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Un-Bricking Linux Plug Computers

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the keeping-the-impervious-patched-up dept.

Linux 68

An anonymous reader writes "Accidentally 'bricking' a little Linux plug computer doesn't have to be forever. This is a good howto on repairing a non-booting Linux plug computer. For example if it uses the uBoot environment then it already has some good built-in recovery tools. The article also mentions ESIA, the Sheevaplug installer, openocd, and GuruPlug."

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unbrick this! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165186)

First Brick!

Oblig. pedantry (4, Interesting)

butalearner (1235200) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165268)

Isn't the fact that you can "unbrick" it mean it's not really bricked?

Also I think this requires JTAG, which comes with Sheevaplug but is sold separately from Guruplug, and AFAIK is not available on the PogoPlug, et al. So, not quite so useful for me (I just picked up a PogoPlug on the cheap with the intent of running Plugbox Linux [plugapps.com] .

Re:Oblig. quote response to oblig. pedantry (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165326)

So what you're saying is that you don't think that word means what he thinks it means?

Re:Oblig. quote response to oblig. pedantry (1)

TitusC3v5 (608284) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165374)

Also, anonymous coward isn't anonymous. I really wish it would warn us if we're posting while not logged in. Or maybe that's the captcha's job.

Re:Oblig. quote response to oblig. pedantry (1)

Zaphod The 42nd (1205578) | more than 3 years ago | (#35170654)

Thats inconceivable!

Re:Oblig. pedantry (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165488)

Unless you've decided to mess with uboot(which is likely a bad idea, unless you are totally comfortable with JTAG...), you shouldn't need anything scarier than some way of speaking RS-232 at suitably low voltage. Re-flashing a device over a serial line is tedious; but not terribly challenging, and even the various Kirkwood-platform products that are "no user-serviceable parts inside" almost certainly have an accessible serial header somewhere, albeit likely unpopulated or even unmarked...

If you've gone and nuked the bootloader, on the other hand, it is, as you say, JTAG time...

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165696)

some way of speaking RS-232 at suitably low voltage.

Ok, I'll bite. How do you speak RS-232 "at suitably low voltage", since RS-232 includes the voltage limits as part of the standard? What do you mean by this?

Re:Oblig. pedantry (2)

idontgno (624372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165782)

Well, -15v is pretty low compared to +15v. Both are officially the lower and upper bounds of the RS-232 signaling voltage range, after all. Certainly, the common -12v "mark" level is much lower (i.e., less positive) than the 3.3v or 5v typical for logic levels nowadays.

Yes, GPP mistakenly conflated "serial" and "RS-232". I'm sure he meant "logic-voltage asynchronous serial". And I'm sure you understood, but that sure was good electronics pedantry.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165788)

Like this: http://www.instructables.com/id/Assembling-a-RS232-to-TTL-Serial-Adapter/ [instructables.com] . You can use it to speak at levels lower than TTL (5V)

Re:Oblig. pedantry (4, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165862)

In principle, you are correct. In practice, an increasing number of devices(especially space or cost constrained ones) implement "RS-232" that behaves pretty much exactly the same way as would be expected by anything post-20mA loop, with the exception of voltage. For cost and board space reasons(and because they are not intending to address the "terminal across the electrically noisy building from the minicomputer" use case), they omit any voltage conversion or protection circuitry and simply depend on the attached hardware to do either 5v/0v or 3.3v/0v, or whatever their logic-level happens to be.

Even an increasing number of supposedly-genuine RS-232 devices(especially laptops) don't generate anything near the +-12 swing of the old days. 12v/0v is more likely, or even 5v/0v, though such devices tend to, at least, have better tolerance for over-voltage than the little guys do.

Because it is so close to RS-232(all you need is a dumb level converter, no logic/protocol translation required), I tend to fall into calling it "RS-232" colloquially, even though it technically isn't.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35166254)

It does all get a bit confusing and has been a bit of a frog boiling. The first deviations would fully inter-operate with fully compliant RS-232 devices provided the cable wasn't too long, so they called it RS-232 even though it wasn't quite. It's been pushing the limits ever since until now we get stuck with "rs-232" connections that will actually burn out if they are connected to a genuine rs-232 device. I was more or less OK with the first deviations, but the latter situation is past the limits IMHO. We need some sort of nomenclature to specify the voltage outputs and limits so we can at least know with confidence what may be connected to what. At minimum we should know what is safe to try even if it doesn't work.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#35166380)

Considering how cheap it is to make the inputs real-RS-232-tolerant, you'd think they would do so. I mean, all that's needed are a couple of resistors, a transistor, and a diode (to prevent reverse breakdown of the base), as a part of the chip.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35168530)

As I understand it, the SheevaPlug uses an FTDI chip to expose a single USB receptacle, and provides serial interfaces to both the on board serial port and the JTAG programmer. I like that solution much more than exposing RS232.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35167648)

Quick correction - if it's RS232, it's inverted. If it's TTL serial, it's not. IE, even if your serial adapter does work at about the same voltages as the serial line you are connecting to, it is very important that a proper invert as well as level-shift occurs.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35172394)

For cost and board space reasons(and because they are not intending to address the "terminal across the electrically noisy building from the minicomputer" use case), they omit any voltage conversion or protection circuitry and simply depend on the attached hardware to do either 5v/0v or 3.3v/0v, or whatever their logic-level happens to be.

Actually, it's because they want to run on 5.0v and 3.3v and don't want to have to include an inverter to produce 12V to do RS232. All of that stuff is handled in the level converter chip so you don't need any of it onboard. And they will only use serial for the boot loader installation process, and the cable for connecting almost certainly has the serial interface IC built in.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

Nursie (632944) | more than 3 years ago | (#35170060)

Meh... a lot of folks changed uboot on their sheevaplug. Someone in the community released a version that was patched to be able to initialise and read from the SD slot so that you could boot from it.

Very useful, no bricks I know of.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165526)

You haven't done due diligence to pedantry at all; I'm disappointed.

Isn't the fact that you can "unbrick" it mean it's not really bricked?

How bricked is "really" bricked?

I always understood brick to be a measure of subjective usefulness. So if my cellphone is bricked it doesn't necessarily mean it's completely unrecoverable, just that it's not practically recoverable in time to be useful to me, or it will be expensive to recover it, or I don't know how to recover it.

I'm doubtful there's a good objective definition. For instance, you might say "having to replace hardware constitutes brickedness." What if the hardware replacement is trivial, like swapping out a battery? Any definition of non-trivial is going to depend on the skill of the user, and you're back to a subjective definition.

And you could define "bricked" as a physical process. Say, having heated the device to the point where most of the casing and electronics became liquid and then let it cool, that would be well and truly bricked, but it's not a very useful definition.

If you've got a better definition, I'm all ears, but a quick search didn't turn up much for me.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (2)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165568)

They were only literally bricked so they could be easily repaired. Now, if they had been figuratively bricked they'd be literal bricks.

goin' for the quote here: (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165694)

It's not literally bricked until the oldest of the three little pigs can build a house out of it.

Re:goin' for the quote here: (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165850)

Literally bricked would be "dumped into wet clay with binder fiber, cast into a rectangular prism, air-dried, and kiln-fired."

Re:goin' for the quote here: (1)

MagicM (85041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165974)

Or lapidated by way of wet clay with binder fiber that has been cast into a rectangular prism, air-dried, and kiln-fired.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#35168206)

is that written in stone?

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165584)

Why would you unbrick something that isn't bricked?

Agree: it's NOT "bricked" (4, Interesting)

KWTm (808824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165716)

Isn't the fact that you can "unbrick" it mean it's not really bricked?

Hear hear! Let's recall that "brick" basically means "turning your equipment into something completely worthless, equivalent to a brick".

I propose the following "USB cable" test:

Has your device been rendered so unusable that you'd be willing to give it to me if I gave you a USB cable?

If the answer is "yes", then you have bricked your device. Congratulations.

If the answer is "no, let me work on this for a bit --I think I can restore partial functionality by pressing this reset button for 30 seconds, and then at least it will function as a glorified wall clock", then this is not "bricked".

If you say, "This is the third time I've bricked my device --I had to SSH into it and do 'sudo reboot'" --then the brick is in your brain.

Now, having said this, it's possible that the owner of the computer didn't know it was possible to undo the damage, in which case, yes, the device is bricked because he might as well have traded it in for a USB cable, prior to knowing how to salvage his device.

You can substitute any marginally useful but cheap piece of equipment for "USB cable".

Disclaimer: no, I haven't RTFA.

Re:Agree: it's NOT "bricked" (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35166584)

Your definition of bricked is worthless since we already have words for burning out the hardware and anything else can be fixed given sufficiently heroic measures (including de-soldering the flash and soldering in a socket so you can re-flash extyernally)..

Perhaps a better definition is that the device has been placed into a state where normal end-user procedures are no longer adequate to recover. Soldering pins onto the JTAG interface and re-flashing that way probably counts. Soldering in serial connection pins to get at a monitor would count. A documented series of button presses to reset to default really shouldn't count.

Re:Agree: it's NOT "bricked" (1)

Rysc (136391) | more than 3 years ago | (#35178822)

A better definition is that the device has been placed in to a state where extraordinary, heroic and skilled actions are necessary to restore any kind of functionality. The average consumer can "brick" a PC to the point where he can't recover it just by sticking gum in the power port on the PSU, so let us not use them as the benchmark for "It's a brick."

Re:Agree: it's NOT "bricked" (1)

MoralHazard (447833) | more than 3 years ago | (#35171020)

Thank you. I have faith that Jesus sent you to speak these words of truth. Desperately needed to be said.

While you're at it, would you mind visiting upon the bag of hammers running Phoronix? Somebody needs to explain to them what the word "regression" means (and doesn't mean).

Re:Agree: it's NOT "bricked" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35171706)

I usually draw the line where i need soldering iron and other extra equipment to render the thing operable. At that point the average cost becomes bigger than the expected return.

Re:Agree: it's NOT "bricked" (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 3 years ago | (#35172162)

I dub this the "KWT Test for Brickedness" and do name thee duke of East Looe for thy services.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

MattBD (1157291) | more than 3 years ago | (#35166358)

With the PogoPlug, all you're doing really on the device is stopping a shell script that's running, and installing a new bootloader. Everything else gets installed on whatever storage device you attach to it, so I think it's probably fairly difficult to properly brick it (although there are more obscure NAND installs that do have the potential to really screw it up).

Good luck with your PogoPlug. I bought one in the new year sales, £20 off, and I ran Plugbox Linux on it for a couple of weeks, but I really couldn't get on too well with it as I don't really like Arch Linux very much, so I've switched to using Debian Squeeze instead. Installed that last night and I'm in the process of turning it into a mail server.

I actually think Debian is a more obvious choice for these devices than an Arch-based distro as it has more packages than any other distro and has good support for ARM. In my case I really wanted a number of packages that were in Debian, such as byobu and procmail, and I use Ubuntu on the desktop and have always liked Debian-based distros, so it seemed the obvious choice.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (2)

butalearner (1235200) | more than 3 years ago | (#35168306)

With the PogoPlug, all you're doing really on the device is stopping a shell script that's running, and installing a new bootloader. Everything else gets installed on whatever storage device you attach to it, so I think it's probably fairly difficult to properly brick it (although there are more obscure NAND installs that do have the potential to really screw it up).

I actually think Debian is a more obvious choice for these devices than an Arch-based distro as it has more packages than any other distro and has good support for ARM. In my case I really wanted a number of packages that were in Debian, such as byobu and procmail, and I use Ubuntu on the desktop and have always liked Debian-based distros, so it seemed the obvious choice.

Funny story: I actually came across your blog yesterday as I browsed for info about setting up a mail server on the PogoPlug. I'm not sure I'll do it (getting a web server and website up and running is first), but just considering some options. I'm actually an Arch user normally, but I tend to agree that Debian might be better since I don't care about having bleeding edge stuff on there. Thanks for the info!

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 3 years ago | (#35166464)

Miracle Max: It probably owes you data huh? I'll ask it.

Inigo Montoya: It's bricked. It can't talk.

Miracle Max: Whoo-hoo-hoo, look who knows so much. It just so happens that your friend here is only MOSTLY bricked. There's a big difference between mostly bricked and all bricked. Mostly bricked is slightly unbricked. With all bricked, well, with all bricked there's usually only one thing you can do.

Inigo Montoya: What's that?

Miracle Max: Go through its hard drive and look for loose data.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

arivanov (12034) | more than 3 years ago | (#35167242)

Yep. As long as you can still print all env values it is not dead yet.

I made the mistake of not printing the values of a cheap and cheerful Chinese tablet before trying to smack a abrasive build on it. BAD mistake. Looks like it had a non-standard framebuffer offset so I will be guessing it till doomsday now...

Re:Oblig. pedantry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35176096)

All you have to do is find someone online who has the same hardware and convince them to do that for you. If it's really "cheap and cheerful" you shouldn't have any problem finding someone.

Obligatory reverse pedantry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35167504)

Isn't the fact that you can "unbrick" it mean it's not really bricked?

If you never wake up from sleeping, are you dead?

I'm not sure when this changed from tech jargon to etymology of sophomoric philosophy.

If it has the use characteristics of a brick it is bricked. That's what bricked means in the original context of use and in current usage. If you unbrick it, perhaps it was never bricked, because the probability wave function collapsed backwards through the space-time continuum, but WHO THE FUCK CARES? Before you unbricked it the damn cat was dead.

So shut up, Schrodinger, or Feynman and I will hold you down while Einstein kicks the crap out of you.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35167694)

Isn't the fact that you can "unbrick" it mean it's not really bricked?

Eh... I've complained about this before, but for me the big difference is whether or not an easy fix was available at the time it happened. I mean if they went out of their way to create a tool to fix it later, then I don't personally have an issue with calling that 'de-bricking'.

Then again, I don't like getting fussy about the term 'brick' until people use it to mean 'it froze'.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#35168770)

Nothing with JTAG or whatnot is really brickable at all, it's just a brick to folks that don't have the proper tools.

Anyway, seems like a non-story to me. The sheevaplug having built in USBJTAG was one of the selling features.

Re:Oblig. pedantry (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#35168806)

grrr. forgot slashdot drops angle brackets. The sheevaplug has a JTAG interface that exists over USB. USB-"DOUBLE_ENDED_ARROW"-JTAG

If it's apparently bricked, dead and lifeless... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35170940)

or otherwise stated, if it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck it probably isn't a foreign spy dressed up as a duck.

If your device is not working and just sits there in such a manner as to only be useful for it's services as a paperweight then it's bricked. Whether it's repairable or not is another matter, and learning that your bricked device can be un-bricked doesn't mean it wasn't bricked.

That's like saying your car hasn't broken down, even though you needed to get it towed, because you can repair it once you have a fanbelt.

Hear that? It's the sound of NOBODY CARES. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165322)

Where's the fucking [+/-] story buttons so I can vote this down off the front page?

Only 2 people have commented in the 15 minutes this has been up, and one of them was a frist post.

Re:Hear that? It's the sound of NOBODY CARES. (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165356)

Your comment has been voted down.

Re:Hear that? It's the sound of NOBODY CARES. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165390)

Nope, still at Score:0 where it started.

Re:Hear that? It's the sound of NOBODY CARES. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35168422)

Ahh, but now its Score:0, Insightful, which I'm not sure is correct, but is interesting. Can you get a -1 insightful?

And, I'd like to know where are the +/- buttons?

JTAG rules (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165376)

I bricked my sheevaplug which I bought last December at the 27C3, due to a bad U-Boot flash. It was extremely easy to recover using JTAG & OpenOCD (which also works fine under Windows XP, a nice surprise). For other devices however, like the WRT*, unbricking requires soldering a JTAG header and finding a JTAG cable, not so easy :(

BTW there's a new plug just release, the DreamPlug. A bit like the SheevaPlug bit with two Ethernet ports & wifi. Looks like a cool little beast, although the CPU like the sheevaplug is a bit underpowered.

Re:JTAG rules (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 3 years ago | (#35170024)

BTW there's a new plug just release, the DreamPlug. A bit like the SheevaPlug bit with two Ethernet ports & wifi. Looks like a cool little beast, although the CPU like the sheevaplug is a bit underpowered.

Is that the one with the REALLY NOISY FAN, because going to two gig-E ports made it too hot to run without a blower?

Just an OS reinstall (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165432)

This is just an OS reinstall. It's not like going in through the JTAG port and loading the firmware.

These devices exist in the space between hard embedded systems and OSs with a user interface. With hard embedded systems, you do all development on another machine and download an entire image. With user-oriented OSs, you can interact with the machine in some reasonable way. These things live in a limbo between those two points - smart enough not to be total slaves, but not smart enough for standalone development.

There's nothing wrong with that; that's normal life in the embedded world. But it's not something that end users previously had to deal with.

Re:Just an OS reinstall (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165576)

Some of these plugs are powerful enough(or, more importantly, have enough RAM) that the only thing that really marks them as "embedded" is the fact that they have no video out and you have to deal with mtd devices rather than block devices...

Compiling on a 1.2GHz ARM with 128-512MB of RAM(depending on variant), when every cheap Wintel/Lintel is some 2+GHz dual core beast with 3GB of RAM is, certainly, somewhat masochistic; but the system can run perfectly normal debian ARM, compile natively, and either reflash its bootloader from the OS or reflash its OS from the boatloader, as well as updating portions of the OS from within a live system, just as in desktop and server Debian.

Certainly more "embedded" than "not-embedded"; but it's a pretty roomy flavor of "embedded"...

Re:Just an OS reinstall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35167150)

I started doing some Arduino development recently and while talking with a friend I pointed out they are more powerful than either of our first computers. And cheap enough to be practically disposable. And less temperamental. Sometimes looking back and something like that (which really wasn't that long ago) makes me smile and wonder what the future will hold. Maybe not flying cars, but cool stuff nonetheless.

My SheevaPlug died after 13 months.... (1)

KPexEA (1030982) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165496)

Seems exploding power supplies are common and after opening mine up it had indeed exploded too. Ordered a replacement PS for 9.95, just waiting for it to arrive.

Re:My SheevaPlug died after 13 months.... (1)

akc (207721) | more than 3 years ago | (#35172466)

Mine did too - but it did quite a lot of damage to the electronics when doing so, so a replacement power supply did not revive it.

Dual NICs (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#35165710)

Anybody know if any of these little beasties come with two NIC ports?

Re:Dual NICs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35165970)

Anybody know if any of these little beasties come with two NIC ports?

The Guruplug has dual GigE ports

Re:Dual NICs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35166248)

Only the GuruPlug Plus has 2, the normal GuruPlug just has one. It appears that the Plus is not shipping, they had to add a fan to deal with heat issues, which is very noisy. The DreamPlug appears to be a replacement, so far so good with mine.

Re:Dual NICs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35166030)

- What's that thing on the wall where the network cable goes through?

- Oh that... well, it's a ... "repeater". You know, your signal degrades, and this repeater is needed to reinforce the signal.

Re:Dual NICs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35166032)

DreamPlug is shipping, got mine a couple days ago. http://www.globalscaletechnologies.com/c-5-dreamplugs.aspx
OpenRD also has dual NICs.

The Alix stuff is reasonable too http://www.pcengines.ch/alix.htm

Re:Dual NICs (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35166958)

Sheevaplug doesn't (at least not the first generation ones), but it does have a USB port, so you could potentially use that...

Oblig Non-Pedantic Question? (2)

tunapez (1161697) | more than 3 years ago | (#35166022)

Have they fixed the power supply over-heating/failure issues or are we still talking about the same warts that have a shelf-life of 12 months or less?

I'm serious, I would like an answer b/c I have been wanting one since the first of many, many, many slashvertisements appeared here two, three years ago. Problem is, everything I read on the outside says they fail prematurely and warranty fulfillment is spotty, at best. Am I wrong, Dude?

Re:Oblig Non-Pedantic Question? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35166420)

Original Sheevaplug buyer here, PSU blew up - common problem - and NewIt (the EU reseller) sent me a new one; the Guruplug Plus has massive overheating issues (although they can be solved by leaving it open or making some modifications (like adding a massive heatsink, like I saw)), but the Dreamplug should have no problems, because it uses an external PSU. It also has audio out!

Re:Oblig Non-Pedantic Question? (1)

Tanuki64 (989726) | more than 3 years ago | (#35167378)

If it is the same device I once read about, yes, they fixed the over-heating problem.... if you like to have a siren where you plugged in the thing. AFAIK the installed a very loud fan.

Re:Oblig Non-Pedantic Question? (1)

plover (150551) | more than 3 years ago | (#35168594)

I read on their site that they recommended running one of the network ports at 10/100 in order to manage the heat until they had a "solution". I was not comforted.

You've got to differentiate.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35171282)

between the "Sheevaplug" and the "Gurrruplug" (sic).

The original white-boxed Sheevaplug is remarkably robust. I've got one that has been running constantly for over 14 months without any problems (surreptitiously touches wood). On the other hand, the Guruplug was delivered late in a still undeveloped state, was far too complex for its own good and does indeed suffer from a host of psu/general failure problems.

I don't know about the US, but I've found NewIT [newit.co.uk] , the distributors for UK and Europe to be sensible and most helpful in supporting their customers.

If you just want a mini Linux box to play about with, then the Sheevaplug is probably quite safe to buy... :-)

should android phones be any different? (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 3 years ago | (#35168338)

i realise locked down bootloaders are about control, but a brave hacker-friendly vendor would say 'here are the keys, no support offered but if you happen to brick your phone, here's how to factory restore'.

Re:should android phones be any different? (1)

El_Oscuro (1022477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35169280)

You mean, like one of these? [amazon.com]

Re:should android phones be any different? (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 3 years ago | (#35171078)

well yes but given nokia's reluctance to offer a successor amidst several s^3 releases, meego's future seems more precarious each month - despite a promise of something big this week.

Sheevaplug PSU problems (1)

tommy_traceroute (701929) | more than 3 years ago | (#35173776)

Remarkable timing for this story, as my Sheevaplug suddenly died last week after just over 330 days of flawless uptime. Turns out, there is a known issue with the original power supplies that were shipped, and they die pretty frequently after 8-10 months of use. This is so common that Globalscale now sells the PSUs separately [globalscal...logies.com] for ~$10 USD (plus another $15 for shipping, of course).
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