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Intel 310 Series Mini SSDs Now Shipping, Benchmark

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the moving-parts-are-for-fuckers dept.

Data Storage 121

MojoKid writes "Intel's new 310 Series SSDs utilize the same 34nm NAND flash memory technology and controller found on the chip maker's 2.5-inch SSDs, but in a form factor just 1/8th the size; a scant 2 inches (51mm) long by 1.18 inches (30mm) wide and flatter than a pancake. The new tiny Intel SSDs are now shipping and despite their diminutive stature, performance is actually pretty similar to that of the company's popular X25-M 34nm SSD. Intel says the 310 Series is shipping to customers for $179 in 1,000-unit quantities for the 80GB version of the drive."

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Units? (5, Insightful)

NBolander (1833804) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208856)

As a European reader, I haven't really gotten my head around those imperial units yet. How many mm would this pancake measurement of yours represent?

Re:Units? (3, Funny)

Adustust (1650351) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208906)

Ideal American pancake flatness should be around 8 to 10mm in thickenss. A 30mm pancake would be a custard pie.

Re:Units? (1)

MojoKid (1002251) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208958)

Ahaha! That was just awesome.

Re:Units? (1)

Zoxed (676559) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209582)

Maybe it is some strange (!!) American usage of English, but to me "flatter than a pancake" is a measure of undulations (i.e. a lack of), for example in the landscape. It is not a measure of thickness. E.g. the ice on the lake could be 1m thick, but is usually flat as a pancake !

Re:Units? (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210598)

I'm American. You're not wrong. Flatter than a pancake is used to describe 12 year old girls and Howie Long's Hair. The phrase should have been "thinner than a pancake". But that is vague. I would have said, as thin as a crepe but that is probably not accurate either.

Now, when are we going to get SSD in the TB range?

Re:Units? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210624)

Why would you need a SSD in the Taco Bell range? What does that even mean?

Re:Units? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210924)

It means flat as a tortilla, not a pancake.

Re:Units? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35213778)

Tuberculosis, not Taco Bell. Sheeesh.

Re:Units? (1)

Megahard (1053072) | more than 3 years ago | (#35212478)

You can get it now [amazon.com] if you're willing to shell out 5 grand.

Re:Units? (1)

falzer (224563) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213774)

See Texas Memory Systems for multi-terabyte solutions. Unless you were actually looking for standard form factors.

From their FAQ:
Q: I really want to make my home computer faster, can you help?
A: Have you considered a home equity line of credit?

Re:Units? (1)

rjstanford (69735) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210820)

Which is quite funny, because I'd be moderately disappointed if my SSD had as many dips in it as the average pancake - far less flat than the average crepe, which is also less flat than an SSD really should be.

Re:Units? (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#35212006)

My mom used to make really thick pancakes and put chocolate chips in them. They were pretty bumpy and thick

Re:Units? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35214062)

Translation note: Pancake in American is Scotch pancake or drop scone in English. Pancake in English is flapjack in American. I've no idea what flapjack in English is in American, probably oat cookie or similar. American pancakes are several times thicker than English pancakes.

Re:Units? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208920)

You're assuming it isn't a metric pancake there.

Re:Units? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208968)

"Pancake" is the English for "crêpe" and should be about one mm thick. In American-speaking countries a pancake is a stodgy horror that looks like it was designed for repairing tractor inner tubes.

Re:Units? (4, Informative)

pieterh (196118) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209358)

In Scotland, a pancake aka "dropped scone" is made from the same dough as Belgian waffles, and is traditionally cooked on a griddle. The English call these "Scotch pancakes". Well made, they are extremely satisfying, and make a great accompaniment to haggis & neeps and black bun, washed down with huge quantities of strong tea with milk. The Flemish also make "pannenkoeken" which are similarly cooked on griddles but with a thinner batter that allows the pancake to be gently spread over the griddle as it cooks, giving the large and thin "pancake" the Brettons called "crêpe" when they imported it from Artois in 1490. Just a year later the French crown took over Brittany, and it has been said this was to seize control of the new pancake industry.

Now to the use of the word "flat"... are we talking about surface curvature (or lack thereof) or thickness? Because Scotch pancakes are not flat at all, they are gently convex, due to the raising agents used (typically buttermilk and baking soda, demonstrating historical cultural connections between lowland Scotland and Flanders, where buttermilk was invented). Whereas the Flemish pannenkoek is somewhat concave, due to the effect of batter pushed out to the edges. French crêpes of course will take the shape of the pan they are cooked in, but are often more concave than convex.

This has absolutely nothing to do with SSDs but neither does the reference to pancakes in the summary.

Re:Units? (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211150)

As a European reader, I haven't really gotten my head around those imperial units yet. How many mm would this pancake measurement of yours represent?

Dude, how could you not know this? Are you saying that the International House of Pancakes is a sham? All this time I thought there was this benevolent international organization spreading yummy treats, slightly sticky hands, and a general knowledge of comparative thicknesses throughout the earth... Turns out they only serve selected areas of North America.

I have been crushed... perhaps my spirits would be lifted by a trip to the Waffle House.

I love the Slashdot icon for this (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208864)

The icon is an old 9-track tape... on a story about tiny tiny new Solid State storage.
there's irony or something like that in the air.

Re:I love the Slashdot icon for this (1)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208972)

there's irony or something like that in the air.

Be careful, iron dust particles could damage the magnetic storage mediums.

Re:I love the Slashdot icon for this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209294)

Old technologies have a physical reality that is immediately obvious. You still tape a video. You still dial a phone. The icon for voice mail is a tape loop. Would you rather the icon be a molecular-sized transistor?

E-mail icon with superimposed telephone symbol (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210660)

The icon for voice mail is a tape loop. Would you rather the icon be a molecular-sized transistor?

How about the back of an envelope with a symbol of a phone handset on it? That combines the icons for "phone" and "mail".

Re:E-mail icon with superimposed telephone symbol (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213594)

Both handsets and mail envelopes are ancient technology as well.

On the Subject of Pancakes (2, Insightful)

da3dAlus (20553) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208878)

I'm curious as to the continued widespread use of "flatter than a pancake" as a technical unit of measure, considering that a specific mm width and length were just previously mentioned. Not to be a nitpicker, I just prefer my pancakes to be somewhat light and fluffy, and therefore not flat. Perhaps "flatter than a tortilla" would be more apt? Though if we're going this route, I continue to back the opinion that "shitload" be considered a unit of measure ;)

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

Adustust (1650351) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208940)

I suppose it matters which type of pancake we're referring to. Are we going with literal translation of "pancake", or should we move deeper and include crepes? As for your "shitload" unit of measurement, I agree. A crepe would be a shitload flatter than a pancake.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208998)

Please read Kansas Is Flatter Than a Pancake [improbable.com] .

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209428)

I loved that, the authors don't stop at mere data acquisition and mathematical analysis, they go above and beyond to provide a concise qualitative summary of Kansas as "damn flat"

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

no known priors (1948918) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209002)

But tortilla [wikipedia.org] aren't actually that flat.

As for this wonderful new device, wow 80GB. No matter how fast it is, it isn't big enough. Considering my non-media (i.e. not moving pictures, still pictures and music) totals over 20 GB on it's own (with my photos (not porn thank you very much, that's in another folder) taking up at least another 20 GB minimum, and my moving pictures (films, TV shows) is nearly 100GB on it's own, and my music is over 50GB) and the fact that I only have a laptop (and travel a lot)...

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209092)

The way i see it is that SSDs are useful if performance is your top priority. For a server, the capacity of the device may not matter if the device is too slow. That's why 15kRPM hard drives exist. They are smaller and more expensive, but are useful as system drives. I keep my other stuff on 7.2kRPM drives because they are cheaper and have higher capacity and I do not really care about the speed for those files. I also archive rarely used files to tape, even though it has much slower random access than hard drives, tapes are a bit cheaper and (hopefully) more reliable in long term storage.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209226)

RTFA. Did you miss the part where Intel said these are primarily intended for dual drive devices with both this SSD and a HD? The SSD for OS/Apps/VM and the HD for mass storage.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209278)

Aside from the "Yup, SSDs still smaller than platter drives, news at 11." answer, I think that there are really two points to be made:

Since this sucker is the same size as a miniPCIe card, rather than a 1.8 or a 2.5inch HDD, it gives the laptop OEMs two options:

Option 1: Ultralight, ultramobile: For a modest premium, you can now build a laptop that simply doesn't have a 2.5 or even 1.8 inch drive bay, just a miniPCIe-sized slot. This will make it thinner and/or lighter than was previously possible, while still offering enough space for Windows, Office, a specialist utility or two, and a bunch of files. Serious Storage will either be irrelevant to the person buying this, or provided by the Office WLAN/VPN. Pure candy for your road warrior types.

Option 2: Standard size; but now with SSD for screaming boot/loading of favored applications, plus standard 2.5inch spinny disk for bulk storage. Historically, if you wanted two disks, you needed to get a behemoth "Mobile workstation" or "desktop replacement". With one of these, you can get the equivalent; but in a body of essentially the same size as a standard 1 laptop drive. 80GB for OS and favored programs, whatever 2.5incher you want for mass storage...

It will also be interesting to see if any storage vendor does something with these. If mounted vertically, you could get a backplane with sockets, plus as many vertically oriented SSD cards as you had space for, in a 2U enclosure. Connected to a suitably screaming SATA controller, that would give you quite high density by SSD standards, with commodity parts for lower cost, and Real Serious Performance...

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209764)

You're missing the S on the end of tortilla. Tortillas is the plural in English and Spanish.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209874)

Wow, if you stopped putting apostrophes where they don't belong, you could save about 1% of your storage space. It's means IT IS.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213832)

Thank's a lot. I'll try to remember that.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209214)

>> Though if we're going this route, I continue to back the opinion that "shitload" be considered a unit of measure

Technically, a shitload = e / pi Libraries of Congress.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

Inda (580031) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209570)

What about a metric shitload?

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

pz (113803) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209592)

Though if we're going this route, I continue to back the opinion that "shitload" be considered a unit of measure ;)

My preferred unit in that scale is the metric butt-load, similar in spirit to the long ton which is the forcing of an imperial unit into a metric approximation by adding an additional layer of arbitrary scaling but still not quite getting it right.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35210152)

Let us not forget the imperial fuck-ton.

Which is bigger? (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210716)

Metric shitload, or English?

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (1)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211602)

shitload is a measurment of volume... shit-ton is a measurment of weight and... for size, its various turds of different species.. I beleive this drive is about the size of a stepped on raccoon turd.

Re:On the Subject of Pancakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35213672)

...Though if we're going this route, I continue to back the opinion that "shitload" be considered a unit of measure ;)

i'm not sure on your 'shitload' measurements
can you provide a conversion to metric fucktonne's please?

Is It Shipping? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35208880)

Holy crap. I've seen better writing from a 6th grader.

Re:Is It Shipping? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209594)

Holy crap. I've seen better reading comprehension from a 6th grader. Yes it is shipping. It says so in the slashdot title, twice in the slashdot summary, and then again on the last page of the article.

Re:Is It Shipping? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35211080)

Whoosh....

Of course I know it's shipping you idiot...he says it three times in three run on sentences.

The comment is directed the bad writing. We know it shipped from the title. It is unnecessary and bad form to mention two more times. Any Sophomore composition professor would kick this back as incoherent and confused.

Re:Is It Shipping? (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213872)

That's why they shouldn't let sophomores be composition professors, obviously. Wait until they're graduated.

$200 for 80gb? (0)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35208990)

$200 for 80gb?

you can get 2 TB HDD for that price or 146 GB 15K HDDs as well.

Western Digital VelociRaptor WDBACN3000ENC-NRSN 300GB 10000 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive is about $200 as well.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (2)

tomkost (944194) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209036)

you are comparing apples and oranges. That 3.5" drives are the size of an old cassette player. these SSD are almost credit card sized (a bit thicker, maybe 4 credit cards stacked on top of one another). 80Gb is enough for business users. U can carry your music and other media on your iPhone... So if you like a small, easy to carry laptop, it should be designed for these SSD only, and no HDD. Then you can still have the bigger cheaper laptops with 2.5" HDD for cost or max storage capability.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209254)

Actually, these SSDs are much smaller than a credit card, and not much thicker.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213954)

As it is nearly 1/4 inch, 5.8mm is considerably thicker than any credit card.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

SiliconSeraph (996818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209080)

Yes but none of those things are about the size of a 50 cent piece. This is.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (0)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209098)

don't kill the SSD hype. it's so cooler having Windows boot up 10 seconds faster and so much worth the ridiculous prices per GB these things go for. not even the power savings make up for the cost

Re:$200 for 80gb? (3, Interesting)

dc29A (636871) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209508)

Spoken like someone who never used one SSD. I was exactly like you, dismissing SSDs as hype. Until I got an OCZ Vertex 2 60GB for less than 100$. My opinion has shifted dramatically, yes windows boots up fast, but it's not just that. Every program installed on SSD boots fast, the system is much snappier, it almost feels like it was an iPad, wake up from sleep takes less than a second. As for price / GB, yes it's steep, but if you keep only applications and OS on the SSD, the price is well worth it.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

VanessaE (970834) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211570)

The same can be said for Linux on an SSD. I have the same 60GB Vertex2 in two boxes here, and it takes roughly 4 seconds from the moment GRUB loads to the moment I see the XFCE desktop, plus perhaps 5 seconds to re-load my session. Counting the POST screen, I'd give it a grand total of 15 seconds from power-on to ready and idle.

Everything moves faster - I don't find myself waiting anymore. Except for Firefox, programs load from a cold start almost instantly. Since the CPU is more than capable of flooding even the fastest disks, programs that need to process large files just blast through the data faster. New programs install lightning fast. I've seen at least one instance of a several-GB file being created at ~249 MB/sec - right up there with the benchmarks we've all seen for SSD's. I can "only" get about 210 MB/sec out of dd or hdparm, though. Of course it takes no effort at all now to max out our gigabit LAN copying files around as usual (~110 MB/sec on larger files).

It took no special effort to get this kind of performance either, at least with Ubuntu "Maverick": just partition, install, and copy my data over like any other disk update.

SSD for the OS's and most of the home directory contents on the two machines, spinning rust for mass storage, external USB disk for incremental backups. Seems like the perfect solution for a normal home user, at least for now.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

Bob Gelumph (715872) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209604)

At my workplace, we replaced most of the devs' spinny disks with SSDs. SVN checkouts went down from about 5 minutes to around 30 seconds, with most of that being due to the SVN server not having an SSD. Other tasks across thousands of files have reduced by heaps as well. On average, easily an hour or two can be saved per developer per week, which pays for itself within a month. Developers don't need more than that kind of size, typically, and large files, like database backups can be kept on the old HDD if space really becomes an issue. The main issue has been a ridiculously high failure rate (over 10% in around 3 months), in this case with Corsair disks, though I don't know if the problem is limited to that brand or the particular model. Also, the lower power consumption and quieter operation are features that nobody could argue with. 10krpm spinny hard drives might not be too much slower for some operations than SSDs, but they are certainly a lot louder and thirsty.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209698)

random reads can easily kill application responsiveness -- not so with SSDs. They really are useful.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209138)

And if your workload consists primarily of random reads you get:
SSD: 187 random reads / second / dollar
HDD: 1.4 random reads / second / dollar

SSD looks like a much better value to me.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (2)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209238)

1) Almost any of the SSDs currently on the market will smoke any of the above drives performance-wise, even the 10k RPM ones
2) This particular SSD is a fraction of the size of those drives. You just listed a whole bunch of 3.5" drives, these are significantly smaller than even 2.5" notebook drives.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209290)

that's all wasted space and power drain for half of laptop users. many of us don't store multimedia crap on our laptop. We just want OS and apps and a few gig for data. I'm glad the price is finally getting within reach

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209392)

and why is the 80gb faster than the 40gb version of the otherwise identical product?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&Description=Intel+310&x=0&y=0 [newegg.com]

Re:$200 for 80gb? (5, Informative)

LordKronos (470910) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209708)

and why is the 80gb faster than the 40gb version of the otherwise identical product?

The way they double the capacity is by using twice as many of the same chips. Since it writes to all chips in parallel, twice as many chips means it can read/write twice as much data in the same time period. You see that in the fact that the write performance spec is exactly double. The reason the read performance isn't double is because it has been known for a while that Intel puts a performance cap on the non-enterprise versions of their SSDs

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

dc29A (636871) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209686)

$200 for 80gb?

you can get 2 TB HDD for that price or 146 GB 15K HDDs as well.

Western Digital VelociRaptor WDBACN3000ENC-NRSN 300GB 10000 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive is about $200 as well.

I know, eh! I decided to put a 3.5 inch high performance desktop drive into my laptop.

First problem: Hard drive didn't fit.
Solution: Duct tape it to the laptop, wire SATA cables. Option two would have been cramming it into the chassis somehow.

Second problem: Voltage. Vast majority of laptops don't have 12 Volt SATA lines.
Solution: Wire some more cables from an adapter of some sort!

Third problem: Laptop now looks really funky with the duct taped hard drive. Oh and is much heavier!
Solution: Don't know, any suggestions?

But hey, I managed to do it! Cramming a desktop drive into a laptop!

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

KingMotley (944240) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210758)

Third problem: Laptop now looks really funky with the duct taped hard drive. Oh and is much heavier!
Solution: Don't know, any suggestions?

Duct tape some helium balloons to it, which will also help to insulate the heat of the drives from your lap.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

snsh (968808) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209890)

Or pay an extra $100 for another 16GB in your iPhone 4.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210752)

Whats that? you paid 20 million for a fighter jet? I can get a flight across the country foe 1000 bucks!

Maybe the are for different purposes?

Re:$200 for 80gb? (2)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211064)

Those old VelociRaptors arent even competitive with a modern 2TB 7,200K RPM consumer drive like the Caviar Black in performance (which is less than $200)

Even ignoring SSD's, that class of 10000 RPM drive has been eliminated from the performance market by the higher capacity 7200 RPM drives. The main issue is that while 10K RPM still gives better seek times, that same RPM also keeps them from using the highest drive densities. 7200 RPM at a higher density beats 10000 RPM at a lower density on raw throughput.

So what we end up with is that the Raptor's having no market any longer. For throughput they are no longer competitive with larger and cheaper drives, and for IOPS they are simply a joke compared to even thumb drives. There is no market for consumer-grade 10K RPM like there was in the past.

The only 10K+ RPM drives that are still successful are enterprise-class, and those aren't cheaper than SSD's. Some enterprise drives can be had for ~$1/GB but so too some SSD's can be had for that, and most enterprise-class drives will run you ~$2/GB.

The shortcoming of SSD's is that they carry an enterprise price tag but do not carry the same enterprise-level guarantees, but that is offset by the significant performance advantages that they do offer.

Essentially, you are reaching for yesteryears trendy performance geek stuff and trying to apply it to todays performance geek stuff. Performance geeks have been using SSD's for several years now, and thats simply not going to swing back towards platters... ever.

Pretty much as predicted- (1)

Firethorn (177587) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213016)

A few years ago now, I predicted 3-5 years for SSDs to start killing the server market - starting with the 10k RPM drives used for high random outs.

I'm not sure if I can call it a failure or not - I also predicted 3-5 before 'major penetration' of SSDs into laptops happened. While most laptops are still using 2.5 inch drives, iPod is pretty much the driver for the smaller drives(1.8") right now. The iPad is run by flash though. Even 'netbooks' mostly have HD's in them.

Maybe this will finally kill the HD in the iPod classic, but looking at the price profiles ($249 for 80GB and $349 for 160), a $100 price difference for 80GB, I'd say that the Intel SSD needs to drop in price by 1/2.

Going by relative advances, I'd have to say another 2-4 years.

SSDs will bypass consumer/bulk data 3.5" drives last, of course. In situations where it's all about the price per GB, performance being a distant second, plain old 3.5" drives are going to dominate for a while.

Re:$200 for 80gb? (2)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211682)

In 1985 a 10 meg harddrive for the commodore 64 cost $600.... 60 dollars a meg!! You could buy 1600+ floppies for that.. and use both sides of them... No wonder harddrives never caught on..

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#35212982)

I wonder what SSD has done to sales of "high-performance" disk drives like VelociRaptors? Who would pay a premium for a faster version of a technology that is inherently slow?

Re:$200 for 80gb? (1)

adisakp (705706) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213614)

$200 for 80gb?

you can get 2 TB HDD for that price or 146 GB 15K HDDs as well.

Ummm... yeah, try putting a 3.5" drive in a mini-notebook. What this $200 gets us is PC's notebooks that will be able to compete with MacBook Airs or Notebooks that can have both an SSD (for fast / instant boot capability and longer battery life) and a HD (for user storage) without being any larger. Making a notebook smaller, faster and have longer battery life is something A LOT of people will pay a mere $200 for.

Any suggestions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209132)

I've been holding off on getting an SSD out of concern of lifetime, cost, etc. Can anyone here give a recommendation on an SSD or SSD/platter system? Is it really worth it to have the OS installed on an SSD? Certain programs? Are there any promising technologies on the horizon that will really drive the traditional platters into obsolescence?

How to attach? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209152)

These SSDs come with an mSATA interface. How do I attach them to my desktop PC or to my EeePC 901?

Re:How to attach? (0)

ezrec (29765) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209242)

I've done some research on mSATA adapters:

http://tinyurl.com/682ehsd [tinyurl.com]

Re:How to attach? (3, Informative)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209276)

RTFA. First off, you wouldn't, you would buy a 2.5" SSD. However, Intel provided the testers with an interposer card than includes a standard SATA connection.

mSATA and PCIe (2)

ezrec (29765) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209162)

What I find hilarious is that the mSATA is physically identical to a PCIe card edge, but is not electrically identical.

I wonder how many returns they are going to get on these.

Re:mSATA and PCIe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35209658)

I heard that when you read the blocks off an mSATA drive in a PCIe slot you get a Glenn Back mp3.

Hybrid disks, and disk names (1)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209462)

What I want is a combination of a large-capacity spinning drive and an SSD in a single housing that's no larger than current 2,5" drives. The SSD should be large enough for the OS + frequently-used apps and data.

The Seagate Momentus XT sort of offers this, but it uses its SSD as a disk cache, so there's no way to influence what gets put on the SSD. And 4 GB is too small: my Hibernation file alone is 4 GB. Also, it has some weird auto-sleep features that make life difficult when you put it in a Mac.

What I want is one physical box (so it'll fit in a laptop) that exposes two separate volumes so I can decide for myself what to put where. 500 GB RD [1] + 32 GB SSD would be sufficient.

1: Rotating Disk, to allow us to talk about spinning rust drives with as much brevity as 'SSD'.

Re:Hybrid disks, and disk names (1)

moonbender (547943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210778)

So you want two physical drives exposed over a single SATA link? Is that even possible? Seems like SATA was specifically designed to do 1-to-1 links. I suppose what you could do is drive both disks over the same controller and expose a single faux-physical disk of combined size to the mainboard/OS; you'd need to partition it along physical drive boundaries, then. Messy.

I'd rather just connect two drives where possible -- ie. desktops, upcoming laptops with dual SATA or PCIe+mSATA slots and just use a single (suitably large) SSD in other situations. Either you've got a desktop-replacement laptop and plenty of space for offering dual SATA (or at least mSATA+SATA), or you've got a portable machine, in which case a 2.5in HDD seems almost wasteful, these days. But that's just me.

Re:Hybrid disks, and disk names (1)

KingMotley (944240) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210792)

No thanks, I'd like to be able to upgrade each individually, or buy a SSD from one manufacturer and the HDD from a different one.

Re:Hybrid disks, and disk names (1)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210900)

Sure, if you have room for it that's the way to go. But there's a huge number of laptops out there that only have room for one drive.

What does this new form factor do for us? (1)

Adustust (1650351) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209558)

Is this still limited to usage in netbooks and laptops? What type of dimensions are in an Ipad or the new ASUS eee Slate? I would love to be able to upgrade the drives in those, it's almost the only thing holding the asus windows slate back.

Re:What does this new form factor do for us? (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211406)

Well, for one, it would allow you to design a smartphone that had an internal hard drive.

So are these compatible with any laptop? (1)

franciscohs (1003004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209772)

Assuming I have a free PCIe slot on my laptop, can I assume that everything will work or do I need some specific feature on the laptop for it to work?

Re:So are these compatible with any laptop? (2)

ezrec (29765) | more than 3 years ago | (#35209850)

mSATA is physically, but not electrically, compatible with miniPCIe slots.

It will fit, but will probably cause your system to catch on fire.

Have fun!

Re:So are these compatible with any laptop? (1)

franciscohs (1003004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210138)

Ah, good to know, thanks. I was confused by the newegg site that said something like "mSATA (Mini PCIe Form factor)"

Re:So are these compatible with any laptop? (3, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210746)

mSATA is physically, but not electrically, compatible with miniPCIe slots.

Then the designers screwed that up. A CompactFlash card can operate in both PCMCIA and parallel ATA modes.

moving-parts-are-for-fuckers (1)

neo-mkrey (948389) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210140)

I suppose to do it properly, moving parts are required for fucking.

Bit of a Freud slip there, Taco?

Too bad Intel didn't make that claim (1)

sosaited (1925622) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210454)

Only if Intel had said "thinner than a pancake" about the SSD, I could have sued them after making a petite pancake definitely thinner than that SSD.

Breakage (1)

AdmV0rl0n (98366) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210492)

The company I work for is occassionally bleeding edge. They purchased quite a number of earlier 160GB Intel 2.5 inch units, and every single one has failed within 18 months. In a first or second gen product, especially bleeding edge arena, we cut people some slack. But Intel have not been good _at_all in terms of warranty, and the base fact is I don't think we have any interest in ever dealing with Intel again in the SSD area. We can tolerate the breakage, its part of being leading edge, but the failure to back the product up in a way thats acceptable is a no no.

Given the hype, frankly we expect 5 years from a unit roughly, and the fact every single one died fills us with a view that these have inherent breakage, and cold shoulder warranty. Not good enough.

Re:Breakage (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210708)

so you want to be bleeding edge, but not take any of the risk from being bleeding edge? For units that are 18 months old?

Good luck.

Re:Breakage (1)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211170)

What sort of failure?

If its not simply using up the write limits (which requires extreme usage), then it sounds like something else is amiss.

Re:Breakage (1)

edmudama (155475) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211326)

If 100% failure rate were common, I'm pretty sure they would have long ago stopped selling SSDs. Maybe you're doing it wrong?

http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2000-07-25/

Let me know when it's (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210680)

flatter then a Crepe.

My pancakes are fluffy and think.

Re:Let me know when it's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35211438)

Use fresher eggs if your pancakes are fluffy and think.

Re:Let me know when it's (1)

mswhippingboy (754599) | more than 3 years ago | (#35211508)

flatter then a Crepe.

My pancakes are fluffy and think.

Pleeeze! Let's not get back into the whole AI thing again.

Combined drive? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210730)

Would this new SSD be small enough to be combined with a 1.8" HDD into the size of a 2.5" HDD?

Re:Combined drive? (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213264)

I'm really surprised "hybrid" drives which automatically cache the small or frequently-accessed files on an SSD portion, and stick the big stuff on a mechanical disk, are not already all over the market. Those who know already use both SSDs and mechanical disks in their systems... why can't Samsung or Maxtor or whoever give us that in a single package?

Didn't we all see this coming? (1)

dlsso (1808390) | more than 3 years ago | (#35210944)

All pancakes aside, I'm surprised it took them this long. Everyone had to have assumed SD card sized drives were on the way when SSDs were introduced.

ExpressCard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35211496)

I really hope that we'll see an ExpressCard adapter (as it fits the dimensions of the smaller variety, the ExpressCard /34).

Enough! (1)

DarthVain (724186) | more than 3 years ago | (#35213098)

OK great, you made them smaller Intel that's just peachy. Now they can be used in other types of applications such as phones and other devices...

HOWEVER, the big problem with SSD is 1) PRICE and 2) CAPACITY...

Soooo what you did here, was make a smaller, slower, MORE expensive and LESS capacity SSD? Bravo.

How about you get working on making a standard 2.5" 300GB SSD not cost about the same as your first born's eternal soul.

k thx bye.

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