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Zimbabwe Professor Arrested and Tortured For Watching Online News Videos

Roblimo posted more than 3 years ago | from the let's-not-go-there-on-vacation-this-year dept.

Censorship 224

An anonymous submitter wrote: "Disturbing reports have come out of Zimbabwe about how a professor who regularly held gatherings to discuss different news topics and social issues, was arrested, charged with treason and tortured for having the audacity to gather the regular group of about 45 people who discuss these things, and showing them some BBC and Al Jazeera news clips about the uprising in Egypt and Tunisia." Quote from the article: "Under dictator Robert Mugabe, watching internet videos in Zimbabwe can be a capital offense, it would seem. The videos included BBC World News and Al-Jazeera clips, which Gwisai had downloaded from Kubatana, a web-based activist group in Zimbabwe."

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224 comments

s/watch/show/ (0)

Troll-Under-D'Bridge (1782952) | more than 3 years ago | (#35319992)

The headline is a bit deceptive. I think the good professor was arrested for showing the videos to other people. (Although it's still possible the people he showed it to were arrested, too.)

Re:s/watch/show/ (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320014)

Oh awesome, phew.
For a second there, I didn't think they had a legitimate reason to torture the guy.
Thanks for clearing that up!

Re:s/watch/show/ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320036)

And knowing is half the battle!

Not news... (3, Interesting)

Oxford_Comma_Lover (1679530) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320628)

I fail to see how this is really news... Zimbabwe has a pretty bad human rights record, and stuff worse than this happens around the world all the time. A number of Universities have withdrawn honorary degrees given to Mugabe. The only difference here is the person whose rights were abused was a law professor.

http://www.hrw.org/en/world-report-2011/zimbabwe [hrw.org] (Human Rights Watch report on Zimbabwe).

Still, the slashdot community tends to have only slightly more knowledge than the general public about human rights matters. So perhaps it's good to occasionally have such stories.

Re:s/watch/show/ (2)

jklovanc (1603149) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320146)

It is not only "still possible the people he showed it to were arrested" it is a fact. As the article stated, all 45 people at the meeting was arrested and charged.

Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (4, Insightful)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320016)

And not just a faceless human. Seriously, not flamebait. This is why the civilized world should act in force, and not just lamely sit around and ship food and medicine to these hellholes.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320056)

Honestly, what can we do?

If we topple Mugabe, we will be seen the same way the Iraqi's see us, as what we are, an occupying force.

The people themselves need to be the ones to secure their own freedom.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320122)

There is no such thing as "The People". If an occupation improves their situation, people will support it. If it worsens it, it will be rejected. I remember reading what a town elder said in "Generation Kill" - "We will build gold statues of president Bush up and down the main street as long as you give us proper sanitation and stay away from our women." Admittedly, that was out in the desert bush and the conditions inside the main cities are of course different, but it is probably representative for the situation in Africa.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (3)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320156)

No one likes an occupation.
No one wants foreigners telling them how to run their nation.

Would they like us to build them power plants? Sure. Would they want us to give them running water? Of course. Do they want us forming their government for them the way we did in Afghanistan and Iraq? No way in hell.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320194)

So they want us to save them from the big bad dictator but they don't want us to stick around so another big bad dictator can't come into power?

You can't have it both ways.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

internettoughguy (1478741) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320532)

So they want us to save them from the big bad dictator but they don't want us to stick around so another big bad dictator can't come into power?

You can't have it both ways.

I suppose you've forgotten about Ngo Dinh Diem, Fulgencio Batista, Augusto Pinochet and so on, US interventionism doesn't prevent dictatorships, it creates them.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

the linux geek (799780) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320846)

The US supported Diem's removal, although not his execution. He was ultimately replaced with Nguyen Van Thieu, who was crazy and autocratic but not nearly as outright evil.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

jelizondo (183861) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321004)

You forgot to provide examples of US support for the removal of Batista and Pinochet or to deny USG and US Corporations in installing them in the first place.

Also please provide said examples for General Videla (Argentina), Anastasio Somoza (Guatemala), Trujillo and Belaguer (Dominican Republic), this last one installed at gun-point by US Marines...And that is only in Latin America, if we throw in Asia and Africa, whew! you would have a lot of work.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320248)

Who cares about cultural identity or national borders when you don't have enough to eat, your children won't receive a proper education, and your life and freedom in any case is at the whim and mercy of whoever has the guns?

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (0)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320258)

Of course they don't then. Tive minutes after you fix the food and random death problems they will care.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320364)

Why would they? The situation in Iraq resulted from there quite simply not being enough boots on the ground to keep the area safe and root out the warring forces kept in check by the Saddam regime. A top-rank general quit over this, referring to established doctrine on occupation and refusing to be involved. Everyone fell on each others throats, seeking power. That doesn't necessarily carry over to other situations, either for want of manpower or for the presence of powder-keg political situations.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1, Troll)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320380)

For the same reason you don't want me running your house.

The situation in Iraq resulted from us being there in the first fucking place. Before that you can thank the British for building a state out of a lot of separate groups that would rather not be together.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320460)

If I went seriously ill, you'd be damn right I'd be happy if someone ran my house and prevented me from dying. And in a long-term scenario, if the bombs fell and you or anyone else managed to become a feudal lord or other autocratic ruler of some kind, offering the only available shelter from roving bandits and control over irrigation or such, I'd most certainly pledge allegiance as long as that wasn't worse than the bandits or starvation. I assume most other people would, as well.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320498)

this

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320894)

Who cares about cultural identity or national borders when you don't have enough to eat, your children won't receive a proper education, and your life and freedom in any case is at the whim and mercy of whoever has the guns?

As bad as a place you don't live looks to you, there will be people who lived in that place for generations who consider it normal. Not everyone will, and the percentage of people who do will vary by culture, religion, and knowledge of the rest of the world.

I know that most of the "live free or die" libertarians I meet are all talk, and would not take even a small risk of death for freedom. But a few of them mean it. There are people like that in every culture.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

pwizard2 (920421) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321168)

If an occupation improves their situation, people will support it. If it worsens it, it will be rejected.

Since it is impossible to tell in advance how something like that would turn out, it is best to leave other countries alone. If that country's people want a change in government, let them fight for it themselves. That way, they will value it and the struggle will strengthen them as a people. If we (the US or any other country in a position to do so) interfere in another country's business, we weaken ourselves by expending resources that could be put to other use and we weaken that country as well by robbing from them the strength they would have gained if they had handled a revolution themselves.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

jklovanc (1603149) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320250)

There is a huge difference between Iraq and Zimbabwe. In Zimbabwe the opposition party has win most of the recent elections but Mugabe will not give up power. Unlike Iraq where there were a number of violently competing faction vying for power there is already a viable elected replacement government in Zimbabwe. Take a look at the Movement for Democratic Change party. There was supposed to be a run off in the last election but the MDC candidate withdrew citing the probability of his supporters being murdered. Mugabe, like many African dictators, is in his last days of power and trying to hold on at all costs.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320272)

Sure, but letting his people get rid of him is better for everyone. We are not the world police, we are not going to make any friends by taking over yet another country.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320414)

Who cares about "friends"? If no-one steps up and forces justice and freedom, it won't happen. It doesn't matter who gives the order, or who holds the guns. If the situation is as described, the problem becomes even simpler, since it's easy to declare when the occupation will end - when the "good" party is in power, and the government has access to enough force to police the people in the area.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321090)

There is absolutely NO guarantee that direct military intervention is going to result in something better, either short or long term. There are examples from history when it has worked, but there are many more examples where it has failed. Do the people of Zimbabwe, as a whole, even want our help?

And frankly, we just can't afford to keep invading and rebuilding every country in the world with a shitty government.

It would be nice if the European colonial powers took responsibility for their former colonies and the instability, violence, and poverty that colonialism and their exploitation caused -- but they haven't, and they won't.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

ghmh (73679) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320704)

We are not the world police

I thought you were? Maybe this is a job for M..mm..Matt Damon!

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (3, Insightful)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320318)

When did our options become limited to invasion or not doing a damn thing? How about we start with some diplomatic action? Or even just public demonstrations? No nation can survive on it's own. And dictators actually do sometimes care about how they look to the outside world - that's why they try to keep stuff like this silent.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320490)

How about we start with some diplomatic action? Or even just public demonstrations?

While I don't disagree with your sentiment, Mugabe has shown that he could care less about what the diplomats have to say about him, and prefers to use bullets during public demonstrations. That pretty much limits (the rest of the world's) choices to invasion, economic sanctions, and not doing a damn thing.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321056)

Option D -- proxy war!

Not that there's enough organized opposition to arm, and not that it's guaranteed to be any better.

Given that it's Africa, the rest of the world will be choosing "not do a damn thing".

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320492)

You're right, of course - but from (my) European view, this has been tried and failed. At least from outside of Brussels, it looks like everything has slid into apathy and a status quo of food shipments and oppressive dictators setting the standards for what constitutes "human rights".

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320748)

Yes...I have noticed much of this myself here in America as well. So much so that I'm quite confident that apathy is the greatest enemy mankind has ever seen.

But still, it is worth keeping in mind that rights are not something that just happens. They aren't given to you, you have to take them. In a case like this, I would say that means going out and raising awareness, and harassing your government until they do something about it.
Also, the apathy may seem worse than it is - because people sit there, not doing anything, because they all feel that nobody else gives a damn. Everything has to start somewhere.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320886)

But this isn't a government the way you and I would think about it. If you harassed it, you would be ignored or shot. Or do you mean harassing my own government/citizenry to take action?

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321002)

I mean harassing your own government/citizenry. Harassment of the Zimbabwe government is up to the people living there - and yes, they damn well better be serious about it if they decide to do so. But you do not face such risks. Hell, harass the Zimbabwe government too while you're at it - just don't go there to do it in person.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320522)

I think we should put a $250 million price on Mugabe's head, payable upon verification.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

the linux geek (799780) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320872)

It would be unpopular in the US, due to fiscal reasons, and internationally, because the Western Europeans and their friends seem to think that killing is evil, No Matter What. These are the same morons that bitched about Saddam Hussein's execution.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321202)

Don't generalize. I'm Swedish, and I think most people just don't want to think about stuff like that, so they adopt whatever principles that's most convenient to them, and get defensive when they are challenged since they are forced to think about horrible things. Developing an intellectually coherent morality isn't something that comes automatically - and notably, in Swedish society at least, flaunting views like this based on pure emotion is considered something very profane and impolite.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320534)

There are more choices than just "do nothing" or "invade with military." What about sanctions, diplomatic and economic pressure targeting Muagabe, arrest warrants from the ICC at the Hague?

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321048)

How have sanctions ever done anything useful? All they do is hurt the residents of his country -- which are literally starving and require food aid programs to survive. Sanctions or not, Mugabe will be living large and laughing loud.

I'm not advocating military intervention, btw. I don't really see that helping much either.

Similarly, I don't see how putting trade sanctions on Libya is going to do anything but hurt your average Libyans.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321158)

Well, it would help if Wikileaks didnt place his only serious competition in jeopardy...

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320074)

If the people that live in these conditions and continue to bring new life into them can't be bothered to change them, why should I? Let them do as they will, so long as they leave me alone.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320200)

Responsibility or borders or rules doesn't really matter in the end, what matters is suffering. That makes the reason pure empathy, even if only to prevent future suffering. Empathy varies wildly between individuals however, and if you don't feel like I do - then you don't.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320334)

Well then, get your ass on a plane boy. Go fight the good fight.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320562)

Ignoring that I have ailments preventing me from serving (at least in the Swedish armed forces, but I could probably soldier in a kill-people position with a lot of physical training and being in a position where med supply isn't likely to be cut off) - What plane? Am I supposed to purchase one myself? And alongside whom? And with what guns and training?

More importantly while I realize that the situation isn't as simple as that, in cheering for armed intervention I don't really feel like I'm asking people to do "dirty things" I wouldn't do myself, in a moral or emotional sense at least - I realize that soldiers are people too. But you're right that I can't speak for them, and most soldiers seem to have a basic mentality quite far removed from mine.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320084)

Two words:

"Blackhawk Down"

The worst thing to introduce into a country freed from colonial domination would be any force with Caucasian soldiers.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

C0R1D4N (970153) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320212)

Then how about a UN force made up of Indians and East Asians? Maybe Brazil could contribute some troops. The wealthier caucasian countries could contribute materials and air/naval assets.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320220)

These are people, not cretins. You don't think they'd be capable of making that distinction, especially if the positive effects of removing oppression where self-evident?

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321164)

It doesn't matter if they do or not. Consider Fallujah, Iraq. The chief instigators were Al Queda in Iraq, headed by Zarqawi, and miscellaneous foreign fighters from Saudi Arabia, Iran (yes, even though they're Shiite), Chechnya, etc. How did these bad dudes gain power and force the local inhabitants to work for them? They were willing to do what we weren't. They would torture and kill anyone who worked with coalition forces, such as the Iraqi National Guard headed by LtCol Suleiman (RIP), and they just straight-up mass murdered the Iraqi National Police detachment. In order to maintain power, radical clerics became more radical, and moderate ones were murdered or lost their power base. Former Baathists who were still loyal to Iraq's Saddam also got in on the action.

As one Iraqi citizen in Fallujah said, "If we help the Americans, we get killed. If we help the mujahideen, we get arrested and released."

There are tremendous politics and other forces in effect; thinking everyone will be grateful is wishful thinking.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320310)

This is why the civilized world should act in force

The problem is that the 'civilized world' doesn't want to see its children shot and blown up saving some Africans on the other side of the world. My son is only 6 months old and I already sure as hell know I wouldn't want him risking his life 18 years from now in whatever despot nation is the hellhole du jour in 2029...

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320652)

Don't you think that, while "right" probably doesn't factor into it, adults should be able to lay down their lives for a just cause if they choose? Although I agree that 18 is a low age as far as mental maturity goes, and I'm just barely 23.

Re:Oh, look it's someone we can relate to (2)

xrobertcmx (802547) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320416)

It might have been better if we (The US) hadn't just sat on our hands and let this nut job take power back in 79/80. If I recall correctly it was the UK which effectively handed him power. He ran Zanu PF which was more or less a terrorist group.

Iraq? (1)

Weezul (52464) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321232)

If Zimbabwe rises up, we should position a carrier battle group and prevent Mugabe from using air strikes against protestors, but we should not land troops. It's their war, we cannot give freedom, they must take it.

Wasn't this pretty much expected? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320028)

Mugabe, feeling the aftershocks from recent - and current - events elsewhere in the world, wants to demonstrate that he is not the lightweight, half-assed dictator that Kadafi is.

We await in fear for his next vulgar display of power.

This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320032)

Manning, Assange, everyone in that concentration camp the US has build. All political opponents. Easy to verify also, hence the lack of proof and fair trails. This article seems like selected indignation to be honest. Sure it's bad, but this guy got tortured once... the US does this every day to many hundrerds, if nog thousands of people. At least this guy got to talk the press about it. He actually got a better treatment than the self-proclaimed good-guy of the world gives him. And to be honest... it's no surprise to most people any more that torture by Zimbabwe is better than 'justice' in the US.
So my US friends, instead of going into an open and fair debat, I wish you all good luck with just ignoring the truth and mod this troll. As usual here.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1, Insightful)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320336)

the US does this every day to many hundrerds, if nog thousands of people.

Citation? Evidence? Anything?

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320418)

Guatamala? You really need MORE proof? What, did you help build that place or what? Walked patrols there? Because something has to be very wrong if you ask for proof while you KNOW that everyone in there.... has been in there for many many years with NO proof what so ever. Even last week the US found it 'news' to report that after 9 years of being held without proof, being tortured (yes, sleepdep, waterboarding, sickcontrol... all real torture) a guy confessed... Hell after 9 years with in illegal custody and daily torture I would confess being your mommy. And so would you.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

IdolizingStewie (878683) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320456)

... Seriously? I'm pretty sure the US isn't torturing anyone in Guatamala.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320482)

US does torture a few in Guatamala.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320710)

They do? Ok Citation, source, you know, the stuff that shows us this isn't just in your head.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320756)

You're right, there wasn't any torture going on. Let's not confuse enhanced interrogation techniques with torture as those are totally different things.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321192)

Wasn't is past tense. Does is present tense. Do you understand the difference between that?

And here I thought I was going to find out something new. Turns out it's just the old stuff regurgitated.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

jelizondo (183861) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321080)

I hope that you do some research and assuming that you are an American, you will do everything in your power to bring to justice those involved and not just play " Really? I didn't know." Now you know.

Citation 1 [google.com] , citation 2 [uusc.org]

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320548)

Even Bush has admitted to it. There is no question about this. It's a fact. The US is using torture and has so for many years on people that they have no proof against, that are being held for years... Seriously, if someone that is a Muslim takes your kid or parents away. Puts them for years in a cell. There is no judge, because there was no crime, so there is nothing to go with to a judge... even the illegal captivity qualifies as torture, but waterboarding, sleepdeprevation, sick-treatment as they call it are all without a doubt torture and are all without a doubt a warcrime. People should be prosecuted for this. But I guess it's ok if it's some US dude who is doing the killing. Those non-us people, especially the ones with another color, probably don't have any feelings like real people anyway. The germans have a great sentence to describe this behaviour. Zum Kotsen.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

IdolizingStewie (878683) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320832)

/sigh.... Geography, people, it's not hard. Guatemala != Guantanamo. Guantanamo is in Cuba.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

jelizondo (183861) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321104)

Please see above comment [slashdot.org] , yes, we are talking about Guatemala, Central America.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320994)

Show me on the doll where George W. Bush touched you.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (3, Insightful)

elashish14 (1302231) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320630)

Not to mention that they're also torturing Manning as we speak http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/glenn_greenwald/2010/12/14/manning [salon.com] .

You're pretty uninformed.

(Sorry for double post)

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320952)

If that's true, they're mentally torturing him as a punitive measure. I can't imagine that it's out of fear of him leaking anything else, that's just stupid, you wouldn't have to stick someone in a signal-proof bunker for that. Even if he allegedly did the leak partly to somehow get back at his superiors, and planning to just dump out all that potentially life-critical information was really irresponsible and childish, that's just excessive.

I wonder how Adrian feels about this?

MOD PARENT TROLL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320388)

The hyperbole in that post is off the scale.

Re:This happens in more places than Zimbabwe alone (1)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321024)

lol wut? We're torturing Assange? Yeah, I'm sure Obama is waterboarding the hell out of him... as he sits in a *Swedish prison* for "surprise sex".

Haloperidol. Look into it before you shoot a congresswoman in front of Safeway.

Traded racist white rule for evil black psycho (2)

judeancodersfront (1760122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320054)

life doesn't always work out as planned.

Re:Traded racist white rule for evil black psycho (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320510)

He's racist, too, or at least xenophobic.

Re:Traded racist white rule for evil black psycho (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35321086)

And they got the worst end of the deal.

I think it's now obvious to pretty well everyone that the blacks are incapable of running their own societies at any level greater than a small tribe.

There are NO functional democracies or modern states in Africa, none at all.

The obvious solution is to reinstate White rule over the Blacks, with a few added safeguards, until they develop sufficiently to be allowed self determination.

Scoff all you like, even the blacks recognise that life was far, far better under benevolent White rule than under the genocidal, homicidal atrocity of the black.

Most blacks would welcome back the days of prosperity and stability given to them by the Whites.

The real problem will be, persuading the Whites to return.

Mugabe: Proof that Carter was worst Prez ever (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320058)

Jimmy Carter gave us Robert Mugabe, amongst a bunch of other failures.

Rant all you want about George W. Bush. Every last one of Bush II's major policy decisions - Gitmo, troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, Patriot Act, "illegal" wiretaps, tax rates - has been validated by Obama. Gawd, that's gotta HURT Bush haters.

Re:Mugabe: Proof that Carter was worst Prez ever (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320080)

What do you mean validated?

Surprise, surprise, the new corporatist puppet has the same dance as the old one. What a fucking shock!

Colonialism gave us Robert Mugabe, Carter was just the one standing around at the time. Not saying he is blameless, just pointless to bring him up.

Re:Mugabe: Proof that Carter was worst Prez ever (1)

judeancodersfront (1760122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320232)

No actually colonialism was traded for Mugabe. Carter was for anything but white rule and let the country go under a dictator.

Re:Mugabe: Proof that Carter was worst Prez ever (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320314)

I must have been unclear. What I mean was Mugabe gained power as the end result of colonialism.

Let the country go under a dictator, was he supposed to invade? Do you also blame the German Chancellor at the time and the Swedish King or are only American presidents supposed to prevent dictators ?

Re:Mugabe: Proof that Carter was worst Prez ever (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321088)

I don't think you understand what was happening when Rhodesia became Zimbabwe.

even though Southern Rhodesia declared independence shortening it's name to Rhodesia in '65 or so, the entire world still recognized English colonial rule over it until 1980 or so when England finally release claim on it. England maintained it wouldn't release it's claim to it (and all their colonies) until they were governed under a majority rule. [wikipedia.org] Anyways, in 78-79 a biracial party was formed to govern and the Lancaster house agreement placed it back under British colonial control.

An election was held [weeklystandard.com] , someone other then Mugabe was elected (Abel Muzorewa), And now enters the Carter administration. [nysun.com]

Carter didn't have to invade. All he had to do is support the democratically elected leaders of the country instead of imposing his own desires on it by blocking UN action and supporting Mugabe knowing he was wanting to create a single party communist state.

The Carter Administration played a lead role in why Mugabe was not removed from power, why the rightful people elected wasn't allowed to stay in power, and why the world recognized Mugabe as the leader..In fact, People from Carter's administration, was toasting Mugabe as late as 2001 when they were attacking whites for their land.

"The only thing that frustrates me about Robert Mugabe is that he is so damned incorruptible," Andrew Young, Jimmy Carter's ambassador to the United Nations

Re:Mugabe: Proof that Carter was worst Prez ever (2, Interesting)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320196)

Gitmo can't be shut down because Americans are too spineless to lock up the prisoners on our soil.
Troops in Iraq are being drawn down responsibly. It was a mistake to go in, but that doesn't mean we should make it worse by yanking everyone out at once.
Troops in Afghanistan were always supported by virtually everyone.
The tax rates were extended because the fascist GOP held unemployment benefits hostage. "Give us billions in tax cuts, or we let millions of innocent people die in the streets!"
I also note that you don't even mention the unmitigated disasters that are Medicare Part D, No Child Left Behind, and a full-hearted embrace of torture.

I'll give you the Patriot Act and the wiretaps. Still, the balance is very heavily against your boy Bush. When even Republican sweethearts like Donald Trump are calling him the worst president in American history, it takes a special kind of willful ignorance to pretend he was anything but a catastrophe.

Re:Mugabe: Proof that Carter was worst Prez ever (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320572)

Asking if the Bush presidency was a catastrophe is like asking if Howdy Doody has wooden balls. But notice it's policy that hasn't changed. It predates Bush by a long shot, and it post dates him. He always rides the limo as a passenger, never the driver.

I just have one thing to say... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320060)

This is what happens when you have uninformed NIGGERS for rulers.

Professor was executed for watching videos (1)

Burning1 (204959) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320062)

In the same way that Mubarak was overthrown by a bunch of guys hanging out and talking loudly.

Thank god. (2)

a whoabot (706122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320102)

Thank god Mugabe and his supporters overthrew those white supremacists so many years ago, and now the people of Zimbabwe can live in freedom and security.

Re:Thank god. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320120)

They would not have had freedom and security if they left the white folks in charge either. So other than non-sequitur what ideas have you got?

Re:Thank god. (2)

a whoabot (706122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320726)

It's a non-sequitur to point out that the regime which overthrew the last regime while promising a better political/social order has not delivered.

Okay then...

I'm sorry I don't have the silver bullet for the country's woes. An initial idea might be the removal of the Mugabe regime. Pointing out the faults of that regime might actually be a start in the removal of it, actually.

Mugabe (3, Insightful)

MarkvW (1037596) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320154)

Even somebody as awful as Mugabe has supporters enough to keep him in power. Same with Hitler. Same with Saddam.

The trick to being a good dictator is to satisfy a hard-core minority of your supporters so that they will control the majority.

Re:Mugabe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320688)

In the case of Mugabe, and even a lot of American politicians, it's as simple as "hate gays? Me too. Vote for me!"

Re:Mugabe (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320810)

The trick to being a good dictator is to satisfy a hard-core minority of your supporters so that they will control the majority.

You mean the army. Thats pretty much how most of the dictators roll, they wrest control of the army away from any civilian government and the rest is cake. Thats definitely how the North Korean regime stays in power. No matter how big the personality cult, I would be willing to bet that if Kim Jong Il pissed off the wrong general he would be meeting an "unfortunate accident" in the very near future.

Goal of the UN to oust repressive regimes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320168)

If this is not a UN goal then it has no legitimacy, as if it ever had any to begin with.

1 down(Mubarak), 1 in progress(Qaddafi)
http://www.parade.com/dictators/ [parade.com]

Re:Goal of the UN to oust repressive regimes? (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320348)

If this is not a UN goal then it has no legitimacy

The UN doesn't have an army. Who would the UN send into the repressive regimes to oust them? Who do you propose should get shot at / blown up and otherwise killed in the name ousting the repressive regimes?

Re:Goal of the UN to oust repressive regimes? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320400)

And if we go after Mugabe, who do we work on next?
I bet the Chinese will not be big fans of these plans.

Re:Goal of the UN to oust repressive regimes? (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320768)

UN peacekeeper troops consists of troops volunteered from the constituent nations armies.

midwest declares uFraUD vs. corepirate nazis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320264)

many are considering shoe throwing (among other things) to express their dismay at the 'kick 'em when they're down' attitude of our domestic pharaohs.

30 years ago (4, Insightful)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320356)

Mugabe was the darling of the Left. But you know something? The people of Zimbabwe were safer, freer and better fed under Ian Smith.

Re:30 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35320880)

Judging by your posting history, it would appear that you're not particularly fond of black people.
Right?

Re:30 years ago (5, Insightful)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320932)

Yep. Countdown to someone calling you a racist in 5... 4.... anyway, Rhodesia wasn't perfect, but under Mugabe's "enlightened" slaughter of the white man, things went from being Africa's breadbasket as Rhodesia to widespread starvation that aid programs struggle to meet. The murdered whites' land was given to his cronies that didn't know the first thing about farming -- they were soldiers, thugs, and death squads, not agriculturalists.

Mugabe has been doing this sort of thing for a very, very long time. How it's any surprise to anyone is beyond me.

Go to Wikipedia and look at Mugabe's list of honorary degrees -- most of which have now been withdrawn -- and the comments people made when awarding them to him. He hasn't changed. The people who laughed at and support his earlier genocide are now just realizing that Mugabe has never been a nice guy, at all.

I do not support apartheid or white minority rule, but there are better ways to move the country forward than murder of all political opposition and everyone of a certain skin color. Yes, the white minority governments in Africa did this as well, but it was wrong when they did it, and it is wrong now. I don't see how the tragedy that was colonialism in any way justifies his actions.

Re:30 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35321222)

Exactly!!

I think the only realistic solution to Africas never ending woes is the reinstatement of White rule over the continent, until the blacks advance sufficiently to enable self determination.

Bad taste? (1)

stealth_finger (1809752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35320574)

He has left in his the sum of 3,700,000 Zimbabwean Dollars which is tied up in bank accounts etcetera etcetera give me you bank details.

Action! Now! (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 3 years ago | (#35321210)

The world community must send a sternly worded letter at once!

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