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Android Honeycomb Born Too Early

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the bees-are-in-my-mouth dept.

Android 192

adeelarshad82 writes "This year's Mobile World Congress was the stage for dozens of new tablets. Unfortunately, Android Honeycomb tablets lacked presence; amongst the top Android tablets demonstrated at the show, only the Motorola Xoom was running Honeycomb, whereas others were running either Android 2.3 or older versions. Moreover, most of the top apps announced for the OS were not new, just reworked. Gigaom may believe that Honeycomb tablets will be iPad's true competition, but progress has been slow, in my opinion. Honeycomb was born too early, primarily out pressure from the iPad getting a one year headstart in the tablet market."

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just like windows 3 (3, Insightful)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279012)

Widows 3 was half baked too. Imagine for a moment there was no iphone (or mac) to compare andorid (win 3) to. both would seem amazing. But the are kind of a joke compared to the seamlessness of the apple garden. Win3 more so. andorid is pretty polished.

The difference this time is that there's no substantial price differential. even the cheapest android is only a couple hundred less than the apple model. not so in the days of win 3. Also the Apple SDK has made it more not less enterprise ready.

So it's hard to make comparisons.

Re:just like windows 3 (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279080)

One of the main problems with initial ndroid releases (2.2, 2.3, 3.0, etc) is that Google works very closely with only one vendor. All the rest then need to play catch-up. With only one 'set of hands' working with the HW/SW mix you don't get as much progress before it hits the stores/streets.

Re:just like windows 3 (2)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279626)

Not really. Google seems to work closely with HTC, Motorola, and Samsung. HTC made the G1, and the Nexus. Samsung makes the Nexus S. Motorola makes the Xoom tablet plus Google really did work with them on the Droid. I thing they also worked hard with Sony since 2.3 has support for game controllers for the Playstation phone.
The lag isn't being caused by Google not working with them. The lag is being caused by Sense, Touch Wiz, and MotoBlur. I forget what Sony calls their skin of Android. Combine that with the Carriers not wanting people to keep their phones so they really want to force upgrades and you have the lag and the lack of updates.

I wish that HTC, Samsung, Motorola, and Sony all offered "Stock android" as an option. But so far HTC seems to be doing pretty good with updates. My Evo is running 2.2 and is supposed to get 2.3 in March. Sense is actually pretty nice to use and since the only Phone right now with 2.3 is the Nexus S I am not too far behind the curve at all.
Samsung IMHO has the worst record of updates of the big 3. I had a Moment and it was stuck at 2.1 but lacked some of the features from 2.1 like live wallpaper and the new launcher. and has a lot or software flaws that where never addressed except by the "enthusiast" community. AKA if you rooted it the freaking thing worked a lot better. The Moment replacement the Intercept came out with EVDO but not Rev A. Which sucked. The Galaxy S phones in the US like the Epic are all stuck at 2.1 as well. BTW I used to be a big Samsung fan but they have really let me down. Motorola seems to do a bit better except for Click owners who they really failed. I am pretty sure that the original Droid is at 2.2 now.

Re:just like windows 3 (4, Funny)

Okonomiyaki (662220) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279166)

Title: just like windows 3
Conclusion: it's hard to make comparisons

You win.

Re:just like windows 3 (1)

TheThiefMaster (992038) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279732)

I can't get Windows 3.0 to run in colour on my 8086 with EGA graphics. Anyone help?

I'm serious. Best I can find out is that Windows 3.0's colour drivers require at least a 286, so I'm stuck with monochrome for now.

Re:just like windows 3 (1)

VolciMaster (821873) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280054)

I can't get Windows 3.0 to run in colour on my 8086 with EGA graphics. Anyone help?

I'm serious. Best I can find out is that Windows 3.0's colour drivers require at least a 286, so I'm stuck with monochrome for now.

Hast thou considered asking thy question on SuperUser [superuser.com] ?

Re:just like windows 3 (1)

syockit (1480393) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280870)

Nay, thou should consider comp.os.ms-windows.setup instead!

Re:just like windows 3 (1)

VolciMaster (821873) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280046)

Widows 3 was half baked too. Imagine for a moment there was no iphone (or mac) to compare andorid (win 3) to. both would seem amazing. But the are kind of a joke compared to the seamlessness of the apple garden. Win3 more so. andorid is pretty polished.

The difference this time is that there's no substantial price differential. even the cheapest android is only a couple hundred less than the apple model. not so in the days of win 3. Also the Apple SDK has made it more not less enterprise ready.

So it's hard to make comparisons.

Following that logic, Apple (or IBM with OS/2) should have roundly and soundly whomped (a technical term) Windows in the marketplace back in the 80s and 90s... but didn't. Personally, I think they will continue to retain their lead for a Long Time, but it's not a completely fair comparison to Windows 3 back in the day.

Re:just like windows 3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280152)

Except Honeycomb has full disk encryption, a MUST if it is to contain sensitive corporate information.

Re:just like windows 3 (0)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280476)

I object to your characterization of Apple's experience as a "garden". It's not, it's a "playpen": you're under constant supervision, can't bring anything not censored and approved first, can't do anything sexual...

Re:just like windows 3 (3, Insightful)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280912)

Unless you have an enterprise licence, when you can do anything you like.

On the consumer side, it's more accurate to describe it as a gated community - in general no one really cares what you do inside there, unless you start making waves. The number of "high profile" "banned" apps is very small compared to the whole ecosystem. For the vast majority of developers and users they are simply not affected by it at all and are doing just fine within the walls.

It's not for everyone of course, and I think Android was an inevitable result of the iOS ecosystem, and they will certainly make each other better. Everyone wins.

The worst possible thing you can do is underestimate or belittle the competition as you have done in your flamebait post. The iOS ecosystem has some well-documented controls, but the sort of hyperbole demonstrated here really oversells it and just puts you out of touch with exactly what it is like, which leads to complacency. How many people on here, for example, still harp on about how iOS is not ready for enterprise because of the "good luck getting your secret/NDA covered app through the app store lolz!" without realising that there's a whole separate in-house deployment system for iOS in enterprise. I saw it a lot in the NFL article about iPads replacing paper for coaches, for instance. It's comments like yours that fosters this sort of ignorance. You don;t actually stop to look at exactly what it is you're rallying against. It really is just "oh, it's made by Apple/Microsoft/Sony/OtherBigBusiness, therefore I don't actually need to do any research on it, I just know it's bad and will now spout off opinion as if it were fact". It's tiresome.

One year? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279024)

One year head start? or you mean, they were the first one to become popular in the mainstream? Got I hate revisionist historical news that declare something only started when it became popular...

Re:One year? (-1, Offtopic)

Yaos (804128) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279060)

Apple also invented the GUI, the computer, and the CRT.

Re:One year? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279152)

You mean *stole from Xerox parc*... Apple is amazing at popularizing technologies that were invented elsewhere, that isn't meant as a slight against them, on the contrary... Everyone tried to do tablets before but no one succeeded.

Re:One year? (3, Informative)

DavidinAla (639952) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279414)

Why do you repeat the lie that Apple "stole" anything from Xerox? Apple and Xerox had a specific deal to allow Apple engineers to see the things that PARC was doing. In exchange, Xerox was compensated in the form of cheap stock in Apple. It's pure ignorance to keep repeating the claim that Apple stole anything from Xerox.

Re:One year? (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280890)

He was saying that they copied the ideas. Stealing was a bad term for him to use.

The point is that they didn't *invent*, they copied.

Re:One year? (1)

bonch (38532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35281076)

Not only that, but many Xerox employees actually went on to work at Apple and create the Macintosh.

Re:One year? (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280972)

The computer was in use decades before Wozniak built his version. The CRT used on those early Apple computers was nothing but a TV set. The CRT was in long use as terminals to large computers. The GUI was copied and improved from Xerox park, though some have opined that some of the features included in Xerox's OS were very useful and better than Apple's. This isn't to say that overall it was better. No competition there. Apple beat them at their own game.

What Apple did then, as they do today, is that they popularized small computing devices.

Re:One year? (0)

FredFredrickson (1177871) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279162)

But you have to admit, we didn't have much to do in our social lives before facebook invented the internet... so..

Not too early. (2, Interesting)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279032)

amongst the top Android tablets demonstrated at the show, only the Motorola Xoom was running Honeycomb, whereas others were running either Android 2.3 or older versions.

Hmm, we had the Galaxy Tab 10.1, and LG G-pad too. They both had Honeycomb.

whereas others were running either Android 2.3 or older versions

Considering Google haven't released the source code for Honeycomb yet, I'm not surprised others didn't have Honeycomb.

Re:Not too early. (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279746)

Considering Google haven't released the source code for Honeycomb yet, I'm not surprised others didn't have Honeycomb.

Considering that people consider Android to be an open source project, I'm surprised to not see others with a pre-release version of Honeycomb too.

Re:Not too early. (3, Insightful)

kangsterizer (1698322) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279882)

Android is pretty much "open source when Google decides"

Not like Meego for example, which is more in thee spirit of the open source development (and most other open source projects)

Re:Not too early. (3, Insightful)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280066)

Yea I know. I noticed this behavior when the Droid was coming out. Evidently the only way Google is able to get hardware vendors on board is to offer some exclusivity to them prior to release. I always wondered how HTC felt being "shafted" by the exclusive deal with Motorola after they were the ones that put Android phones in the hands of the consumer.

It's as if Google is using "open source development" as a facade to sell Android to us geeks. It's not really fully open sourced if we are only allowed to fix bugs or add features after the initial version release. Then again we are only fixing bugs and adding features to OUR phones, since the average non-rooting consumer will most likely be stuck with the initial version of the OS that came with their phone for the life of the contract.

Still it is the more open than iOS, but less open than Meego.

"Too Early" (2)

vgerclover (1186893) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279042)

Too early? If anything the summary gives you the idea that it came too late. But I digress.

Only time will tell if Android 3.0 is any good, but as long as nothing extremely unlikely happens, Android isn't going anywhere: it has a sizable market presence and some of us even like it. As long as I can add my home-made apps to my handsets/tablets, I'll keep using Android. It can only get better.

Re:"Too Early" (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279434)

Too early, too late, nothing's ever just on time anymore :P

I'm pretty happy with my G-Tablet running a custom TnT-Lite ROM (well, "custom" in the sense that it uncustomized all the crap that Viewsonic put in the OS). The surprising thing for me was that Dolphin HD was the main app I find myself using on it... in preference to all of the crappy app-ified versions of several services. Flash videos and stuff work great, much better than my eeePC (probably due to the nVidia stuff).

I'm looking forward to getting Honeycomb on it purely from a 3D UI bling perspective. But I wouldn't hold off on buying a tablet waiting for it (provided you don't get one with "planned obsolence" via ROM update blocking)

Re:"Too Early" (1)

bemymonkey (1244086) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279498)

Obsolescence.

And agreed - current Android builds work just fine on tablets...

Re:"Too Early" (3, Interesting)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279876)

I'm pretty happy with my G-Tablet running a custom TnT-Lite ROM (well, "custom" in the sense that it uncustomized all the crap that Viewsonic put in the OS). The surprising thing for me was that Dolphin HD was the main app I find myself using on it... in preference to all of the crappy app-ified versions of several services. Flash videos and stuff work great, much better than my eeePC (probably due to the nVidia stuff).

Here's my delima which probably mirror others. I'd like to have a tablet PC to take with me on a very long (more than 24 hours from the first plane to the last plane) flight itinerary. I can get a Viewsonic gTablet 10.1 for $350, spend an afternoon installing one of the xda custom ROMs and get a crippled experience in exchange for getting a 2.2 version of Android working on an otherwise fine piece of hardware (WTF Viewsonic?). Or I can spend a $100 more and get an iPad (that may soon be replaced with iPad2) but works out of the box with all the apps that would keep me entertained and somewhat productive until I land and able to use my laptop.

I'd like to play with an Android tablet, since I have an Android phone *but* my time is worth more than the $100 I'd save. So I wait...

Re:"Too Early" (1)

Sonny Yatsen (603655) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280128)

I bought and rooted my Nook Color ($250). The battery lasts fairly long, it's got fairly decent performance (I think it uses an 800 or 850 MHz ARM processor?), it's easily modifiable, and very difficult to brick. It also has a very nice 7 inch color screen. It does everything I would want on a tablet. Why not look into that?

Re:"Too Early" (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280320)

My daughter has one that she uses for reading, and she is happy with its response.

I heard there was a way of booting an alternate firmware version from the MicroSD without messing with the original stock nook ROM. If this proves to be true, than I might consider running out and spending $250 on something that may not get used much. Then again, I could just use the stock ROM and read a book during the flight.

Re:"Too Early" (1)

chaboud (231590) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280408)

Or, you know.... just read a book...

Re:"Too Early" (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280764)

I do. Unfortunately I'll be away from home for quite a while and traditional books are expensive where I'm going. The last time I was there it cost me $35 for a paperback version of Dexter. At least with an e-reader I can purchase an ebook from the states and download it for much less than I can buy it at the only bookstore within 1500 km or worse at an international airport newsstand.

Also the other books I read are quite thick and I've been saving money and weight by purchasing the ebook version from people like "Pragmatic Programmers".

Re:"Too Early" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280822)

Yes, it's true. Honeycomb runs off of a micro SD card. All you have to do is put the Honeycomb image from here [xda-developers.com] on an SD card. I have it running on my rooted Nook Color in front of me right now (haven't tried on a non-rooted one, but I don't see why it wouldn't work). You just turn it off, put in the SD card, and turn it on -- automatically boots into Honeycomb. Turn it off again, take out the SD card, and turn it on -- automatically boots back into the stock ROM. Pretty good Android tablet for $250, IMHO!

Re:"Too Early" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280376)

Except almost no devices last more than 6 hours in practical use. Sure, you could just sit there and stare at the thing for 8-10 hours, but that wouldn't be any fun.

Some people actually LIKE the "crap manufacturers put on there". The Galaxy S series has wifi tethering and DLNA built right in at Android 2.1. Some even like TouchWiz. Perhaps you should see if you can't go in store, or check out the videos to see if you like it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Luc_hIW44lE

Oh wait, that's right. You can install home-screen replacements if you don't like it. Just a few taps looking into the market, no custom ROMs needed - 5 minutes of your time if you don't like their custom interface.

Compare and contrast: If you don't like the interface on the fruitpad because it's too simple (no widgets, no LWP)... Oops, out of luck.

Re:"Too Early" (2)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280606)

Wow you are so hard up against Apple that you had to rush out and spew nonsense without even understanding what I was talking about? No wonder you posted as an AC.

Go read the multitude of reviews about the Viewsonic gTablet 10.1, almost all of them talk about how poorly the tablet runs with its stock ROM and suggest that it is better with an alternative ROM from xda and others.

Here you come and offer a Galaxy S for comparison, too bad it costs more than the wifi only iPad while only offering only a few features that I'm interested in. Not to mention a shorter battery life.

Unlike Sonny Yatsen who understood what I was talking about and suggested that I look at the Nook Color for $250 since I would be rooting anyway.

By the way, I feel sorry for the folks that place a high value on widgets versus other features of the device. It means that they are more interested in the shiny interface than the people that they ridicule.

I have widgets on my Android phone that I don't really use, and I can do heavy work with my eeePC running Ubuntu. I just wanted something to read books and play games that don't come stock on a e-book reader using a form factor that was bigger than my phone yet didn't require the tray table taking up the valuable space in coach.

Two other tablets were running Honeycomb (3, Informative)

jac89 (979421) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279052)

Both the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1, and the LG Optimus Pad (G-Slate) were running honeycomb at MWC. http://www.androidcentral.com/lg-optimus-pad-hands [androidcentral.com] http://www.androidcentral.com/hands-10-inch-samsung-galaxy-tab-android-30-honeycomb [androidcentral.com]

Not true (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279068)

The LG Optimus and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 were running Honeycomb too.

How did this get through? (5, Interesting)

Qwavel (733416) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279076)

As far as I can tell, the only evidence to support adeelaershad82's conclusion that Android was "born too early" is that the top apps are not new. To my surprise, none of the links given really backup or explain his this thesis.

So, at launch, Honeycomb will not have very many tablet-specific apps, so early adopters will be stuck mostly with regular Android apps. Wow! Big surprise.

If this is the best attack on Android they can come up with then Honeycomb must be pretty good.

Slashdot is a tabloid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279954)

The editors have long since given up doing anything but trolling the users. They only accept articles with sensational headlines, regardless of quality. The resulting wailing and gnashing of teeth generates page views, which is probably all they actually care about.

Therefore, Slashdot is a nerd tabloid. It's really, really sad.

Re:Slashdot is a tabloid (1)

Qwavel (733416) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280210)

I'm afraid you are right. The difference is quite noticable. And it is too bad.

Is there a better site now?

Re:How did this get through? (1)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280022)

Actually it's better that Honeycomb is coming out now. If it weren't, companies would still be releasing Android tablets, but they would all be based on 2.2 or 2.3, which many will admit isn't exactly designed for the tablet form factor. The companies that make these tablets really don't care if the OS isn't the best, they're more concerned with shipping units and making money. They've seen how successful Apple has been, and depending on whose numbers you believe, the Galaxy S Tab may have also done impressively well.

Google saw that this ship was going to sail whether they had a tablet optimized version of Android released or not. Honeycomb might be a little rushed, but it's going to be better than having dozens of tablets running a non-tablet optimized version of the OS and completely trashing the Android brand. The 7" Dell tablet got demolished in reviews. If more tablets like that were to come out, it might create a lot of aversion to Android devices in the future. Google doesn't want that to happen so they'd rather ship something early that still needs a little work than wait another two or three months while less than stellar devices tarnish their brand.

Half-baked or not, Honeycomb is better for tablets than Froyo or Gingerbread. There are too many chips on the table right now and Google can't afford to be too late. With the Xoom and other tablets releasing before the next iPad comes out, there's a good sales window for Android hardware manufacturers to make sales.

Re:How did this get through? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280496)

They've seen how successful Apple has been, and depending on whose numbers you believe, the Galaxy S Tab may have also done impressively well.

We can believe fantasy numbers and feel impressed, or we can look at the truth. Samsung shipped 2 million Galaxy Tabs to retailers. How many were bought by customers? Samsung isn't saying. Why not? But they have admitted that of those that did sell to customers, 16% were returned. That hardly sounds "impressively well."

Honeycomb might be a little rushed, but it's going to be better than having dozens of tablets running a non-tablet optimized version of the OS and completely trashing the Android brand.

But that's exactly what's happening. Something like a hundred tablets have been announced, almost all of which are running some pre-Honeycomb version of Android.

Re:How did this get through? (2)

bonch (38532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35281136)

So, at launch, Honeycomb will not have very many tablet-specific apps, so early adopters will be stuck mostly with regular Android apps. Wow! Big surprise.

That's actually a bigger issue than your dismissiveness implies.

Honeycomb means... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279102)

..paying $800 for the privilege of fiddling with some widgets. I think Honeycomb is going to fizzle out because there is just not enough mainstream demand for a neckbeard-class device that lacks quality apps or consistency.

People want laptops and they want iPads.

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279148)

There will be tablets running honeycomb for $300 before the year is out. Motorola is just being greedy.

Re:Honeycomb means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279210)

Yeah and they will be just as junk as the other low cost Android tablets have been.

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279452)

No, not at all. The Archos 101 is a perfectly acceptable tablet for 3/5 price of the iPad. It's slim, has a long battery life, 10.1" capacitive touch screen, memory slot, 8GB on board, HDMI / USB outputs and plays pretty much every common video format. The Nook is another example of a low cost tablet designed for a job (in its case ereader) and doing it well. They're not "junk", they're perfectly fine devices.

Tablets don't need to pack in as many features as Motorola, Samsung et all seem compelled to do. Why does a tablet need GPS again? Or a rear facing camera? Or 32GB flash? Or 3G? Come to that why does it need a super high end dual core mobile processor? Or barometer / compass? The 3G alone apparently slaps $200 onto the price of the Xoom which will be a mystery to anyone who has seen 3G dongles on sale for a fraction of that.

Sure advanced features are nice, but most tablets are going to be used for playing videos, browsing, reading and don't need those high specs. Even 3G is superfluous for anyone with an Android handset which supports tethering, or owns a mifi device.

The Archos 101 demonstrates that a tablet can be affordable and reasonable specced. And I expect more examples will trickle out this year. There will be tablets to match all price points, many of which will be less than an iPad and certainly much less than a Xoom.

Curious (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279520)

How many units has the Archos 101 sold?

Re:Curious (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279664)

I have no idea. What's that matter?

Re:Curious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279718)

I just wondered, if it's so great and costs 60% of what the ipad does, why hasn't it caught on?

Re:Curious (1)

TheEyes (1686556) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279938)

No giant marketing push. I mean, who has heard of the Archos outside of tech blogs?

Re:Curious (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280026)

Are you implying that the Xoom costs so much because of the marketing? I wouldn't be surprised if were true though.

As for the Archos, I'm just using it to demonstrate what's going to happen this year. 2011 started with very usable tablets in the $250-300 range and it's likely that the field is going to swell considerably before the year is out.

Re:Curious (1)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280018)

Because its not advertised widely, i hadn't even heard of this device until i read about it here.

Re:Honeycomb means... (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279766)

Why does a tablet need GPS again? Or a rear facing camera? Or 32GB flash? Or 3G? Come to that why does it need a super high end dual core mobile processor? Or barometer / compass?

GPS should be painfully obvious. Rear facing camera is for reality overlay and for just good old picture-taking. Lots of flash is obvious as well. 3G is obvious but let me get to that in a moment. Super high end dual core mobile processor is so I can replace my desktop with it, which will work fine for most users if it has mini-HDMI. Barometers are cool and practically free. A compass is needed for reality overlay and also practically free.

Now, on to 3G:

The 3G alone apparently slaps $200 onto the price of the Xoom which will be a mystery to anyone who has seen 3G dongles on sale for a fraction of that.

Yes, that is ludicrous bullshit. But 3G is useful. I want a Kindle (but am unwilling to shell out for the small one, and unwilling to shell out so much for the big one) with 3G because it is a mobile Wikipedia terminal. Being able to look up zonation at the nursery or compatibility at the electronics store when shopping the sale counter is eminently useful.

Sure advanced features are nice, but most tablets are going to be used for playing videos, browsing, reading and don't need those high specs.

The difference between a tablet and a PDA is size. The difference between a GPS and a PDA is software (and a GPS, which some but few PDAs have.) The difference between a phone and a PDA is the radio. There is no particular reason why the user should not wish to converge all of these devices. Indeed, they each become more powerful when you do.

Most interestingly, when you converge them and add a rear-facing camera you get reality overlay. I don't think there is anyone out there who has any of these devices who would not like to see any of them perform GPS navigation features with reality overlay so that you can hold the unit up and see signs drawn on streets where they are missing, or a plotted route drawn out over the city so that you can see where it will lead. A lot of people don't get the utility in such a thing, but if they held it in their hand most of them would be instantly hooked.

Or in short, don't be a Luddite.

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279868)

GPS should be painfully obvious.

You need GPS while sitting on the couch watching a movie? Or while playing a game? If you need GPS why are you buying a 600 dollar tablet rather than a 100 dollar GPS device or cheap smart phone?

Rear facing camera is for reality overlay and for just good old picture-taking.

You would be carrying around a 10.1" tablet to take pictures instead of a camera or smaller smart phone? Is this really something that people are routinely doing?

Re:Honeycomb means... (0)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279990)

You need GPS while sitting on the couch watching a movie? Or while playing a game? If you need GPS why are you buying a 600 dollar tablet rather than a 100 dollar GPS device or cheap smart phone?

Logical fallacy: false assumption. If you are buying a 600 dollar tablet, and you can buy a 620 dollar tablet to avoid buying a separate 100 dollar device, why not get the slightly more expensive tablet. Of course, this is based on what such an upgrade might cost in a rational world.

You would be carrying around a 10.1" tablet to take pictures instead of a camera or smaller smart phone? Is this really something that people are routinely doing?

First, you quoted but ignored reality overlay. Second, you ignored again my central point, which is that if I'm going to carry the device anyway then I would like it to take pictures with the camera that I want anyway for reality overlay, which you cannot do well without a camera.

If you would like to try rereading my comment again and making a reply which does not depend on logical fallacies or ignoring central points of my comments, then I will be pleased to read it as well.

Re:Honeycomb means... (2)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280258)

Logical fallacy: false assumption.

Yes, on your part not mine. I was talking about what an average person is using their tablet for and wondering why any of those situations would require GPS. Care to point to any data showing that any significant group of people would use or are using tablets as their GPS devices?

If you are buying a 600 dollar tablet, and you can buy a 620 dollar tablet to avoid buying a separate 100 dollar device, why not get the slightly more expensive tablet. Of course, this is based on what such an upgrade might cost in a rational world.

Because most people don't want to lug around a 10" tablet as opposed to a smaller 3 inch sized GPS device?

First, you quoted but ignored reality overlay.

Boohoo. I'm not required to respond to every single phrase in what I quote.

Second, you ignored again my central point, which is that if I'm going to carry the device anyway then I would like it to take pictures with the camera that I want anyway for reality overlay, which you cannot do well without a camera.

That's great. But you were trying to make it seem as if what YOU want to do is somehow a common thing that OTHERS are wanting to do. I was asking you to back this up. You are trying to conflate your preferences as if these are common complaints for average users and that is highly doubtful.

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280372)

you were trying to make it seem as if what YOU want to do is somehow a common thing that OTHERS are wanting to do. I was asking you to back this up. You are trying to conflate your preferences as if these are common complaints for average users and that is highly doubtful.

You're crying about how people don't want to do these things when they don't even know they want them because they don't have them yet because they don't have hardware to support them. Did you predict the failure of the Wii because people don't want to wave their arms around when playing video games, too?

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

Unipuma (532655) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280020)

PS should be painfully obvious. Rear facing camera is for reality overlay and for just good old picture-taking. Lots of flash is obvious as well. 3G is obvious but let me get to that in a moment. Super high end dual core mobile processor is so I can replace my desktop with it, which will work fine for most users if it has mini-HDMI. Barometers are cool and practically free. A compass is needed for reality overlay and also practically free.

Uhmm... sorry? Isn't that what we have all been buying smartphones for? I didn't plan to carry a tablet around with me to take pictures, and augmented reality works just fine on a smartphone too. Those are applications I want to have when I am moving around. When I have a tablet, I'd prefer to be sitting down, or lying on the couch.

The difference between a tablet and a PDA is size. The difference between a GPS and a PDA is software (and a GPS, which some but few PDAs have.) The difference between a phone and a PDA is the radio. There is no particular reason why the user should not wish to converge all of these devices. Indeed, they each become more powerful when you do.

Once again, I don't see myself cramming a 7" tablet in my pocket, just because every possible device was crammed into one. Let alone some brands who don't want to go below 10".
10" is not portable as in, have in your hands and working with it while walking. It's a laptop without the keyboard.

Or in short, don't be a Luddite.

Great closing argument...

Re:Honeycomb means... (2)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280234)

GPS should be painfully obvious.

It's painfully obvious if you're a farmer in a field. It's not so obvious to me sitting in my house where I can't even get a signal lock. What I meant to do with it anyway? Google services can fallback on wifi spots which are reasonably adequate for location and failing that it could always offer me a dialog to "stick a pin where you are" for geolocation.

Rear facing camera is for reality overlay and for just good old picture-taking.

Which would be great if I want to take pictures of my balls while browsing. Not so much use otherwise. Who is seriously going to hold up an enormous slab to take pictures?

Lots of flash is obvious as well.

Most Android phones have micro SD slots. Stick 8GB of flash into the tablet and let users augment it if they need to.

3G is obvious but let me get to that in a moment.

Again it's obvious if you have no other means of using the internet. Most people do. They're in a house or office which has wifi. Android tablet owners most likely have a phone which can tether. Failing that, Android tablets sport a USB port, so why not support popular 3G dongles?

Super high end dual core mobile processor is so I can replace my desktop with it, which will work fine for most users if it has mini-HDMI

Not everyone wants to replace their desktop. They want to browse and do casual stuff. Stuff which shouldn't tax a moderately specced tablet. I also doubt you could replace your desktop with any tablet at the moment even if you wanted to.

Barometers are cool and practically free. A compass is needed for reality overlay and also practically free.

The point is it's superfluous fluff. It takes space, power and bloats the price while having dubious application in a tablet.

Yes, that is ludicrous bullshit. But 3G is useful. I want a Kindle (but am unwilling to shell out for the small one, and unwilling to shell out so much for the big one) with 3G because it is a mobile Wikipedia terminal. Being able to look up zonation at the nursery or compatibility at the electronics store when shopping the sale counter is eminently useful.

I'm not saying 3G is useless. I've been commenting a lot recently saying how cool it would be if Sony's NGP worked like a Kindle. What I'm saying is it really adds to the price of the tablet.

Or in short, don't be a Luddite.

I'm not being a Luddite. I just don't check my brains in at the door when the latest shiny thing comes out at ludicrous prices. Tablets can and should be cheaper.

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280290)

How dare you question drinkypoo!! His word is gospel!!! Look forward to being told that you are committing "logical fallacies" by question his logic.

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

teh31337one (1590023) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279240)

Wifi only version is $600, on par with the iPad 32GB. Troll much?

Re:Honeycomb means... (1)

dagamer34 (1012833) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279368)

No release date. Verizon has it's hooks cast into Motorola telling them when they can release a WiFi only version.

Re:Honeycomb means... (2)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279508)

Another problem is fragmentation in the Android platform. You for the most part never hear iPad users worrying or complaining about about what version of the OS a particular device has, what compatibility issues there are with the hardware, and what version is required by what apps. It's all abstracted to the user. Until someone starts making Android tablets that are price competitive, feature, competitive, AND accessible, there won't be any credible threat to the iPad in the tablet space.

Re:Honeycomb means... (-1, Troll)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280196)

You for the most part never hear iPad users worrying or complaining about about what

Yeah, and you virtually always fail.

Re:Honeycomb means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280292)

..paying $800 for the privilege of fiddling with some midgets.

Bad Summary, FUD (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279104)

The summary and the article don't match at all. The first article talks about multiple Honeycomb-powered tablets (Galaxy Tab 10.1, LG G-Pad, Xoom).

Fail summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279140)

The article talks about Galaxy Tab 10.1 and LG G-slate too. Honeycomb lacked presence because it's not out yet. Similar to how HP touch pad, windows 8 tablets and Playbook lacked presence.

Partners are not selected carefully (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279160)

Did you see the Motorola ad for their tablet? Treating the other device owners and arguably the most technologically curious/early adopter people like some clueless slaves in most watched advertising segment of year could backfire.

Also the fact that dual core being mentioned to sports watching general public etc... Nobody cares! I speak as a very early adopter of Quad core (G5 Quad), it took years for software to take full advantage of parallel processing including Apple OS X itself.

Motorola, Koreans, Chinese. Android is really doing well despite them.

It's all a matter of perception (1, Troll)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279196)

Look at the iPad. It's half backed in my opinion. That's why I will not buy it. The absence of a rear camera and gyroscope make it a none starter for me, yet millions have bought the device and are satisfied.

If the folks at Motorola price the Xoom well, they will sell millions...well, it does not look so.

Folks, for many things in this world, it is a matter of perception. Period.

Re:It's all a matter of perception (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279430)

Okay I find your complaints about the Ipad odd at bast. No gyro or rear facing camera?
I don't get it.
I would find taking pictures with the iPad to be cumbersome at best so why would I want a rear facing camera.
Gyros maybe but really but I do not know that motion gaming with the ipad will be all that practical because of the size.
To me you are really missing a lot of the really big missing features.
1. No multitasking. The new fast task switching is at the same level as switcher for Mac OS was way back when. It is a fast improvement but not really multitasking.
2. Lack of removable mass storage. I have to buy a silly adapter to read SD cards? Having a built in SD card reader where I can put in an SD card loaded with pictures, music, PDF, and or any other type of data file would make the device a lot more usable.
3. Lack of GPS and compass on the WiFi Only devices "Same for the iPod touch" a network connection is not a requirement of GPS navigation. Even as a replacement for a hand held GPS for hiking it would be nice.
4. No front facing camera. Yea using an IPad as a camera is dumb or at the very lest going to be awkward. Using it for Face Time and or Skype seems like a no brainier.
I agree that the iPad is lacking I wouldn't say half baked since I reserve that for WP7 devices but I do not agree on the flaws.

Re:It's all a matter of perception (1)

Karlt1 (231423) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280536)

1. No multitasking. The new fast task switching is at the same level as switcher for Mac OS was way back when. It is a fast improvement but not really multitasking.

So it's "not really multitasking" that:

1. Music apps work in the background (Pandora, iPod, etc.) and can be controlled by the standard music controls of iOS devices.

2. VoIP apps work in the background. (iCall, Yahoo Messenger voice chat, etc) and allow you talk and receive calls.

3. Navigation apps/Location aware apps work in the background.

4. Apple apps have always worked in the background. Safari can stream music, mail can download email, iTunes can download apps/podcasts/music.

5. A task can complete working in the background.

Re:It's all a matter of perception (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280654)

You have to excuse him. He wanted a replacement for Microsoft's Tablet PC at a much lower price, and you wanted a dedicated media consumer appliance that works out of the box the way you like it.

I don't know why the two camps can't get along on Slashdot, but here we are.

Re:It's all a matter of perception (2)

bonch (38532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35281156)

I don't know why the two camps can't get along on Slashdot, but here we are.

Because this is Google territory, and Google is one of Apple's competitors.

Re:It's all a matter of perception (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279704)

There's a lot of things to gripe about with the iPad, but a rear camera? A gyroscope? Holding up a 10-inch aluminium slab to wave it around and take pictures are make-or-break features to you? You sound like the kind of guy who has a laser sight on his golf clubs.

Re:It's all a matter of perception (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279978)

I can get a laser sight for my golf clubs???
Sign me up!!!

Google need to calm down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279238)

All this 2.3/2.4/3.0 stuff going on when pretty much everything is still running 2.2 anyway. They need to do one more release this year that brings tablets and smartphones together into the same version then give everybody a year to catch up.

Android should be ready...but it's anarchy! (1)

mschaffer (97223) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279260)

It's not too early for Android. It may be too late. Android's biggest flaw is that Google isn't "steering the ship at all". Unfortunately, it's just about to hit a rock. Contrast that to Apple (run by obsessive-compulsive micro-managers) that tries to chart a course with millimeter tolerance.
If it were not for so many people eschewing Apple (and it's closed platform) in favor of Android, it would all be over.

Get to the Point (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279290)

So, let me guess. We should all go buy the iPad 2. Game over.

If so then Apple will be selling out of iPad 2s (3, Insightful)

rednip (186217) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279340)

I saw another article talking about the $500 price point as being 'unbeatable' in the market, this is an odd place for Apple as they actually seem to be the price leader. I'm sure that Google will sort things out with Android's issues, but for now, I think this is Apple's game.

Re:If so then Apple will be selling out of iPad 2s (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279740)

I suspect it's the iPod Shuffle all over again. Apple was able to undercut competitors on price by buying up a simple majority of the available flash memory supply. They're probably doing something similar on displays to keep the iPad cost low without compromising their "high-end" image.

(That they're willing to cut off features on the presumption that they're not big selling points can't hurt.)

Uninformed OMG!!!! (3, Interesting)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279350)

At MWC 2011 the following new tablets were presented:
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 (Honeycomb)
  • LG Optimus Pad (Honeycomb)
  • Huawei IDEOS S7 (Froyo)
  • HTC Flyer (Gingerbread)

Huawei and HTC devices didn't have Honeycomb on them. HTC said that Flyer would get Honeycomb at at lunch or right after launch.
In essence, there are 5 new tablets(Moto XOOM) on the scene. With 60%(3/5) of them on Honecomb!
If you add Galaxy Tab, then it drops to 50%.


The Honeycomb Born Too Early is an overstatement at this point.

Re:Uninformed OMG!!!! (1)

Glock27 (446276) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279724)

HTC said that Flyer would get Honeycomb at at lunch or right after launch.

Calm down, now. They're only tablet computers, not anything terribly exciting... ;-)

Your post did make me realize I'm hungry though.

Re:Uninformed OMG!!!! (1)

CaseM (746707) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279822)

would get Honeycomb at at lunch

I knew it! Should have never scheduled that noon meeting...

Thesis? (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279420)

TFS' assertion that Honeycomb is "born too early" seems not just ill-supported; but simply followed by irrelevant information occupying the location where supporting details customarily go.

Obviously, Honeycomb is later than Google would want it to be. All software, even stuff that ships as predicted, is later than its creators would want(because who wouldn't want software to be done in zero time?) However, that seems to have no logical connection to how many devices are being displayed with it. As with essentially any OS that isn't tied directly to one specific product, early development likely occurs on dev boards that will never be made into products, or on last-gen stuff that is deemed adequately representative for testing purposes. Eventually, it matures enough to appear in public facing tech demos, and then it ships. In this case, Motorola seems to have been the BFF launch buddy. Other than the trivial sense in which it is "too early" for Honeycomb to have broad distribution(which is true of every software package at some point in its life) how is this relevant?

Clearly, Google is working on catching up to the incumbent(and busy stealing share from the other players, especially no networks that Apple doesn't care to deal with); but, unless there is a cogent argument that Apple will do something in the near future that will be so groundbreaking that Google will just have to run away and abandon their efforts, the notion that they are "too late" seems dubious. Later than they would like, obviously; but (unless public reports are being fudged pretty seriously) moving more than enough Android devices to make their improvement efforts strategically viable, possibly even self-sustaining, for the forseeable future.

Two problems.... (4, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279424)

iPad has 2 years head start. Honestly Apple had been working on it for more than 30 seconds. Google has a LOT of catch-up to do.
Most of the manufacturers of android tablets are making low grade junk in hardware quality and choice. Yes the new ones are far better but have a price point that is the same as a iPad, so now they have to compete in direct comparison. If you were able to undershoot by even as little as $100.00 you make sales a whole lot easier. Hit the $200.00 price point and suddenly you will get even ipad diehards buying them.

But, what was released at the $200.00 pricepoint were junk. Processors and ram to slow and small to even run android 1.x decently. All of them came with a bastardized version of android and not a pure android that would have ran faster. AND all of them had severe battery problems that make them useless as a tablet.... sorry but 10 hours on and playing a video is needed. I do not want to have to charge my tablet nightly. WEEKLY is the most you will get on the charger.

Android will get there, but the current offerings do not entice me. more expensive than an ipad and still not big enough screens. Dammit I need a 8.5" by 11" screen with the resolution to match. Doctors, lawyers, engineers, and students all would want this size.

Re:Two problems.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280330)

But, what was released at the $200.00 pricepoint were junk.

Absolutely spot on. All the Android tablet makers are rushing about like headless chickens in catch up mode,desperate for a piece of the action (just like all those who made 'iPod killers' a few years ago), and it shows.

I'd like a tablet, but the for the amount of use it'd get I'm not willing to pay iPad prices, or get locked into Apples 'our app store, or nothing' philosophy, so I went looking around at the available Android tablets. Like you pointed out, there is simply nothing out there worth the asking price, it's either half-arsed rubbish or more expensive than an iPad.

I know it's the in thing to slate Apple, but they've got the upper hand in the tablet market. They control iOS, they control the app store, they control the hardware. The whole thing 'just works'. Google seriously need to get some control over how manufacturers are bastardising Android, cut out the crap and properly standardise it.
  Otherwise all it takes is once cheap crappy tablet to give the average Joe a bad impression and put them off Android for life.

Re:Two problems.... (2)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 3 years ago | (#35281044)

I think it's telling on the price point. Everyone assumes that Apple has just slapped a massive profit margin on the iPad and released it (even though it was released a few hundred cheaper than most estimates originally, they just revised downwards), but I think people are starting to realise that the components really are that expensive right now and that it's very, very difficult to undershoot the price of the iPad while keeping the hardware decent (it is a benefit to Apple that they have economies of scale already working to their advantage).

Inevitably the prices will fall on all sides, but the cavalier attitude that Android would "have it in the bag" because there would be a flurry of tablets of the same quality as the iPad but much cheaper has gone, because they are just not appearing yet - they're all equivalent in price or higher (or are just considerably sub-par in the hardware department).

Apple really hit the market perfectly with the iPad. They walked in and cleaned up, establishing a solid presence that continues to grow and no one has been able to match them yet. It won't be that way forever, but right now the iPad really is king, at a price point few are able to match.

Re:Two problems.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35281100)

why oh why is this marked insighful? It's complete trolling. The hardware of at least the Mot, LG, and Sammy tablets are outstanding, and substantially better than the ipad. I played with all three at MWC.

Slight restrictions: Good for Android? (2)

swb (14022) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279648)

Could Google slightly change the "rules" for Android to keep release cycles and the released base a little tighter?

I'm an admitted iPhone addict and one of the things that keeps me from looking at Android is going back to the world of waiting for the carrier to "approve" or distribute OS updates and the sinking feeling that they won't ever approve them (so you'll re-up and get a new phone...)

If Google could tweak their language a tad, maybe they could coerce handset makers and carriers to either more frequently approve updates or allow customers to bypass the vendor and carrier and self-install. This might also require rules designed to keep handset makers and/or carriers from de-standardizing Android so much that updates can't be applied or are onerous to create (which gives them an excuse to not create them...)

They might also create a "new device sunset" date for specific Android revisions so that vendors can't release an "obsolete" Android version on new hardware, promising updates that they never deliver as they chase after the next hot thing.

Re:Slight restrictions: Good for Android? (1)

TyIzaeL (1203354) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280274)

If Google could tweak their language a tad, maybe they could coerce handset makers and carriers to either more frequently approve updates or allow customers to bypass the vendor and carrier and self-install. This might also require rules designed to keep handset makers and/or carriers from de-standardizing Android so much that updates can't be applied or are onerous to create (which gives them an excuse to not create them...)

I have to admit, this is really my biggest problem with my Android device. It's a Motorola Milestone running 2.1. It's capable of running 2.3, but I doubt it will ever see an official update.

Reworked? Isn't that what apps only need? (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#35279804)

The only things Android would need for tablets are reworked apps and a resolution independent UI API.

If Android hasn't had a good resolution independent UI API since birth, I'm a little afraid given how flexible it's supposed to be. The built in browser, email client, and other system default apps should be rebuilt for larger screen resolutions.

I think GigOm is full of it, and I normally fanboy for Apple.

Posted by CmdrTaco himself??!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35279914)

This "story" is ridiculous. Please, leave the mobile news to engadget. They actually follow the topics that they post about.

Firstly, as it has already been pointed out, the Xoom wasn't the only Honeycomb tablet at MWC. Just proves the author didn't know what he was talking about (or was intentionally misleading in order to create a more sensational story), and the poster, didn't know enough about the topic to realize (I'm pointing at you, founder of Slashdot).

But even if the Xoom was the only one, how would that imply that Honeycomb was released before it was ready? It was _just_ announced by Google. An emulator is out to assist developers in testing their software. The source has not been released. If you don't have a "Google Experience" device running Tegra2, you had no opportunity to have Honeycomb on your device.

I'm no Android fanboy, but even I can tell that this "story" is complete BS. We'll see if Honeycomb has legs when the products hit the market, but at $800 for Xoom, and ipad2 around the corner, I'm skeptical.

I don't really follow slashdot closely anymore, but this, posted by CmdrTaco??!!, is the last straw. I really only check slashdot when I happen to glance at my seldom visited igoogle page, and it's getting removed right now.

I'm sure you don't believe me, oh well. Goodbye Slashdot, thanks for the memories, you were once the King, I'll try to remember you as you once were.

Too Early? Pffft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280262)

By "too early" you mean "too late" for the manufacturers to design around it and prep first class products?

A torrent of excuses... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35280370)

...always seems to accompany any Android release. The lead up is "iPad killer, iPad killer, iPad killer", gradually morphing into "buh but Apple had a head start!" to justify yet another clearly inferior product.

An easily jail broken iOS device is just better than a rooted Android device, by any usability metric, and the longer google lags behind, the more this fact is fixed in the public consciousness. Google needs to get it right or hang it up.

Well I know I am disappointed! (1)

cstanley8899 (1998614) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280528)

What shall we do? The honeycomb came too soon and now? Well I don't know but this sounds important I think!

Honeycomb criticism is too early (1)

walterbyrd (182728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35280712)

I am okay with people criticising products that have actually been given a fair chance. But honeycomb is not even out. Of course earlier versions of android will have more apps - what an unbelievable stupid observation.

The web is flooded with critics trashing products that have not even been released, and products that these critics have never even used.

Why do I suspect that some of this is a smear campaign from the competition?

Born too early? More like too little too late. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35281026)

From the summary it sounds like it was born too late.

Emphasis added.

Unfortunately, Android Honeycomb tablets lacked presence; amongst the top Android tablets demonstrated at the show, only the Motorola Xoom was running Honeycomb, whereas others were running either Android 2.3 or older versions. ... Gigaom may believe that Honeycomb tablets will be iPad's true competition, but progress has been slow, in my opinion."

This author needs to learn the difference between late and early. Each of the bolded items suggest they are delivering too little too late, not too early. From what I've heard it seems like Google stalled and delayed with Honeycomb, and impatient folks like Samsung went ahead with Android 2.3, contributing to the larger problem described here.

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