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TI Plans Minority Report UI Using ARM SoC + Projector

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the welcome-to-the-future dept.

Input Devices 72

siliconbits writes "Texas Instruments wants to deliver a Minority Report-like user interface by combining its just-announced OMAP 5 platform, which is based on two Cortex A15 cores, with one of its own DLP pico projectors and a camera. The US semiconductor giant wants to pioneer the use of so-called next generation natural user interfaces by adding hardware support for stereoscopic 3D, gesturing including proximity sensor and interactive projection. This is reminiscent of the SixthSense, a wearable device invented by Pranav Mistry, which was demoed back in March 2009 by the then-PhD student of MIT's Media Lab Fluid Interfaces Group at TED."

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72 comments

Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140000)

What's this obsession with Minority Report interfaces? They really don't look very ergonomic to me - I'd imagine all kind of law suits if people had to use these on a regular basis. Just because it's been in a (shitty) sci-fi film doesn't mean it's a great idea.

If you're going to make tech based on popular films you should really start with the Hoverboard and Mr Fussion first. Once you've got those sorted then you can make dumb arse UIs.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140124)

Kitchens, bathrooms, hospitals. Anywhere you can't physically touch an input device without some horrible downside.

Re:Why? (2)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140260)

Ah, of course -- the OCD market!

Re:Why? (1)

cfvgcfvg (942576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35141028)

Cafeterias, restaurants, old folks homes, public input terminals, grocery stores, convenience stores...

Re:Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140142)

They also make using a computer more difficult for those with disabilities. Thats why I will never own a console.

I'd love to know what happened to all those neural interface devices that were supposed to come out a few years back. The OCZ one was a $300 waste of time.
Was the technology just abandoned?

Re:Why? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140910)

My impression is that neural interfaces are currently in something of a bind: The effective "bandwidth" we can presently achieve without invasive surgery or big, pricey, MRI setups is unexciting.

For the small number of patients so thoroughly paralyzed that any of the minimal-motion input mechanisms are impractical, they are still quite useful; but being stuck as a "medical device" that is only really relevant to a small number of seriously impaired patients is not a recipe for high speed development and low cost.

With invasive surgery or Serious MRIs, you can actually do some pretty cool stuff(looking through someone's eyes by imaging their visual cortex? Awesome.); but neither is all that practical for user interface purposes...

Re:Why? (1)

Minion of Eris (1574569) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140194)

OK, I'll grant that the film wasn't great. That said, the core ideas were excellent. I don't think I have seen a single movie yet that lived up to a P.K. Dick short story, let alone novel. (possible exception for Scanner Darkly - and they even messed that one up). Anyone know who has the film rights to "Man in the High Castle?

Re:Why? (2)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140392)

Ridley Scott [imdb.com] is supposedly working on a miniseries for the BBC [movieweb.com] real soon now.

Re:Why? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140444)

Just because it's been in a (shitty) sci-fi film doesn't mean it's a great idea.

If you're going to make tech based on popular films you should really start with the Hoverboard and Mr Fussion first. Once you've got those sorted then you can make dumb arse UIs.

Forget that, my vote is either Cherry2000 (speaking of dumb UIs) or "Weird Science" (apparently robot UIs had improved by that movie)

Anything to get Americans to exercise (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140026)

While I think that standing in front of a 'computer' and waving my hands looking retarded isn't the best way to interface with a machine, it would get folks off the couch and at least moving more than their fingers.

Just don't make it mobile. People look stupid enough with bluetooth head sets as it is.

Re:Anything to get Americans to exercise (1)

patch5 (1990504) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140432)

Hands off my chair; when I'm ready to move around, I'll get up and move around. Outside of it just being a novel interface, I honestly can't see any application where this type of UI is more practical or useful than what presently exists, but I can see several where it'll make general computing a lot more difficult. Just because the mouse has been around with us for a while doesn't mean that any conceivable alternative to it is an improvement. Think I'm going to have to pass on this, and hold out for the neural interface.

Bad design (1)

TiggertheMad (556308) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140602)

"While I think that standing in front of a 'computer' and waving my hands looking retarded isn't the best way to interface with a machine, it would get folks off the couch and at least moving more than their fingers. "

...which would probably be a net decrease in productivity, unfortunately. While I think getting people up and moving around more would be healthy, I don't know how efficient it would be to introduce large limb moments to work flow. Here is my thinking as to why:

Musicians are privy to a little secret, in order to get fast and fluid with your fingers, you try to move them as little as possible. Its easier and faster to move small muscle groups than larger ones. Fencers try to move from the wrist, and not from the elbow or shoulder. So, while its cool looking to see tom cruse waving his arms all over the place, it would probably be really tiring and slow.

Not that this will keep a virtual projected ui scheme from working, it just will probably end up being exactly what you see from Hollywood.

Re:Bad design (1)

jack2000 (1178961) | more than 3 years ago | (#35142874)

Once you have the infrastructure for this there's nothing stopping you from fine tuning the stuff to look for your wrist movements.
You can even assign different actions depending on what you moved your wrist for a fine control of something or your entire arm, etc.

This is what I've been waiting for (1)

MikeURL (890801) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140106)

For ages I've been wondering why processor power has increased many times over but input devices have hardly changed at all.

We're starting to see that change with things like the Kinect and multi-touch on smartphones. Now this news looks like it could be a next step--holographic input. In some ways that is conceptually combing the Kinect model with the multi-touch model in 3D space.

It is gratifying to me to see input devices finally start to take some lurching steps forward. It is still unsteady to be sure but certainly better than we have seen over the last decade.

Re:This is what I've been waiting for (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140208)

For ages I've been wondering why processor power has increased many times over but input devices have hardly changed at all.

Because for general purpose computer use, a keyboard and mouse are hard to beat.

Re:This is what I've been waiting for (1)

MikeURL (890801) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140414)

No argument. For what they do they are pretty awesome.

But after using android for a while I can certainly see where different input methods have value. Also, after seeing what some hackers are doing with Kinect it really opens the mind up a little in terms of what is possible.

I'm not suggesting the death of the KB mouse hegemony but maybe there is room for some other effective input methods as well...

Re:This is what I've been waiting for (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140418)

If someone really came up with better input devices, the pro computer gamers would be using them.

As for user interfaces, Starcraft players seem to manage very many actions per second.

So the challenge is to create a user interface that's friendly and usable to "noobs" but also able to augment pros/experts to their limits.

Most recent UIs seem to emphasize friendly and usable to "new users", but they neglect the case where some of those new users don't mind taking the trouble to learn to do things very very much faster.

Re:This is what I've been waiting for (1)

FullMetalJester (887382) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140504)

If someone really came up with better input devices, the pro computer gamers would be using them. As for user interfaces, Starcraft players seem to manage very many actions per second. So the challenge is to create a user interface that's friendly and usable to "noobs" but also able to augment pros/experts to their limits. Most recent UIs seem to emphasize friendly and usable to "new users", but they neglect the case where some of those new users don't mind taking the trouble to learn to do things very very much faster.

current games are designed around KB mouse input, the kinect stuff is programmed to take advantage of the hardware. give it time.

Re:This is what I've been waiting for (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 3 years ago | (#35151810)

Kinect adds a lag of about 200-250 milliseconds:

http://www.anandtech.com/print/4057 [anandtech.com]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MF9b5UiVq-Q [youtube.com]

That's fine for casual use, crap for the pros.

You can react faster than kinect - just watch the video and move your hand up/down when the person in the video does it. You can do it before Kinect does.

If you were playing an FPS using a kinect against someone who was using a low lag controller, many times you would already be "dead" before kinect recognized your action.

As for work, whenever possible, it's the humans that should be making stuff wait, not the computers/controllers/UI ;).

Re:This is what I've been waiting for (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35141174)

So the challenge is to create a user interface that's friendly and usable to "noobs" but also able to augment pros/experts to their limits.

Why's that the challenge? Make one that's powerful for experts, and those worthy will adapt.

Re:This is what I've been waiting for (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140490)

For ages I've been wondering why processor power has increased many times over but input devices have hardly changed at all.

Apparently not many "ages", or your idea of an age is like my idea of a long coffee break.

Dectapes, punchcards, and a "programmers console" forever!

So.... (2)

Syberz (1170343) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140116)

They're going to do the same as a Kinect, but for more expensive?

Re:So.... (1)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140222)

And they'll sue people who try to write homebrew apps for it, like they do to owners of their calculators.

Re:So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140988)

And they'll sue people who try to write homebrew apps for it, like they do to owners of their calculators.

They only do that because standardized tests want to think that certain calculators are "secure" for use.

Oh good! (5, Interesting)

techishly (1792140) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140128)

I've been too comfortable, sitting in a big desk chair all day, hardly moving a mouse a few inches to summon an entire world of information. What I really want is to be standing up all day in front of a huge transparent screen, holding my hands up in the air and wildly waving my arms around. That would be a huge improvement.

Re:Oh good! (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140230)

holding my hands up in the air and wildly waving my arms around. That would be a huge improvement.

Yeah, but just think of the benefits: if you walked down the street wildly waving your arms around ten years ago people thought you were a lunatic, if you do it ten years from now people will think you're a poser with the latest Apple iThing.

Re:Oh good! (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140356)

I still get this with bluetooth headsets. See someone walking alone down the street arguing with them self for a few minutes. That little blue LED really needs to stay on during use instead of blink so we can more quickly identify the real schizophrenics.

Re:Oh good! (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140938)

I still get this with bluetooth headsets. See someone walking alone down the street arguing with them self for a few minutes. That little blue LED really needs to stay on during use instead of blink so we can more quickly identify the real schizophrenics.

I'm not sure I get this - do all schizophrenics have blinking blue lights, or is it just you?

Re:Oh good! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#35141234)

My augmented reality rig puts flashing DMS-IV evaluations over everybody's head. It's quite amusing.

Re:Oh good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35141236)

Talking into a headset/mobile phone is a nice way to keep people from finding out if you talk to yourself or the voices in your head. So yes most schizophrenics should have blinking blue lights.

Re:Oh good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140960)

Sure, may not work here, but since they're comparing it to Minority Report, think about how such an interface was used there. I could actually see this being useful for interfaces where you're not expected to be on it _all day_ and where you need to share information between multiple people. For one example, think about using it in a classroom or lecture hall. You could make things much more interactive than a simple slideshow then. Sure, some people would be using it wrong, but I've seen the physics profs at my uni use powerpoint quite brilliantly. And I can think of plenty of ways they could do even more with an interface like this. Quick example: You could set up virtual experiments, and you wouldn't have to be behind a computer to operate them. If there are any questions along the lines of 'what would happen if...', you could quickly make the changes and show it while describing exactly what you're doing. Sure, it wouldn't be a _massive_ improvement, but it would still be cool.

Re:Oh good! (1)

the_raptor (652941) | more than 3 years ago | (#35141888)

You can do that now with touch screens (and have been able to for several decades). Adding a camera and projector into the mix really doesn't change anything except, maybe, make it cheaper.

This would be interesting if it was portable/wearable and allowed you to project an interface and screen on any convenient surface. Using it "Minority Report" style is pure Hollywood BS.

All this "next generation user interface" crap is just the new Virtual Reality. Until we get direct neural interfacing the mouse and keyboard will be the dominant interface system.

Re:Oh good! (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35143740)

Cheaper is what you need. And removable. There's a reason nearly ever classroom at my university has a projector and screen rather than just replacing the chalkboard with a massive LCD monitor....

Re:Oh good! (1)

commodore6502 (1981532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35148850)

>>>I've been too comfortable, sitting in a big desk chair all day, hardly moving a mouse a few inches

Precisely. My arms already hurt just imagining waving them around all day in my office. I prefer the current interface where I just lay my arm on the table, and barely move at all except to adjust the mouse & click. NON-labor rather than wearing myself-out like a factory worker doing repetitive motions.

Wrong, just wrong, and everyone always does it! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140152)

Minority Report was NOT a camera-based gesture recognition interface!
There is a control glove! 2 of them!
Every single time someone does this, it is always gesture-based camera systems and they completely forgot the hand-piece!

Quit that shit already and go back and see it.
Here, better yet, the video of the exact scene.
Minority Report viewscreen [youtube.com]
Someone e-mail EVERYONE, EVER.

Gesture-based recognition systems are terrible, they really are. They have absolutely no precision, at all.
I wish people would get away from this crap and realize that actual, physical controls are GOOD.
Every gesture system has failed. Even gaming ones have failed. Eyetoy, overall, failed. Kinect is already failing a slow, but very sure death, despite the advertising. (and that stupid price as well, what in hell are they thinking?)
Gaming gesture recognition is just plain awful. It limits your interaction significantly and lowers accuracy. (to the point of some games even playing themselves to hide how awfully limiting gesture input is.)

TI, please don't waste your time doing this. Optical Gesture-recognition is the most hyped up failure in all of tech history. The Kinect crap certainly isn't helping, neither is this.
A wearable device is infinitely better than optical gesture recognition.
Also, accessibility accessibility accessibility. Not everyone wants to, or CAN, flail their arms around for possibly hours at a time.

Re:Wrong, just wrong, and everyone always does it! (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140958)

I am told that the Italians have been using an Optical Gesture-recognition communication system to supplement the bandwidth of their voice-channel for several centuries now...

Re:Wrong, just wrong, and everyone always does it! (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35143006)

Not just the Italians. The Fuckyoutonians were very successful with theirs, too, to the point that it's been adopted by most major languages on Earth. Of course, their language only has one word...

Re:Wrong, just wrong, and everyone always does it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35141004)

mailto:*@*.* [mailto]
Subject: Doing it wrong.

Re:Wrong, just wrong, and everyone always does it! (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35142972)

Every gesture system has failed.

That's because of a failure of haptics and resolution. It's not because the concept is invalid.

If you can create a system that actuates a virtual button right where it appears to be to the user, within a fraction of a millimeter, within a few milliseconds, it will work.

But you won't get that with the current stuff. Too slow and too chunky for anything other than demos.

Re:Wrong, just wrong, and everyone always does it! (1)

Carnildo (712617) | more than 3 years ago | (#35143526)

That's because of a failure of haptics and resolution. It's not because the concept is invalid.

Try the following: Stand up. Stick your right hand out in front of you at shoulder level with your arm fully extended. Hold that pose for five minutes.

Now, reconsider your opinion of the validity of gesture interfaces.

Re:Wrong, just wrong, and everyone always does it! (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35143822)

When do you ever lean on a key on your keyboard for five minutes?

I can't imagine any activity that requires such an act.

Oh, and FYI, I can probably do that with a 5-lb weight in my hand. But that's me.

My arms hurt..... (0)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140168)

.....just thinking about it. I prefer the current interface where I just lay my arm on the table, and barely move at all except to adjust the mouse & click.

Re:My arms hurt..... (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140304)

You must be a real tiger in the sack...

Ouch! (1)

handy_vandal (606174) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140512)

That let the cat out of the bag!

Re:My arms hurt..... (1)

commodore6502 (1981532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35142176)

>>>You must be a real tiger in the sack...

That's why man invented vibrators - so he wouldn't have to work as hard. Also dishwashers, laundry machines, self-cleaning ovens, .....

This is for WHAT exactly? (2)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140170)

Sure, sure, not enough foresight but it still feels like a solution in search of a problem. Anything that impairs a person from using a computer will probably be an expensive enough procedure that they would have assistants anyway except for a car mechanic and even then, what would the benefit be over, say, voice recognition or designing rugged, water-proof and washable interface hardware?

Re:This is for WHAT exactly? (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140284)

Like all new technology, it facilitates the delivery and use of porn, of course! Keyboards and mice are hard to clean!

Repetitive stress injuries in... (4, Funny)

awtbfb (586638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140182)

3, 2, 1...

Re:Repetitive stress injuries in... (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140346)

If wanking doesn't give you an RSI, you wont have any problems with this interface.

Re:Repetitive stress injuries in... (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140568)

Will this interface also enforce a thirty minute rest period after every thirty seconds of "activity"?

Re:Repetitive stress injuries in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35142564)

Maybe you should see a doctor, or invest in one of these little blue pills.

Expensive interface and bloatware like = Mistake (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140244)

The two main faults of every attempt i'v seen so far, and this one seems to be head on to be another expensive bloated inefficient interface.

Great (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140328)

First we got Bluetooth headsets which made people talking on the phone indistinguishable from schizophrenics, now we get this new GUI technology which makes computer users indistinguishable from spastics... what next?

pfft, I want EFC (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140378)

I don't want Minority Report UI. I want the Earth Final Conflict UI(and device). Hell, it was sponsored by Sprint even IIRC

Re:pfft, I want EFC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140864)

I don't want Minority Report UI. I want the Earth Final Conflict UI(and device). Hell, it was sponsored by Sprint even IIRC

Can you post a link to the UI?

Re:pfft, I want EFC (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35143052)

I want the Lexx. And several of the crew...

Re:pfft, I want EFC (1)

Samizdata (1093963) | more than 3 years ago | (#35152070)

I'd settle for just one of them. Better clarify - The deliciously full lipped one.

Ah, c'mon! (1)

Phoenix666 (184391) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140394)

Gesture interfaces are all about looking cool and getting babes.

Medical uses (1)

zero0ne (1309517) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140534)

This makes sense in the medical sector.

Who wouldn't want a 3D holographic representation of their patient in real time to rotate, zoom and pan?

This in the cubicle (1)

stimpleton (732392) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140594)

So....I'll look like Tom Cruise in Minority Report, complete with the gloves....in my 2m x 2m cubicle...doing my Stationary Budgets...my somewhat overweight guy ass moving like a lap dancer's toward the cubicle entrance.

Yep, this'll really fly. Just wait till those cuties from graphics with their iMacs get sight of this. They'll be wanting the same, just to be like me.

Er, usability? (1)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140618)

I don't know about you, but while I thought the Minority Report UI was *cool*, it would SUCK to work with. Enter text? Copy? Paste?

You basically can't sit at a desk, you'd have to stand so as to wave your arms about.

On the plus side, we couldn't all be stuffed into our little veal-fattening pens, there simply wouldn't be enough room.

Re:Er, usability? (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 3 years ago | (#35145996)

Enter text? Copy? Paste?

Text? You mean like "typing"? How quaint!

Why can't I just speak and have it enter the text? Why am I pounding away on this technology from the 1800s?

I say what I want. When I want to adjust it, the text of what I said will appear and I can select it and move it around as necessary.

Re:Er, usability? (1)

Doug Neal (195160) | more than 3 years ago | (#35146542)

Dictation software has been around for about 15 years, so that's still an option for you. Here's why I'm not using it:

  • Ambiguities in speech, e.g. different words that are pronounced the same as each other
  • Code-writing that involves lots of symbols, numbers, precise spacing; or generally anything that's not free-form natural language.
  • The noise - I don't want to hear everyone around me talking to their computers all day
  • Similarly, I don't necessarily want everyone else around me to know what I'm typing
  • Noisy environments can render the whole thing unusable

My feeling is that in due course there will be a UI revolution in text input that renders the keyboard as we know it obsolete, but speech recognition isn't it.

Don't think Minority Report, think Iron Man (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140770)

The UI that Tony Stark uses in the Iron Man movies is very much like the Minority Report one, except that he actually works with his hands in front of him and at waist/chest level. Like people work with real objects. Just because I can turn down the speed on my mouse so it requires me to move it across the entire desk doesn't mean I will...

Stop Griping (4, Insightful)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#35140844)

Yeah, we know, for all the data entry, heavy computer use/coding jobs an interface like the Minority Report one is stupid and inefficient. But at least it's a step in the right direction. For those of you that have been posting about how nice it is to sit in an office chair and click a mouse all day, I have to ask what kind of ecstasy you're popping to make that a pleasant experience.

I fucking hate the typical cubicle set up. It makes my lower back hurt after 5 hours. My shoulders constantly ache from being crouched over a tiny POS keyboard. My right hand is significantly fatigued by the end of the day, whereas my left elbow is killing me from leaning my weight on it constantly. Sitting on my ass all day puts enough pressure on my prostate (okay, I have a bony ass) that I wonder if it might have negative effects on the libido. Squinting at monitors that blast my face with bright white backgrounds all day makes me hate the color white.

When it comes down to it, the typical cubie setup is a completely shit arrangement to be stuck in for 8 hours on end. So to fix it, we have to get up every hour and stretch or walk about for 5 minutes. We pay for massages and chiropractic adjustments to fix our strained backs. And don't even get me started on the amount of tension we hold in our jaws. What TI is proposing, here, is an interface that could let you stand up for a period, then sit down for a period. It could use an 'on-screen,' split keyboard for when you need to type in info. It would be capable of projecting onto a cubicle wall, so I wouldn't be tethered to a monitor on a desktop. It will be clunky and a PITA for the first generation or two, but give it some time and some prototypes and we could really be working our way towards a useful engineering interface that frees us from the ergonomic hell that is the cubicle lifestyle. Personally I'd like to see more research go into this field.

I know a lot of engineers that wet themselves when they watched the first Iron Man where Tony Stark designs an exoskeleton using a 3-D holographic touch interface. That was damn cool and you know it. If projects like the one TI is proposing get us closer to that kind of modeling interface little by little, I'm all for it. Bring it on TI!

Re:Stop Griping (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35141062)

(Long story about poor management as the cause of poor ergonomics in the workspace) ... What TI is proposing, here, is an interface ...

(Long list of interesting technical possibilities)

Bring it on TI!

The problem is you (probably) don't work for TI, you work for the guys who simply don't care if they destroy your body. And a new technological way to do it, is just going to be a new technological way to destroy your body.

Your management will simply force you to wear extra heavy boxing gloves on your upraised hands. Maybe tie your work metrics to how many times you lift a weight using your back instead of your legs (yes I am well aware that is "wrong"). Maybe to make it sense you better, your boss will shine intense searchlights on you all day long, like the stereotypical movie police station interrogation room. Perhaps to "give you more space to move around" you'll be moved out of the nice quiet semi-private cube and into a cage or padded room, after all no one should expect privacy or a quiet working environment at work, should they, and only executives need to think, not peons, right?

We've long since been freed from the "ergonomic hell of cubicle life". Its just that your boss simply doesn't care, and will probably go on not caring, so your body is being ruined. On the other hand, my boss does care, so frankly after 11 hours at work I go home feeling fine, probably better shape than I'd be in on a day off. Yet based solely on slashdot UIDs, I'm probably old enough to be your father, maybe grandfather.

I expect your workplace will not be turned into a workers paradise merely by flailing your arms around.

Gorilla arm syndrome anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35140850)

So have you heard about gorilla arm syndrome http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/10/gorilla-arm-multitouch/ that makes Minority report like interfaces fail?

Dammit! Other films did this too (1)

lumpenprole (114780) | more than 3 years ago | (#35141406)

I need to compile a list, but off the top of my head Earth: The Final Conflict did this years before Minority Report. That is all.

Boring questions: Has anyone seen it? (1)

wonkavader (605434) | more than 3 years ago | (#35141876)

I don't care at all about the interface.

OMAP 5 is scheduled for release in the second half of 2011. Has anyone seen one of these in action? Not minority report whatever, just dual A15 cores running anything?

And is this the first product to reach even early production with an A15 core or cores? Is there any A15 presence around other than this? I see NVidia is planning something, but it's still vapour, right?

ARM and projector? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35142640)

I'd like to use both my ARMs.

Great, another road hazard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35143520)

As if people didn't already have enough things to distract them while driving, or crossing the street...

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