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How To Protect Your Privacy and Make Money

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the pardon-my-skepticism dept.

Privacy 123

itwbennett writes "You have precious personal information; marketers are willing to pay good money for it; and now there are services to broker the deal. London-based Allow Ltd., for example, negotiates with marketers on your behalf and cuts you in on the deal. One Allow customer, Giles Sequeira, made a whopping $10 for letting a single credit card company know that he's in the market for new plastic. In the US, a company called Personal is starting a similar pay-for-data service, and you can hop on its waiting list now." Anyone selling bridges?

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Posting anonymous so that... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352566)

Posting anonymous so that... Bots can't dig my posting habits!!

Baby Boomers (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352866)

How To Be An Old Geezer

With the aging Baby Boomers there are now more elderly people in America than ever before. It becomes more apparent that a segment of them
do not know how to age gracefully. Traditionally, this way of life was learned from extensive contact with and careful observation of the
previous generation of elders. In today's fast-paced world this is less and less viable. While not intended to be 100% comprehensive, this
document is a quick HOWTO reference to at least help today's old people get started. The following are the most important points, the
time-tested things you really MUST do in order to be an old person in the modern world.

  1. Fuck the younger generations as much and as hard as you possibly can. This point is critical and cannot be overemphasized. Most other
    points are related to this one. That's how key it really is. There is one great way to do that, better than all other ways combined:

    Vote as a single homogeneous bloc. This is politically very powerful. Use that power to run up massive debts that you have absolutely
    no intention of paying. That way, future generations can inherit them. You need to do this even though collectively, you are the single
    wealthiest demographic group in existence.

    Your retirement from Social Security is the best way to arrange this. Sure, you could have
    taken personal responsibility for your life and started saving for your own retirement from a young age, but where's the fun in that? It's vital
    that you let Social Security remain the Ponzi scheme that it is so that no young person today has a hope of collecting a dime from it BUT they
    still have to pay into it (hah-hah! I guess the joke's on them!). BE CERTAIN that any politician who even suggests changing Social Security
    towards long-term viability is ending his or her career in politics.

    Sure, they are your children and your grandchildren, but so what? Now that they've grown past early childhood they aren't so cute anymore
    anyway. That makes it easy to treat them like you hate their guts even if you don't know you hate them. If you faithfully practice the points
    outlined in this document, then soon any guilt you might feel over what you've left for them to inherit will melt away and be replaced by
    an insatiable sense of entitlement. In the event this should fail, the constant coverage of the current pointless foreign war that the flower
    of our youth is going off to fight will serve as an excellent distraction.

  2. Run a homeowner's association. As a retiree, it's not like you have to work for a living anymore. You've got some time on your hands. What
    better way to use it than to take your neighbors to court over such worthy matters as the difference between white paint and off-white paint? Those
    bastards should have read and memorized their 100-page homeowner's covenant before daring to modify their own property. As an added bonus, any
    time they spend in court and not at work means even less opportunity to pay off the debts you've left for them to inherit. Any monies they pay
    as a result of losing the lawsuits serves the same goal, so it's a two-for-one!
  3. Drive very slowly, particularly on one-lane roads where it's difficult or impossible to safely pass you. Every time you do this means one more
    chance to make it hard for someone to get to work on time. That way, not only is a significant chunk of their paycheck taken from them to pay for
    your retirement and your medical care, but as an added bonus you add insult to this injury by hindering them from getting to work in the first
    place so they can make the money that pays for your expenses! That'll teach 'em. Whatever you do, don't ever pull over and allow the ten cars
    stuck behind you to pass, especially not when they have a clock to beat and you don't.
  4. When you are a customer at a restaurant, grocery store, technical support line, or the like, be as helpless as possible. Your goal is to be
    a really high-maintainence customer. Sure, you could demonstrate that with your age has come wisdom, but that wouldn't make you feel important
    and special. Instead, ask a lot of stupid questions that you'd already know the answer to if you noticed the most obvious of cues. Ask for a
    lot of trivial changes to a product before you will buy it. Demand a lot of extra effort and attention from whoever is trying to serve you.
    Transform from "sweet old grandma" to "mega-bitch" in a split-second if such attention is not immediately granted. Do not, under any circumstances,
    notice that all the other customers behind you are waiting.

    When it's time to pay, write out a check and take your sweet time about it. Even though you knew what store you were going to visit, DO NOT under
    any circumstances prepare the check in advance by filling out everything except the dollar amount.

  5. This is another important point. Perform all of the above faithfully and consistently. Then whine about how misguided the younger generation
    is as though you didn't have anything to do with that. Complain that they don't respect you. Act absolutely astonished that anyone would see you
    doing all of the above and would respond with anything other than gratitude, praise, and admiration. That will add an element of mindfuck to the
    heretofore material damage covered by the previous points. It's especially effective if you have the compulsive liar's talent of learning how to
    sincerely believe this as you say it. You can complain about how "back in my day" the youth were better/more submissive/kinder than today's youth
    while conveniently forgetting that the elders of that generation actually tried to give their children a better world than they grew up in. It is
    advised that you set your irony detector to "off" while doing this, however.

By faithfully following these steps, you too can be a typical American old geezer.

Wimp. (1)

msauve (701917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35354110)

My name is Rufus T. Firefly. I live at 123 Main St., Anywhere, USA. My phone number is +1(800)555-1212. My Social Security number is 078-05-1120.

How much do I get paid?

Re:Wimp. (3, Funny)

Nikker (749551) | more than 3 years ago | (#35354210)

$1000, the check is being mailed to the above address as we speak. Thank you and have a good day.

Re:Posting anonymous so that... (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#35354776)

/. bots dig with your IP address and trace back even through proxies. [grin]

Protect Your Privacy (4, Insightful)

iYk6 (1425255) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352574)

How does this protect your privacy? It sounds more like selling your privacy.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352594)

Obvious slashvertisment.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352836)

I thought that at first, too, because it sounds like a press release. But slashdot user itwbennett has an actual posting history and submissions that include various things of interest to geeks that don't appear to be corporate press releases. If this is a slashvertisement, it is a slashvertisement for IT World, not these services.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353642)

I thought that at first, too, because it sounds like a press release. But slashdot user itwbennett has an actual posting history and submissions that include various things of interest to geeks that don't appear to be corporate press releases. If this is a slashvertisement, it is a slashvertisement for IT World, not these services.

And are you an actual person, or are you a virtual person creating a virtual testimony to create a virtual good reputation for your other virtual profile.

Information is power. Where is the information? (1)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353816)

Does anyone here know? How much information is there on people, who are the groups that have it, how to access it, and when do these laws start meeting resistance and limitations? The Habeas Data and FOIA laws give you the right to know. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habeas_Data [wikipedia.org]. The lesson of Wikileaks and these laws are, information is power. We need some public information and intelligence agencies, too. Enough information for government only, we all have a right to information too.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (3, Insightful)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352670)

It doesn't, but if you're personal information is going to be whored out anyway, you might as well at least be the one pimping it.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (3, Funny)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352900)

Yo, got your 16 digits right here, they're barely legal and ready to do naughty things for cash.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

causality (777677) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352684)

How does this protect your privacy? It sounds more like selling your privacy.

I've argued before that the way online advertisers track your browsing habits and otherwise take your personal data without first asking is like a form of piracy. It absolutely amounts to treating you as a resource like so much lumber or livestock. What I found was that many people are willing to make excuses and rationalizations for it. Some of them even acted like it's some kind of public service to invade your privacy in order to spam you with ads for things you are more likely to buy, as though you couldn't decide for yourself what you want, as though it were some epitome of altruism.

So, now that more people are attaching a dollar value to their personal data will that finally be what it takes to get them to value their privacy and reject the idea that they should ever have to surrender it involuntarily? At least in the USA the almighty dollar seems to convince people more readily than the soundest of principles.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

flowwolf (1824892) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352910)

When you visit somebodies web server, the information regarding that visit is not your personal property. If you don't want them to record and mine your activities on their website, don't visit that website. Get noscript and live on the internet that way

Thats like walking into a 7/11 and bitching because they're recording you without asking. Its like getting on public transit and bitching at the driver because there are passenger counters installed. Its like going to your local politician up in arms about the traffic counter installed on the road you take home. Frankly, I have no idea what personal data is supposed to mean in this context. You're visiting somebody else's domain. How is a record of that and what you do there, belong to you in any way shape or form?

Re:Protect Your Privacy (5, Insightful)

causality (777677) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353134)

When you visit somebodies web server, the information regarding that visit is not your personal property. If you don't want them to record and mine your activities on their website, don't visit that website. Get noscript and live on the internet that way

Thats like walking into a 7/11 and bitching because they're recording you without asking. Its like getting on public transit and bitching at the driver because there are passenger counters installed. Its like going to your local politician up in arms about the traffic counter installed on the road you take home. Frankly, I have no idea what personal data is supposed to mean in this context. You're visiting somebody else's domain. How is a record of that and what you do there, belong to you in any way shape or form?

It would be courteous of you to learn what browser tracking is, how it is performed, and what sorts of data can be gathered before deciding to speak about the subject. That would save me some time and Slashdot some bandwidth.

That the owner of a particular site knows my IP address visited that specific site is not the problem. In short, the problem is that there are multiple ways in which an organization can track your browsing across many different sites that said organization does not own.

This is not like complaining that the local 7/11 recorded my visit. This is more like the local 7/11 hiring someone to follow me around and record every store I visit.

Now that the very most basic bit of knowledge about this subject has been spoonfed to you, perhaps you could revise your position in light of this new information.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

flowwolf (1824892) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353546)

Even though there are ways to be tracked in such a manner across domain, its not accepted. You're just making justifications for hating all of online tracking, including those done by the domain you're visiting. Sites that perform these shady techniques to track your browsing are not smiled upon by the status quo. You're talking about all forms of tracking in your first point, and then justify such a position by presenting techniques usually reserved for use only by porno sites.

This kind of tracking has been happening for ages anyways. If you buy gas with your CC every time, that data can be used to track your travels. Even your licence plate driving past cameras can be used to track you. The point is, you leave cookie crumbs everywhere you go doing everything you do. How does this cookie trail even begin to belong to you? How is it YOUR data? These are the main questions of my original point but you completely dodged them. Instead you chose to attack my intelligence. Bravo Sir.

I don't think I need to explain to you the facts about bandwidth as I assume you're trying somehow to discredit my opinion with that entirely off topic comment; However, you may need to know that slashdot's entire purpose for being are these discussions. You seem to need to be spoon fed this obvious fact though so here comes the airplane open the hanger! VROOOM

Time perhaps to fight back? (1)

Hyperhaplo (575219) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353894)

Perhaps it is time to fight back?

I dislike that any web site I visit can pull irrelevant information from my browser.. perhaps a privacy option or plugin for Firefox which whitelists information provided to websites?

Perhaps allow either an override or random values to be sent instead?

We know that Mozilla is looking into similar options - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1334615/Privacy-victory-Firefox-plans-stop-firms-tracking-look-online.html [dailymail.co.uk] - but this is addressing the problem at a higher layer.

Any thoughts out there?

I currently run NoScript, AdBlock Plus, Ghostery, Better Privacy plugins.. but nothing I've seen can prevent or change data sent to the web server.

Re:Time perhaps to fight back? (1)

andrea.sartori (1603543) | more than 3 years ago | (#35355094)

Besides the add-ons you already run, you might want to change host and agent data (and some other information) directly in about:config. Not a solution for the average Joe, but maybe worth it. And maybe somebody will write an add-on that will allow to change those data in a more user-friendly fashion.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352828)

It doesn't look like the parent poster read the article, from the source:

Of course, the only way to make that model work is to make your data scarce. So Allow first removes as much of your personal information as it can from the many many marketing databases where it resides. It’s helped in this by the UK’s Data Protection Act, which requires data brokers to remove you from their lists if you ask politely.

It's an interesting idea really, and I would like to know just how much data they can remove from their competitors through the UK's Data Prevention Act.

Another question I would like answered is how much resale value does your private data carry?

Using the example provided: Company X pays $10 to know that I am interested in getting a new Credit Card.
Can I also tell Company Y that I am interested in getting a Credit Card for a further $10 or... does Company X now hold the rights for this information?

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352914)

How does this protect your privacy? It sounds more like selling your privacy.

Well, it could work out if it were turned around a bit (and the middle man eliminated).

If every time they contacted you (mail, email, phone) with a sales pitch, they had to send that 10 dollar bill along as payment for your attention and use of your mailing address, it would greatly reduce the value of a list of random names that some company is trying to sell them. If a million name list costs 10 million dollars to use each time it is used, the value and the usage of the list and the collection of the same will fall drastically.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35354066)

They protect it by backing it up on multiple servers globally silly.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (1)

calmofthestorm (1344385) | more than 3 years ago | (#35354202)

Two years ago I was shopping around for a credit card. I don't care who knew; indeed I told my friends soliciting advice. Earn money too? Sure.

Re:Protect Your Privacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35354538)

It's my privacy,
I'll sell if I want to (x3)
You'd buy, too,
if they sold it to you :D

Re:Protect Your Privacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35355266)

How does this protect your privacy? It sounds more like selling your privacy.

I'm assuming they help you send Data Protection Act letters to existing data brokers to remove the personal information they have already collected on you. This gives them a monopoly on your info, and you control who can buy it.

allow seems to offer 10 quid as a signup fee, (2)

qwerty8ytrewq (1726472) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352584)

Although this does seem a bit like getting paid to donate blood, somehow good but wrong... this guy [freedom-to-tinker.com] has some interesting writing on how selling your 'private' data can be a good idea.

Re:allow seems to offer 10 quid as a signup fee, (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352662)

What is wrong with getting paid to donate blood?

I have blood someone wants it, why should I not be at least paid for the time it takes to get it?

Re:allow seems to offer 10 quid as a signup fee, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35353142)

There's actually no law against selling of blood in the US, but the major collection services will not pay you for one major reason - it would cause people to lie in order to get paid. Yes, there are screening procedures to weed out blood that has a large number of problems - HIV, West Nile, Hepatitis and others - but no screening procedure is perfect and the Red Cross and regional blood services providers do not want to take the risk. Groups will pay you for plasma though, because for plasma it's possible to centrifuge out all the viruses and make it safe. However, most of that plasma goes toward research and not human use anyways.

Re:allow seems to offer 10 quid as a signup fee, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352674)

Although this does seem a bit like getting paid to donate blood, somehow good but wrong...

I think it's more like selling a kidney.
Your body can make blood after you give it away.

Re:allow seems to offer 10 quid as a signup fee, (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 3 years ago | (#35354412)

Being paid to donate blood, a renewable resource, isn't wrong in my opinion. It's a bona fide incentive to part with something you need, as well as spend time draining it out.

At any rate, it's better than a blood tax.

What an amazing offer (1)

Stan Vassilev (939229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352612)

One Allow customer, Giles Sequeira, made a whopping $10 for letting a single credit card company know that he's in the market for new plastic.

If you make $10 selling your own personal information, guess where they'll recover their $10 from, a bit later. You. And they'll make a profit.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352638)

Considering I have never paid a late fee or interest on a credit card since college, please tell me how they do that. I always pay it off every two weeks and spend the rewards when I get X amount. How are they making money?

My real interest is because if this does make them money I will probably stop doing it. My biggest reason besides the rewards for doing this is to hurt these banks.

Re:What an amazing offer (5, Informative)

Auroch (1403671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352660)

Considering I have never paid a late fee or interest on a credit card since college, please tell me how they do that. I always pay it off every two weeks and spend the rewards when I get X amount. How are they making money?

My real interest is because if this does make them money I will probably stop doing it. My biggest reason besides the rewards for doing this is to hurt these banks.

You mean, the fact that there is a hidden cost of using a credit card built into your daily life doesn't bother you? Of course, you don't see the price increase, the merchants build it in. Generally speaking, you can get a cash discounted price at a mom and pop store for simply paying debit or cash - because then they don't pay the CC company and the related merchant fees.

So, yeah, I guess just so long as you don't actually *see* the increased cost, it won't bother you. And for big-box stores, those prices are part-and-parcel of their merch, so abstaining from using a CC may not help you there ... but if you're okay promoting the practice, then keep on plastic-ing.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352688)

I have never gotten a cash discount at any store that I know of. Heck, if they offered it I would go for it.

I am fine with increased costs I cannot change, no point in worrying about that.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

RingDev (879105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352798)

Most stores CC agreements prevent them from marketing it or even doing it. But if you ask a Ma & Pa store owner at the register "is it any cheaper if I pay with cash?" You'll usually hear about their CC fees.

One local game store around here openly acknoledges it. They can't give you a discount due to their contract with their CC provider, but they do openly point out that you are doing more to support the store by paying with cash or debit.

-Rick

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352830)

Oh wow, support their game store. Do they donate all their profits to the poor? Maybe they sell everything at nearly cost and operate as a non-profit?

Otherwise I fail to see why I should care. They are trying to make money off of me just like the credit card folks. How are they any more deserving?

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352996)

Because they will not find ways to fuck you in the ass like a CC company will

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

mattack2 (1165421) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353858)

You seem to be missing the point. I, and h4rr4r, pay off our credit cards every month.

Thus it is *more* convenient _and cheaper_ (due to rewards, which yes, I realize is simply giving me back a bit of what they charged the store) to use credit cards. The VAST majority of stores take credit cards nowadays, so they must be doing it for a reason.

The only time I see cash discount is at (many but not all) gas stations. Though most of the time, the actual price paid when taking into account rewards, the credit card price is the same as the lowest cash only place (e.g. Arco, aka BP, which I don't want to support nowadays anyway.. but I haven't used them for years because of the cash only thing).

Re:What an amazing offer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35354708)

I agree, it's more convenient for us, but in the end it's also cheaper for society: Handling all that cash has a massive cost that totally surpasses the card handling costs -- it's just distributed very evenly and is hard to calculate. The reality is that handling cash _securely_ in the store, on the way to the store, in the bank, on the way to the bank, at homes, at the reserves, _everywhere_ is a major cost.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

Auroch (1403671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353346)

Oh wow, support their game store. Do they donate all their profits to the poor? Maybe they sell everything at nearly cost and operate as a non-profit?

Otherwise I fail to see why I should care. They are trying to make money off of me just like the credit card folks. How are they any more deserving?

You mean, why should you support a real-life store that provides you with real benefits, as opposed to a nebulous company which provides you with a way to access a highly predatory loan with an outrageous interest rate?

I'd like to know why you insist on using a CC when a line of credit is usually 1/2 the cost...

Re:What an amazing offer (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353458)

CC costs me nothing, I pay it every 2 weeks. CC companies hire people, give me cash back and a free loan. What does the game store do that compares?

What line of credit provides cash back?

Re:What an amazing offer (2)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353542)

Gotta be pretty naive to not see the benefits of small local businesses.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

mywhitewolf (1923488) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353986)

he acknowledges it, but doesn't care. he is already costing the CC company money by claiming rewards without paying yearly fees or interest. however for every dollar he costs them they are making $1000 back on those who have had the same mindset, found they needed to lean on the credit card for any period of time, and had to pay back the interest. i doubt they are worried because someone can stick to a budget, where as thankfully to them not many people can. tldr; the CC company make their money back on idiots, not on every single user. they make money of business regardless of if you use your CC or not.

Re:What an amazing offer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352834)

All I can speak for is my limited experience: London, Tottenham / Toronto, College / New York, Canal -- I've received several 'discounts' for paying cash vs. credit card over the last decade or more. Most were the result of a sign posted on/by the register, they also taught me to ask where the sign isn't there.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

Auroch (1403671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353328)

I have never gotten a cash discount at any store that I know of. Heck, if they offered it I would go for it.

I am fine with increased costs I cannot change, no point in worrying about that.

I am okay, accepting the things I cannot change.

But I am not accepting the things I don't think I can change, because I never bothered to asked, because I wasn't informed enough to do so.

I guess the problem is "how to know that you don't know" ...

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 3 years ago | (#35355068)

That depends on the store and how they manage their own finances. Some stores will wear the cost and place them into an increase in prices on the shelf, others will apply a surcharge on the way out. When I bought my university textbooks there was a sign at the counter showing the credit card surcharges. They differed depending on the card with MasterCard and VISA being the lowest (3%) and diners club and AMEX being the most expensive at (7%). I paid cash. There was an ATM next to the store so I think pretty much nearly everyone else did too.

Re:What an amazing offer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35355192)

Spec's gives a 5% discount if you use debit (with pin) or cash.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

Ghengis Khak (1967518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353022)

You mean, the fact that there is a hidden cost of using a credit card built into your daily life doesn't bother you? Of course, you don't see the price increase, the merchants build it in. Generally speaking, you can get a cash discounted price at a mom and pop store for simply paying debit or cash - because then they don't pay the CC company and the related merchant fees. So, yeah, I guess just so long as you don't actually *see* the increased cost, it won't bother you. And for big-box stores, those prices are part-and-parcel of their merch, so abstaining from using a CC may not help you there ... but if you're okay promoting the practice, then keep on plastic-ing.

In addition to this flaw, from a psychological standpoint people also spend more [livescience.com] when using a credit card.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352696)

Considering I have never paid a late fee or interest on a credit card since college, please tell me how they do that. I always pay it off every two weeks and spend the rewards when I get X amount. How are they making money?

My real interest is because if this does make them money I will probably stop doing it. My biggest reason besides the rewards for doing this is to hurt these banks.

It's not you they make money from. It is the person who does not pay off the balance, and thus incurs interest charges.

Actually, come to think of it, there may be per transaction fees between the merchant and the credit card company, allowing them to make money off of every purchase you make on your card whether you pay interest or not. Some places will charge you less if you pay cash.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352714)

What places?

I have heard this claim, but never found such a place.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

Idimmu Xul (204345) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352740)

Half the independent newsagents/corner shops in the UK will charge an extra 50p to £1 if you pay by card (either credit or debit)

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

DanTheStone (1212500) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352756)

I've visited Rhode Island several times, and several gas stations there have 2 prices listed now. You pay ~5 cents less per gallon of gas if you pay cash.

This was in the Warwick / West Warwick area.

Re:What an amazing offer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352774)

Gas stations are the only place I've seen it. Some stations around here (upstate NY) knock 4 or 5 cents off a gallon if you pay with cash.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352780)

Not sure if I think saving less than a dollar on a fill up is worth going inside to pay. Seems like it would be if I drove commercially or something.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353196)

They also make money by selling your purchase history to third parties.

As for the charging less for cash, banks, credit card companies and credit processing companies all get a cut when you pay plastic, and the merchant isn't officially allowed to adjust their price for credit payment. To get around this, some companies add in bonuses for cash purchases. I usually see this at import/export companies, specialty stores, and tech stores.

For that matter, I've also seen this for online payments (PayPal for instance will take a cut off the top if you receive payment via credit card). Many people get around this by charging more for "shipping and handling" if you pay by credit card.

Re:What an amazing offer (2)

igreaterthanu (1942456) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352702)

Considering I have never paid a late fee or interest on a credit card since college

You are paying the extra 3 or so percent that all the merchants increase their prices by to pay for the credit card fees. Now the fees go to the company who paid you the $10. At 3% and $10, they only need you to spend $334 before they make money on the deal.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352766)

But If all merchants have this price increase and I cannot avoid paying it, why should I worry about that?

Sounds like it is better to take the $10 and at least get something out of the deal.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

flowwolf (1824892) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352842)

You're missing the point. They profit off of you every time you use the card. The merchant is charged that cost and their costs are raised in price so that you have the convenience of paying with your card. If you think that using your credit card daily is sticking it to the banks... you're very mistaken. Thats exactly what they want you to do.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352854)

But I cannot escape those raised prices. By at least giving nothing more to the banks I come out ahead.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353224)

Bzzt. By at least giving nothing more to the banks you come out less behind than you would have. You escape the raised prices by living in a credit card-free society. OR, you escape the raised prices by shopping local, paying cash, and having the extra money go to your local business who then in turn has more money to spend on what YOU are selling, without the money being siphoned out of the local economy to be hoarded by credit companies/banks.

That said, I pay plastic for everything, because I admit that I live in a global economy (and the credit card companies have been my customers on multiple occasions) ;)

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

moonbender (547943) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353238)

You, individually, can't easily escape those raised prices. But clearly, if enough people decided NOT to use credit cards, the market power of the CC companies would be reduced, with all kinds of consequences. Even if you never pay them a dime (beyond the transaction fee), you're extremely valuable to them just as "another satisfied customer".

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353348)

You can often escape credit card payment/processing surcharges by paying in cash. Have you never been in a store where the clerk told you that paying by credit card would cost 1 or 2 dollars more?

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

mattack2 (1165421) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353888)

In the US, it is against the law to charge more for credit card use. They can give a cash discount, however. Yes, you may say that that is equivalent, but it means that either the posted price (e.g. for comparison) is the credit card price, or both prices are posted (e.g. gas stations).

Re:What an amazing offer (2)

Faux_Pseudo (141152) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353012)

The rewards don't hurt the banks. They hurt the merchants you redeem them at. They are the ones that take the hit, not the card company/bank.

Eheh (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353998)

And of course that is the reason why if I pay with iDeal (dutch bank system) I don't have to pay the transaction fee that I have to pay when I use a credit card.

Not all companies do this, most just add the transaction costs to the price. But those companies that operate in more then one country clearly show just how expensive credit cards are and it is YOU that ends up paying it.

Oh and what is the monthly, yearly cost for your credit card? Mine is 10 euro's per year and I can pay in any shop and online with ease and more security.

Re:What an amazing offer (1)

mattack2 (1165421) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353868)

Though that $10 really doesn't seem like much, since I know of one card where you get enough for a $50 rebate right off the bat when getting the card. Yes, I know that this says that he was only "in the market for new plastic" in this case.. But I doubt there are a bunch of different credit card companies willing to do this.

Rule of Acquisition #121 (1)

intellitech (1912116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352650)

Everything is for sale..

Let's all wait for the general population to whore themselves out further.

Re:Rule of Acquisition #121 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352692)

That's actually the first Rule of Acquisition.

Re:Rule of Acquisition #121 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352888)

I think rule #1 is actually "Once you have their money, never give it back."

prior data... ip? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352654)

so can I negotiate with facebook for the cost of all the private data they are freely taking?

Re:prior data... ip? (1)

History's Coming To (1059484) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353282)

Yes, in theory. The most extreme estimation of Facebook's equity-per-user is around $800, so there's your starting point. Of course, as more and more people join the more us non-members will become statistical outliers, and therefore at the interesting and maybe valuable end of the spectrum. I'm holding out for exactly this...either Facebook go bust spectacularly, fade into obscurity, or I get a few million for being one of the last to sign up. I don't really care which, the money would be nice but I'm not enough of a fool to actually believe social marketing is worth that much per person.

FUCK SLASHDOT (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352792)

Why are you trying to shove this shit down our throats. Fucking CmdrTaco too... One more piece of asshattery and I'll be dropping Slashdot like I dropped Pandora.

Re:FUCK SLASHDOT (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352806)

Does your own asshattery mean you are now gone, or only asshattery in what is posted on the front page?

PROTIP: complaining as an AC is not going to convince anyone.

cmdrtaco (1)

mevets (322601) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352926)

I've never asked anything of you; please try to find something even more 'asshattish' than this and bit by bit the world becomes a better place....
I know you have it in you.

Biased information (1)

flowwolf (1824892) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352810)

How can you even begin to see this as effective market research? Your sample has ulterior motives. They'll answer whatever gets them the money.

Do I even have to ask why affiliate marketing schemes are on front page of slashdot?

world+dog think US invasive by nature/desperation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35352812)

many think greed, fear & ego are our primary motives? others think we're fanatical crusading zealots. the more we know about you/your fears/needs/ability to pay, the better we're able to decide how to arm you/us against your enemies, or anybody for that matter. just please (we mean that in the strongest terms) don't use our weapons against us, ok? the money's good, right? nobody knows much, so the 'privacy's' good too? that's US? see you on the other side of it?

despite the obviously expanding 'unrest' (continued facilitation of the murder of innocent folks by weaponized industrialists/unnamed corepirate nazi elitists/bankers/politicians' hired goons etc...), the creators are continuing to schedule million baby 'play-dates' all over the wwworld. they must know something too?

How lame (1)

al0ha (1262684) | more than 3 years ago | (#35352878)

The company does not even list a Chief Information Security Office (CISO) listed among their upper level management. How can they claim to respect privacy and security when their senior level technology management expertise lies in making online maps?

Marketing Strategy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35353008)

It is indeed a great marketing strategy of having a very large number of customer in a single shot. Thanks for the initiative and the analysis about this topic.

accommodation Gold Coast [gchr.com.au]

Can I sell YOUR information? (2)

nghate (722525) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353088)

I wonder how long before ID theft get's applied to make money this way...

Re:Can I sell YOUR information? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353804)

I wonder how long before ID theft get's applied to make money this way...

I wonder how long until "fake ID creation" will be wide-spread.

This isn't anything new (1)

YoshiDan (1834392) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353124)

How is this any different from the billion other survey sites on the internet (Rewards Central for example) that pay you to do surveys or polls and then give you a small payment for it?

Re:This isn't anything new (1)

YoshiDan (1834392) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353140)

That pay you to do surveys or polls and then give you a small payment for it

Geez that made sense... I need more coffee...

Re:This isn't anything new (1)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353232)

It's better because it's honest. The survey people are selling your info left and right and you have no say in whom gets it.

Re:This isn't anything new (1)

YoshiDan (1834392) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353454)

Every survey site I've ever been a member of claims to provide their client that they are doing the research for with anonymous data only. It's nothing new at all.

With a headline like that, I actually wondered.... (1)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35353158)

....if I'd ticked 'Ads Disabled'.

Re:With a headline like that, I actually wondered. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35354152)

yeah, you ticked it off. :p

no idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35353654)

Like some nice guy you meet on the street, tell you how horrible the world is and say to you: give me all your privacy, they are safe with me.

I'm not interested until I can pull a Chicago (1)

istartedi (132515) | more than 3 years ago | (#35354056)

I'm really not interested in this until I can pull a Chicago attack on it. In other words, create lots of fake identities and get $reward*$fakes.

Of course, it'd be highly illegal unless I could find some kind of loophole. So, for all intents and purposes (heheh) I'm not interested.

Re:I'm not interested until I can pull a Chicago (1)

linuxisforbigfatfags (2005994) | more than 3 years ago | (#35355202)

intents and purposes

Your sig says all intensive purposes, but your post says all intents and purposes. So which is it, tough guy?

hell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35354444)

Hell I'm broke atm, I'll sell all my friend's phone numbers, email, facebook profiles you name lol

Reusablity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35354530)

As an enterprise software salesmen once told me, "Bits are like hookers, You sell them, you still have them, you sell them again."

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