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Trumpet Winsock Creator Made Little Money

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the change-that-if-you-care-to dept.

Networking 358

omast writes "It appears that Peter Tattam, creator of Trumpet Winsock, got very little for this piece of software. For those of you who do not remember — or did not need it because were already outside the MS Windows world — Trumpet Winsock was a shareware program that provided TCP/IP functionality to Windows machines back in 1994-1995. It allowed millions to connect to the Internet back then; I was one of them. According to the article, Tattam made very little money from the program as it was widely distributed but rarely paid for."

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I remember! And I never paid either... (5, Informative)

singingjim1 (1070652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426272)

I always thought it was just a piece of accessory software that was provided to make Windows work. Never even considered it was supposed to cost money to use. And back then bulletin boards provided everything and anything you needed without the need for pesky "Keys" or registration.

Re:I remember! And I never paid either... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426296)

+1

Re:I remember! And I never paid either... (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426398)

Yeah, I had no idea it was supposed to cost money either.

Re:I remember! And I never paid either... (2)

King_TJ (85913) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426760)

It's been so long, I can't even recall all the details anymore. But honestly, I thought it was a situation where some early version of Trumpet Winsock didn't require a payment to use it (though maybe the documentation asked for it if you kept using the program?), but later versions added the registration requirement?

I just have some vague recollection of everyone using an older (and more buggy) version of Trumpet that was handed out on disks provided by colleges and universities for their students to get online. And when we'd find newer, better versions to download, they always had those timers in them preventing using it more than so many minutes at a time or whatever, so we'd get frustrated and go back to the older one.

Re:I remember! And I never paid either... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426426)

It's the problem with the redistributed freeware model. While everyone is working their 9 to 5 jobs and using the software the guys spending their time writing it aren't making a living. Once they repost the software the chain is broken and the poor writer goes unpaid. Years ago I had this happen with Winzip where I actually paid for it but it wasn't the original writer selling it so he got stiffed. I got more careful after that episode.

Re:I remember! And I never paid either... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426618)

Thought you were talking about GNU software for a minute.

I didn't know it was shareware. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426454)

I thought it was Microsoft's branding of TCP/IP Sockets - I thought it was an MS product. All those books on programming TCP for Windows were called Programming Winsock or something. I didn't program sockets until Win 95 so I didn't have to deal with Winsock itself - I just used the books written about it to program later versions of Windows sockets.

The code worked perfectly, btw ....

Isn't that interesting ....

I haven't programmed down on the socket layer in Windows in years, so I have no idea if that's still the case.

Re:I didn't know it was shareware. (5, Informative)

tchuladdiass (174342) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426506)

"Winsock" was Microsoft's specification for a Windows TCP/IP stack. Unfortunately, they didn't ship a dialup TCP/IP with Windows 3.1 (Windows for Workgroups included a Winsock, however that was for Ethernet only). So "Trumpet", a specific implementation of Winsock was written to fill in the gap, and provide a Winsock stack to Windows 3.1 / dialup users.

Re:I didn't know it was shareware. (1)

singingjim1 (1070652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426576)

I'll buy THAT for a dollar!! (and I just did)

He would have made more... (5, Informative)

HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426598)

If it wasn't for the mindless bug in the trial period timer. On the 60 day trial version, you could set the date on your machine to current+10 years, install it, run it once, set the date back to current and have a trial period of 10years+60 days. I did it. And I wasn't the only one.

DRM (5, Funny)

RoFLKOPTr (1294290) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426710)

I don't get why he didn't just require an internet connection before Trumpet would run...

so? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426274)

i care about some guy's revenue from aping BSD sockets because:

(ps first post, gnaa, etc)

Re:so? (-1, Offtopic)

singingjim1 (1070652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426288)

2nd post. :)

Does shareware ever make money? (2)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426278)

Traditional shareware, I mean. Has anyone ever made a living off of it?

I know there's plenty of "crippleware" or game demos that claim to be shareware, but traditional shareware involved giving the product away for free and then begging for money. (Sort of like public radio.)

a little company called id Software (2)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426292)

had something to do with shareware.

or so im told.

oh i see thats not considered shareware (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426320)

i have no idea. the guy who made pkzip died waist deep in a pile of hoarder trash or something.

Re:oh i see thats not considered shareware (5, Informative)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426340)

Actually he died of organ failure due to his alcoholism.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Katz [wikipedia.org]

But you may be right, PKWARE was pretty successful.

Re:oh i see thats not considered shareware (4, Informative)

dHeinemann (1954876) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426686)

There's an article you can read about Phil Katz' life here [bbsdocumentary.com] , entitled "The short, tormented life of computer genius Phil Katz". The poor bloke had a pretty rough life.

Then he was found dead April 14, Phil Katz was slumped against a nightstand in a south side hotel, cradling an empty bottle of peppermint schnapps. The genius who built a multimillion-dollar software company known worldwide for its pioneering "zip" files had died of acute pancreatic bleeding caused by chronic alcoholism.

Re:a little company called id Software (1)

White Flame (1074973) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426324)

No, those were limited-content demos according to the parent's description.

Re:a little company called id Software (2)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426380)

Yes. And also, this business model was called the "Apogee model," after a company that was most definitely not id, although the confusion is a little understandable :)

Re:a little company called id Software (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426570)

I've heard that Quake (1) still holds the record of most shareware copies being registered - estimated at 8%. Most shareware has a much, much lower rate. Which is why you rarely see any around without nag-screens and such.

but I think you needed to pay to get all the maps (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426692)

but I think you needed to pay to get all the maps in Quake 1.

Other shareware works with all or most parts with just nag screens.

mIRC (2, Informative)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426550)

Traditional shareware, I mean. Has anyone ever made a living off of it?

mIRC chart is a classic $20 shareware program, introduced in 1995, now at. v7.17.

32 million dowloads from CNET's Download.com (since Dec 2010), currently about 125,000 downloads a week from CNET alone.

TreeCardGames's SolSuite Solitaire (now at v 11.2) is another example, with about 4,000 downloads a week from Download.com.

Re:mIRC (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426666)

Doesn't really answer the question. Has anyone registered these programs?

Re:mIRC (5, Insightful)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426670)

You didn't even remotely address the question. Out of those 32 million downloads, how many have paid for it?

Re:mIRC (1)

east coast (590680) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426690)

Call me a sack of shit but I've downloaded mIRC myself about 15 times in my life and I have never sent anyone a dime for it. I know I'm far from being the only one who can honestly say this.

Downloads have nothing to do with marketshare or (in this case) profit.

Re:mIRC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426752)

'm' must be for money because it requires registration, but I don't understand the IRC part... Besides, This intertubes thing is just a fad and when the word spreads on the BBS's, there won't be a need for any of it.

Re:Does shareware ever make money? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426644)

Indirectly. yes!

"Today, partly due to that early internet exposure, I am a well-paid software engineer."

Re:Does shareware ever make money? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426676)

From my FidoNet days, some 15 years ago, I recall a netmail/echomail editor called GoldEd. That was shareware; the only thing you got when you had it registered was a tagline that indicated so; yet many people did register and the author was making money off of it. It was said that he was actually making a living with it.

And indeed regarding to Winsock, well I never knew it was supposed to be shareware... I always thought it was simply something that belonged to Windows, like a kind of network driver.

Provided by university (2)

horatio (127595) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426280)

Trumpet Winsock was provided to us (though I don't recall if it was hosted or just a link) by Ohio State when I was a freshman there. I definitely didn't pay for it, but it got me started into the world of networking and TCP/IP.

Re:Provided by university (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426470)

Trumpet Winsock was provided to us (though I don't recall if it was hosted or just a link) by Ohio State when I was a freshman there. I definitely didn't pay for it, but it got me started into the world of networking and TCP/IP.

I think various universities licensed it for their users - I got my copy the same way (except at U of Washington).

Re:Provided by university (1)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426474)

I installed it on hundreds of machines at the University of Tennessee while I was a student employee there. I primarily did professor and office installs, not students, but until today I didn't realize it was anything other than freeware. It was simply one of the things I was trained to install.

Re:Provided by university (1)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426566)

IIRC, it was free for academic/educational use, and didn't have any license enforcement in the software. It just told you that you should pay for it.

Allowed windows to get online? (5, Funny)

GNUALMAFUERTE (697061) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426298)

Wow, that's one early piece of malware ;)

Octal accounts optional (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426316)

Criminy!

I remember when I was just learning how to connect to the interwebs, and the nice folks on my dial-up CB-chat computer told me about Trumpet.
I had no frackin' idea what a stack was, but if I could download more pr0n - I had to have it.
Compuserve & AOL were already beating me by the minute for connnect-charges, so I thought -they- were supplying me with that software.

Good thing nobody heard of the RIAA back then!

Re:Octal accounts optional (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426536)

First, lots of people had heard of MPAA -- this was well after the "home taping is killing music" era.

Second, you mean BSA, unless my memory's bitrotted and this "trumpet winsock" was actually a recording of trumpets playing the winsock concerto.

1 billion+ sick starving dying little ones tonight (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426318)

we (US) only have 30 flavors of pop-tarts. are they so poor they cannot have 1 flavor of pop-tarts, or anything at all? who's responsible?

should starving babys not have a choice? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426384)

wouldn't it be ok to give them 2 flavors of pop-tarts? then, they wouldn't have to eat the same thing all the time, & we (US), would still have 28 flavors of pop-tarts? sounds fair, because they don't work yet, & they'll feel better when they 'earn' more flavors of pop-tarts, at some point in the future?

Donation link from the article (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426322)

At our prompting Peter has set up a Paypal account where you can make donations. I invite you to chip in to reward a man whose work let so many of us open the door, for the first time, to an important part of our lives.

Thanks, Peter.
--
Donate to payments@petertattam.com

http://Paypal.com [paypal.com]

Re:Donation link from the article (2)

singingjim1 (1070652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426504)

While I certainly think people should be paid for their innovation and creativity. I'm poor. But I'll give a $1 just for old time's sake. I invite you all to do the same. I am in no way affiliated with the author of the software. And if you feel like donating another dollar to cover my dollar, and fund my mountain bike racing season, send it to cincitykid@comcast.net. (gratuitous horning-in on someone else's fundraising)

Re:Donation link from the article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426584)

Oh you are on Comcast! That is why you are so poor.

Re:Donation link from the article (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426702)

Why oh why does this feel like astroturfing?

http://www.trumpet.com.au/ [trumpet.com.au]

I'm in 2 minds about it. On the one hand I think he should be paid. On the other my only recollection of using Trumpet Winsock was in my very earliest days connecting to uni on an old machine and I think it was actually shareware (quickly replaced by win95). And I'm not sure if paying someone who's trying to live off work done a couple of decades ago is particularly moral. I think I'd rather pay for a more recent product.

Re:Donation link from the article (2)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426518)

I'm boycotting paypal you insensitive clod.

ATH0+++++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426332)

I remember using that, I'll buy a copy now for how much i used it then :P back on Windows 3.11

Send him money now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426336)

You should rally some peeps to send the guy $5

Winzip (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426338)

Next thing you know people will be paying for winzip.

Re:Winzip (0)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426354)

Why would you pay for Winzip when 7-Zip is free FOSS software?

Re:Winzip (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426418)

You know why: because you're a newbie who hasn't heard of 7-Zip, or because it's the mid nineties and it hasn't been invented yet. What were you hoping to accomplish with your post, besides annoying people?

I feel kinda bad for him but, ... (0)

haruchai (17472) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426342)

his software sucked nasty goat balls. I never used it on any of my own machines but had to support it for my then employers' Win 3.1 users. He might have gotten some users online but the fucking crap couldn't keep them there - not for very long. We eventually paid for a custom stack that was much more user-friendly and far more reliable

Re:I feel kinda bad for him but, ... (4, Interesting)

zoid.com (311775) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426486)

Trumpet was a great solution for tinkerers and enabled many of us to get on the "net". Not sure why you have to crap on it so bad however I feel bad for anyone that had to support anything on win31.

Re:I feel kinda bad for him but, ... (2)

haruchai (17472) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426574)

The worst part about it was before we got the custom solution, we absorbed an ISP of "elite" Win3.1 users who all had 2 phone lines, so we couldn't ask them to go away and try some setting - they've be all "oh, hang on, I can try that right now". Crappy Win3.1 modem drivers did so much to add to the joyous experience. If USRobotics and ( to a lesser extent ) the other external modem vendors hadn't been so overpriced, they could have done the world a favor and rid us of all those PoS internal modems especially those damned Winmodems and the accursed IBM MWave ( GAAAAAHHHH!!!!)

Re:I feel kinda bad for him but, ... (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426632)

You know what really sucks? The fact that I have as many or more issues setting up a machine today than I did back then. Today everything is buggy bloatware that wants to dial home and every time you blink you find some strange windows error that requires googling to find a solution. My latest laptop - a Qosmio X500 I had to downgrade Zonealarm, Virtualbox and the Antivirus. Zonealarm broke remote desktop. Virtualbox broke local network sharing. Antivirus is too new (version 2 of MS Security Essentials) to be recognised as valid to log into a VPN I use AND turns on Windows update for you without asking.

Is anybody surprised? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426344)

It's Economics 101. People won't pay for what they can get for free, unless there's a substantial convenience or hassle-avoidance (legal, malware) factor thrown in. They talk about supporting open source and musicians who offer free downloads, but that's all it is - lip service. Oh, and "I once donated $20, or was it $50, no it was definitely $100 to such and such a musician". Yeah, so maybe you did. A long time ago.

Out of Australia? (1)

igorsalad (2009302) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426350)

I don't remember what I bought but I remember I had to mail a payment to Australia to get it

Re:Out of Australia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426450)

Your wife?

Re:Out of Australia? (1, Offtopic)

igorsalad (2009302) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426468)

aye mate and she be a fine shela

Travel down memory lane (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426364)

My first ISP gave out floppies of Trumpet Winsock. I don't remember if it was a shareware or free version though.

Side note..
When I come across articles referencing the "early" stages of the internet I used to always do some usenet archive searches for the topics. Google groups was well maintained when the transfer from DejaNews happened but in the last two years, it is falling apart. Basic searches like Trumpet Winsock returns very few results, sorting by date fails. It basically just sucks. Does anyone know of a better place for searching usenet archives?

Re:Travel down memory lane (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426440)

I don't believe there was ever a "free" as in Freeware version of Trumpet.

I remember a lot of dial-up ISPs providing floppies (and later CD's) that installed it, but I don't remember anyone telling customers that they needed to pay for it.

definitely remember (1)

rjejr (921275) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426370)

Bought my first "modern" computer in Dec. 1994 - 1 piece Compaq Pressario long before the iMac, bought first computer in 1983, had to hook it to a tv and it ran off cassettes, still may be in my parents basement ;-) . I tried all the online companies of the time and still remember laughing at the "trumpet" and "wind"sock. Don't remember paying for any software, spent all my money on 4mg RAM.

Re:definitely remember (2)

olsmeister (1488789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426430)

Your experience sounds pretty similar to mine. My first computer was a TI99/4A, then I upgraded to a C=64, which I absolutely loved. Then, in 1993, I bought a Canon 486SX 33 MHz. No modem, no way to get online at that time. A while later, I purchased a modem (a BocaModem I believe), was given Trumpet by my ISP, and away we went...

I'm sure he did fine... (2, Interesting)

h3llfish (663057) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426406)

once you consider the fact that it must have been pretty lucrative to have "author of Winsock" on his resume. Not all of the financial rewards of creating something are direct, and not all are financial.

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426436)

I'm sure it was a great pickup line at bars and clubs at the time.

"Hey ladies, I'm the author of WinSock"

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (2)

seifried (12921) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426446)

No but getting several million people to pay you say.. $10 each means you don't need a resume anymore =).

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (1)

ynp7 (1786468) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426512)

These aren't Mac users we're talking about, there's no way more than a handful of people would have paid $10 for an application, no matter how useful, that provides functionality that should be included with the operating system.

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (2)

DarkVader (121278) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426734)

Um, the Mac users didn't have to worry about it, we had MacTCP conveniently included in the operating system.

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426740)

You think Mac users are bad, take a closer look at Amiga users.

Up until a couple of years ago, there was a commercial browser. Only Amiga users would pay for a browser in 2009 that didn't do CSS. They stopped acception registrations, and users started complaining !
  Oh, and like Winsock, the Amiga had several commercial TCP stacks too, and they all cost a darn sight more than $10, and they still bitch that you can't register them in 2011.

  But then again this is the same bunch of people who in 2011 are still willing to pay $1000+ for a motherboard with a single core 1Ghz CPU.

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (3, Informative)

h3llfish (663057) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426522)

But why does he deserve millions of dollars? How many hours did he spend working on this software? I suspect not enough to justify a million dollar paycheck. If he hadn't written it, would someone else? Surely. So how big of a payday does he deserve? Obviously, there are a lot of people in this world who contribute little and get millions anyhow, so I would much rather see this guy be rich than some brainless beauty or Wall Street crook. But the best of all possible worlds would be one where people are paid a fair amount for a day's work.

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (4, Insightful)

Firehed (942385) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426630)

Value is not measured in hours, otherwise sports stars would be making about $10k/year. Creating software that allows millions of people to connect to the internet definitely provides value. I would certainly argue that a dollar a person is on the low side.

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426698)

If he would have required and received $1 payment from every user, those millions would probably have used that free version that some other guy wrote that we now never heard of, because he didn't write it because there was the freely available trumpet winsock...

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (1)

h3llfish (663057) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426726)

Obviously the value of labor is not simply measured in hours, which is why I also mentioned the feasibility of someone else doing the work. Software engineers are valuable, doubtless, so he certainly deserved to be paid more than someone who had spent the same amount of time making pizza, which also creates value but is something that far more people are able to do.

A dollar a person is low? Thinking like that is why Bill Gates is so rich.

Re:I'm sure he did fine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426648)

Not all of the financial rewards of creating something are direct, and not all are financial.

I'm pretty sure all financial rewards are financial by definition.

Similar family name (1)

maierstrahl (2011912) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426408)

Reminds me of Simon Tatham, creator of PuTTY [greenend.org.uk] .

He has a Website. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426428)

http://petertattam.com/

Looks like some people have donated money to him. Maybe a ton more should?

And to the author (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426444)

To the author: FFFFFUUUUUUUUU

It was distributed on ISP disks, at no charge! (4, Informative)

urbanriot (924981) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426452)

Back when it was widely used, I thought it was free piece of software as local internet providers were sending out disks (and later discs) with this software as part of their internet signup. Based on how many times I've installed it without realizing it for various people, I feel a little guilty over my naivete.

Wasn't it supposed to disconnect after 15 min? (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426494)

Maybe I misremember, but ISTR that the unregistered version was supposed to kick you off your connection after a certain time.

OTOH, maybe that's just Windows 3.1 I'm remembering.

Re:Wasn't it supposed to disconnect after 15 min? (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426540)

If that's the case, my WinXP SP2 laptop is still using Trumpet for its WiFi driver.

Didn't know it was shareware?? (1)

swalve (1980968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426510)

I'm pretty sure there was a splash screen or nag screen of some kind. Can't remember, but I sure as heck knew it was.

Re:Didn't know it was shareware?? (2)

swalve (1980968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426526)

Also. Kermit and zmodem. THAT'S how the internet should have remained.

Scam (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426528)

A lot of money was made by the author of Winsock in the ensuing settlement with Microsoft over the IP. The author is no pauper. Do NOT give money to this cause.

I never used Winsock (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426538)

But now I'm feeling guilty about all those years of freeloading Telix to dial into the local BBSes.

Did not need it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426544)

or did not need it because were already outside the MS Windows world

I did not need Trumpet Winsock. Back in 94 I was on the internet using Linux, which natively included a TCP/IP stack from the beginning. Something M$ only saw fit to add after their "omg, this new thing called the internet is going to kill us" scare.

Funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426552)

I never seen any threads in stories like this discussing how broken the copyright system is.

Felt bad until I read this..... (-1, Troll)

ZosX (517789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426564)

The first comment on the page:

"* Alert - This is Not Really a good idea - do NOT send money *
There was a court case on this. Peter made several million out of the settlement between him and M$ over Winsock. He used it to set up Trumpet Software international and the TrumpNet ISP. Trumpet Software created a number of ill-conceived software packages which did not sell, and burned all the capital. After splitting with his wife he lost a lot of money to her, and the TrumpNet business. His ex then destroyed Trumpnet by refusing to upgrade it to support ADSL and only supplying dial-up. Dont' be sucked in by this. A number of my friends worked fro TSI and I worked for TrumpNet at one point - so sad to watch it all die. Don't give Peter any more hard-earned money to lose."

I'm guessing there is a kernel of truth to that. Also winsock was the worst tcp/ip stack I've ever had the displeasure of using. I never had to run it directly (thank god!), but in my experience with windows 3.1 systems, it was abysmal. It used to be the butt of many a joke. I really don't know if we should feel like we owe this guy anything.

Re:Felt bad until I read this..... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426636)

I'm guessing there is a kernel of truth to that. Also winsock was the worst tcp/ip stack I've ever had the displeasure of using.

No joke. I lived in Santa Cruz and knew people at TGV so I had the TGV stack for Windows 3.1, it was actually seriously fast. We had a nice little 10baseT network in the house and a 28.8k CSLIP with a /24. Those were the days...

Re:Felt bad until I read this..... (4, Interesting)

Jacques Chester (151652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426652)

Peter alerted me to the comment. He says that it is completely untrue.

Re:Felt bad until I read this..... (2)

ZosX (517789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426680)

Sometimes I wish I could retract comments on slashdot. I don't know why someone would post something that would smear him if it were untrue.

Re:Felt bad until I read this..... (5, Informative)

PTrumpet (70245) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426756)

just for the record folks... I just posted this in response...

"urban myth. the only court case was the one with Ozemail, cited in the original thread. It cost both sides heaps to run the case and was settled out of court after the judgement was given. Trumpet Software did receive some $$$, but not on the scale you mentioned."

As for starting up, Trumpet Software grew out a lounge room from shareware regs alone, not with a huge cash injection from a court settlement or any VC $$$.

As for some of the other stuff, there's a fair bit of personal stuff which would be inappropriate for me to discuss, except it almost broke me to have to resign my position in the business in 2004 because of the divorce proceedings. There are also some other inaccuracies in the statements you made, but as you can understand it is just not appropriate for me to discuss the ugliness of the divorce proceedings and settlement in public (except to say it took almost 7 years through the courts, the longest case in Hobart I have been told).

Peter T

Don't blame me (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426590)

I was using an Amiga back then.

He got the internet in return... (4, Interesting)

Paul Fernhout (109597) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426600)

Seems like a more than fair deal. :-)

Or at least, that's what my wife and I like to tell ourselves about our GPL'd garden simulator (a six person-year labor of love around the same time period):
    http://www.gardenwithinsight.com/ [gardenwithinsight.com]

There have always been four different economies throughout human history:
        * A subsistence economy ("There's some lovely berries over here.");
        * A gift economy ("The meat from this deer is going to spoil; let's share it with the tribe.");
        * A planned economy ("Let's put the longhouse here.");
        * An exchange economy ("You scratch my back, I'll scratch yours.");

Their relative balance shifts with changes to culture, technology, and other circumstances.

See also the comment I made here:
http://peswiki.com/index.php/OS:Economic_Transformation [peswiki.com]

So, we can expect the balance between those four economies to change as our technology and society changes, perhaps with:
        * A subsistence economy through 3D printing and local PV solar panels or other clean energy technologies (like cold fusion or something else);
        * A gift economy through the internet, like sharing digital files to use with our 3D printers;
        * A planned economy on a variety of scales, including through taxes, subsidies and regulation affecting market dynamics; and
        * An exchange economy marketplace softened by a basic income.

Re:He got the internet in return... (0)

benjamindees (441808) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426662)

You forgot:

* The consumer economy ("We're out of cheeseburgers, let's go liberate another oil field.")

We paid for it... (1)

Mage66 (732291) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426616)

We bought a license to deploy it at a company I worked for in 1997. It worked well for us. Supposedly he was writing an OS that was Windows Compatible, but I never heard anything about it. No screenshots or anything.

Updates to story (4, Informative)

Jacques Chester (151652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426628)

I'm the guy at HN who started the appeal, including the related website [thanksfort...insock.com] . See this thread for updates [ycombinator.com] . In summary, in light of the hundreds of donations, Peter has issued an amnesty for all individual users of Trumpet Winsock up to the end of 2012.

Missing definition of (1)

no-body (127863) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426716)

"very little" - what's that in $$'s?

Two Floppy Disks and one Expensive Headache! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35426720)

I remember my first isp giving me two disks to use on our 3.1 486. And having to run out and buy a copy of Windows 95 and another 16 meg of ram to make it work! So getting on the net wound up costing me an extra 200 bucks. When I upgraded to a new computer the next week after finding that IE (Mosiac) or Nutscrape would not work for more than 30 minutes without crashing the stack I decided to try Linux!

It was a revelation. Using ifconfig and ifup was a breeze compared to the nonsense of having an unreliable windowing gui. Understanding how to create a script has been invaluable. So ever since my first 2000 dollar Windows experience setting up a network configuration I have always had at least one version of Linux around to make sure that we can always get on the net.

That said if it were not for those disks from our ISP my wife and daughter would never been able to get on the net and the use of MS office for work communication would have been even more expensive than it was back then. Essentially the non gui scripted version of trumpet winsock was the only way to keep Windows on the net at all.

  The original Microsoft network stack gui was a train wreck and did not do dos batch worth beans the way that good old piece of shareware could! Until the second service pack of Windows 95 the use of something other than Netscape Navigator and Trumpet Winsock was essential unless you really were a sucker for punishment. About this time the whole virus and malware crap started...Funny but I never had any trouble before Internet Exploiter 3 and LOOKout Express! Before that you could not keep Windows network software on the net long enough for anything dangerous to happen anyway.

Why wait til now to pursue possible legal action? (1)

Tetrarchy (1651907) | more than 3 years ago | (#35426746)

While I certainly would feel bad for anyone who lost out on millions of licenses, why wait until 10-15 years later to pursue legal action against large companies and ISPs who distributed illegally?
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