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Online-Only Currency BitCoin Reaches Dollar Parity

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the computationally-intensive dept.

Bitcoin 517

IamTheRealMike writes "The BitCoin peer to peer currency briefly reached exchange parity with the US dollar today after a spike in demand for the coins pushed prices slightly above 1 USD:1 BTC. BitCoin was launched in early 2009, so in only two years this open source currency has gone from having no value at all to one with not only an open market of competing exchanges, but the ability to buy real goods and services like web hosting, gadgets, organic beauty products and even alpaca socks."

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517 comments

In other words (4, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#35164902)

The US Dollar will soon be worthless?

*ducks*

Re:In other words (2, Insightful)

grnrckt94 (932158) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165020)

Isn't the dollar already worthless?

Re:In other words (2)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165056)

If anything depends on pure faith more than anything else, it would be currency. Lots of people still have faith in the dollar, so no, it is not worthless yet.

Re:In other words (4, Interesting)

cheezedawg (413482) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165590)

It will never be worthless. The US Treasury Dept only accepts US dollars for tax payments, so we need to have dollars to pay our taxes, or we go to jail.

Re:In other words (3, Insightful)

ErikZ (55491) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165174)

The "Hard liners" in congress have proposed 100Bn in spending cuts, on a 1400Bn deficit.

That is the biggest fix the US politicians could come up with, and half of them are whining about how it's too much.

It's not worthless yet. But the US is going to hit a financial wall very soon, very hard.

Re:In other words (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165312)

Maybe. It is a little problematic to forecast the solvency of a country when the only test of the solvency of a country is whether it can borrow sufficient money to finance the debt it already has (with maybe some hand waving there about "at reasonable rates").

Of course, massive deficits and debts don't really seem to do anything good for the economy of a country (especially when much of it seems to be on spending $2 today on programs that cost $4 tomorrow and return $1 of value).

Not as long as you can use dollars to pay for oil. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165202)

When countries stop taking dollars in exchange for oil, then the dollar will be worthless. Over night. War doesn't look quite so bad now, does it?

Re:In other words (1)

kellyb9 (954229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165236)

Isn't the dollar already worthless?

Maybe... Maybe not. I can still go into any store in the US and buy something with good old-fashioned cash. If I went in their with my digital wallet of BitCoins, they'd probably laugh at me.

On a side note, if they were real geeks, they would've called them credits.

Re:In other words (2)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165616)

On a side note, if they were real geeks, they would've called them credits.

Bitcoin is not a credit-based money system. That's kind of the point.

Strength of dollar != competition (4, Insightful)

RingDev (879105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165298)

The dollar is weaker compared to other currencies than it has been in the past. It sounds like this is a bad thing, but really, it's not such a clear cut issue.

For instance, I have a bunch of Canadian and European friends who are coming to the US this year to vacation. The weaker US dollar means their Canadian dollars and Euros will go much farther. And Tourism is awesome because it brings money from outside of the economy in.

We are also seeing a slight uptick in exported goods as our prices are effectively lowered by the weak dollar. It creates a lower labor cost (relatively speaking) and allows us to create more jobs for exported goods manufacturing and services.

And it also means that our debts, while still significant, are effectively smaller.

There's a fair bit of not so go that goes a long with a weakening dollar as well, but it's not a wholly good/bad situation. There is some good, some bad, and some ehhh that accompanies any change in value of the US dollar.

-Rick

Re:Strength of dollar != competition (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165324)

So I'm guessing you have to take a short bus to get to whatever school of economics it is that you subscribe to?

Re:In other words (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165092)

From the site,

The total eventual circulation will be 21 million bitcoins. There will never be more coins than that. The coins are entering circulation gradually, at a steady pace over many years, to nodes supporting the network in proportion to the CPU time they contribute. With the current total CPU power on the network, most CPUs will usually take months between successfully generating 50 BTC.

So basically, this is like "collector items", not currency. A very scare "resource", if you can call it that. You get 50 BTC after few months, meaning that basically you've just spent $50 in electricity to get your "free" money.

Anyway, this virtual "currency" is bad for so many reasons, it's not even funny. Fist, the purpose of currency is not to hoard it - it is to spend it for goods/services. Currency is IOU notes that devalue over time. It is not a hard asset, like coal or copper or shares of MegaAssInc. FIAT currency tends to be *backed* by something, like an economy, like USA or European Union or even China. What is this backed by?

Anyway, another fad "currency". Might as well collect "ISK in eveonline" or "gold nuggets in WoW" - same thing.

Re:In other words (3, Insightful)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165170)

You get 50 BTC after few months, meaning that basically you've just spent $50 in electricity to get your "free" money.

No, you get 50 BTC by selling something or some service, just like any other currency.
The money "generations" isn't a way to earn it, it's just to produce them initially.

Re:In other words (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165490)

I can give "100x Frank IOU Note" or some service. Then you can use that to get another service from someone else, or from me. Eventually though, that IOU note *must* be used to purchase something from the originator. Only I, the originator, can take Frank IOU notes out from circulation.

That's how ALL world currencies work. USD is ultimately only "meaningful" in the US. The Euro, in the European Union. The Canadian Dollar is only worth anything in Canada. These are the IOU notes that people tend to accept.

Money supply is regulated by central banks, so money amount in the economy matches the economic value. Taxes are used to remove currency. Government spending is used to inject the said currency back into circulation. That's the crux of how the currency works.

Who decides how BTC works? Who regulates the amount in circulation - oh wait, it was already capped at 21 million. That means if the currency becomes useful for anything, it will suffer from MASSIVE deflation as its value spikes to $10+k to 1 BTC and the original users will get very rich, if they dump it on the way up. If entire world only used BTC, the value would have to be millions of dollars per 1 BTC. ha!!

Sorry, but that is not how currency is suppose to work. Whoever was selling stuff for BTC basically is banking on this deflation which is already massive. Giant pyramid scheme.

Re:In other words (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165338)

Personally I think it time to replace the dollar and take control of monetary policy away from the FED returning it to Congress as the constitution dictates. I also think we need a modern monetary standard, ie not some metal but something tied directly to industrial capacity and an amendment not just a regualr bill to make it hard enough to scew with that the politians won't be able to devalue it on a whim.

My proposal is something like for each MegaWatt of domestic commerical electirc power generation capactiy the treasure can issue some number of eDollars (that number being hard coded in the constitutional amendment) the fedeal government must also be barred from subsidizing or selling electricity commercially.

Re:In other words (1)

loufoque (1400831) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165588)

So basically, this is like "collector items", not currency. A very scare "resource", if you can call it that.

Any finite resource can be a currency. Scarce yet widely spread resources work best (gold, for example).

What is this backed by?

Computing power, which is derived from energy.

Re:In other words (2)

Xunker (6905) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165626)

"FIAT currency tends to be.."

I believe you mean 'fiat', not "FIAT". Fiat currency is legal tender that has value backed by decree of a policymaker; The FIAT Currency is the new hatchback from the Italian automaker.

SWEET! (2)

jpedlow (1154099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35164932)

I had bitcoin generating nightly on my Dual-Quads at work (in their own VM, scripted to start nightly), and have about 300!!

woohoo? :D

Re:SWEET! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165494)

Buy some socks before the whole scheme crashes.

Seriously, alpaca socks are awesome, especially in northern winters. No sarcasm.

meaningless (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 3 years ago | (#35164952)

To reach "parity with the dollar" means nothing. A Yen may be worth $0.01, but that doesn't mean ANYTHING about the strength of the Yen.

Re:meaningless (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165014)

To reach "parity with the dollar" means nothing. A Yen may be worth $0.01, but that doesn't mean ANYTHING about the strength of the Yen.

True, but if you knew historical values of the Yen or Bitcoin vs. the Dollar (or any other currency) you might know something about it . . .

And then there's this point from TFS: "BitCoin was launched in early 2009, so in only two years this open source currency has gone from having no value at all to one with not only an open market of competing exchanges, but the ability to buy real goods and services . . ." Actually, that's about 1/2 TFS, so it is short enough to read in its entirety. As is TFA . . .

Re:meaningless (2)

eugene2k (1213062) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165192)

It's not meaningless. The point is not to say that bitcoin is as strong as a dollar - which it isn't (as the strength of a currency is defined by how many traders accept it), but to say that the adoption rate is growing and quite rapidly.

Re:meaningless (3, Interesting)

harks (534599) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165620)

True. Dollar-parity is just a psychological milestone. What is meaningful is that Bitcoin has increased from about $.05 in September to $1 now.

The real threshold (4, Interesting)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 3 years ago | (#35164980)

You'll know that this currency has achieved official status once you can start renting escort services with it.

Re:The real threshold (2)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165098)

Well, with Triskelion Quatloos, you can buy a chick in a tinfoil bikini armed with a giant can opener: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamesters_of_Triskelion [wikipedia.org] . Maybe you should consider using that currency?

Re:The real threshold (1)

NetDanzr (619387) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165606)

Nope - escort services are just a middle step. A currency will become viable when the Feds will try to shut it down.

The first step (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35164982)

to eliminating money altogether. Is it going to happen overnight? No. In 100 years? Probably not. Eventually? Let's hope so, and this could be the very beginning, as it will make it easier for people to realize that currency really has no value other than what they place on it. Huzzah.

Re:The first step (1)

jasmusic (786052) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165030)

You will never eliminate money as long as you have human freedom and incentive. And to contemplate eliminating human freedom and incentive would be demonic.

Re:The first step (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165648)

there is no relevance in between money and human freedom and incentive. dont be a moron. freedom and incentive were here long before money was ever thought of.

Re:The first step (2)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165094)

There are only 2 ways to eliminate money.

You can provide every human need and desire for free using magic, if you have magic.

You can collapse the world economy to the point where no one trusts representative value, then you will be bartering a cow and a dozen chickens for your next iPhone.

Re:The first step (1)

einstein4pres (226130) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165330)

A cow and a dozen chickens would be a vast overpayment for an iPhone. Cows cost something closer far to $1000 than $500, though chickens are pretty cheap. Unless of course, we're talking about a younger cow.

Maybe if you got a few months of service on that iPhone...

Sorry (2, Funny)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35164992)

...but I only accept payments in Beenz or Flooz

Re:Sorry (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165142)

But THIS time it's DIFFERENT! This time there's crypto-decentralized-cloud-p2p-trust-digitalness in it! It's more privatey! That makes it way better and more underground, so it's required that everyone on Slashdot will switch to it at once.

not another currency, please! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165002)

No more fiat (or in this case, fiat-esque because it lacks a govement) money. We need physical-backed money.

I don't care if it's gold or doughnuts, just no more fake currency.

Re:not another currency, please! (1)

Tr3vin (1220548) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165138)

Physical backing does very little for money. I often wonder if people like gold because of its properties or just because it is worth a decent amount of money. The main reason for physical backing is that your savings are less likely to be devalued. I would argue that the value of something like gold is just as fake as the value of a "fake" currency.

Re:not another currency, please! (3, Funny)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165180)

Not entirely true.

Gold is high density, malleable and corrosion resistant so it makes great bullets.

Re:not another currency, please! (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165378)

Actually it is far too malleable. Copper makes much better bullets for my 300 winmag. Barnes is the company that makes them. Nice high velocity shooting without the bullet totally disintegrating on impact.

Re:not another currency, please! (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165598)

That is usually only the case if you are shooting something with a thick skin. An unkevlared person will probably take a lot more damage from a hollow point gold bullet than a solid copper slug. Plus gold won't contaminate the meat like lead or copper can.

Re:not another currency, please! (3, Insightful)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165154)

Why? Gold has very little inherent worth. If the shit really and truly hit the fan people would probably go back to it out of some belief otherwise, but in reality using gold (or any other near worthless commodity) is practically identical to using a fiat currency. The only reason you accept anything as payment is because you have faith that you'll be able to pay someone else with it tomorrow. The only difference between fiat and backed currency is that the amount of money in circulation is controlled by a governing body, as opposed to being 'controlled' by the global output of whatever your backing is. At least if the Federal Reserve prints a few billion extra dollars there is generally a reason for it, if someone were to find a major, previously unknown gold deposit tomorrow the value of a backed currency would fluctuate for no reason.

Re:not another currency, please! (1)

hypergreatthing (254983) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165160)

No more fiat (or in this case, fiat-esque because it lacks a govement) money. We need physical-backed money.

I don't care if it's gold or doughnuts, just no more fake currency.

How about bottlecaps?

Why ... ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165004)

Why does my alpaca need socks again?

does this online money have any bank backing? (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165026)

does this online money have any bank backing? or is some thing that they can say the eula says we don't have to pay out any thing.
what about tax?

Re:does this online money have any bank backing? (1)

dadioflex (854298) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165070)

I think the point is that it isn't backed by anybody. I've read up on the website and I've read the Wikipedia entry and I understand how to mine bitcoins, but I haven't figured out what they get out of it. I thought maybe it was a cloud computing for hire service using the distributed clients but that doesn't seem to be it.

Interesting idea. I wish it well but I'll go back to not caring about it.

noone gets anything (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165730)

it is a distributed cloud that lives on the internet. its sole purpose is to exist independently, without anyone's intervention, to make possible for exchange of units, for transactions.

cannot be controlled, manipulated by any party or even its creators. it has a life on its own.

it is based on computational power that network has. so, even if you attempt to join the network with a huge farm of servers to get rich in an instant, the computational power of the network immediately grows with your own server farm joining it, and you fall short of being able to break the system. not to mention getting huge cost of electricity shoved up in your ass, not justifying your effort.

its also based on electricity cost. for anyone to beat the system, electricity cost must be zero. but, the system assumes that, if a condition in which electricity cost practically becomes zero, the need for money and transactions will end. (rightfully)

Re:does this online money have any bank backing? (1)

francium de neobie (590783) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165172)

Why do you want yet another currency backed by banksters?

Re:does this online money have any bank backing? (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165328)

Because that's the only way it will be accepted beyond a couple of internet sites no one has ever heard of?

Re:does this online money have any bank backing? (2)

ribuck (943217) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165212)

... or is some thing that they can say the eula says we don't have to pay out any thing ...

There is no EULA. It's completely peer-to-peer. You don't register, you just run the open source client.

Well, people buy massively overpriced "gold"... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165038)

...and they trust that when it all comes crashing down, then their bank will give them the actual gold they supposedly own, so there's no reason to believe they wouldn't believe in the attributed value of other bits telling them somebody owes them something. IOW, people are stupid.

I was thinking of calling it a con (4, Insightful)

makubesu (1910402) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165052)

until I realized starting up a system like this isn't really any different than what banks do with fractional reserve banking.

Re:I was thinking of calling it a con (5, Insightful)

JesseMcDonald (536341) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165582)

... this isn't really any different than what banks do with fractional reserve banking.

Aside, of course, from the complete lack of anything resembling deposits, loans, or reserves (fractional or otherwise). In other words, no real similarity at all. It's not a con or scam either, of course—merely a protocol for indirect exchange in which certain hard-to-find patterns of bits take the place of scarce physical commodities. As a virtual currency it has many of the attributes which make precious metals so eminently suitable as physical currencies: scarcity, durability, divisibility, and fungibility, to name a few. The protocol may not be perfect, but it is the best I've seen thus far. The limitations mainly relate to scalability and maintaining a consistent state between many decentralized peers—technical issues, not economic ones.

O-key (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165068)

So the EFF will accept BitCoin-based donations. I'm sure their staff will be ecstatic to be paid in this "currency" rather than old-fashioned euros (or dollars or yen).

Seriously - this seems no more useful than money earned in Second Life or Monopoly money.

Re:O-key (4, Interesting)

sturle (1165695) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165504)

I've sold a lot of bitcoins (in the past when the value was lower than 1/4 of it's current value) for normal money in the bank, and I have bought coffee, gadgets, a month of VPS and more for bitcoins. My main use of bitcoins now is to transfer money to a foreign account without paying outrageous fees to my bank. (The foreign account is for paying expenses in that country, not for tax evasion or anything illegal.) I buy bitcoins in my currency and sell in the other. Often with a profit as well. Can't do that with monopoly money.

Non-story (2)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165096)

In other news, my new currency will trade at 100USD to 1. Therefore, it is much better and we can all ooh and ahh over how obsolete national currencies are. That's the whole story here, right?

"Working directly with the owners of this small family farm in Massachusetts, we are offering selected Alpaca products for Bitcoins."
Yeah, so I suppose this is someone's father or something. Real great customer there. The Eco-shop online linked from the article has 5 of 7 categories listing no products. You know I love buying from those sorts of stores! Either the owner never finished the site or it's been abandoned for some time, there's no way to know. The best part is giving my CC info to some shop with tumbleweeds and cockroaches wandering about.

Re:Non-story (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165260)

In other news, my new currency will trade at 100USD to 1. Therefore, it is much better and we can all ooh and ahh over how obsolete national currencies are. That's the whole story here, right?

It's not just parity. It's parity with a significant amount of coins in circulation. Try to start a new currency at 100USD to 1, and see how many buyers you get. There are now over 5 million bitcoins in circulation.

Re:Non-story (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165370)

I like how you quoted only that part and yet ignored the more substantive part which is that this currency is only accepted by a half finished internet store and some alpaca farm. Get back to us when we can buy groceries, gas, clothes etc from REAL stores or places like Amazon, etc. Until then you can bleat all you want about your 5 million coins but they are just as worthless as flooz and beenz (Which in their heyday were at least accepted at more places).

Re:Non-story (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165430)

If you use bitcoin you never give the shop your CC info, just saying.

Re:Non-story (1)

dc5464 (869897) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165624)

For what it's worth (since you don't know me from, well, an alpaca), Grass Hill Alpacas is for real, about 1/4 mile from my house. Nice folks and cute alpacas (also goats, ducks and guinea fowl, though I don't think you get socks from those). They do sell socks made from alpaca wool.

All of today's currency is meaningless... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165122)

...in the post-apocalyptic world. That's why I'm saving bottle caps.

404 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165128)

successfully slashdotted

In other news... (1)

ratsouffle (1873428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165144)

The Flainian Pobble Bead is still at parity with itself. 1 Flainian Pobble Bead = 1 Flainian Pobble Bead.

Oblig (1)

AcidPenguin9873 (911493) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165220)

BitCoin credits? BitCoin credits are no good out here. I need something more real.

I don't have anything else...but BitCoin credits will do fine.

M&Ms reach parity with the dollar (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165238)

I have an M&M. I'll give it to you for a dollar.

I don't understand the appeal (2)

curril (42335) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165452)

BitCoin enthusiasts seem to fall into the same category as gold standard promoters. You can't run a modern global economy with financial instruments based on a rare commodity. Only 21 million BitCoins will be generated, which will cause deflation once that limit is reached. The only way a government could use BitCoins is the same way they used to use gold, ie. buy up enough of it to have reserves that can be used to pump money into the economy when it needs it. BitCoins won't be more stable than modern fiat currencies because they will have all the problems associated with gold, such as hoarding and dumping. BitCoins are interesting as an attempt to create an electronic form of cash, but hoping to build a stable economic platform on them is foolish.

Re:I don't understand the appeal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165558)

Only 21 million BitCoins will be generated, which will cause deflation once that limit is reached.

since this is not a debt based currency, can you explain how deflation is a negative effect? It seems to me deflation is only a concern when your wares drop in price but your debts do not.

Re:I don't understand the appeal (1)

marco.antonio.costa (937534) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165578)

Once that limit is reached neither deflation nor inflation will occur. Any price fluctuations in a currency with stable supply will be the result of supply and demand fluctuations.

Which is the point of having a price system in the first place, conveying that information as accurately as possible.

There are several problems here (3, Interesting)

Omnifarious (11933) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165580)

First, a fixed number of bitcoins will not actually work. The smallest unit of value people will want to exchange is not one 21 millionth of all the units of value in the world. It will be significantly smaller than that. As the total size of the economy expands, the total value people will want to exchange as a fraction of the size of the economy will become smaller and smaller.

Secondly, the way the system works affords no transaction anonymity. And for a currency to be 'real' this is a big deal.

I have long felt that in order for any currency to work, it must be able to be 'stolen'. In other words, you must be able to use it to engage in transactions that are not legally sanctioned.

Of course, the identity behind any given public key in the bitcoin network is something of a mystery. But it's not that hard to trace, especially since it's possible to compile a complete and unbroken history of all transactions any bitcoin has been involved in.

This is an interesting experiment, but I don't think it's a replacement for currency.

Re:There are several problems here (4, Informative)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165656)

The smallest transferable unit is not a single BitCoin. It is in fact .00000001 BitCoin, making for plenty of transferable units.

Re:There are several problems here (1)

harks (534599) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165666)

Bitcoins can be divided up into units as small as .00000001 The software currently only supports 2 decimal points, but this can be increased in later versions.

Re:There are several problems here (1)

fastest fascist (1086001) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165720)

Point #1: The coins are divisible to 8 decimal places. 21 million coins is 21 bilion milliBitcoins, or whatever you want to 1/1000th of a Bitcoin, and it divides much further. Point #2: masking the origin of a payment should be quite simple. You could, for example, send a sum to some currency exchange and send a different sum to a different Bitcoin address. Having a completely untraceable wallet should not be too difficult.

Fiat for Fiat???! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165618)

Why would you want to trade one Fiat Currency for another Fiat Currency?

http://dailyreckoning.com/fiat-currency/

Dragon's Tale (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165704)

FWIW, my company has released (public Alpha) a game that revolves entirely around Bitcoins. It's a cross between a casino and an MMORPG - the first of it's kind, from what I can tell. Dragon's Tale [dragons.tl] is filled with novel games of luck and skill. Some skill-based games have a >100% EV for the smartest players.

It's built on the same platform as A Tale in the Desert [atitd.com] , so native Linux, OSX, and Windows clients are available.

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