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Microsoft Shows Off Radical New UI, Could Be Used In Windows 8

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the trial-balloon dept.

GUI 403

autospa writes "In a three and a half minute video, Microsoft may have shown the world what it has in store for the eagerly awaited Windows 8. In the video Microsoft showed a radically different interface from past versions of Windows — even Windows 7. Running on Surface 2, the touch-screen successor to the original Microsoft Surface, the device accepts input from a Windows Phone 7 handset (HTC HD7). Gone are the icons that drive Windows, OS X, and Linux operating systems of past and present. In their place are 'bubbles' that interact with files and post streaming information off the internet."

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And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (5, Insightful)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324256)

And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use. The new Excel is a nightmare to learn well. And now, "bubbles"?

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (2)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324398)

Well, it seems that MS cannot make anything better than Windows XP/7 and Office 2003, so the company will just make the UI different each version.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (2)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324552)

I would say that Office 2007 was the pinnacle of Office. Lots of people (including me) bitched and moaned about the ribbon interface, but it turned out to be a good decision that exposed all of the functionality of Office instead of hiding things in obscure and/or arbitrary menus.

The "Office Button" from 2007 was replaced by a "File" ribbon menu in 2010, but to me it looks like a half-assed step backwards to appease complainers. In the context of the new Office interface, the File ribbon doesn't really make any sense.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324660)

Meh, I'd rather go back to word perfect 5.1, where all every feature was available with a single modifier + F key press. Sure it took a little longer to learn, but once you learned all the key shortcuts, you could get a lot done quite quickly. Most of the students in my highschool had all the important keys memorized. You never needed to take your hands off the keyboard. It was great. I wish we could go back to something like this. Also we didn't waste time messing with fonts and formatting, since it supported very little.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (4, Insightful)

JamesTRexx (675890) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324724)

For me it's the ribbon interface that hides everything.
At least with a menu I could just browse and read from the text what the option is. Now I often have to guess what that icon does and I'm not going to remember all those from the large amount of applications I have to support.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324448)

And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use.

Guess what? The UI received extensive usability testing and people of merely average ability found it easy to use. Congratulations, you must be below average.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324498)

Aww... I love it when Microsoft employees show up on Slashdot.

The entire lot of you needs to die in a fire.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (0)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324548)

That's way off base.

Dying in a fire is too fast and painless for Microsoft employees.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (5, Informative)

LordKronos (470910) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324608)

No, he's not below average. The problem is mostly likely not that he finds the new interface simply difficult to use, but that he probably has a decade or two of experience using the old interface. He's had all that time to learn where each feature was. When each new version came out, the old features were almost always exactly like before, and just a few new menu items and buttons were added each time. Each time he had to learn a few new things, but all of his old knowledge was still relevant. Now suddenly in one version, everything he's spent many years learning has been pulled out from under him, and he's instinctively looking in the wrong places for everything. Habits that are that well ingrained can be incredibly difficult to break.

I've been using the new interface for about 3 years now, and I still instinctively want to look in the wrong (ie: old) locations. What makes it even more difficult is that there are items in the new interface the mislead people accustomed to the old interface. For example, in the old interface of Excel, if you wanted to insert a new row into your spreadsheet, you went to the menu bar and picked Insert -> Rows. With the new interface, you go up to the top, you see a tab on the ribbon named "Insert" and you automatically think "that's where I'm gonna find the option to insert a row". So you click on it and, I'll be damned....you can insert just about everything EXCEPT a row or column.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324624)

Is it really going to take you forever to realize that the bubbles are the icons that they allegedly replace? So, the bubbles are bigger and may be animated or live even, and user created. Using a bubble, where clicking on them brings up actions/tasks that you can do to the bubble, is not any different than right clicking and bringing up a context menu. Using a cellphone or other such type device to control (as a touchpad), or stream to, isn't radical at all. Many systems support that. I've done it with Linux, the Mac, and Windows. That doesn't make them radical.

If they plan on designing this around surface PCs, well, that's just impractical. People aren't going to replace their current system with something that replaces icons with bubbles and more cash outlay.

As far as I'm concerned the desktop needs to be cleared of icons, especially in Windows, as too many slow the computer down, and as the desktop crashes (which it does for everyone) the automatic reload is irritating and slows us down. Change of this sort can be accomplished without a trick which changes the icons into circles (bubbles) while requiring new hardware to accomplish.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (2)

Imrik (148191) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324694)

Or above average.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (1)

tkprit (8581) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324460)

ITA; very little added functionality, just everything's hidden in a new place and called something different.

I'd like to know a bit about the filesystem underneath these "bubbles". ....or, omg, is it all CLOUD BASED (that sky drive nightmare—worst implementation ever of 'net storage'.).

THIS is more one the lines of new Windows 8.. (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324524)

That's gobbledygook.
I don't see anything but speculation in TFA. Hell, if we are speculating, here's something that's better and a lot more believable to be Windows 8:

http://www.vimeo.com/13580196 [vimeo.com]

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (5, Interesting)

anshulajain (1359933) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324612)

Bubbles reminds me of the original vision for KDE4, except that "Bubbles" was/is referred to as "Widgets". Information flows to and from the internet into these
"widgets" in the KDE4 desktop. They have stuff like Facebook/Twitter feeds directly accessible and writable through these widgets and something like an OpenSocial framework for social interaction. Not exactly the same, but the idea seems to be very similar to KDE4.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (2)

jitterman (987991) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324680)

I'm a professional developer and user; I've found the ribbon interface to be a good thing. We often hear a lot of complaining when the old way of doing things changes, even if those changes prove in the long run to have been an improvement, from those who cut their teeth on the old. For those who start their Office experience with 2007/2010, they will probably look at the previous generation and wonder, "how the hell did you put up with that?"

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324704)

I guess you are referring to the ribbon interface that Microsoft introduced in Office 2007 and is pretty much unchanged in Office 2010.

In my view, the ribbon interface is substantially easier to understand and use than the previous menu driven system. In fact, the ribbon is just a larger and more descriptive menu system. Whenever there's a paradigm change there will be a period of relearning, but I'd hardly characterize it as a nightmare.

I've heard this type of complaint from some users (usually directors and VPs), but after I sit down with them for a few minutes they usually grok the way to use the ribbon and the advantages over the previous menu driven system. Whenever I have to go back to Excel 2003 I'm reminded about the advantages of the ribbon.

I see from your username that you claim geek status. If the ribbon is a nightmare for you, I humbly request you turn in your geek license immediately.

Re:And I thought Office 2010 was hard to use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324718)

..Bubbles which stream your Excel sheets on the internets as they "interact" with the files.. Your sheets will feel simultaneously violated and exited by this treatment.

You ruined it (1)

Stan Vassilev (939229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324260)

The UI is interesting on its own. You don't need to spice it up with arbitrary easily falsifiable BS like "it'll be in Windows 8" to make it interesting.

The UI was not interesting. (3, Informative)

microbox (704317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324372)

I didn't see anything interesting. The promo-video was a waste of time. Someone could have said the same things 10 yrs ago.

Re:The UI was not interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324388)

agreed

Re:The UI was not interesting. (1)

Kral_Blbec (1201285) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324404)

but not with demos of them doing it.

Re:The UI was not interesting. (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324534)

I didn't see anything interesting. The promo-video was a waste of time. Someone could have said the same things 10 yrs ago.

promo-video? Err, even MS wouldn't make such a promo video. It's just a research tech preview demo.

No...it ruined itself (4, Informative)

BonquiquiShiquavius (1598579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324744)

Did you watch the video? I found the summary's weaknesses much more palatable than the ridiculously vague video in TFA, which was filled with corporate-speak, and showed off a bunch of interactivity projects without demonstrating how any of these would be used in real world applications, let alone how they would improve the way we currently interact with computers.

(from article) "eagerly awaited"? (4, Insightful)

haus (129916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324264)

by whom?

Re:(from article) "eagerly awaited"? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324304)

The Federal Reserve has been asking for a bubble-based UI.

Re:(from article) "eagerly awaited"? (1)

healyp (1260440) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324508)

The Federal Reserve has been asking for a bubble-based UI.

HA, wish I had mod points.

Re:(from article) "eagerly awaited"? (-1)

metrix007 (200091) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324600)

By people interested in the advances going on in computers. It's understandable that linux zealots would dismiss interesting research simply because of the company doing said research. Understandable, and sad.

Re:(from article) "eagerly awaited"? (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324626)

Ghost in the Shell fans?

"eagerly awaited" ? (4, Insightful)

richlv (778496) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324272)

"eagerly awaited Windows 8" - say what ?
next version of grub might be more eagerly awaited than windows 8 or whatever.
ms hired a pr company to build up some buzz ? :)

Re:"eagerly awaited" ? (1)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324380)

ms hired a pr company to build up some buzz

Careful now, that's a registered trademark ;)

Re:"eagerly awaited" ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324666)

I just wish they'd stop. Thing is, no one really wants new operating systems. People just want run their software. They should have just kept updating win2k. Rolling updates just like Linux. Imagine how sturdy that OS would be by now.

Maybe the profit motive really doesn't work for operating systems, maybe MS is still too much of a monopoly. All I know for sure is that every new windows version involves a period of me wanting to stab a windows user experience designer in the forehead.

A Tragic Mistake (1)

kevinmenzel (1403457) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324280)

The fundamental problem I see with that UI, at least from the article, is that it is gadget based. Fine for my phone. Even fine for Surface, which isn't targeted at the home. But 98% of what I do on my computer wouldn't have a useful gadget sibling in any way shape or form. Not to mention, the utter waste of screen real-estate. To be fair, I've seen people assume that such concepts are new Windows UIs for years. It hasn't been true yet...

Non story - news at 11 (4, Insightful)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324282)

I read TFA, I watched TFV, and I still can't connect the summary to anything of substance.

Re:Non story - news at 11 (1)

andrea.sartori (1603543) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324308)

Also, that bubble interface is shown for maybe 2 secs, and it looks like it's nice to watch but utterly useless.

Re:Non story - news at 11 (4, Funny)

maird (699535) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324362)

There's the proof it's Windows 8 at least.

Re:Non story - news at 11 (2)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324540)

It's cool to be snarky, but haven't seen many outlandish ideas as the main UI of Windows in any version, so how is this proof?

Re:Non story - news at 11 (1)

sco08y (615665) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324496)

There are bubbles... and they do stuff... in the cloud?!

Mundie thinks the computer needs to go from being a "tool" to a "helper." I guess he figures that after 20 or so attempts at this, from Bob to Clippy to whatnot, it's got to eventually work.

Maybe. What is conspicuously absent in the video, though, is anyone getting any work done.

bubbles? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324284)

color bubbles? I guess, it does look more organic than plain squares...

What? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324296)

This has got to be the dumbest thing ever. Microsoft is just being different for the sake of getting attention, because they know they are quickly becoming irrelevant.

Well, so long Microsoft, it was a good run, but you finally have reached the limit of what you can steal from others and the ideas you come up with on your own are pants-on-head retarded. Goodbye.

Re:What? (1, Insightful)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324410)

This has got to be the dumbest thing ever. Microsoft is just being different for the sake of getting attention ...

    That seems to work well for Apple.

Re:What? (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324754)

Is this like a autogenerated comment by something like the IBM Watson? Maybe it studies the upmodded comments in previous articles and comes up with this tripe. But the best thing is that it will work with the moderators on here.

That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (4, Funny)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324312)

You know if you use these Linux and such OS, there is so much of cost retraining the employees in the new system. You stick to Microsoft, you can rest assured that all the training costs you have spent will be investments that pay dividend over a long time to come. That is why you should invest in microsoft and stay away from those platforms that keep changing their UI.

Re:That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324390)

Dammit! I was going to post something almost identical, but you beat me to it with a better phrased version!

Re:That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (4, Insightful)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324516)

I'm no fuddy-duddy. I'm willing to change when an obviously superior idea comes along. What fucks me off about Microsoft is that they rearrange where you find the fucking things but they're ultimately the same fucking screen from the last four versions. But where do you go to configure network properties? It's a goddamn easter egg hunt.

Don't even get me started on that fucking ribbon.

Re:That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (3, Informative)

Bengie (1121981) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324620)

WindowsKey->Type("Network Connections")->enter

There, now you can config your NIC :P

Re:That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (4, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324814)

Well, that's great, except that what if you wanted to see the status of your network conenctions - your method (which requires a lot of typing) doesn't work.

Even better, I decided to type "configure network card," and the only usable option that popped up was "Manage Devices and Printers," which, interestingly, doesn't even show my network card as a device.

Why, might I ask, do you need 3-4 different ways to manage the network, some of which are inaccessible from other areas.

Why, in the network and sharing area, does a right-click on 'Home Network" not allow you to change the relationship, a right click on "Joined" for he home group does not allow you to unjoin or change the home group, and a right click on "local area connection" not bring up status, ipcongif info, the network card properties, or anything else? Why not put all those single clicks to new levels of dialog boxes into a unified interface? Why does doubl;e clicking your wireless icon in the tray disconnect you?

I can only assume that this guarantees more training dollars for everyone that has to use this stuff.

Re:That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (1, Insightful)

Arlet (29997) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324830)

My keyboard doesn't have a "Windows" key, you insensitive clod.

Citations and plagerism (3, Insightful)

bussdriver (620565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324616)

The academic world worries about citations and plagiarism in their works but the commercial world never bothers or usually takes credit for others work as their own; the marketing departments go even further.

We (the community) should be pointing out and calling BS to this heavily marketing driven society that has created a world in which smart people and educational institutions lack their due respect as the true innovators and instead we are told to worship the mighty corporations; its no wonder so many Americans are anti-intellectual and pro-corporation -- they see new technologies like this Microsoft PR and think Microsoft "innovated" all that stuff when I didn't see anything there that they innovated other than perhaps the bubble thing which they didn't show much of (and I likely just missed some paper somebody did on the concept 10+ years ago.)

Re:That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324816)

...which explains all the complaints about Office 2010, eh?

Re:That is the greatest advantage of Microsoft (0)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324842)

Maybe you should actually wait till its confirmed beyond a super speculative Slashdot post(any other news source calling this possibly Windows 8)?

worst feature removed yet? (0, Troll)

magarity (164372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324316)

With every new version of Windows since 95, I ask: did they get rid of the %^$#ing registry yet? If no, it's not much improved.

Re:worst feature removed yet? (0)

black3d (1648913) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324346)

Every OS has a registry - an accessible record of cross-application settings and references. Unless we go backwards (ie, DOS), you'll never see an OS without a registry - even if it's not called that.

Re:worst feature removed yet? (1)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324430)

Well, it seems that GP just wants to have hundreds or thousands of tiny text files all with their own incompatible formats, like it is in Linux (mostly).

Re:worst feature removed yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324544)

I would love to see that

Re:worst feature removed yet? (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324558)

Sounds like it. If it's one thing I don't miss from the old 9x and Win3.x days is everything being stored in text files. Sure it was easy to find and edit something(with a basic text editor), even in DOS. It was an organizational nightmare if you wanted to do something else like reference something in another non-hived registry(I mean random text file).

The current registry system has it's faults, and hive registries can nuke the OS because of corruption really easily. But right now? Much easier to work with, at least until someone has a brain wave and comes up with a better system.

Re:worst feature removed yet? (1)

robmv (855035) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324562)

and that is bad? when did you need to open a registry file on Word, Paint or another program that need to understand a single file format? Settings files are not documents, are not videos, are not pictures that must be of a known format because you feed them to different programs, yo give them to other people, settings file doesn 't. Writing all system settings in one .DAT file is technically wrong, it is a single point of failure for all your system

Re:worst feature removed yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324602)

Writing all system settings in one .DAT file is technically wrong, it is a single point of failure for all your system.

So is a partition, and a hard drive.

Re:worst feature removed yet? (1)

guruevi (827432) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324868)

But those you can make redundant. I like the way Mac OS X does it. The Unix-way with individual files for individual programs and the Mac-way with each individual file following a certain format (XML) which is well-documented. The Windows-way is to take all those individual files the old-Unix-way (each program using their own format), stuffing it into a singular file and making it utterly unreadable (using GUID's, allowing proprietary binary code and very deeply nested trees) then giving everyone, everywhere access to it. And then still applications (Office, Internet Explorer) make directories and files in hidden folders with settings, caches etc. so it's apparently not the best solution even for Microsoft themselves.

Ever tried to delete every trace of a program out of Windows? It's nearly impossible. In Linux or Mac you just go to /etc and ~/.program or ~/Library and do a find and delete.

Re:worst feature removed yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324702)

and that is bad? when did you need to open a registry file on Word, Paint or another program that need to understand a single file format? Settings files are not documents, are not videos, are not pictures that must be of a known format because you feed them to different programs, yo give them to other people, settings file doesn 't. Writing all system settings in one .DAT file is technically wrong, it is a single point of failure for all your system

Well, would you rather have 1000 separate points of failures? That happens too.

BTW, .reg files (the things you can use to automatically edit your registry) are basically text files, and their syntax is as easy to use as any Linux config file.

Re:worst feature removed yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324672)

Yes, because even that is better than one opaque blob that can get trashed beyond repair. At least with all the text files, if one gets garbled the system doesn't become unusable.

Bubble Buddy (1)

DreamArcher (1690064) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324322)

Sponge Bob will love this.

Prediction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324324)

Windows 8 will look like a slightly shinier, flashier Windows 7, with gimmicks added in an attempt to play catch-up with MacOSX. As usual.

FLIUX CAPACITOR FINALLY IN CIRCUIT !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324338)

Just what is needed, and just in time. Don't have time for more now, must install WinFS beta 1.

Radical (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324348)

"You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means":
http://www.geek.com/articles/mobile/nokia-experiments-with-bubbles-interface-on-symbian-cell-phones-2011024/

How is a row of bubbles (1)

rsilvergun (571051) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324354)

different from a row of icons? Except maybe they're not well organized? I didn't see anything in the video I hadn't already seen a million times though. Is it just a slow news day?

Unless... (1)

drwhite (456200) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324370)

I am technically stupid (which I'm not), I don't see TFV! All I see are pics. Shit article.

the summary is for a different video (1)

inkscapee (1994086) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324384)

Because the "bubbles" got about two seconds of attention. The rest was airy-fairy 'Minority Report'-style handwaving.

BSOD (1, Funny)

Ice Station Zebra (18124) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324386)

Bubble Screen of Death.

Re:BSOD (4, Funny)

alostpacket (1972110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324618)

Somewhere Clippy is sitting unshaven, disheveled, and hung-over -- blowing soap bubbles and popping them in symbolic, disgusted jealousy.

Icons drive Linux? (1)

siwelwerd (869956) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324420)

"Icons drive the Linux OS"? Really? I don't have any icons on my desktop (Fluxbox), and one can run Linux just fine without any sort of GUI.

Re:Icons drive Linux? (1)

calmofthestorm (1344385) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324638)

Icons? Is that the thing at the far-left of the shell prompt?

Re:Icons drive Linux? (2)

koolfy (1213316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324658)

Most of Linux GUIs (window manager/desktop environment, etc) either disable Desktop icons by default, or allow to disable them easily.

In fact, most of linux innovative GUIs (yes, by windows' standards, 2007 Fluxbox is innovative.) are built around a minimal-to-no-desktop-icon paradigm, using the desktop as a menu generator, or widget emplacement

the only ones still using this 1998-ish idea of letting you flood your screen with a shitton of pointless icons with no organisation whatsoever are those who admit imitating windows' interface to make the transition easier for noobs.

I haven't used a single linux GUI that didn't organize launch icons in a logic and structured menu for like 5 years.

Gone are the icons that drive Windows, OS X, and Linux operating systems of past and present.

Seriously GP, try harder. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desktop_environment#Gallery [wikipedia.org]

As if (Windows 8) (1)

DavidR1991 (1047748) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324428)

MS are so risk averse that the likelihood of this UI showing up in Windows is as likely as them moving the Linux kernel.

They won't do anything drastic because they're in the pockets of their business customers: Who need everything pretty same-y to avoid retraining, software changes etc.

 

Re:As if (Windows 8) (0)

Gonoff (88518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324510)

Sometimes, I wish they were more in those pockets. Office 2007/2010 changes are the biggest waste of time I have ever seen on a computer.

Research stuff (5, Insightful)

diegocg (1680514) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324462)

Microsoft research does really cool things, but somehow the bureaucracy always kill them. I don't think it will be different this time.

Radically new (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324476)

Unless you noticed that similar approaches were already used in things like this [labnol.org] (of course that their new minion will sue them, but still)

Why get excited? (2)

vampirbg (1092525) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324480)

Don't you remember all the promises about Vista and all the fancy changes etc? Not even half of those made it and we're using Win7 now... I suppose it'll get cut at the last moment for Win9... Maybe it'll be in Win10 or Win11 provided M$ is still functioning :)

Plasma (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324500)

Is it just me or does the whole bubble thing just seem like a really poorly thought out version of the KDE plasma idea?

And I'm sorry but there was nothing else in that article that Microsoft wasn't touting as "revolutionary" 4 years ago or we haven't seen from various other companies in the past 5 years.

But its Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324502)

And therefore can't be good. . .

I want my 3:46 back (5, Insightful)

jfengel (409917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324506)

There's nothing here you haven't seen before. It's the usual Microsoft Surface things, drawing Fantasia-y colors by waving your hands and rotating 3D objects, which you've seen before. Add to that a lot of vagueness about how everything is going to change and a soundtrack that could easily have come from any HR video on sensitivity training or proper timecard procedure.

Maybe these features will be nifty when we get them. But this video is the worst kind of marketing speak.

This is NOT Windows 8... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324520)

Give me a break, what a nonesense article. There is no way this is Windows 8. The video showed a combination of the already on the market $10,000 touchtable device (used in a lot of high end demonstration rooms for companies such as medical device makers,etc), knockoffs of the Wii, and things stolen from the iPhone.

And what the hell is that guys actually saying? The computer is no longer a tool, but a "helper"???? What a bunch of baloney.

Bullshit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324522)

I've pegged Steve Ballmer as being a similar type to the halfwit David Cameron. He can't see beyond his own closeness to big business and thinks talking your way through is everything. If this is anywhere near true, and I suspect something like that is, this is Microsoft's answer to the "Big Society". Think George W. Bush and "Compassionate Conservatism."

If things turn out the same and I have no reason to doubt they will the idea that software architecture, usability, and value to the customer has anything to do with it is blown out the door. It will be a lot of plausible flip-flopping waffle and a massive media campaign. People will buy it in their droves but it will eventually crash the company. We're entering the final stage of Microsoft's inevitable death.

If Steve Jobs is on the way out (and part of me hopes he is) then there's a possibility that Apple can get ahead of the curve and enter the marketplace to replace Microsoft. That means lower prices and accessibility. It means letting go and looking at providing products that incentivise the bottom of the market. It means getting back to their roots before they got greedy.

Bubbles (0)

KagakuNinja (236659) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324530)

It's bubbles, all the way down...

Name change? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324550)

I guess "Microsoft Windows" will become "Microsoft Porthole"...

How about they just improve it.... (1)

Hans Lehmann (571625) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324564)

Some of us have to actually use computers to, you know, make a living. We don't want or need yet more fluffy widgets to keep us from getting our work done. For every improved driver in Windows 7, there were at least two annoyances that were added to the mix. Transparent overlays?... useless. God-awful search tool that doesn't even recognize a tilde (~) character?...even worse than useless. Completely arbitrary user interface when trying to copy files (probably depending on which serf wrote that piece of code), absolutely infuriating. Hey, Microsoft, how about you try making your OS better, rather than just putting more lipstick on the pig that is Vista.

new VRML ? Not! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324572)

I thought it would be some new kind of vrml like a take off on Oracle of the 90's.

How is this any different than image slicing, crap wrong term. I never can remember what you call it.

I'll guess at it.

bubble_hoover()
bubble_click()

I have to admit I didn't watch the video because it's in an iframe. But, I will bet it's something I either already have the capability of, or don't need.

Wild speculation! I did not hear/see Windows8. (3, Interesting)

Barryke (772876) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324580)

People, please watch that video. The article is wild speculation. I did not hear or see anything that ought to be how Windows 8 looks. Its just MS saying what they recently did with Surface and Kinect.

Those bubbles some speak about (which where in visibly only for seconds, not even showing how interaction would actually work) are not represented as being how Windows 8 would or could work.

Not that i appreciate the idea of such a big company thinking really hard to remove that hassle of having to use a mouse and even then perform verbose, repetitive actions that could be represented with a single voice command. I'd love that.

Rise of the machines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324592)

My wife points out that she can picture this video playing on a jumbotron in Times Square. The camera zooms out to reveal a hellscape of burnt out vehicles and bodies while the few remaining humans run from animatronic mannequin terminators.

This works, if EVERYTHING is streamline, the world (4, Interesting)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324604)

This works, if EVERYTHING is streamline, the world isn't streamlined.

[.jpeg] [.jpg] [.jpe] [.jpg] [.gif] [.] []

The above where ALL extensions I found for jpeg images. Yes, the last one is empty and the gif? Just one of the many wrongly named ones. How do you deal with this uniformly? How do you write a super smooth UI that shows images if even determining what is an image is already that hard.

Link the weather to my airplane ticket? That only works if somehow the ticket data exposes location data in a way the weather plugin can understand AND if then the ticket plugin can understand the weather data. My airport is Eindhoven, my weather plugin only knows about Amsterdam (Schiphol is NEAR to it but NOT the same). So how does that work? Ah, only unified services work... nice lock-in you got going there then. This kind of stuff is a chain and chains are only as strong as the weakest link.

It is not like this kind of stuff hasn't been tried before, it is the intelligent home dream.

The dream where you put a carton of milk in your fridge and it tells a phone that it is getting old. My local supermarket has four brands of milk at least. That is ONE supermarket. If my carton I picked up at a new supermarket on the way doesn't register, the entire service is useless and I might well end up drinking spoiled milk trusting that my intelligent home would have warned me.

My flight can not be just delayed because of the weather at departure airport but also by weather enroute and arrival airport or indeed whatever area my plane is coming from in the first place. My ticket doesn't have route information or where the airplane is coming from, how can my PC check this info if even the airline company can't? And does any of this check the road conditions? How about public transport? Does it KNOW whether I will be driving, a friend, a cab or I will be going by train?

Another one, language and subtitle choices. this should be trivial as long as everyone and every coded uses ISO encoding and then agrees on how many letters. Should be trivial, it isn't. Nobody can ever agree on someone elses standard.

Oh, your services are ALL going to MS supplied? Better hand in that iPhone then, just give it to me, I will take it off your hands. GIVE IT... geez, you expect a Windows 8 experience to work out of the box with iOS? No? Then what is the point.

We can't even get MS to smoothly discover various makers MP3 players. They going to bother with any services that don't pay through the nose for it and share all their data?

There is a reason we don't have integrated services that could power such a UI. The world is filled with individuals who all like to do things their own way. See Google and its chrome window that doesn't work the same as every other window on Linux.

This kind of UI is limitted to the movies where god, the writer, knows exactly what is going to be needed to get done next.

KISS (1)

woboyle (1044168) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324630)

These are people who have obviously never heard of the KISS principle... Yet they will force these new user interfaces upon the world at a huge cost, to that world. As much as I dislike Apple's business practices, I have tremendous respect for their interface designers. As far as I'm concerned, MS failed that class.

who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324632)

eagerly awaited? you sound like a MS marketing flack. nobody is eagerly awaiting windows 8. what could any new version possibly have to offer other than lobotomizing your dual 6 core machine that seemed fast last week before you installed windows 8.

Building a more annoying interface (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324640)

The reason Windows was so elegant is text is laid out in rectangles. All bubbles do is make poorer use of the screen real estate. Now that we finally have screens that can display text properly and on some monitors even multiple pages properly you want to eat up most of the screen with graphics??? Microsoft is famous for system bloat and now they are tackling the last frontier with screen bloat. What's next 250 key keyboards? Hey why don't we add keys for capital letters! I don't need more crap on the screen I need it organized efficiently. I'm still annoyed they fucked with a perfectly good filing system. It was the one thing they had that blew away Mac. At least Mac when they do something like this, say widgets, they stick with rectangular shapes. I'd be far more excited about multiple customizable tool bars. Make them optional for the love of God but give us top, bottom and side tool bars and add in those lovely expanding menus Mac has in Snow Leopard for displaying open files. That would be efficient and not bloated. Just make the tool bars go away and expand when moused over and no lost real estate. The problem is OS makers worry about the OS not how people work and use them. The very best OS is one you barely notice. It should work seamlessly with the software.

Not that impressed (1, Insightful)

SoupIsGoodFood_42 (521389) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324650)

While MS have been mucking about with concepts, Apple have actually added real and useful features to their next OS upgrade.

A Steve Jobs copy? (1)

JoeCommodore (567479) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324676)

Didn't it look like the guy was trying for that Steve Jobs look?

Ideas without apps (1)

JoeCommodore (567479) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324706)

Like most of the other MS innovations of late, they seem to have a lot of very cool ideas, bit not really any great apps that utilize them.

Looks like Prezi.com applied to the OS interface (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324720)

At first blush, that looks an awful like like the paradigm behind the presentation software the Prezi guys have championed (www.prezi.com). Seems like it can be a really effective model for presenting information so it *might* be pretty cool for an interface, too, assuming you prefer GUIs. I hope those guys got paid well for the use of their IP.

On the other hand, I'm kind of in the same camp as some of the Linux guys. (I don't use it at home yet, but I'm thinking about it.) Windows Vista and Windows 7 kind of pushed me over the edge--2+ GB of RAM just to boot the OS, for crying out loud?! I'm having a hard time buying into that model and I'm having a hard time believing that this new interface is going to reduce that trend.

Party poopers, the lot of you. (1)

gfizeek (624828) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324742)

A bunch of IT and linux curmudgeons poo poo a UI redesign? Shocker!

Maybe, just maybe, MS would like to recapture some of interest of the recreational users rather than the sticking to the grudging loyalty of the corporate machine while Apple scores all the oohs and ahhs. What fools! They should just re-release XP every few years to save everyone the hassle of figuring out how the new alt-tab works.

God, you guys are boring.

It was radical and new in 2006 (1)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | more than 3 years ago | (#35324760)

Yeah, it was radical and new in 2006, before the iPhone came out with a multitouch display.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89sz8ExZndc&feature=player_embedded#at=61

Once again, MS is talking about how bleeding edge they are and showing off half a decade old tech.
While that may be radical and cutting edge for MS, it'd be hilarious if it weren't so sad.

Let the fun begin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35324804)

who did they steal it from? I am sure that other companies/individuals will soon be coming forward with loads of proof that MS stole something else.
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