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Sun Produces First Cycle 24 X-Class Solar Flare

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the go-outside-and-look dept.

Space 131

radioweather writes "For the first time since solar cycle 24 began, the sun produced a massive X-class solar flare, the strongest type of flare event. This comes from sunspot group 1158, which produced an M-class solar flare on Sunday. The EVE X-ray imager on the solar dynamics observatory shows a bright explosion on the sun, so bright it made a lens flare. The last X-class solar flare was on December 13th, 2006 and was part of solar cycle 23. Look for spectacular auroras in a couple days as the slower Coronal Mass Ejection hits earth. This will be a test of how well our newest technology handles stray energy from such solar disruptions."

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Stop this already... It's Oracle (5, Funny)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207730)

'Nuf said

Re:Stop this already... It's Oracle (1)

hishamaus (1991142) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207990)

Well, Then I Am The One Who Will Be Asking Questions Around Here - *Homer Simpson styled*

am I the only one? (5, Funny)

youn (1516637) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207734)

for a second I thought it was about a 24 core new server from sun... then I realized the solar flare was not the oracle purchase :)

Oracle (3, Funny)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207768)

I did think Oracle for a second, but I quickly progressed to worrying if my computers could withstand a

Re:Oracle (1)

organgtool (966989) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209364)

I did think Oracle for a second, but I quickly progressed to worrying if my computers could withstand a

... an Oracle product?

Re:am I the only one? (1)

Nursie (632944) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207818)

Nope, you're not alone. It took me until the word "flare" to realise this was something else!

It took me even longer (1)

puddles (147314) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208926)

since I thought "flare" was another marketing buzzword, used to organize classes of multicore server offerings. "24 cores!" I thought ... it took me until the word "observatory" to realize they're talking about our Sun, not Oracle's.

Re:am I the only one? (2)

fabioalcor (1663783) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207838)

Oracle didn't bought THAT sun... not yet.

wait, it's not 2012 yet... (2)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209252)

but when they do, they'll ruin that, too!

Re:am I the only one? (1)

dogsbreath (730413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208150)

Ans: Noooooooo! It was the first thought in my head as well.

"X-Class Solar Flare", at last something to replace the Victoria line of CPUs and do away with those bloated, overpriced, power hungry SPARCs (is my prejudice showing?).

How disappointing that we are talking about a celestial object that is the prime enabler of our life on Earth and an event which will create spectacular results to be viewed by millions around the world.

Sigh.

Re:am I the only one? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208854)

I also had a shiver of hope that Sun was back in business...

snifff.... We Want Sun Back!!!

tagging policy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209624)

My understanding is that this article was tagged 'sol' to distinguish it from articles on the technology company Sun. However, Sun policy now requires us to tag all articles related to that company with the tag 'java', whether related to the Java programming language or not. Therefore, please feel free to use the tag 'sun' for the huge hot body at the center of our solar system. HTH.

start worrying? (5, Funny)

louic (1841824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207740)

How is this informative if we do not know if we need to be worried or not? Please let us know if we need to start worrying or not, just like in this post earlier on slashdot [slashdot.org] .

Re:start worrying? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207778)

How is this informative if we do not know if we need to be worried or not?.

Save often, buddy, it doesn't hurt.

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208190)

I use a SSD, you insensitive clod!

Re:start worrying? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208266)

Unless you are using SSD as the main memory, it doesn't help for the case of unsaved-still-in-RAM source files.

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208392)

Saving often do hurt, you insensitive clod!

(save when you need to, not every n minutes or whatnot)

Re:start worrying? (1)

lul_wat (1623489) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207790)

February 15, 2011

* The United States government's national threat level is Elevated, or Yellow.

Re:start worrying? (2)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207806)

How is this informative if we do not know if we need to be worried or not? Please let us know if we need to start worrying or not, just like in this post earlier on slashdot [slashdot.org] .

I agree.
But according to all the media, there are so many things to worry about that I propose that from now on, we only get the Factor of Cumulative Worries (FCW).
The news should simply give us a level of worriedness - it can be in 5 simple colors so that infants also understand it - ranging from green to red.
"Today it's level Red! We're gonna die! Tomorrow, we expect a mild level Yellow. It will be green over the weekend, but don't cheer because on Monday we expect another Red!"

Back to your question: It's government policy that it's probably safer to worry. So, yes, you should be worried. Just in case.

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35207866)

You always need to worry. The sun's dangerous y'know. It causes global warming and everything.

Re:start worrying? (4, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208122)

Duh! It's a thermonuclear reactor! Of COURSE it is hellish dangerous! Why do you think it was built so far away?

So you're saying the sun isn't a cause? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208144)

So you're saying the sun isn't a cause of warming on the earth??!?!

My god, you deniers will deny ANYTHING to make yourself feel good, won't you.

Re:start worrying? (2)

MacTO (1161105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207892)

Well increased solar activity it ought to add a little spunk to the aurora, which means that you can watch one of natures more beautiful light shows without tangoing with polar bears. So that's one less thing to worry about and one more thing to be happy about.

Re:start worrying? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208586)

It was viewable as far south as Lansing MI Last night. This next one hopefully will push the northern lights as far south as that again.

Re:start worrying? (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208792)

Aurora Borealis: Imported from Detroit

Re:start worrying? (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208946)

Oldsmobile is gone, dude, get on with life.

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209336)

Crap, At what time. I live closer to the State border with Ohio. I checked several times last night (admittedly for only maybe 10-15 minutes at a time) and saw nothing, Just a stupid UFO (probably just a very slow moving large plane moving straight at or away from me, but from my viewpoint it hung in exactly the same place for well over 10 minutes, and its running lights seemed especially bright with no distinguishable strobe light)

Re:start worrying? (4, Insightful)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207922)

No, you don't need to worry about it. You just happen to know about it. If you did need to worry about it there was nothing you could do about it.

Re:start worrying? (5, Informative)

epiphani (254981) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208974)

Here's a bit more context.

Sunspot 1158 is currently facing towards earth. This is not terribly uncommon - but X series flares are relatively rare. This is the strongest flare in the last four years. What is notable about this event is that it's an X series flare AND its pointed straight at us. It's not in the top ten (X9.0 is the bottom of the top ten, and its a logarithmic scale) of what we've observed, BUT it is the strongest flare in modern history that has been pointed straight at us.

The CME will arrive in 24-48 hours. What the effects of the geomagnetic storm we're about to get will actually be, nobody's completely sure. The most likely case is a K7 or K8 geomagnetic storm. See this scale [noaa.gov] - and expect G3 or G4.

Realistically, this will mean some power utilities are paying very close attention to their systems and having to tweak things. HAMs will definitely notice it, and cell phones may have some issues (not that you'd notice much).

In summary, if you're anywhere north of 45 or 50 degrees lat and have some clear skies, get outside tonight and tomorrow night. Should be a good show.

Re:start worrying? (1)

Wolfling1 (1808594) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208994)

Whilst there is little to worry about with this flare, it is a great opportunity to remind those folks who are not tech-savvy about backups.

A little bit of media induced madness is just the catalyst to get your customers off their loathsome spotty behinds, and backing up their mission critical data.

For us, it was a timely reminder to check that our offsite backups were current, and that they were being stored in a Faraday cage. They were. Its a nice feeling.

OMG! OMG! (1)

Pf0tzenpfritz (1402005) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209522)

So we really are doomed! I knew it when I read that story yesterday..

Re:start worrying? (1)

sjwt (161428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207924)

I believe the answer to the previous post, was not to worry, and I would hazard a guess that this flair is a result of the ''hole'' and is covered by the same answer.

Re:start worrying? (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207942)

worry? There's no point in worrying. If the Sun ever did something that could require worry, there wouldn't be a damned thing you could do about it anyway.

Re:start worrying? (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208510)

There are outcomes between "sun comes up, sun goes down" and "Sun gives the Van Allen belt a good hard shove and everybody eats ionized death"...

Solar behavior capable of knocking out a bunch of satellites, or affecting the power grid, is worrisome; but can be mitigated(or at least expected and then repaired) for various levels of nuisance and expense.

If, for example, next week is going to be a especially terrible time to go into the wilderness with nothing but your trusty GPS and satellite phone, you can't do anything about what the sun is going to do to that infrastructure; but you can avoid relying on it...

Probably not (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35207960)

Large disruptions in the sun's magnetic field can cause huge damage to satellites and power distribution. AFAICT, this flare isn't one of those. It does seem, however, to be one of the biggest of its type in the last hundred years. Most of its spectacular effect seems to be in the visible to x-ray region.

On the other hand, some of the people who pay attention to such things are hoping to see some spectacular auroras.

Re:start worrying? (1)

daid303 (843777) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207982)

There is nothing you can do about it, so don't worry about it.

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208006)

Are you on /. or digg? Do you want someone to hold your hand while you use google?

Re:start worrying? (2)

stealth_finger (1809752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208026)

How is this informative if we do not know if we need to be worried or not? Please let us know if we need to start worrying or not, just like in this post earlier on slashdot [slashdot.org] .

DON'T PANIC!

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208038)

WARNING: this site may contain other information than fear, hatred, tits and the weather forecast.
Then again, it may not.
Who knows?

Re:start worrying? (4, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208046)

How is this informative if we do not know if we need to be worried or not?

The best thing to do, is to monitor announcements from from your local authorities on radio and television . . . um, which will not be working, because they were trashed from the soft X-rays from the solar flare. OK, let's try again. Wait for the police car to drive by and give announcements over the patrol car's megaphone . . . which will also not work, because the car ignition and megaphone were fried by the X-rays, and the policeman is hiding in his cellar anyway, because only an idiot would go outside into a hail of X-rays.

OK, just wrap yourself in tinfoil, and go outside at night and look for the aurora borealis or aurora australis, depending on which hemisphere you live in. The aurorae are much more impressive if you drop some acid before observing them. As a matter of fact, if the acid is good enough, you don't even need the aurorae to see funky lights.

Re:start worrying? (4, Funny)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208618)

And that is why you dont have any superpowers like the rest of us.

I go out naked during Xray events while holding a TV antenna high in the air.... I can now get stains out of any carpet with my mind!

Re:start worrying? (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208092)

It tells us to go to the arctic circle, for you will see nice auroras there (in a couple of days time). A *REALLY* big one might cause problems, but we get a few days warning to prepare.....

Re:start worrying? (3, Informative)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208264)

How is this informative if we do not know if we need to be worried or not?

Please let us know if we need to start worrying or not, just like in this post earlier on slashdot [slashdot.org] .

If a news outlet tells you that there is a massive thunderstorm coming do they have to spell out whether to take precautions or not? If an X-Class flare is sighted and they tell you that a massive CME is going to head our way, do you really have to have it spelled out? Besides, unless you are planning on building a Faraday cage what exactly can you do about it if we have a severe solar weather event? Backup data? You don't do that already?

By the way spaceweather.com [spaceweather.com] is your friend if you give a shit about such matters. You know, like how you might hear a blurb on the news about possible bit thunderstorms so you go to a weather site for more info?

People are so lazy these days, wanting everything spoon fed to them.

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208658)

Is that www.spaceweather.com or just spaceweather.com?

Re:start worrying? (1)

louic (1841824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208516)

How is this informative if we do not know if we need to be worried or not?

Given many of the comments, and the fact that my OP got modded interesting instead of funny, I have to conclude that there is much to worry about. But it is not the solar flare.

Re:start worrying? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209424)

Details on the scales NOAA uses are here: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/NOAAscales/
This one was category scale:R3 descriptor:Strong:
Effect: HF Radio: Wide area blackout of HF radio communication, loss of radio contact for about an hour on sunlit side of Earth. Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for about an hour.
Physical measure: X1 (10-4)
Average frequency of occurrence (1 cycle=11 years): 175 per cycle
(140 days per cycle)

If you want alert emails when these events happen: https://pss.swpc.noaa.gov/LoginWebForm.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fproductsubscriptionservice%2fMainMenuWebForm.aspx
(Registration Required)

Somebody in Canada, St Petersburg or South Pole... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207772)

... please let us know about auroras when the time will come.

Meantime, make sure the UPS-es are good, save often and.. send the files to wikileaks by DVD (can't do anything else anyway, somebody [foreignpolicy.com] took their submission system).

No sir (1)

acehole (174372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207774)

You don't have to be particularly bright to produce a lens flare. Just use it in moderation.

Re:No sir (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209012)

Is it a lens flare? It looks like a sensor overload.

Re:No sir (1)

Majik Sheff (930627) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209412)

This is why I read down before I reply. You beat me to it. From the full image height spike and what appear to be after-images at regular intervals I would say you are dead on. The CCD went WAY beyond saturation for that moment. Not a lens flare, but still very impressive.

Fairly informative article on the subject here:
http://learn.hamamatsu.com/articles/ccdsatandblooming.html [hamamatsu.com]

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Re:Seo Services India (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208088)

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Re:Seo Services India (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208148)

dats waisist!!1!1

Lens flares (2)

ThunderBird89 (1293256) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207800)

An explosion on the Sun that produces a lens flare. On the Sun. Now that's something...

Consequences? (1)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207860)

Should we be concerned about upcoming interference?

Re:Consequences? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208222)

Should we be concerned about upcoming interference?

Don't put yourself in a situation you'd depend on your mobile.
Save your source-code often. Check your UPS-es and increase the frequency of backups
If still have spare time, look for auroras - if not being closer to the poles, it'll be wasted time, unless you actually see one (but if you see one far from the poles, it certainly spell big troubles).

EOTD server update (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207862)

So it's not a new M class server with 24 CPUs/Cores? Meh, time to change the EOTD-server to "solar flares" again then.

From NOAA.gov website (2)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207880)

"... the largest xray solar flare in over a year..."

So we shouldn't be heading for the nuke shelter's then, as we're still all here after last year's "largest xray solar flare in over $meaninglesslysmalltime..."

Ok, so this is going to make pretty lights up at the pole, but the whole EMP-esque electrical Armageddon nuance is little over-hyped, don't you think?

Lens flare? (3, Interesting)

atomicthumbs (824207) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207882)

That's not a lens flare, that's a CCD artifact caused by the intensity of the light (X-rays, in this case) saturating the CCD sensor, and leaving that column saturated as it's moved across the sensor to be read out.
Read up. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Lens flare? (1)

cvtan (752695) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208206)

Agree this is not a lens flare in the usual sense and is a CCD artifact. If this were a saturated set of columns the artifact (vertical stripe) would be as bright as the central spot which it is not. If this sensor is of the interline type (not likely), then it would be termed "smear". If it is a full-frame device, then it would be an afterimage effect (image retention). Charge is stuck in traps which have a slow release time and bleeds out during the frame readout.

The sun, jealous at the moon,... (2)

TheMidget (512188) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207884)

... has started farting at us!

Now, how will the moon react against this blatant trademark infringment?

Farts... now available also where the sun does shine...

Sense of scale (2)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207900)

It a bubble popping. Not an explosion.

Also light takes longer to go from the center of the sun to its surface than from the surface to the Earth. - Just cause you didn't know.

Re:Sense of scale (1)

toetagger (642315) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208274)

How does light travel through the sun? Is it transparent?

Re:Sense of scale (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208336)

Anything is at least partially transparent, if your light source is bright enough.

It doesn't have to be transparent. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208556)

It doesn't have to be transparent. It just has to let light out. Doesn't have to be the exact same photon any more than your descendent has to be the exact same person as you for your legacy to live on.

When? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35207928)

So when will it hit the earth?

Re:When? (1)

stjobe (78285) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208174)

From TFA: "Lookout for auroras in the next couple of days."

Don't you mean . . . (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35207938)

"Oracle Produces First Cycle 24 X-Class Solar Flare"?

Epic fart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35207946)

Wow, that's the most massive thermal fart [imgur.com] ever recorded! Too bad Guiness officials weren't there to witness it, though.

Spaceweather (1)

Xelios (822510) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207956)

For anyone who doesn't already know about it, I'm sure there will be spectacular pictures of the auroras on SpaceWeather [spaceweather.com] as the CME hits us over the next couple of days.

Hits Earth?! (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207962)

You mean the magnetosphere is GONE?! Time to break out the tinfoil body suit and air out the bomb shelter....

Lens flare? (1)

atomicthumbs (824207) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207976)

That's not a lens flare, it's vertical smear caused by the saturated pixels on the CCD saturating the entire column as they're read out.
Read up [wikipedia.org] .

I for one... (1)

cosmicaug (150534) | more than 3 years ago | (#35207988)

I for one welcome our new coronal mass ejecting overlords.

Cycle 24 X-Class Solar Flare? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208032)

Cool server name!

Biggest flares since the 70's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208048)

No no no no yes, it's good news! X class solar flares are also vigorous in the ultraviolet, UV heats the ozone layer, a warmer ozone layer means a faster, less meandering jet stream - and that means - a barbecue summer!!! Woo hoo!! I mean, it's obvious, init?

Re:Biggest flares since the 70's (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208236)

No no no no yes, it's good news! X class solar flares are also vigorous in the ultraviolet, UV heats the ozone layer, a warmer ozone layer means a faster, less meandering jet stream - and that means - a barbecue summer!!! Woo hoo!! I mean, it's obvious, init?

Hurricanes/cyclones?

All joking aside... (3, Interesting)

ATestR (1060586) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208062)

The significance of this solar flare is not that it could or will be a danger to Earth... it is that is a sign that the sun is waking back up. Anyone who has been watching for long can tell you that there haven't been any significant sun spots for quite a while. It is possible that this is the reason behind some of the cold weather that the northern hemisphere has been experiencing this winter.

Re:All joking aside... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208162)

What? But I thought global warming was due to the sun's increased activity???

Re:All joking aside... (1)

locofungus (179280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208294)

It is possible that this is the reason behind some of the cold weather that the northern hemisphere has been experiencing this winter.

Anecdote but I'd not say that this winter has been cold. Other than a couple of weeks in December it's been remarkably warm in London.

I cycle to work. In the summer I wear a t-shirt. Autumn and spring I also put on a thin nylon reflective cape (mainly due to riding in the dark rather than for warmth). Winter (mid-late Nov through to some time in March) I usually need to wear an extra layer but this year I'm still in my "autumn" attire and it's only been those couple of weeks in December where I've put on an extra layer.

Tim.

Re:All joking aside... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208366)

Midwest US: Below normal since December? Record snow in Chicago?
NE US: Blizzard after Blizzard after Blizzard?
Texas: Ice storms/snow in EXTREME SOUTH TEXAS?
MS/AL/LA: Snow several times this winter?
OK: double digits on the wrong side of 0F?
Mexico: Crop failures due to freeze?
Maybe it's fine over there, but it's dang COLD over here!!!!!

Re:All joking aside... (1)

Tim C (15259) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208440)

To be fair, those couple of weeks were fucking freezing. (It's not exactly tropical out there right now, either)

Re:All joking aside... (1)

eatfrog (212644) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208690)

It's -32C here. I'd say its pretty damn cold. It's been really cold for a few weeks now, and it's supposed to continue. (Northern part of Sweden)

Re:All joking aside... (1)

dachshund (300733) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208346)

It is possible that this is the reason behind some of the cold weather that the northern hemisphere has been experiencing this winter.

The thing is, the northern hemisphere /hasn't/ been all that cold --- just parts of it. For example, the arctic is experiencing record warm temperatures:

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/sciencefair/post/2011/02/record-low-arctic-sea-ice-in-january/1 [usatoday.com]

Re:All joking aside... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208446)

And the record hot summer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil?

Re:All joking aside... (1)

Fractal Dice (696349) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208924)

Some of US has experienced periods of a Canadian winter, but my impression is that in areas that are normally north of the jet stream that marks the stormy boundary of the northern and southern air masses, it's been a pretty normal winter, even a mild one. It would be interesting to see temperature data mapped over the whole northern hemisphere because my impression is that the arctic air mass behaves a bit like a toupee on the globe - sliding the boundary south on one side tends to mean it's sliding north on the other.

Class M (1)

rpillala (583965) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208086)

Doesn't that mean it's habitable?

Re:Class M (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208176)

Glad I wasn't the only one thinking this. Engage.

sun and oracle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208254)

the sunspot group 1158 has done remarkable work producing the first cpu prototype codenamed "solar flare". seems oracles acquisition of sun finally pays off... :-)

F--- Me (1)

multipartmixed (163409) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208278)

It's 07:23, I've been up for about ten minutes, and I look at the Slashdot front page, trying to decipher the headline describing wonderful new hardware from one of my favourite companies.

Then I realized they don't exist any more and this is just about a big ball of gas.

Thanks, Slashdot, my day's off to a *great* start.

Small fizzle, but solar cycle 24 is interesting. (1)

velocirupture (1164479) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208328)

It's just an X2.2 R3 "event". Which means, in worst case: "HF Radio: Wide area blackout of HF radio communication, loss of radio contact for about an hour on sunlit side of Earth." "Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for about an hour." In 2003 there was a solar flare at X28++ ... don't think anyone remembers that. It might however be somewhat interesting for people following cycle 24, with all the sunspot magnetic fields progressively getting weaker and all... http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/111142-Solar-Cycle-24-Update [bautforum.com]

What a coincidence. (1)

durrr (1316311) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208378)

My integrated soundcard went dead just this morning. I blame the sun.

Re:What a coincidence. (1)

ArmchairGeneral (1244800) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208490)

Interesting, my car had some trouble starting this morning, if it weren't so cold I could have popped the hood and checked out to see what the problem was. I blame the sun too.

Re:What a coincidence. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208544)

I had trouble pooping this morning. I blame the sun.

Re:What a coincidence. (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208570)

Eh, that's just one of the audiophile wet-ops teams. After a few thousand rounds of being mocked about $600 ethernet cables and $2,000/meter silver IEC cables, some of the tighter wound ones go rogue and start striking back at the uncaring world that will never understand or accept them.

In addition to the onboard sound(an unforgivable aural insult), you may find that your system and backups have been selectively purged of all lossy-compressed media. In especially severe cases, all audio may be purged(it was only CD "quality" to begin with, and even lossless compression makes audio sound flat and lifeless. It has to do with jitter, you wouldn't understand.)

Sun? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208512)

You mean "Oracle Produces First Cycle 24 X-Class Solar Flare"... Fixed for you.

Everybody join in (1)

s122604 (1018036) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208680)

The assclown carnival begins on 27.025MHZ, world-wide baby!!!

i'll be ok (3, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208788)

i only use monster brand digital AV cables. the best buy salesman assured me they were designed specifically to resist x-class solar flares

Might explain radio reception this morning... (1)

scharkalvin (72228) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208820)

Local FM station was being drowned out by neighboring stations bleeding over. Might be related to the solar activity, or maybe some stations just switched on IBOC transmitters.

Crosshairs (1)

khr (708262) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208916)

The MSN article's headline is a lot more dramatic, "Earth in 'crosshairs' of solar explosion". Makes it sound like a disaster waiting to happen... Fortunately the article isn't as bad.

Follow this on spaceweather.com (2)

AbrasiveCat (999190) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209702)

I use spaceweather.com to follow solar flares. There is also an explanation of flare intensity at http://spaceweather.com/glossary/flareclasses.html [spaceweather.com] . This is all I'll get, the rain has moved back to the pacific northwest, we will not even know if the sun is out. :(
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