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Tiny Transistors Could Be Used To Track Cash

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the transitional-form-of-currency dept.

The Almighty Buck 175

disco_tracy writes "Banks have long considered placing silicon transistors on currency for security purposes, but the technology was too chunky and intensive for paper bills. Now, tiny low-power organic transistors developed by German scientists could make it possible to really follow the money."

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Damn (3, Insightful)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#35314998)

There goes one of the last mediums of semi-anonymous financial transactions.

Re:Damn (3, Interesting)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315070)

"There goes one of the last mediums of semi-anonymous financial transactions."

Back to the barter system anyone??

Re:Damn (1)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316126)

Way ahead of you. We've already accepted manure, services, and pot for our work. Everybody's happy.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315120)

I smell an opportunity... anyone else read The Great Simoleon Caper by Neal Stephenson?

Re:Damn (5, Insightful)

aztektum (170569) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315132)

Toss your bills in the microwave.

Re:Damn (3, Funny)

molo (94384) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315514)

And then don't forget to launder them.

-molo

Re:Damn (2)

dargaud (518470) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315840)

I always though that the dollar bill, as opposed to just any money in the world, was made on purpose easy to counterfeit so that it would be used as the de facto worldwide currency. I mean it's only 2 colors (green and black) and the security measures on it are ridiculous (some hair in the paper, are you serious?). The paper is too similar to basic paper for the average Joe to tell (it indeed dissolves if you forget it in your pants while using the washing mashine). If you take most other moneys, like the Euro, you have 20 things on it that make it very hard to counterfeit.

Re:Damn (1)

BlackSnake112 (912158) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316096)

The money dissolves? I have washed US paper money often. Not on purpose, but a lot. The currency was sill usable after word. This includes $20, $10, $5, and $1 dollar bills. I have washed $50 and $100 as well. Th bills were never flat. they were folded in a pocket. If the bill got lose it was usually shredded by the washing machine itself. Maybe you did actually have counterfeit bills?

Re:Damn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316428)

"after word"? Seriously? This is worst than its/it's, than/then/could care less mistakes and similar.

Re:Damn (1)

Raenex (947668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316098)

I always though that the dollar bill, as opposed to just any money in the world, was made on purpose easy to counterfeit so that it would be used as the de facto worldwide currency.

I doubt it. Massive counterfeiting can easily make your currency worthless. The US gained worldwide currency status not by being easy to counterfeit, but by having a huge economy and a relatively stable currency.

Many of the security measures are just very old, and they've been conservative in introducing new ones.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316140)

you, sir must not actually have ever washed American money, it does not dissolve. It does stain you other clothes red from the blood on it though.

Re:Damn (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316602)

US money certainly does not dissolve in the wash as I can personally attest to - I have mistakenly washed bills on several occasions before and the color fades a bit, but other than that there is no discernible degradation of the paper itself. The paper used in US currency has some linen fibers woven into it to make it strong. As a matter of fact, most counterfeiters will run their fake money through the wash a few times themselves to make it appear to have been in circulation for a while. Also, you should take a look at recent US currency. There are more than just the red/blue fibers to prevent counterfeiting. There is a watermark, a strip that runs through the bill that tells it's denomination, the ink is slightly magnetized, etc. so reproducing good looking fakes is not such an easy task as you think.

Re:Damn (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315600)

Then they'll no longer be accepted as genuine.

Re:Damn (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315824)

How about an industrial strength press?
At worst, several tons of pressure might make vending machines a bit unhappy about accepting your dollars.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316172)

Right, because it's so hard to design a frequency-specific current shunt which makes it unlikely to be harmed by a microwave while leaving you thinking that it's now harmless.

Re:Damn (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316442)

Well, mostly harmless.

Re:Damn (-1, Troll)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315134)

There goes the last place you can hide your crimes.

Re:Damn (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315266)

The protesters in the middle east could be seen as criminals. Anonymity is important because it can protect dissenters from retribution from those in power. It may mean that there will be people that buy drugs or whatever, but I fear tyrants more than I fear crime.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316332)

And doing drugs shouldn't be a crime.

Re:Damn (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316398)

Depends on the drugs. Depends on what else you're doing with them. Depends on who you're getting them from. Depends on why you're doing them and how much your addiction is costing everyone else.

Re:Damn (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316394)

I'm not in the middle east. If you're hiding money from my government, you're a criminal here.

Re:Damn (3, Insightful)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315362)

Your ignorance on the importance of anonymity astounds me. Try living next to some nosey, judgmental, zealous neighbors sometime and tell me how much you like the idea of all of your actions, transactions, and movements tracked.

Re:Damn (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316420)

I can deal with nosy people.

I can't deal with criminals who are hiding their transactions using money that I paid to have printed and that has value only because the system of laws that I pay for knows the difference between tyrannical transgressions against human rights and simple methods of preventing crime.

Re:Damn (2)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315394)

Shame on you for even saying it even in jest, because some people will no doubt think it. The attitude that just because something is secret or private it must be a tool of crime is just wrong. There should exist a right to privacy, being able to make purchases in anonymity at least of things we have not specifically classified as controlled is a pretty basic part of that.

   

Re:Damn (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316454)

Shame on you for being so illogical.

I didn't say that things that are private are crimes.

I said that someone who makes a lot of noise about keeping his transactions private is so likely to be doing something that the police should know about that I am safe in assuming so.

If you're making transactions with your cash that you wouldn't willingly make with a credit card, then you're doing exactly what I'm talking about.

(-4, incorrect troll template) (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315684)

the proper form is :

if you have done nothing wrong, you have nothing to hide

most effective in the line for the free TSA prostate exam

Re:(-4, incorrect troll template) (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316488)

No, the proper form is:

If you want to a vehicle of fungible value that the government printed and protects, then you'll have to abide by the rules that prevent crimes from being done with that vehicle.

"if you have done nothing wrong, you have nothing to hide" is not justification for a search of your person or your home; but spending money, like driving the freeway, is the use of a public infrastructure and no longer a private act.

If you want to keep your crimes secret, barter. I'm not paying for a treasury and a rule of law and a stable business climate so you can have dollar-for-dollar value for your criminally transacted dollars any more.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315260)

http://bitcoin.org/

Re:Damn (1)

indyogb (1517319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315480)

No kidding. First chips in credit/debit cards, now cash. I guess I better start panning for some gold.

Re:Damn (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315672)

O, I don't know. Seems like 12 seconds in the microwave, or under a steam iron, or maybe thru the delicate cycle in the washer would pretty much render these inoperable.

Re: inoperable (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316246)

Only terrorists use inoperable cash!

Re:Damn (1)

Kingrames (858416) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315752)

Might not even work very well.

I can see this technology doing one thing:
People afraid rightfully so for their anonymity will spend more money on it. Only now, doing so will be one massive black hole of spending.

Re:Damn (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315756)

yeah, not like those serial numbers on the bills are unique or anything.

Re:Damn (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316052)

Exactly what I was going to post.

In fact this is no different than that except it's easier to automate. Normally stores, banks, whatever, don't keep track of bills that pass through them, this technology would allow that. Every transaction could easily be automatically tracked.

In theory you can do the same thing with serial numbers but nobody does. In fact, I wonder why they need this transistor technology at all, why not just install some sort of automated OCR to grab serial numbers? Seems about the same amount of effort by vendors and a whole lot less effort for the bills themselves because they won't need to have these transistors installed.

Re:Damn (1)

tophermeyer (1573841) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316448)

But it sounds like the banks, and I presume Government, would be the ones actually interested in tracking the money.

7-Eleven (for example) doesn't care whose dollars are going into their registers. Of course they might start to care if banks refuse deposits without a data file representing the serial numbers they think they have. But without such drastic measures you're never going to get small businesses to take on the expense/headache of tracking their currency.

Re:Damn (0)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316600)

Why should "finance" be anonymous?

You're using the government's own printed scrip, backed by the government's health and stability, all of which is costly to all of us.

If you want to conduct anonymous transactions, print your own money. It's just paper. But good luck getting anyone to trust its worth.

Re:Damn (1)

blackdropbear (554444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316652)

Welcome to the gold standard

Where's George? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315006)

Why not just use "Where's George" stamps?

DO NOT WANT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315018)

"All your currency are belong to us"

Sincerely,

Your government.

Re:DO NOT WANT (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315936)

Who did you think it belonged to? Do you think the world wants a personal unsecured IOU from you?

Microwave? (2)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315036)

So is your currency invalid if you microwave it?

Re:Microwave? (1)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315392)

Depending on the organic compound, it could end up quite delicious after you microwave it.

Re:Microwave? (4, Funny)

Tmack (593755) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315398)

So is your currency invalid if you microwave it?

Yes, because only a terrorist would do that, so you would be arrested on the spot if you tried to use it!! Yeh, sure your "friend" gave it to you, or you got it from selling stuff at a "yard sale", thats just terrorist speak for fellow terrorist and Arms Sale!

-tm

what about old and beat up bills? (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315604)

what about old and beat up bills?

Re:what about old and beat up bills? (1)

Rizimar (1986164) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315694)

New Money will now have an expiration date. This is an effort to not only track your cash through the transistors, but to further encourage spending. Goodbye, national deficit!

Re:what about old and beat up bills? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315828)

Increasing spending increases the national deficit - it's not like people are going to buy locally produced stuff when there's cheaper stuff from China sitting on the shelf.

and how long will it take to roll this out? 10 yea (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316058)

and how long will it take to roll this out? 10 years when there lot's of old bill with out this?

and what about install scanners all over the place?

Re:what about old and beat up bills? (1)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316164)

New money already has an expiration date. The Fed already updates their money on a regular basis. Among other things, it helps flush out black market cash back into circulation.

Re:what about old and beat up bills? (1)

BBTaeKwonDo (1540945) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316532)

New money already has an expiration date.

Wrong. From moneyfactory.gov [moneyfactory.gov] :

Will there be a recall or devaluation of the older-series notes?
There will be no recall or devaluation of the older-series notes, which will be removed from circulation as they wear out. Older worn notes will be replaced with the new notes.

Which is not nearly the same as an expiration date.

Re:Microwave? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315886)

No, but they might fine you for defacing government property...

"U.S. Code Title 18 includes several specific sections that govern U.S. currency.
Section 333 covers paper currency. It states that it is illegal to cut, deface, mutilate, disfigure, perforate or rejoin bills. Section 333 also pertains to any other activity that is intended to make a bill 'unfit to be reissued and remain in circulation'."

Re:Microwave? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316486)

So remember folks, it's illegal to buy beer for Bill. It makes him unfit for driving.

Re:Microwave? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316060)

Probably not. At least, my cash has not been rendered invalid when I've pulled out the security ribbons. I've never had ribbon-free cash rejected in the US, even by machines. I have had it refused in foreign countries, particular at banks that use ribbon checking machines to count currency.

Deutschland fur Immer (1)

jimmerz28 (1928616) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315040)

Ah I love German scientists 3 Always coming up with great things!

What happens when... (1)

Q-Hack! (37846) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315062)

What happens when I launder the bills in my pocket?

Re:What happens when... (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315152)

They shred. Only now they do it in a futuramic way.

Re:What happens when... (1)

killkillkill (884238) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315974)

I think part of the idea here is to make laundering the bills harder to accomplish.

No, it's not fake! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315086)

If I was to say, microwave my bills (completely by accident)...would that make them worthless?

Just as long as these chips are not the default method for identifying counterfeits, I could not care less.

Re:No, it's not fake! (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315178)

Maybe.

How about if you microwave your head by accident?

Shouldn't it be more robust than your money?

End result? (1)

trollertron3000 (1940942) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315100)

The found conclusively that It almost always ends up at strip clubs.

Re:End result? (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315590)

That is a good reminder any cash you handle likely spent time stuffed in a diseased stripper's g-string. It also probably has mucous and blood from multiple noses when it was used to snort drugs.

Thanks, science! (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315106)

Wow, you mean up until this point it simply wasn't feasible to track cash? And now science has provided a way? Thanks, amoral German scientists! This is the best gift you've given the world since mustard gas!

Re:Thanks, science! (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315774)

Agreed. There is already a perfectly good way of tracking valuable slips of paper.

Recently I had in my hand a slip of paper worth over $600. I presented it to a guy, he held it under a blinking light for a moment, and something went "ding" and a light turned green. Then he let me on the plane.

If we needed to track every last hundred dollar bill, we could already be doing it. There are perfectly good ways already. The reason we're not is because it would require expensive new equipment being rolled out nationwide and finding some way to get people's money to pass through it so it can be tracked, and although the technology to put electronics on banknotes may be fascinating I don't see that it changes any of those things.

barcodes? (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315150)

No? Too simple? Or can OCR software simply not read the serial numbers printed on the notes?

Ah wait. They want to be able to do it clandestinely... I see...

 

Re:barcodes? (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315224)

My thought exactly. Simple OCR and lookups can validate bills. If each bill gets scanned and location data, timecode, and (unique, already printed) S/N, you could know for certain if there was a duplicate somewhere. You could add other data, too. It's not like they don't already get individually counted when they're deposited at a bank.

Even more ways to get in trouble. (2)

Conrthomas (1993390) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315222)

Most of our coinage is already worth more than its denomination in raw materials.....so are we proposing to give (low denomination) paper money the same treatment? I can already see black market micro-transistor harvesting businesses. Either that, or hackers and DIYers are going to start modifying them to make the company whose job it is to track such money miserable. This could almost be fun! If it weren't so 1984-esque.... Oh wait, I forgot, we already have "Where's George?", the voluntary version of this...which is basically a toy, and has no real practical use.

Where's George? (2)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315670)

The web sight and voluntary tracking are no doubt a toy.

However it is a thought provoking toy. I bet all bills get scanned at the bank every time they are deposited. Adding OCR for serial numbers has been computationally trivial for at least a decade, standard fonts and all. There is even a valid reason as many batches of counterfeit cash share serial numbers.

Anybody want to bet the bill counting machines are network connected?

Who works at a bank? Clandestine traffic analysis? If they are tracking the bills it's got to generate a decent amount of traffic, especially by the standards of 10 or so years ago. I bet just looking for it is a fire-able offense. You'd need a reason to be looking at the traffic on the segment, then just forget to turn it off for a week or so.

Don't Worry. This is never going to happen. (1)

MarkvW (1037596) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315312)

Do you really think Congress would pass a law that would allow cash tracking?
Think of the mayhem such a law would create with the current "system" of campaign financing and "political contributions."
Get real. This will never happen.

Re:Don't Worry. This is never going to happen. (1)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315382)

I highly doubt political contributions and campaign financing are enacted via cash very often.

Re:Don't Worry. This is never going to happen. (1)

kent_eh (543303) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315654)

How about less than a decade ago, and in a modern democratic country by the Prime Minister [wikipedia.org]

Or were you being sarcastic, and I missed it?

Yes, it will. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315516)

Do you really think Congress would pass a law that would allow cash tracking?
Think of the mayhem such a law would create with the current "system" of campaign financing and "political contributions."
Get real. This will never happen.

Absolutely!

This is why: they don't want to be soft on terror, drugs, crime, and most importantly child molesters. Because we all know that criminals need cash to do their business.

And as far as campaign contributions are concerned, they've been getting around that for decades.

Get real indeed.

Re:Don't Worry. This is never going to happen. (1)

Eudial (590661) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315534)

Oh I don't know. Surely there's some way to spin cash-tracking as stopping pedophiles.

Re:Don't Worry. This is never going to happen. (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316526)

Don't these guys need money to buy candy to lure the kids?

It's quite obvious what we should do: ban candy!

Re:Don't Worry. This is never going to happen. (1)

Raenex (947668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316200)

Do you really think Congress would pass a law that would allow cash tracking?
Think of the mayhem such a law would create with the current "system" of campaign financing and "political contributions."
Get real. This will never happen.

They'll just exempt themselves from the law by finding a "legitimate" need for such an exception.

why not just get rid of cash (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315320)

and put the chip in people's right hand or forehead...

it might upset a few people though (mostly christians)

Re:why not just get rid of cash (1)

thestudio_bob (894258) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315530)

and put the chip in people's right hand...

They tried that in Logan's Run, but then they started using the chip to kill off all the old people.

neatly solves the SS & medical crisises, too! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315952)

kill off all the old people.

You say that like it's a bad thing. Obviously you've never been to South Florida.

X-Files was right (1)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315330)

Didn't the Lone Gunmen demonstrate this in one episode?

But will it run (1)

bugs2squash (1132591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315438)

linux ?

taking back our hearts, minds, ability to thrive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315488)

never a better time. see you there? remarkable signs we're surviving/winning might be such as spontaneous outbreaks of caring for one another/our young. dissolution of weaponized empires (recycling) might be another. babies without borders et al? track that.

Re:taking back our hearts, minds, ability to thriv (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315642)

Not only does that not make sense, it actually creates some sort of anti-sense that renders previously understood concepts incomprehensible. I could do algebra before reading your comment, but not anymore.

cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315798)

sounds acceptably effective. do the math; you+me=(:->-+-

equation tuncated (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316130)

finishes as ++, conversely; you+-+-,,me+-+-=+-+-,,,

Plausible deniability (1)

zenaida_valdez (599247) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315532)

Plausible deniability: Foil lined wallet. Microwave your cash every night. Wear a floppy brimmed hat and stoop when you buy the newspaper with a $20 at 7-11. They may scan the bill, but the cameras can't see your face. Your change is off the map. Purchase items of value (guns, jewelry) from private sellers with this cash. Sell the same way. Money laundering is a continuum, from a Cayman Islands corporation to painting a friend's house for cash.

Sigh (1)

carrier lost (222597) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315556)

...could make it possible to really follow the money

Every day I find myself wanting a personal EMP generator more and more.

Pa-dum-tish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315560)

This was possible 5 years ago. RFIDs, anyone?

Another stupid materials science article (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315622)

Somebody makes a modest advance in materials science, and it's hyped into an application. Again. The Discovery crowd is notorious for these.

The usual subjects for this class of hype are batteries, displays, and memory devices.

I can see how this will work out. (1)

orsty3001 (1377575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315668)

You're going to see a lot of conspiracy theory nut jobs microwaving their money.

Re:I can see how this will work out. (1)

snookerhog (1835110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315950)

you mean you don't already microwave yours?

it kills all the nasty germs that the isopropyl bath misses.

US Dollar backed by Gold? (1)

Chessucat (143856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315716)

Manufactured with minute amounts of aluminum and gold using a special dry process, each flexible 250-nanometer-thick array only needs three volts to operate.

This is FED attempt at being funny, 'eh?

Re:US Dollar backed by Gold? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316566)

So it only needs 3 volts, eh? Cool, we can talk to it with Arduinos!

Silly Big Brother (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315830)

Before such tainted cash even hits the streets, you will be able to buy a shielded billfold, or an inexpensive device that fries the tracking chip.

That, or the smart ones among us will make a concerted effort to displace tainted cash with a new money system. Maybe something like the funny money some communities have started using for local businesses.

WHY??? (1)

gurps_npc (621217) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315854)

If you truly need to follow all significant money movements, simply stop printing paper money. Force everyone to use credit cards and checks. I mean really. We don't do that because it is an invasion of privacy. There is no need to come up with a NEW way to invade our privacy, we already have enough old ways.

Herp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35315892)

Bitcoin?

RFID? (1)

mazesc (1922428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35315934)

Privacy problems aside: So basically these "tiny transistors" are RFID chips?

From TFA:

These low-voltage transistors could one day provide added security or tracking by transmitting information wirelessly to a scanner.

Security for whom btw? For the banks I assume?

What we really need is a digital paper trail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316168)

This is where bitcoin comes in.

question is - who would want that? (1)

kubitus (927806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316188)

the cheque is invented, so is the bill of exchange.

the advantage of banknotes is their anonymity, the abstraction to the underlying transaction of real goods and services.

Thieves will know who to rob (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316290)

Thieves will hang around in areas with high pedestrian traffic waiting for someone with a lot of money to come along then follow them waiting for a good opportunity to rob them (i.e. somewhere with fewer people around).

Don't we already have this? (1)

diskofish (1037768) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316380)

Don't all bills have a unique serial number? So they can already be tracked, just scan the number. What difference does it make if it is electronic or not? The only time it's going to be tracked is when it's scanned.

Skip the bank for clean cash. (1)

Adam Appel (1991764) | more than 3 years ago | (#35316502)

See after I rob a bank I spend the next few weeks going from crap-shack to crap-shack buyin something cheap and loading anon visa cards with the larger bills. Pick carefully, dont pattern and don't be lazy. Easy if somewhat time consuming way to launder money.

Trackable cash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35316586)

If there is a trackable chip in the cash, how long until someone can count how much cash you are carrying as you walk past. $20 in your wallet, another $300 in your money belt - hmmm good target.

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