an iPod-like lock on the tablets for years to come (check above about subsidies).

Knock-offs shouldn't have long term impact (1)

angularbanjo (1521611) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124228)

Many of these tablets are just those MID-based far east iPad knock-offs; they're in abundance in the UK from electrical outlets like Maplin. They're not a serious competitor to anything, in the way that knock-off Bentleys aren't. Some of these are just so laughably poor that a decent Honeycomb implementation shouldn't have to worry about a paternal suit.

Still too expensive (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124236)

We haven't seen a device come out that's really cost competitive with the iPad. Sure you can get cheaper Android devices, but with a wide variety of flaws including slow UI and bad battery life.

The Tab looked OK, but is kind of small, and there's the upgrade issue... for whatever reason, it doesn't seem to be selling at a huge clip, but I think mainly because it requires a contract.

The first Android tablet I thought looked like it might be really good was the Xoom. But now we know it's $800, and if a Best Buy circular is to be believed, you can't even use it on WiFi without paying for a month of cell service! To me it seems like the quickest way to kill a product is to make the first thing consumers do when they get your device is to interact with a cellular company. That was a large part about why the original iPhone was so successful, because Apple wrapped up all the carrier contract bullshit into an iTunes interface for signup that was tolerable.

Tablets in general were born too soon (2)

ProbablyJoe (1914672) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124340)

Well, I think it was going to happen regardless really, obviously they want to get in on the action now Apple has driven everyone tablet crazy.

Still, every time I see an announcement saying a company is releasing an Android 2.3 tablet I groan. I for one wouldn't consider buying any tablets that aren't released with 3.0. I don't really need something with identical functionality to my phone, with a bigger screen

That said, I'm not sure 3.0 even brings enough to the table - and the same goes for the iPad (I don't claim to know much about them, but as far as I'm aware the iOS on there is almost identical to iPhones?). The resolution on these tablets is almost as big as my monitor at work, and yet they still don't have windowed apps? I was amazed when I tried out the Android 3.0 preview SDK, and every single app, even simple things like SMS, took up the entire screen. I know some of these simple things provide widgets for that sort of thing, but really, why do we not have windowed apps yet? It's not like Android has any issues with multitasking, so why can't it do 2 things on the same screen?

Until I can do more with a tablet than I can with my phone, I'll be more likely to consider a small laptop (or a netbook for you buzzword lovers).

prolly written by an apple troll (1)

Latinhypercube (935707) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124344)

"...its functionality is limited to that of an Android smartphone"
you mean like how the ipad is a big iphone and not a real computer ?

In the other hand.... (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124356)

Maemo was killed too early. Would had loved to see a bigger-than-n900 tablet/netvertible with it, The remaining hope is Meego, and is coming very late to the party.

Natural selection (0)

bl8n8r (649187) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124374)

A lot of those crappy android tablets are under $200 bucks and will get weeded out. It's the natural evolution of gadgets and just the way the consumer market space works. If anything, it sounds to me like the iFans are getting a little worried and trying to find anything they can to argue with. If you want a great android tablet the Moto Xoom is the one you want. Oh, and it comes with a USB port and dual cameras. Apple doesn't give you either. Apple wants you to be an iWhore and they are succeeding en masse. At least with even the crappiest android tablet you can still get your data off/on it without having to try and go through the steel fist of apple.

Newton (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35124424)

Somebody should mention the apple newton. It was a tablet and it was released too soon.

See some of use believe in product intelligent design and others in product evolution.

Re:Newton (1)

jappleng (1805148) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124556)

You should consider registering to /. if you're going to be making those silly remarks 3

Re:Newton (1)

jappleng (1805148) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124562)

(offtopic)

You should consider registering to /. if you're going to be making those silly remarks 3

The 3 is suppose to be a heart. i forgot to disable html for my post so please don't take it the wrong way

but the galaxy tab is nice... (1)

jappleng (1805148) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124546)

Sure, it cost about $700 + $100 in extra fees (thanks verizon for cheating my step-dad for paying that much for nothing), but the tablet itself seems to work fine, so long as you don't install more than 30apps on it. I had to format it once because I had too many apps and it was lagging to the very end, and I have roughly 20~ish downloaded apps on top of my pre-bundled apps and it's starting to do it again. Despite this, it does what it needs to do unless you want to use the GPS... Man, I almost forgot about the GPS problem. If you have your tablet on for too long your GPS won't work and you'll have to restart the system which can sometimes take a whopping 15mins depending on how many apps you have (currently 4mins for me). I guess I am suffering from early adopter's denial :/

There probably won't be a Honeycomb distro for this unit either since Samsung is terrible at providing updates and there's none available on the dev site.

Not only tablets...AC-100 is also an epic failure (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124550)

I've just bought a Toshiba AC-100 at a reduced price and spent 4 hours trying to figure out how to install flash for watching videos (hint: not possible). Okay, so flash is evil, perhaps I should force myself to live without it even though its used everywhere. Then I spent another 4 hours and numerous factory resets trying to figure out how to enter accented characters---the keyboard is Portuguese and has accents, but for some bizarre reason they are not combined with the character. On Ubuntu I'd just change the keyboard settings, but on Android there is no such setting (no, ctrl-space does not work). Of course, I could press "a" very long to get a menu and choose the accent in that menu---a really good option for someone who makes a living by writing texts. Oh and by the way, there is no word processor or text editor on the AC-100. And, of course, Toshiba had the glorious idea not to include the market place app so you cannot install new apps from market.android.com and have to use their crappy clone with about 50 apps instead.

Quite honestly, if I had the money I would definitely sue companies for pushing out clearly unfinished and dysfunctional products like the AC-100. I'm tired and too busy for being an unpaid beta tester, and putting GNU/linux on the device is not always a solution. (In case of the AC-100 it's still very complicated even for a tech-savvy person like me and you can accidentally brick the device because the factory reset does not work as it should.)

Could someone make a page with the personal phone numbers of the CEOs of companies like Toshiba, so people can call them up for customer support? Just an idea...

Anyway, thanks for your attention ;-) I'll return the device tomorrow.

Fashion accessory (3, Interesting)

angus77 (1520151) | more than 3 years ago | (#35124576)

What's this talk about technology? The iPad is a fashion accessory. Android tablets are not fashionable.

Seriously, what is the point of a tablet device? At the high school I work at, we're going to be made to use iPad's starting in April. I've played around with one of the test devices and I can't imagine actually getting work done on these things. I'm dreading April. If it were an Android device it wouldn't be any better.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?