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Aussie Brewery Creates Space Beer

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the drunk-in-spaaaaaace dept.

Beer 118

astroengine writes "An Australian brewing company has created the world's first beer that can be consumed in space. 4-Pines Brewing Company teamed up with Saber Astronautics Australia, tirelessly testing different brews on zero-G flights last year. They have now finalized the winning formula, calling the beer 'Vostok' — after the spacecraft flown by Yuri Gagarin in 1961. The beverage is a strong-tasting stout with reduced carbonation to avoid the dreaded microgravity 'wet burp.'"

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hic (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35382800)

hic

Aussies and Beer (5, Funny)

Maclir (33773) | more than 3 years ago | (#35382812)

Makes me proud to be an Australian. Now there are no reasons why we can't colonize space - we can take our slabs of VB with us, all we need is a barbie (that's the device for cooking hunks of dead animals over flames, not the de-sexed doll) that is safe to use in zero gravity.

Crack a tinny, mate.

Re:Aussies and Beer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35382952)

I know, space beer and Mad Max? I'm totally gobsmacked.

Re:Aussies and Beer (2)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383042)

I thought you had to be a serious yahoo to come up with something like that.

Re:Aussies and Beer (2)

smelch (1988698) | more than 3 years ago | (#35382974)

Gross, you should take slabs of Java with you.... or pretty much anything other than VB.

Re:Aussies and Beer (2)

uradu (10768) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384314)

That Victoria Bitter for the non-Aussies in the crowd. Not the best of Aussie beers, but hey, better than XXXX I guess.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

dwywit (1109409) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384878)

Ohhhh, bring it on - are you a cockroach, a mexican, or a croweater? VB is what you'll find in the gay bars in Fortitude Valley. It's long been known as the "bachelor's drink".

Re:Aussies and Beer (2)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385438)

even us mexicans don't drink VB...

Now Coopers, that's an aussie beer to be proud of.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

dwywit (1109409) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386334)

+1, that Dark Ale is a ripper. Prefer the Cascade stout, though.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

Phoghat (1288088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35387198)

I live in Zacatecas and most of the people around here drink Tecate which colloquially translated means "Shit"

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

Phoghat (1288088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35387194)

Then why is it that VB has the highest market share [wikipedia.org] in Australia. Is most of Australia gay? (Not that there's anything wrong with that))

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35382990)

The Ruskies brought vodka into orbit, the Australians are doing beer. Americans? Well, I guess we made Tang. So there's that. Oh, and nukes, we probably brought weapons into space first.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383392)

Actually I'm fairly certain the Ruskies were the first with weapons.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386146)

The Ruskies brought vodka into orbit, the Australians are doing beer. Americans?

Mr. Jack Daniels and Mr. George Dickel both make a fine Tennessee whiskey. We'll supply that.

Re:Aussies and Beer (0)

SalsaDoom (14830) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383250)

Great,

Now we have beer... if you open up a Tim Hortons up there somewhere, we Canadians can come too!

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385294)

Wait... you're saying Canadians can only get off in Tim Horton???

(I had to Google it... Tim Hortons is a chain of coffee/doughnut shops.)

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

metalgamer84 (1916754) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384206)

Don't forget the Vegemite.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385600)

No need for modification there.

As a bonus, you can use it to spackle any cracked re-entry shield tiles.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

Faulkner39 (955290) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385688)

This is why I love Australia. The people have their priorities straight.

Re:Aussies and Beer (1)

bloodhawk (813939) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386872)

No proud Aussie would be drinking VB, it is barely a step above drinking fosters, the thought of consuming either of those makes me feel ill.

Priorities? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35382850)

This is real Nerd news, but there are sometimes I wonder why? Shouldn't we have higher priorities to spend money on? Space elevator, far space travel, populate Mars (coz frankly we are getting too crowded on earth)? But beer in space? Just what we need, some drunk space pilot docking to the space station. This is why I have no hope for the human race. Sure, I could lighten up, but I'm ready for the younger generation to get off my earth lawn!

Re:Priorities? (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35382962)

This is real Nerd news, but there are sometimes I wonder why? Shouldn't we have higher priorities to spend money on?

Diversity of projects is exactly the reason why a space elevator may become a possibility one day. This isn't Master of Orion where you can just pump all your assets into one technology and have it turn up in 21 turns.

Re:Priorities? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383016)

Shouldn't we have higher priorities to spend money on? Space elevator, far space travel, populate Mars (coz frankly we are getting too crowded on earth)?

This is Australia we're talking about, so "no" and "crowded?"

It's Research! They were doing it for Science! (1)

billstewart (78916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383032)

Science is important, and this is research!

Besides, we're not going to have a significant fraction of the human population off the planet in your lifetime, or for centuries. (I don't count it as significant unless it's self-sustaining colonies, not dependent on having Earth around to supply them. Less than that is an important first step, but those kids aren't getting off your our lawns, so we've got to put up with them.) So relax, have yourself a beer.

Re:It's Research! They were doing it for Science! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35384892)

Besides, we're not going to have a significant fraction of the human population off the planet in your lifetime, or for centuries.

And as long as there's no beer in space, that'll continue to be true. So I, for one, welcome this experiment in brewing, and I remind the brewmaster that I might be useful in taste-testing it aboard ISS.

Re:Priorities? (5, Insightful)

Facegarden (967477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383490)

This is real Nerd news, but there are sometimes I wonder why? Shouldn't we have higher priorities to spend money on? Space elevator, far space travel, populate Mars (coz frankly we are getting too crowded on earth)? But beer in space? Just what we need, some drunk space pilot docking to the space station. This is why I have no hope for the human race. Sure, I could lighten up, but I'm ready for the younger generation to get off my earth lawn!

Umm, isn't this the same tired argument people use *every* time someone does something other than cure cancer?

"OMG, why are you playing baseball, there's cancer to be cured!"

"Why are you playing guitar, there are starving people in Africa!'

"Why are you studying journalism, you should be studying engineering and solving the energy crisis!"

No matter what you are doing, there is always something more noble to be done, but we can't all be doing noble things. There's nothing wrong with brewing beer for consumption in space, or making Justin Bieber lunchboxes for kids or making yet another iPad case. People should do whatever they're best at, or whatever makes them happy.
-Taylor

Re:Priorities? (1)

uradu (10768) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384346)

Come on now, there's all sorts of wrong with making Justene Bieber lunch boxes, mate!!! FFS, what were you thinking?!

Re:Priorities? (1)

Jezza (39441) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383576)

I dunno, if you're being crowded by characters in the pub I think it only makes sense to hit the space beer...

(Sorry... I thought it was funny. It should be noted I was insert mode when I thought of that joke [sorry, I stop now before I need braces {sorry - I'm done now}])

Re:Priorities? (2)

Smauler (915644) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383782)

I read something a little while back about the threshold theory (not sure if it was actually called this, but it's my post any I'll cry if I want to). Essentially, human space travel now, and in the past, is experimental and by drips and drabs because there is no obvious short term return. We need to rely upon governmental pioneers with massively funded projects with no financial results (note - this IMO is one of the primary reasons for government). We will reach a tipping point at some point in which private investors see financial gain outweighing the outlays. This doesn't _seem_ like happening soon, but with cheaper, better and more reliable ascents to Earth orbits, it's not massively far off IMO. Once the benefits of going into space outweigh the costs, _everyone_ will be doing it, and we'll be worried about unregulated access in space.

We've seen this to some degree with satellites - Originally only governmental agencies stuck them up there... it was assumed that the prohibitative cost of sticking a sattelite in orbit around the earth would deter companies. Now satellite communications are massive business, and commonplace.

Also, and to contradict any point about manned space flight being somehow special, I'd point out deep sea explorations and technologies. Most of the best divers in the world are employed by companies concerned about their assets.

The reason why is just to pump money at it until we hit the threshold when it becomes benficial. Because, (and I'm not being nostradamus-esque here), there will be a point when it will be profitable to send people into space. And all the governmental pushes, which returned crap all direct financial benefit will be used.

This is as spoken by a relatively socialist libertarian, anti big government.

Re:Priorities? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385714)

The word you are looking for is 'economic' not 'benficial' (sic).

New technologies become economic by being price and feature competitive with the old way of doing things. As they continue to drop in price they often completely displace the old way.

For space flight 'the old way of doing things' is a tough question. e.g. ICBM's were feature and price competitive with bombers, but the only market is the government.

As far as the dream of moving population off of earth. I'm afraid the old ways of reducing population (4 horsemen) are usually dirt cheap (modern war being an exception).

Re:Priorities? (1)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385850)

Because, (and I'm not being nostradamus-esque here), there will be a point when it will be profitable to send people into space

I'm not so sure. At the same time that the improvements in launch systems are going on to make it profitable to put people into space, we also have improvements in robotics. It's far cheaper to put a robot up there than a human, and once robots hit a certain point of intelligence and capability, there's no economic reason to send people.

We might, in a post-scarcity future, send humans into space anyway -- manned spaceflight as the biggest performance art project of all time. But economically speaking, manned spaceflight beyond Earth orbit, or maybe Luna, will probably never turn a profit.

Re:Priorities? (1)

bertok (226922) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386038)

Once the benefits of going into space outweigh the costs, _everyone_ will be doing it, and we'll be worried about unregulated access in space.

What benefits?

No really, I want to hear what these supposed benefits are. I hear a lot of discussion about "reducing costs", and "thresholds", and "privatization of space", all with a supposed long-term goal of colonization or private enterprise, but I just don't see what everyone is going to be doing up there, except perhaps tourism.

You know what space contains? Cold rocks in a vacuum. What's so exciting about that that we should be spending trillions to make it more accessible to everyone? We have cold rocks here! Sure, they're not in a vacuum, but I don't see how that's not better!

There's no resource in space that is not available here, on Earth, at a vastly lower price point. There is no territory in space that is more cost effective to inhabit than any existing uninhabited area on Earth. There is nothing special or magic about any location in space within a 50 light year radius that would allow any industrial activity that cannot be performed terrestrially or in low earth orbit.

Ignoring a small tourism industry "it was fun but I wouldn't want to live there", and the possible novelty factor that might attract the ultra rich, there really isn't anything of interest up there.

We'd have to discover either intelligent alien life AND faster-than-light travel, OR find unobtanium to make serious space colonization, travel, or industry worth it. Without those we'll never do anything except tourism, scientific research, and low-earth orbit satellite launches. There's just no point.

Re:Priorities? (1)

Smauler (915644) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386778)

There's no resource in space that is not available here, on Earth, at a vastly lower price point. There is no territory in space that is more cost effective to inhabit than any existing uninhabited area on Earth.

Solar power is one possible example. It is currently available on Earth at a vastly lower price point than sending collectors into space. However, space-based solar power is inherently better than trying to do it on Earth, for masses of reasons.

I'm not idealising what is out there, I know it's almost all basically boring rocks with nothing in between. The vastly lower price point is our current situation. The point I was making was that at some point I believe throwing crap into space will become a relatively negligent cost, and the "barrier" will become a non-issue.

Re:Priorities? (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385300)

Look at 'em spending all this money on zero-g beer, when they've spent nary a penny researching zero-g sex!!!

Re:Priorities? (1)

captain_sweatpants (1997280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386524)

Warning: Consumption of space-beer may lead to zero-g sex experiments.

Re:Priorities? (1)

BeaverCleaver (673164) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386040)

I'm pretty sure a business can spend their own money on whatever field of R&D they choose. Just as you are free to invest _your_ money in that company, donate the money to starving orphans, or spend it on shiny toys for yourself.

Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vodka (-1)

flyboy974 (624054) | more than 3 years ago | (#35382856)

Just like how do you use a Pen in space, Russia came up with a simple answer. A pencil.

Why on earth (and space) are they trying to fix the carbonation problem. Put in some Cranberry juice with Vodka and you have a great drink. No carbonation. No problem.

Simple.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35382900)

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35382994)

Just like how do you use a Pen in space, Russia came up with a simple answer. A pencil.

I like how readily people accept that story despite how contrived it sounds.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383228)

I like how, except for Linux, where it is expected of one to go to any lengths to get Linux on their toaster, /. is rather Luddite.

Researcher:"Here's this new development!" /.:"How does it involve Linux?"

R:"It doesn't." /.:"Then it is a waste of time and you could have just used X."

R:"But this was developed to solve problem Y with X in environment Z!" /.:"I can't hear you over my massive Archos listening to oggs out of my painstakingly handcrafted directory structure."

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383312)

How does it sound "contrived?" I mean, it's kind of an obvious answer, and it's not inconceivable that when we were racing into space, someone set aside a large sum of money to fix a "Space problem" that had already been solved. Think of how much time and money get devoted to solving and preventing "computer" crimes that are really just regular old crimes, except that someone involved used a computer. Think of how much we spent "on terrorism" on things that had nothing to do with terrorism. Wasting money is not a new government behavior, it sounds entirely plausible to me.

...Or maybe you meant that a pen would work just fine in space? Well, many of us don't think about the physics of pens, so it doesn't sound that contrived to us.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383386)

It's one of those cases that demonstrates common sense isn't.

With a little thought one realizes that pencils work by depositing particles, that are only barely attached, on the surface they are used on. Lots of lose particles in zero-G with sensitive electronics is just asking for trouble.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383788)

Electrically conductive particles, no less.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

uradu (10768) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384404)

Not only that, but the very thought of all these micro particles floating around in the cabin atmosphere and inevitably also being breathed in makes me cringe. Iron filings anyone?

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384498)

With a little thought one realizes that pencils work by depositing particles, that are only barely attached, on the surface they are used on. Lots of lose particles in zero-G with sensitive electronics is just asking for trouble.

I'm not to proud to admit that I never would have thought of that. The whole "graphite stuck to paper thing" was not something I would have thought about.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383410)

How does it sound "contrived?" I mean, it's kind of an obvious answer...

Precisely.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383886)

I meant that pencils would seem like an obvious answer to the problem of "how do you write in space," and I could easily see NASA overlooking this.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384166)

I meant that pencils would seem like an obvious answer to the problem of "how do you write in space," and I could easily see NASA overlooking this.

I understood that, but the 'obvious answer' bit is so dizzylingly obvious that it doesn't make any sense. You're talking about a select team of dudes working to solve a problem once thought impossible, who are USING PENCILS to solve this problem

It isn't believable because it's a plausible scenario, it's believable because we WANT to believe that it happened. Mistakes made by dudes that are smarter than us really put a bad day at the office into perspective.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384464)

It isn't believable because it's a plausible scenario, it's believable because we WANT to believe that it happened. Mistakes made by dudes that are smarter than us really put a bad day at the office into perspective.

... no, I'm pretty sure it's believable because "Pencils write in space without gravity while pens don't" sounds plausible.

"'Pens use gravity to get the ink onto paper' you say? I can't remember the last time I tried to write upside down, but I think the pen may not have worked, so I could buy that. Pencils probably work without gravity, that just makes sense. NASA didn't think of it but the Russians did? Well, I don't know anyone working at NASA, so okay, I'll take your word for it."

I really don't think many people accepted that because of reasons like "Ha ha, those overeducated morons at NASA! I dropped out of high school but I could have solved that one!"

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384580)

I really don't think many people accepted that because of reasons like "Ha ha, those overeducated morons at NASA! I dropped out of high school but I could have solved that one!"

Really? Think about why this story was dug up today. Was he trying to point out how silly the premise sounds, or was he trying to sound smart?

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

Smauler (915644) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383956)

I mean, it's kind of an obvious answer, and it's not inconceivable that when we were racing into space, someone set aside a large sum of money to fix a "Space problem" that had already been solved.

It is an obvious answer to some... but a bad one. Pencils in a zero gravity high oxygen electronic dependant sealed environment. Can you really not see any problems with pencils in this kind of environment?

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384400)

I rarely use pencils, and it's even rarer that I write in zero gravity high oxygen electronic dependent sealed environments, so... no.

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35383914)

While I believe Russians did use pencils on occasion I believe Russians have simply been using BIC pens (or their Russian counterpart) for decades. NASA astronauts didn't know that standard pens worked just as well as "Space Pens" until the MIR exchange program when an American Astronaut noticed the practice. I remember seeing an interview with the astronaut that made the "discovery".

Re:Russia over complicating it? Go back to the Vod (2)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385316)

That reminds me of the story of the constipated mathematician... he worked it out with a pencil.

Limited market (3, Funny)

Zoxed (676559) | more than 3 years ago | (#35382890)

A beer to be drunk in space: now that is what I call limiting your market ;-)

Re:Limited market (2)

AchilleTalon (540925) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384584)

Well, I believe that's what we call a vertical market.

Re:Limited market (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385240)

I'd say they have a monopoly. When people start taking orbital trips in a few years, theirs might very well be the only brew served, and you know that plenty of folks are going to want to have a beer in space. They can probably charge an arm and a leg for it too. It may be a niche market, but, for now, they have it entirely to themselves.

Great! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35382950)

And still no cure for cancer.

Re:Great! (1)

smelch (1988698) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383036)

Right, because frankly what we need is a brewery to finally crack that case, but all of their engineers are locked up in zero-g refreshment projects instead of in medical school where they belong.

Re:Great! (0)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383078)

Hypothesis: beer consumed in low gravity will cure cancer.

Experimental protocol
1. Make a beer designed for space and get cancer doing it
2. Consume beer in space, curing cancer
3.???
4. PROFIT!!!

Here we go (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35383000)

Sigh, cue all the beer snob posts.....

What was wrong with Guinness? (1)

Vrtigo1 (1303147) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383052)

I don't claim to be a chemist, but I don't think Guinness is carbonated. It uses nitrogen to make the little bubbles, and it doesn't make you burp like a regular cabonated beer does. Wouldn't this accomplish the same thing without all the expense of creating and testing new beers in a zero G environment?

Re:What was wrong with Guinness? (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383296)

Isn't (natural) carbonation part of the fermentation process? Nitrogen would probably help its shelf life by slowing the reactions that change the flavor but I doubt they 'carbonate' it with N.

Re:What was wrong with Guinness? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35385190)

It produces CO2 as part of the fermentation process, but they "charge" it with N when it's poured. They also use a special tip on the tap. The nitrogen forms smaller bubbles than carbon dioxide, resulting in the famous creamy head. There's links on the guinness website that take you to the explanation of the "widget" they use in canned guinness to achieve the same effect - and they use lasers in the process.

Re:What was wrong with Guinness? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35383480)

Beer gas a combination of carbon dioxide and nitrogen, but the real problem is the extra gas put into the stomach, which must be expelled via the mouth. in zero G, the bubbles don't agglomerate the way they do under gravity, so when the gas is expelled, out comes a bunch of stomach contents, as well.

Lambic would probably be an OK beer to drink in space, as it's traditionally served flat.

Re:What was wrong with Guinness? (1)

pthisis (27352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383510)

I don't claim to be a chemist, but I don't think Guinness is carbonated. It uses nitrogen to make the little bubbles

Guinness is carbonated with CO2; it uses a nitrogen push.

The next time you're at a bar that has Guinness on tap, take a look at the taps--the Guinness tap is a tall, vertical faucet that has a restrictor plate in it. The purpose of that is to knock most of the CO2 out of solution quickly, to form the fine, cascading bubbles that Guinness is known for.

In order to push beer through the restrictor plate, you need a pretty high level of gas pressure to push it through. Normal beers just use CO2 to push them, but at the high pressures you need to drive a Guinness faucet you'd wind up with wildly overcarbonated beer (if you have a high pressure of CO2 in the keg, it will wind up overcarbonating the beer as it reaches equilibrium between the headspace in the keg and the dissolved volumes of CO2 in the beer).

The solution is to use high-pressure nitrogen to push the beer; nitrogen is basically insoluable in beer, so you don't wind up with the overcarbonation problem. Actually they use beergas, which is a blend of CO2 and nitrogen (if you had _no_ CO2, the beer would become undercarbonated as dissolved CO2 left solution to equalize pressure in the headspace).

The widgets that "draught" cans/bottles of Guinness use serve to agitate the beer quickly to force a portion of the CO2 out of solution quickly and form the microbubbles; it's still carbonated with CO2 in the cans and bottles, just as it is on tap.

Re:What was wrong with Guinness? (1)

Mad_Rain (674268) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385756)

Thank you for learning me something *hic* about my *hic* favorite bread *hic* I mean beverage.

Re:What was wrong with Guinness? (1)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385816)

You, sir, are my favorite chemist!

Re:What was wrong with Guinness? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385768)

Couldn't they drink a _good_ stout instead?

Guinness is piss.

Obsidian Oatmeal Stout would be worth paying the cost of lifting it to orbit. Guinness? At $5K+ a pound? Fuck you very much.

I'll be bringing a nice '91 Opus 1 if I'm paying that much anyhow. Bubbles must suck in zero g. You could get a red to breath nicely as a floating sphere of liquid.

Cart, meet horse. (3, Funny)

MachDelta (704883) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383110)

Oh sure, invent space beer AFTER the last shuttle has launched. Way to fuck up the order of operations on that one guys!

(tongue firmly in cheek)

Re:Cart, meet horse. (2)

Vrtigo1 (1303147) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383148)

I thought it was just the last flight for Discovery? Isn't Atlantis supposed to be up next, assuming the government actually gives NASA money for it?

Re:Cart, meet horse. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35383622)

I thought it was just the last flight for Discovery? Isn't Atlantis supposed to be up next, assuming the government actually gives NASA money for it?

That is correct, but they want to prolong the media hype as much as possible as their pretty much fucked for publicity/funding until they fire someone at Mars.

Re:Cart, meet horse. (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386184)

There are one or two flights left (the second one may or may not be funded but was mandated by Congress)

Now the Colonization of Space may begin! (3, Interesting)

bareman (60518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383112)

Beer (& Whiskey) open the way for civilization!

There was a recent discovery channel program called "How Beer Saved the World" and in Life on the Mississippi Mark Twain wrote

"How solemn and beautiful is the thought that the earliest pioneer of civilization, the van-leader of civilization, is never the steamboat, never the railroad, never the newspaper, never the Sabbath-school, never the missionary -- but always whiskey! Such is the case. Look history over; you will see. The missionary comes after the whiskey -- I mean he arrives after the whiskey has arrived; next comes the poor immigrant, with ax and hoe and rifle; next, the trader; next, the miscellaneous rush; next, the gambler, the desperado, the highwayman, and all their kindred in sin of both sexes; and next, the smart chap who has bought up an old grant that covers all the land; this brings the lawyer tribe; the vigilance committee brings the undertaker. All these interests bring the newspaper; the newspaper starts up politics and a railroad; all hands turn to and build a church and a jail -- and behold! civilization is established forever in the land. But whiskey, you see, was the van-leader in this beneficent work. It always is. It was like a foreigner -- and excusable in a foreigner -- to be ignorant of this great truth, and wander off into astronomy to borrow a symbol. But if he had been conversant with the facts, he would have said: Westward the Jug of Empire takes its way. "

Re:Now the Colonization of Space may begin! (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 3 years ago | (#35387362)

Exactly. Without alcohol, exploration and colonization won't get far. Now that we can have beer, wine, and liquor in space, let the exploration begin.

They must be Tankard fans! (1)

rev0lt (1950662) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383162)

If you stick to drinking Space beer Hangovers - headaches will be in the past The Sci-Fi-booze makes you healthy and wise Your dick and brain will grow in size If you're bald, it'll make your hair grow If you're not, drink it for fun Your liver wants more and more of it It keeps your stomach strong and fit We love it - a beermaniac Utopia We want it - oktobertest comucopia (Taken from "Space Beer")

Re:They must be Tankard fans! (1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383352)

It's a jelly.

Stupid, marketing only. (1)

AchilleTalon (540925) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383462)

Most stupid thing ever. Astronauts are doomed to drink their own recycled pee since the payload to carry a twelve-pack of beer is too high. So, there is no use for beer in space and the cost to send beer in space is way too high to justify it. However, it is a good marketing campaign idea.

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35383524)

So you've tasted the beer?

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (1)

Macgyver7017 (629825) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384046)

There is, however, the hope for space homebrew made from recycled pee.

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (1)

AchilleTalon (540925) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384576)

As long as you can make it instantaneously. Otherwise, putting aside you "water reserve" for fermentation for weeks may not be advisable.

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35384956)

Longer voyages or living on a space station? I realize you would need some 'extra' water if your only source was recycled pee. With homebrew as the reward rest assured some some future astronaut will figure it out.

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385784)

You gotta do what you gotta do.

One glass of water continually recycled would be enough to keep a person going while the beer brewed.

Besides they also get 'new' water from fuel cells. So you just use all the water for the beer, then waste energy when you are thirsty.

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386204)

There are 100's of gallons of water available. In addition, when and if we go to Mars or the Moon, there will be a need for a significant amount of radiation shielding, which will likely be made, in large part, of water.

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35384664)

Heck, don't recycle the pee just carbonate it. Everybody would think it's beer.

Re:Stupid, marketing only. (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385336)

In a recent blind taste tests, astronauts were unable to distinguish between their own recycled pee and American beer...

Yahoo Serious (1)

Speare (84249) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383478)

Thank goodness Yahoo Serious wasn't involved. "Young Einstein" was bad enough for the image of Australian beer culture, an aftertaste that lasts a lifetime.

Re:Yahoo Serious (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386220)

But imagine if we could split a beer atom. In space this could be used for propulsion. Maybe this is exactly what we need to get to Mars!

Volunteers for testing! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35383528)

Volunteers for testing this new space beverage! The line form immediately behind me. No, I said behind! No!, Behind me! Hey, get back over there!

Someone educate me (1)

shadowfaxcrx (1736978) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383582)

I remember back in the mid-80's, Pepsi and Coke sent soda into space and the astronauts drank it. I even have one of the replica Pepsi space cans somewhere. I never heard or read anything about them having "wet burp" issues, and soda is far more carbonated than beer. I tried to find info on whether or not bad things happened when the astronauts drank the sodas, but couldn't. Anyone have info on this?

307 Ale! (1)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383700)

"They added choice ingredients to brew a little brew, [tomsmithonline.com]
But they didn't know the wires were crossed in Chamber Number Two.
A tiny bit of space got folded, things were looking queer --
They turned the spout and then came out the world's first Hyper-Beer."

Beer... meh. (1)

cstanley8899 (1998614) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383858)

I'm anticipating the anti-gravity bong. Beer makes me feel crappy enough as it is.

So wait.... (1)

kyuubiunl (1747574) | more than 3 years ago | (#35383866)

They invented flat beer?

Mead (1)

petgiraffe (539721) | more than 3 years ago | (#35384002)

The correct answer to this problem is to drink mead instead of beer. Mead doesn't need to be carbonated at all to provide its vaguely beer-like flavor. Also, while it's brewed like beer (no distillation) it is much higher in alcohol, so you needn't carry as much of it on your launch vehicle.

Plus I've always wanted to know what Space-Berserkers would be like.

There are no cops in space, so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35384910)

Space beer goes nicely with space cakes. Why not? Then you're _really_ high above the earth.

Where Is the More Interesting Article... (1)

severoon (536737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385152)

...on the "dreaded microgravity wet burp"?

Re:Where Is the More Interesting Article... (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#35386196)

...on the "dreaded microgravity wet burp"?

This [nasa.gov] is the closest I could find. The article is from 2001 and your particular query is only covered in the last paragraph, but the whole article is kind of interesting.

Houston...I've got a problem... (1)

nowen2dot (1768088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385204)

Let's make a rule before the lawyers get involved. Any disputes about damages due to intoxication must be taken outside and settled with fisticuffs!

Remember, friends don't let friends dock drunk.

With apologies to "Alien" (2)

517714 (762276) | more than 3 years ago | (#35385402)

In space they can't hear you burp.
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