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Foreign Hackers Attack Canadian Government

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the take-off-hackers dept.

Canada 208

An anonymous reader writes " According to the CBC: 'An unprecedented cyberattack on the Canadian government from China has given foreign hackers access to highly classified federal information, and forced at least two key departments off the internet, CBC News has learned. The attack, first detected in early January, left Canadian counter-espionage agents scrambling to determine how much sensitive government information may have been stolen and by whom.' It should be noted that the Auditor-General warned of this months ago and was ignored by everyone as she usually is. It should also be noted that public sentiment towards China is getting very, very testy."

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While you're getting hacked I'm getting (-1, Offtopic)

lul_wat (1623489) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230064)

First post

Re:While you're getting hacked I'm getting (0, Flamebait)

lul_wat (1623489) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230070)

ps. Check out my doubles.

Re:While you're getting hacked I'm getting (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230126)

Wanna loose karma? Well done.

Re:While you're getting hacked I'm getting (1, Offtopic)

lul_wat (1623489) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230258)

What're you gonna loosen it with?

Re:While you're getting hacked I'm getting (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230364)

congrats, you fell for an easy troll.

Re:While you're getting hacked I'm getting (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230370)

keep posting, you dumb little faggot

soon you'll have to create some sock puppet accounts like those morons commodore64love and michealkristopeit

Re:While you're getting hacked I'm getting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230410)

u mad?

China Ain't Too Bright (2)

kyrio (1091003) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230078)

Attacking every country for gains which are likely worth nothing. Great way to get yourself banned from the playground.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (4, Insightful)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230102)

Great way to get yourself banned from the playground.

This can't happen overnight... it already owns too many balls, not to mention the playground and some referees... better get used to how the game is played nowadays.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230672)

Well, the Canadians told them to get away from their shitty firewall, but the Chinese wouldn't listen.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230762)

Next time, ask them kindly using the "Guo Biao Kuozhan" charset, the Simplified Chinese won't do (and, for the sake of God, don't try French or Vietnamese scripts, too many accents... makes the writing too complicated to understand ;) )

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (4, Funny)

realityimpaired (1668397) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231572)

Well, it's a language barrier thing. Canadian for "fuck off" is "would you please consider leaving at your convenience?" :)

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

commodore6502 (1981532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230822)

"Attack" seems a poor choice of words. In the cold war days we simply called this "spying" or "espionage". The fact the spies are now sitting behind computers instead of sneaking into buildings doesn't require a new word.

It's really just gov't propaganda. "Oh horror! Our country was ATTACKED! We need to lockdown the internet, so we can save you."

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (2)

MasaMuneCyrus (779918) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231344)

It actually did happen overnight -- but due to the Senkaku Islands incident. The entire world is scrambling to create alternatives to China, and East-Asian nations are basically saying, "USA, get back in here!"

The fact is that, while people around the world adore "China," nobody likes the People's Republic, their leadership, their ideals, or their actions. That dislike is rapidly turning into animosity, both from the public and officials. Except maybe Myanmar and Pakistan.

It's worth mentioning that Chinese people don't like the government, either.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231416)

Sorry, but that last point needs to be challenged.

There are enough people who harbour a dislike toward the government, but I've met (and even been taught mandarin by) Chinese people who are reassured by the patriarchial governance and dislike those who challenge the ideals. Like any society, there's a balance between amicability and animosity toward political figures.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230106)

Yeah right, like any country is going to do much about it. Everybody wants a piece of the pie. There'll be stern warnings and that will be all. (Captcha: showdown)

So some data was stolen (2)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230552)

It's not like data leaks/traffic/theft/espionage was invented the other day and doesn't happen all the time. All the ad-tracking businesses, credit bureau, embassies, corporations, are full of undercover info smuggling all the time. You just dont *see* it very often. If they steal your data, you steal their data. It's not even violent. Heck, if you weren't so busy with those tons of skeletons in your closet, you might even think it was fun.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (3, Interesting)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230108)

It's actually a lot more complicated than this. China buys a TON of natural resources from Canada(and info on said resources is probably one of the most likely targets). Canada is probably in even more of a bind vis a vis China then the United States is. While Canada's government isn't nearly as indebted to the Chinese as the Americans are, the Canadian economy depends much more on selling to China than the US economy does. Of course on the flip side if you eliminate access to Canadian resources all of a sudden Chinese manufacturing becomes much more uncompetitive.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (5, Informative)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230434)

Canada's largest export partner is the US, the second is Europe(all). All of Asia combined ranks 3rd, but we still export more materials to Japan and India than China. Unless you're counting either coal, or nickle. Really if you eliminate Canadian resources? The world goes for a shit spin, mighty fast because ~30-35% of the market just went poof.

Really though? If China pulls shit and we take our ball and go home, not much will happen in Canada. We have other markets(south america, and russia--along with various others not mentioned) which we can continue to supply goods to. It will hurt china more, than it will hurt us.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (4, Informative)

aveldina (938862) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231548)

Which part of the country do you live in? In general it seems you're correct. However it's worth mentioning that out here in the frozen prairies much of the current economic strength, especially in Saskatchewan, has been coming from potash. You can't hear a discussion about potash and not hear China mentioned at least once, China is a huge buyer of the potash produced here. The price of potash has gone up significantly in recent years and they rely on it. Having China refuse to buy potash might not hurt people out in the east, but in the prairies we certainly would be impacted by it.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230668)

It's actually a lot more complicated than this. China buys a TON of natural resources from Canada(and info on said resources is probably one of the most likely targets). Canada is probably in even more of a bind vis a vis China then the United States is. While Canada's government isn't nearly as indebted to the Chinese as the Americans are, the Canadian economy depends much more on selling to China than the US economy does. Of course on the flip side if you eliminate access to Canadian resources all of a sudden Chinese manufacturing becomes much more uncompetitive.

Well, Canada could always sell these resources to India instead. The two countries are currently in free trade talks:

http://www.cbc.ca/money/story/2010/11/12/canada-india-free-trade.html

One interesting fact about China is that its current average age is 40, so in twenty years it will be 60. India has an average age of about 20 currently.

China is probably approaching the height of its economic power before its population becomes silver, and so they're racing to become rich before they get old.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230862)

One interesting fact about China is that its current average age is 40, so in twenty years it will be 60.

That's.... that's not how averages work...

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (3, Funny)

Trails (629752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231294)

Of course it is!!! China's population is entirely static. No one is being born and no one will die. In 1200 years their average age will be 1240!!! Then they're really fucked.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

ffreeloader (1105115) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231558)

Well, with their policies on their own people having children, their average age pretty much has to keep on going up for the foreseeable future. The way it is, for every child there has to be at least two adults. Most likely it's going to be 6 adults per child fairly soon as grandparents on each side of the family will have only 1 grandchild between them. That's 4 grandparents and 2 parents per child, plus any great-grandparents.. The average age is going to rise rapidly.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

Trails (629752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231682)

Yes, because the children today have no grandparents. Grand parents are clearly trending upward.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (2)

kevinNCSU (1531307) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231430)

One interesting fact about China is that its current average age is 40, so in twenty years it will be 60.

It scares me that this might not be a joke, and that is has been modded Interesting. Windmills do not work that way!

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230120)

Chinese hackers != Chinese government.
Heck, it could've been done by a Canadian who routed everything through the evil China. I'm no hacker, but if I were to attack a country A I'd prefer to pass my traffic through an adversary B of that country, this way the investigators would have a harder time getting the info they want since B wouldn't want to help A.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230346)

Why should China make attempts to cover it up? You just said it yourself: they have total plausible deniability. No matter how many attacks originate from China, they can always say "Oh but it was just some individual or you faked it". Hell, even if you'd find definitive proof China's government was the culprit, they'd just be all like "No comment! Not like you could do anything about it anyway. We'le fleakin' China, bitches!" :D

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

thoughtsatthemoment (1687848) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230132)

Obvious China ain't too bright attacking every country for gains which are likely worth nothing. It should attacking every country for gains which are worth a lot and single out inexperienced players like China as the bad guy. Or China shloud build it's own playground and pretend to be the good guy.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

merlock18 (1533631) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230418)

They arent attacking anyone. They are data mining ilegally and getting caught. Espionage isnt an attack yet. Theyre getting really close though...

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

lorenlal (164133) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230846)

That or... Maybe they're trying to find a way to get access to SIPRNet? Canada is a trusted ally of the United States and does have access to some of our secure networks.

The chances of actually getting access to SIRPNet would be low, but maybe the possible payoff is enough for them to try anyway?

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (2)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230320)

No kidding. When will they learn there's no money in moose futures?

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (1)

merlock18 (1533631) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230402)

Seward wouldn't agree.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (0)

pokyo (1987720) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230916)

Can we please stop personifying China. It is quite annoying to read peoples assumptions that just because an attack originated from China it was organized by their government. This is ./, we are brighter than this.

Re:China Ain't Too Bright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231284)

This is ./, we are brighter than this.

Citation needed.

Who said China did it? (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230952)

There seems to be no evidence either way, as all the routing info can be faked. Ask yourself who has most to gain? Who would gain most from the spin that China goes around hacking the Canadians? Who would like all their neighbours to sign up for some online neighborhood watch scheme for government snooping?

trojan (2)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230088)

I was sort of half asleep on the drive home, but the radio made it sound like some moron installed a trojan (presumably hot_pic_of_me.jpg.exe), which then scraped internal networks (that should have had better access control, no doubt) for anything interesting. It was pretty vague but that's about what I picked up from it.

Sounds like amateur night anyhow. Maybe they've got HBGary running their security.

Re:trojan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231300)

presumably hot_pic_of_me.jpg.exe

It's an unfortunate truth that the people who need the sensitive data and have the most access to it are the people who are generally technologically illiterate and fall for this kind of shit.

Why even connect sensitive computers to the net? (1)

KClaisse (1038258) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230112)

What I can't seem to wrap my head around is why they would even have that kind of information on a computer that is open to the internet. Why on earth would you expose sensitive computers to the world for anyone to hack? It just doesn't make sense to me.

Re:Why even connect sensitive computers to the net (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230144)

Define "sensitive". You have sensitive information on your own computer, yet you expose it to the internet too. At some point it will come down to convenience and efficiency. For some things, there's no way around it, unless you want to have every single conversation and do every single transaction in person.

Re:Why even connect sensitive computers to the net (1)

KClaisse (1038258) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230162)

I'll use whatever the government defines as sensitive.

Re:Why even connect sensitive computers to the net (2)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230212)

That would probably be everything they do, including all email, which by necessity has to travel via the internet. There will of course be different levels of classification, and hopefully they'd encrypt the "more sensitive" stuff.. but really, even if there are good security policies in place, quite frankly a lot of people are idiots when it comes to using computers, and will make mistakes anyway. Mistakes like running a trojan, which makes a lot of security measures useless, if for example the trojan did keylogging, screengrabbing, etc..

Re:Why even connect sensitive computers to the net (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230380)

It just doesn't make sense to me...
They like to look up Ford car parts, bathroom repair, fantasy football and correct wikipedia ect ... all from their day jobs ip

Re:Why even connect sensitive computers to the net (1)

merlock18 (1533631) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230430)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIPRNet [wikipedia.org] I dont know about Canada but the US has theyre own worlwide network, completely separate from the WWW.

How far is too far? (4, Insightful)

Haffner (1349071) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230128)

All the news of China's hacking attempts, compounded with the links many of those have to government, begs the question: "How far is too far?" When will the US (or the international community) hold China accountable and force them to stop these actions? The way I see it, what they are doing is worse than firing shells over a border. This could easily be a buildup for a larger attack, yet no one has done anything substantial yet.

Re:How far is too far? (-1, Troll)

thoughtsatthemoment (1687848) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230176)

All the news of the Wall Street financial fraud attempts, compounded with the links many of those have to government, begs the question: "How far is too far?" When will China (or the international community) hold USA accountable and force them to stop these actions? The way I see it, what they are doing is worse than firing shells over a border. This could easily be a buildup for a larger attack, yet no one has done anything substantial yet.

FTFY

Re:How far is too far? (3, Interesting)

Haffner (1349071) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230350)

I think the big difference here is that the financial crimes that were committed stemmed from behavior that was initially within the law before greed took over. On the other hand, hacking another country's government has never been within the law.

Re:How far is too far? (0, Troll)

tomthepom (314977) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230572)

the financial crimes that were committed stemmed from behavior that was initially within the law before greed took over.

And rape stems from behaviour that is initially within the law before lust takes over.

Re:How far is too far? (1)

Trails (629752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231326)

Rape is not driven by lust. It's an act of subjugation. Rape is not sexy, it's horrible, that's the point.

Re:How far is too far? (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230292)

The US or the international community won't force China. We only force weak countries that don't pose any real threat, like Saddams Iraq after more than a decade of UN sanctions and with no WMD:s.

Re:How far is too far? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230530)

It won't happen. Most countries are plutocracies these days, the EU gets by because each country has an image to uphold, and will try to do the right thing only because of that. The USA, well, they've been bought and sold for decades.

But it's not really an issue, China is experiencing a growth right now, but all growths eventually slow down, stop and drop back again, the only difference is, that when it happens, a controlled system like theirs will simply implode, it won't have the benefits of an open market like the others. Basically it's a matter of time, everything balances out sooner or later.

Re:How far is too far? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230562)

The way I see it, what they are doing is worse than firing shells over a border.

Did anybody die?

The West has a long and inglorious history of using espionage to aid domestic industry. China is doing exactly the same thing, only using technology to do it faster and cheaper. When the CIA and NSA (or whatever the spy organizations in your country call themselves) have been disbanded I'll agree that China is doing something unfair. Until then, what's your complaint?

Re:How far is too far? (3, Informative)

david.given (6740) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230654)

This could easily be a buildup for a larger attack, yet no one has done anything substantial yet.

Some actual hard evidence that China is involved in any any meaningful way would be nice.

From the article:

They caution, however, that there is no way of knowing whether the hackers are Chinese, or some other nationality routing their cybercrimes through China to cover their tracks.

Re:How far is too far? (5, Interesting)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231306)

The problem is that the Chinese government isn't doing it - they are simply giving others license to do it, with assurances of government protection and payment.

Sound familiar? It is - it's called privateering. It used to be done with ships on the sea; now it's done with computers on the internet. While China may not be at war with us, their use of privateers is proof that they do NOT mean us well.

So how do we combat it? Article I, Section 8, paragraph 11 of the U.S. Constitution authorizes Congress to "grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water." Imagine if the US Congress granted Google the authority to go after China - can you imagine how much havoc that would wreak if Google employees focused 20% of their time on fucking with China?

Executive spear-phising (3, Interesting)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230134)

TFA

How it was done
In the world of cybercops, it is called "executive spear-phishing."

This is what you get if the executives you have are fishes, no matter (or even easier) if they look/behave like sharks.

Re:Executive spear-phising (3, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230202)

Q: How can you tell the difference between a spear phisher and an actual sys admin?
A: The spear phisher is polite.

NUKE EM !! NUKE EM NOW !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230136)

Then, when we are done with Canada, NUKE CHINA !! NUKE EM THEN !!

The REAL story (0)

pasv (755179) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230148)

BREAKING 0DAY NEWS: Humans still vulnerable to social engineering with dumb emails! Fix the human, fix the problem.

Re:The REAL story (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230232)

yes, castration is indeed a good idea.

Re:The REAL story (5, Insightful)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230374)

This attack could have been EASILY avoided using 1 simple system: PGP digital signing. Give every government address a PGP key and set up a government public key repository. Any company doing work with the government has no excuse for not being able to do the same.

You then set up the email servers to block any email with attachments that isn't signed by a trusted key.

PGP signing (and even encryption in most cases) is so pathetically easy to set up, the fact that governments don't MANDATE it for internal use (and even external use for anything other than simple civilian inquiries) is absolutely unforgivable.

Re:The REAL story (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230508)

America the land of the free... and monopolies.

Re:The REAL story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230698)

That would allow signed anonymous leaking (see ring signatures) they "do not want" that.

Re:The REAL story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230722)

What you outline would do NOTHING to prevent this particular attack. In fact, it would help it. Read the article. Hackers *first* gained access to government computers. It is only then that emails are sent out from those compromised computers/accounts. The same staff will be conned to provide key passwords if they were PGP signed. The same email attachments with viruses can still be sent out.

Which vector was used for the initial hack? Who knows. They probably won't ever say. Maybe it was typical click-me-to-clean-your-computer ads. Maybe it was autorun. But PGP won't do a damn thing to prevent this.

Re:The REAL story (5, Informative)

c (8461) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230888)

> This attack could have been EASILY avoided
> using 1 simple system: PGP digital signing.

The Canadian government is in the process of rolling out a digital signature system... unfortunately, it's Entrust rather than an open solution like PGP, and it looks like it's going to be cumbersome enough that it won't get used in situations it's not absolutely necessary for.

Because it's not based on open standards it can't be used for external communications which makes it rather infeasible to block all unencrypted attachments. Which would be a bad idea, anyways, given the small fraction of "protected" information on unclassified networks (i.e. ones which communicate with the outside world).

Oh no! (1)

EnsilZah (575600) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230210)

The Chinese may have acquired... *dramatic pause* stealth mÃÃse technology!

Re:Oh no! (2)

EnsilZah (575600) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230226)

Hmm, that'll teach me to preview before using non-ASCII characters.

The word was 'moose' in case anyone is wondering, and apparently the technology is already in use.

Re:Oh no! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230298)

Damn Moose and Squirrel.

Re:Oh no! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230344)

Yeah, it's hilarious how the all-new web 2.0 slashdot still can't do unicode. I guess they value the "lameness" filter above usefulness.

Re:Oh no! (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231524)

Hmm, that'll teach me to preview before using non-ASCII characters.

The word was 'moose' in case anyone is wondering, and apparently the technology is already in use.

A m00se once bit my sister.

Re:Oh no! (1)

qmaqdk (522323) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230260)

Maybe we should...

*puts on sunglasses*

...start hunting.

YYYYYEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230218)

because chinese ip means its chinese goverment. Really, give me a break. Its like CIA doing industrial espionage using traceable federal government computers.
How difficult is to use chinese zombies for attack?

I'm not afraid to open my email ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230294)

It's dead easy to prevent trojans from infecting a computer. That the Canadian government was too clueless to do this is criminal.

Heads should roll; especially since the auditor general warned them it would happen.

Canada? (4, Funny)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230306)

What did the steal? Their recipe for maple syrup?

Re:Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230700)

it's much worse than that, they stole the secret handshake for the mounties.

Re:Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230818)

What did the steal? Their recipe for maple syrup?

No, they can't get that...it's in the same vault as the Coca Cola recipe.

Re:Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231412)

No, just all the military and industrial secrets that Canada stole from the USA. :)

Re:Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231450)

They stole Bryan Adams eh!

Re:Canada? (3, Informative)

Laxitive (10360) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231622)

God no. We keep that shit in a bunker underneath the Canadian shield, disconnected from the internet. You don't leave national secrets like that just lying around.

On a serious note, China's main interest is in Canada's natural resources. As they grow and industrialize, their need to import massive amounts of raw resources to fuel their economy and people.

For example, Saskatchewan has basically the largest natural deposits of Potash in the world. The whole province is basically potash.. dig anywhere.. and you'll hit potash. Potash is what they make fertilizer out of. Not too long ago, a chinese firm wanted to acquire Potash Corp., Saskatchewan's potash producer. There was a big ruckus raised about it internally, and eventually the sale was stopped by the federal government after the extremely popular provincial minister went on the warpath about Saskatchewan natural resources being sold to foreign interests.

I don't disagree with that move (It'd be idiotic to sell off the rights to your own land's bounty).. but China really doesn't like not being able to get what they want. While it's not proven that it was the Chinese government behind these attacks, my suspicion is that they are (occam's razor). There's a well known effort by China to influence the Canadian government and people, and it's been brought up in the national media not too long ago.

-Laxitive

What? Why!! (-1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230310)

I have been assured, on many occasions, that Canada makes no enemies, only acts positively towards other nations, and thus nobody would ever want to mess with them. I don't get this story, is it a fake? Has it been fact-checked? I smell a rat. The last sentence about "public sentiment towards China is getting very, very testy" is openly racist and sounds jingoist as well.

Re:What? Why!! (3, Interesting)

Keen Anthony (762006) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230368)

"Public sentiment towards China is getting very, very testy" That sounds racist and jingoistic to you? You're kidding right? I mean, "China replacing all Canadian government documents with takeout menues" would at least sound somewhat racist. The Chinese hackers leaving a calling card in the form of an animated takeout box would too. And jingoistic, well "Oh, Canada uber alles, eh!" would sound jingoistic. Canadians marching in the street screaming, "Take off you pandas!" would be both racist and jingoistic.

This is probably a true story though. Chinese hackers have been very aggressive in the last couple of years. One suggestion I've heard was that China wants to test its limits, find vulnerable infrastructure, and so on.

Re:What? Why!! (0)

afxgrin (208686) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230942)

The fact remains that there's no way of proving the attack had anything to do with China except that the computers involved were from China. There are many unpatched Windows computers in China as most are using pirated copies that will likely stop working if a service packed is installed, hence leaving them vulnerable to a variety of exploits. It would be foolish to assume this had anything to do with the Chinese government.

Re:What? Why!! (1)

Keen Anthony (762006) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231378)

That's possible, but with the number of Windows volume licenses in extraneous use, I'd bet that those machines aren't having such a difficult time being upgraded. It is known that China is aggressive in staging cyber attacks. We might not have absolute proof, and I mean "we" as in /. readers. I bet the U.S. and Canadian governments' own cyber warfare specialists have a fairly good idea of whether they're facing Chinese agents or dealing with zombies computers.

No, it isn't. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231120)

Recently a Chinese national snuck into the country using an elaborate rubber mask. He was arrested and held as a security threat. Then, he was RELEASED, bypassing immigration entirely, and is going to Toronto where he's going to get employment. Public reaction to this nonsense IS getting testy, very testy. Nothing to do with jingoism at all.

Re:What? Why!! (4, Interesting)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230448)

Well the first part is by and far true. We don't make enemies, hell we're the first ones the world runs to when they want mediators. Probably that whole, slow to anger, stubborn, type of thing. However, unlike in the US where shit hit the fan several times, over several things. And Americans went WTF, HOLY SHIT, CHINA...what the hell are you doing?

Canadians went...eh...okay. Dead? Nope. Carry on, government to do a better job. People as a whole here don't get angry quickly, over anything. And it takes a lot to push the general public over the edge on something. Either it has to have dire ramifications and is so fucked up for everyone(UBB is a fine example), or a lot of people have to die because of government stupidity(air india). People are getting pissed off at China here, it's taken a lot of really hard work to get people here angry. And that's saying something.

Re:What? Why!! (1)

merlock18 (1533631) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230478)

They didnt say "public sentiments towards the Chinese." Its China, not hte Chinese. The government, not the people. You wouldnt be offended if your werent shortsighted.
There is a reason the people of China have to work their asses off just to get some decent internet http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Shield_Project [wikipedia.org]
Why has stating facts, that mention a race, become racist lately? It getting ridiculous. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falun_Gong [wikipedia.org]

Re:What? Why!! (1)

pokyo (1987720) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230926)

I agre, that "very very testy" statement is ridiculous. I'm Canadian, and I am not very very testy at all. I also don't judge an entire nation based on the actions of a small group.

Well, in America... (1)

Grapplebeam (1892878) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230318)

My tip for her would be to sensationalize this until people start paying attention. But I've never watched Canadian news, so I don't know if they're the same level of hyperbole (100%, plus or minus nothing at all, because it's 100% hyperbole).

Re:Well, in America... (1)

Stormthirst (66538) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231146)

I'm from the UK, but now living in Canada - so I've been brought up on the BBC News [bbc.co.uk] . I don't have time to watch much news, but I do get CTV here with my cable package and tend to watch it in the morning over breakfast. I have chosen to watch half an episode of Glen Beck (I got bored quarter of the way through and couldn't stomach the rest), but I do watch the Daily Show regularly.

I can say that hyperbole is an American form of reporting.

And you can keep it as far as I'm concerned!

Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35230384)

I live in the USA, we just sell them everything instead.

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'Apparently' China... (0)

david.given (6740) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230646)

...if you read TFA.

What's with all the xenophobic vilification of China these days? We're getting a steady stream of OMG CHINA EVIL articles, none of which are actually backed up by any evidence. What is this, Fox News?

Does anyone even RTFA anymore? (-1)

mahiskali (1410019) | more than 3 years ago | (#35230840)

From the article:

They caution, however, that there is no way of knowing whether the hackers are Chinese, or some other nationality routing their cybercrimes through China to cover their tracks.

So really, this whole posting is just speculation. Some agencies in Canada were hacked, possibly by Chinese interests and possibly by little green men from Mars looking to understand the moose population more.

This is a republican distraction technique (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231022)

The Canadian Republican Party ("Conservative Party of Canada"), is under heat because one of its' ministers has been caught forging official documents and running political interference. Thus, the news of this was leaked to distract the public from government corruption. This is typical of the CPC, as they are known to be a particularly corrupt government.

Re:This is a republican distraction technique (1)

canistel (1103079) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231408)

Right...... because no other news can possibly occur when the one news item that happens to annoy you is also being talked about.

Ducks in a barrel (0)

bl8n8r (649187) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231048)

It's not surprising. I would bet the pwnage is larger than they think.  Most admins I know are bright people but just simply lack the sills to even secure a resource in the nost mediocre way. In fact, many of them view the corporate lan as and extension of their home network and apply the same 'security' methods across both.

Re:Ducks in a barrel (2)

Trails (629752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231436)

We should believe this because the author wrote it in Courier New, making it look more like shell text, and highlighting his overall l33tn3ss.

For "months ago" read "years ago". (2)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231180)

Auditor-General Sheila Fraser, for one, first raised the alarm in 2002 when she warned "there are weaknesses in the system.

"There are access controls that need to be fixed; there are a whole series of minimum security issues that are not being dealt with. There are vulnerabilities. Government needs to fix them."

Three years later, Fraser checked again and found not much had changed.

canadians are prickily nationalistic (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231440)

they don't flaunt their nationalism, but its there and its quiet and its real

i see something concrete in response coming out of this as more likely than if europeans or americans were attacked

c'mon ottawa, do something. show that at least somebody has a backbone in response to these provocations. london or washington dc wouldn't, and didn't, do anything

Nuke them (1)

sproketboy (608031) | more than 3 years ago | (#35231670)

We should nuke them. Oh wait we don't have any. America, mind if we borrow a few?

Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35231746)

Looks like the Saskatchewan Seal Skin Bindings, we used on our wooden fire wall, was insufficient. We may need to call out the Canoe Army in preparedness for an on coming attack!

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