Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Is Daylight Saving Time Bad For You?

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the what-doesn't-kill-you-makes-you-late-for-work dept.

Medicine 333

Hugh Pickens writes "According to experts on circadian rhythms, the hour shift in sleep schedule from Daylight Saving Time can have serious effects on some people's health, particularly in people with certain pre-existing health problems. One study found that men were more likely to commit suicide during the first few weeks of Daylight Saving Time (DST) than at any other time during the year, and another study showed that the number of serious heart attacks jumps 6% to 10% on the first three workdays after DST begins. Dr. Xiaoyong Yang, an assistant professor of comparative medicine and cellular and molecular physiology at Yale University, theorizes that shifts in biologic rhythms could trigger harmful inflammatory or metabolic changes at the cellular level, to which these individuals may be more susceptible."

cancel ×

333 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I don't care I enjoy the later sunsets. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465622)

I don't care I enjoy the later sunsets.

Re:I don't care I enjoy the later sunsets. (2)

omarius (52253) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465654)

I was going to say, FINE! Fix it: keep DST all year round!

Re:I don't care I enjoy the later sunsets. (2)

Cowclops (630818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466120)

Yes - the problem is that we have to change it at all, not that the sun goes down an hour later (and comes up an hour later). I prefer the light at the end of the day myself, so, indeed, make it DST year round. Problem solved.

Re:I don't care I enjoy the later sunsets. (1)

oliverthered (187439) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465958)

I enjoy flexi-time.

Re:I don't care I enjoy the later sunsets. (1)

coastwalker (307620) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465982)

The winter is terrible whatever we do with the clocks so I vote for keeping summer time all year round - because the summer is better for the extra hour of outdoor time in the evening. When you have slaved away for decades in an office you come to realize that this evening time is very valuable, I would even go so far as to say that double summer time GMT+2 would suit us in the UK with so called summer time GMT+1 for the winter. As for suicides and health problems - well stuff em I say, the gene pool could do without wimps who cant cope with the clock shift. I worked 4 on, 4 off, 12 hour shifts in my younger days and it does mess with your health but earning money doesn't always come for free. Fix the rest of capitalism before you get excited about trivial things like DST.

Re:I don't care I enjoy the later sunsets. (1)

daodao (1641121) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466258)

The problem are the earlier sunsets -- oh I miss you Sun!

would have happened anyway (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465666)

It sounds like the heart attacks (at least) would have happened anyway at a later point, if someone is that vulnerable to small changes.

Re:would have happened anyway (1)

undecim (1237470) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465806)

A change to your sleep pattern is hardly a small change biologically. We may not understand everything about sleep just yet, but we do know one thing: It's damn important.

A change in your sleep schedule changes your biological clock, which helps control many complex biological processes. Even small changes like that can confuse the body and cause it to do things wrong.

Yep (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465676)

As someone who suffers from SAD, depression, etc. I can attest to the fact that a strict sleep schedule is incredibly important to keeping me healthy and functional. DST rudely smashes all my carefully laid schedules and plans.

It may not seem like much, but even shifting things by a single hour and put me (and people like me) a very difficult spot. Light boxes and sunrise simulator alarm clocks help, but what helps the most is strict consistency in sleep/wake times. This is especially harmful to people with bipolar disorder because it can trigger a manic or depressive episode.
DST sucks!

Re:Yep (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466000)

I suffer from S.A.D also (I hate the fucking acronym!) I actually do better on DST - yeah, part of it is because it's the Spring and Summer but there's also more Daylight in the day; which is what we need.

My doc tried a bunch of different solutions for me but the best thing for me is any type of physical activity during the day: running, walking, yard work, etc....

Oh yeah, stay away from booze and caffeine.

Re:Yep (4, Insightful)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466006)

If it's really a health issue, why adjust your sleep schedule to match the changing clock? Can't you simply get up an hour earlier during winter?

Re:Yep (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466152)

I'm already waking up before the crack of noon. I don't know how much earlier you expect me to get up.

Re:Yep (-1, Flamebait)

dadioflex (854298) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466222)

Can't wait to hear the answer to this.

I think it isn't a health issue. I think it's a wah issue. As in... "Wahhhhh!"

Baby.

Re:Yep (1)

fridaynightsmoke (1589903) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466402)

Can't you simply get up a hour earlier in the summer, without changing the clocks to regulate everyone else into doing so?

Re:Yep (-1, Troll)

dadioflex (854298) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466186)

Hmmm. That would make you an evolutionary dead-end.

I'm all for technology empowering folk and making the extraordinary ordinary.

If you're a tech writer or worker and you suffer from some of these too minimal to care disorders, maybe you should bite the bullet and ask for special circumstances from your employer.

The rest of us, the majority... we live in perpetual Twilight. We don't need sunlight to wake us, or moonlight to send us asleep. We sleep when we're tired and wake up when we have to.

Evolution is a bitch. Get better or die trying.

Re:Yep (1)

wulfmans (794904) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466206)

Move to Arizona if your in the USA and don't like silly time shifts.

Re:Yep (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466228)

There's a condition for this actually. It's called "You're A Pussy".

People who travel? (4, Insightful)

ramk13 (570633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465678)

How does this compare to people who travel one time zone over, let alone multiple time zones? Aren't these people (millions) in worse shape?

Re:People who travel? (2)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465724)

This is a related problem. But unlike travel which can be mitigated by either avoiding it or traveling by car/train, DST is something that's imposed by the government and cannot easily be avoided if you're in an area that observes it. Few employers are going to let you come in late to avoid having your circadian rhythm disrupted.

Re:People who travel? (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465932)

This is a related problem. But unlike travel which can be mitigated by either avoiding it or traveling by car/train

How? If one hour is a problem, you'll have a problem crossing any timezone. And if you're travelling multiple time zones, it's not likely your boss will pay for days of travel each way either. To be honest this might be triggering on the statistics, but those people must be pretty fragile to begin with. It's like how they say the flu kills thousands each year - the weak and elderly that can't take it, but it's only the last straw and something would have did them in.

Re:People who travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466040)

To be honest this might be triggering on the statistics, but those people must be pretty fragile to begin with. It's like how they say the flu kills thousands each year - the weak and elderly that can't take it, but it's only the last straw and something would have did them in.

Exactly. Weak, fragile people can got to hell. As you rightly say, if it wasn't this then something else would get them so let's give them a good kicking.

Re:People who travel? (4, Interesting)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465946)

DST is something that's imposed by the government and cannot easily be avoided if you're in an area that observes it.

You could always move. Arizona doesn't observe DST.

Some people move to dry or warm climates for reasons related to health. This isn't really that much different.

Re:People who travel? (1)

kanweg (771128) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465966)

It is impossible for an individual to slowly change his own sleep schedule over the course of a couple of weeks, by say 5 minutes per day without consent from the government.

Bert

Re:People who travel? (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466218)

Few employers are going to let you come in late to avoid having your circadian rhythm disrupted.

If you can prove you have this problem... for example, you can prove you will have a heart attack if you have to come in an hour earlier, then by law (the ADA) the employer would have no choice, they have to make reasonable accomadations.

The problem is... well.. how are you going to prove it?

A healthy person won't have a heart attack because they had to get up an hour earlier. And in the wild.... predators/violent animals/other threats won't respect your circadium rythm.

Re:People who travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466302)

And in the wild.... predators/violent animals/other threats won't respect your circadium rythm.

That's one of the reasons I don't live in the wild, but as DST would be completely irrelevant in the wild, it's hard to imagine what your point might be. Do you have one?

Re:People who travel? (3, Interesting)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466352)

So get up an hour earlier during winter rather than an hour later during summer, and you won't have to come in late or have your circadian rhythms disrupted.

Re:People who travel? (1)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466288)

How does this compare to people who travel one time zone over, let alone multiple time zones? Aren't these people (millions) in worse shape?

Assuming they move twice a year, yes. Otherwise, no. But, yes, moving is a time of great stress that does indeed have negative health impacts.

Natural Selection! (1, Troll)

notommy (1793412) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465706)

This is the weak getting picked off. If you can't handle an hour change twice a year, you probably shouldn't be getting up (to work) anyways.

Re:Natural Selection! (2)

Aphex Junkie (633436) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465730)

How about this modest proposal: let's grind up the "weak" and turn them into cat food! In fact, let's have sweeps on a yearly basis. This will finally solve our problems and allow humanity to advance to the next level. One may even go so far as calling it a.... final solution.

Re:Natural Selection! (1)

cognoscentus (1628459) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465798)

Godwin in 1! (You have a point, though)

Lengthening the Blanket... (5, Insightful)

kenwd0elq (985465) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465714)

I saw an editorial cartoon perhaps 30 years ago. In the cartoon, Richard Nixon is depicted sitting in a rocking chair saying "I need to make this blanket longer, so that we can stay warm in the winter. So I'll cut one foot of the blanket off at one end, and sew it onto the other end." That's everything you need to know about Daylight Savings Time.

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (2)

peragrin (659227) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466108)

While your analogy is correct, it misses the point.

    I stopped and looked at it one day. in NY the sun sets on Sept.1st at about 8:30pm. without daylight that means it sets at 7:30pm The northern states would literally lose the ability to do many things they can now simply because it will get dark out in August and September, instead of October.

Evening sports, afterwork hobbies, anything that one does after 5pm(when most people stop working) will lose time to do things like mow the yard afterwork. How many things do you do in the summer after work, and how many of them require daylight to be made easier. That is daylight savings time working for you.

I would love it if we used daylight savings all year round. it would solve both problems.

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (1)

Plunky (929104) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466210)

No wait.. what you seem to want is to stop work at 4pm instead of 5pm but you still want to call it 5pm? Then, you want to start work at 8am instead of 9am but you want to call it 9am? I think I'm getting this now.. so you want to have lunch at 12noon but call it 1pm!?

Of course, some people don't have friendly employers and require that the government mandate the hours that they work.. but it sounds like a pretty hackish solution..

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (1)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466318)

It is... but if it seems silly to you, you treat the entirely arbitrary way we label periods of time entirely too seriously. Among other things, you seem to think that a particular point of time is really 4pm rather than 5pm, which is patently absurd. It's either 4pm or 5pm because we decide to call it that. Neither answer is more "real" than the other.

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466246)

You know, those of us who want the extra daylight could just get up an hour earlier and go into work earlier.

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (2)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466336)

You know, those of us who want the extra daylight could just get up an hour earlier and go into work earlier.

I can do that. However, I was under the impression the majority of people actually work for someone else, often at companies or organizations that have a set schedule. "You know, those of you who want this can just quit your jobs." Uh huh...

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466398)

Instead of making everybody change their clocks, Congress could require companies to allow people to make those changes.

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (5, Interesting)

kenwd0elq (985465) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466282)

When I was in the Navy, I spent a couple of years on Bermuda. (I know; a TOUGH assignment!) Bermuda doesn't (did not?) do DST. Instead, many businesses did "summer working hours"; come to work at 7 AM, no lunch break, and then close at 2 PM. If many employers offered flextime, or people could break out of the clock-watching habit, then they could have the benefits of DST all year long.

The only thing "daylight savings time" does is force, by government decree, that EVERYBODY must do this at the SAME time, in lockstep.

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (2)

MatthiasF (1853064) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466280)

I think the benefits of the system are being curtailed by the fact it's being applied by longitude instead of latitude.

As most know, the differences in sun rise and sun set align along the latitude (local solar time), yet the daylight savings adjustments are currently aligned against the averaged time zones by longitude. This was the easiest way to do it and it seems to be holding back the system (based off studies).

If instead they setup latitude DST to run perpendicular to the date lines, we'd definitely see the efficiencies gained. But this would mean countries like the USA would have 2-3 DST areas (northern one from New England west to Washington state, southern one from Georgia/Florida to Southern California, and a middle one from North Carolina-Maryland over to Northern California), applied on top of the normal time zones.

Could get confusing when two people who were in the same time zone now have to deal with an hour difference as well, but would be an hour closer to someone in a time zone behind them.

It's really the only way DST would work but adoption would be difficult. Maybe less so nowadays that computers and phones can do the adjustments for you, but to explain to the broader public why the system had to become more complicated would probably be a disaster in itself.

(copy pasta from a previous comment on DST)

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466348)

Fuck it. Too complicated.

Stick everybody on GMT / UTC / Zulu (whatever you want to call it) and just deal with it.

Re:Lengthening the Blanket... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466330)

Why do people feel the need to cite stupid quotes? In one scenario there are tangible benefits, while in the other scenario you're just keeping exactly the same blanket with no benefits at all.

In other news (2)

starfishsystems (834319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465718)

In other news, I believe that waking up to an alarm clock is hazardous to my health.

Jetlag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465734)

FTA:

In other words, people who are already vulnerable to certain health problems may experience more severe effects of their body-clock disruption.

In other words, people who are already in trouble feel compound effects with other changes in their lives.

Can an hour or two really have such a severe effect? If that was the case, shouldn't there be a massive effect when travelling and crossing time zones? A quick PubMed search didn't throw up any studies with jetlag and suicide or heart attack.

Time to solve the problem (3, Insightful)

Wowsers (1151731) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465738)

To solve the problem is VERY simple, but the politicians don't like it. When you move to summer time, move the clocks 1/2 hour forward instead of 1 hour... and then LEAVE them there. No more going forwards and backwards wasting time changing countless clocks and gadgets, and no more bickering about moving the timezone multiple hours forward like the UK had recently just to please some European fascists.

Recent campaign for UK to be on Berlin Time [dailymail.co.uk]
Portugal wants to move back to GMT [dailymail.co.uk]

Re:Time to solve the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465764)

I agree with you on the 1/2. I leave the other rants for you.

Re:Time to solve the problem (1)

jfengel (409917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465876)

I agree about DST, though I don't see the point in being a half-hour out of synch with GMT. It just makes the mental math harder.

I'd say just do away with daylight savings time the next time it comes around. You'd need to give everybody at least a year's notice anyway, so that devices can be updated and gotten into the retail channels.

Re:Time to solve the problem (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466304)

I agree about DST, though I don't see the point in being a half-hour out of synch with GMT. It just makes the mental math harder.

So adjust GMT as well, by having 30 leap-minutes one year.

Re:Time to solve the problem (0)

magpie (3270) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465914)

Sorry your using the daily mail as a reference...can't believe anything you say. BTW how did they link it to immigrants and mortgage rates?

Re:Time to solve the problem (-1, Troll)

C_amiga_fan (1960858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465934)

Daylight Savings Time is as pointless as forcing people to switch to Fluorescent Bulbs. Whatever energy is saved is so small (one-tenth of a percent) as to be trivial in the total economy, and the side effects (high expense, mercury, damage to sick persons) are worse than the original problem.

Better to just use the existing schedule/ technology.

Re:Time to solve the problem (1)

superdave80 (1226592) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466036)

You have no idea what you are talking about:

"What that means is that if every one of 110 million American households bought just one ice-cream-cone bulb, took it home, and screwed it in the place of an ordinary 60-watt bulb, the energy saved would be enough to power a city of 1.5 million people. One bulb swapped out, enough electricity saved to power all the homes in Delaware and Rhode Island. In terms of oil not burned, or greenhouse gases not exhausted into the atmosphere, one bulb is equivalent to taking 1.3 million cars off the roads."

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/108/open_lightbulbs.html

Re:Time to solve the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466142)

They already produce enough power to power all the homes in Delaware and Rhode Island.

Something is wrong there. (1)

khasim (1285) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466200)

In terms of oil not burned, or greenhouse gases not exhausted into the atmosphere, one bulb is equivalent to taking 1.3 million cars off the roads.

Since there are only around 300 million people in the USofA ... and none of them can drive more than 1 car at a time ...

All we'd need to do to completely eliminate the carbon footprint of our cars is to ...

Replace 300 bulbs.

Or 100 people replace 3 bulbs each.

I think your time scales are out of sync.

Re:Something is wrong there. (1)

kopo (890010) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466286)

One bulb per household.

I don't think many households have 300 light fixtures in which they could replace bulbs.

Re:Time to solve the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466248)

Your example only serves to illustrate that savings in minuscule scale require enormous implementation to see appreciable results. If 300 million people each put a dollar into a jar labeled, "NATIONAL DEBT" then we'll have $300 million to apply to the debt, but we'll still be $14 trillion in the hole-- with no appreciable difference to where we were before.

Just the same, if we burn 500,000 tons of coal to power 110 million households, and those households in turn, save 0.1% on their power usage, then we've still burned 499,500 tons of coal. Or, more likely, since coal consumption does not respond directly to power usage, we've probably still burned 500,000 tons of coal, and some of the resulting electricity went largely unallocated.

It's all horse shit. It's one thing to be responsible with what we do with our resources, but the line has to be drawn somewhere. Why stop at changing out a lightbulb? Why not just remove all of the lightbulbs? We can return to using candles, can't we? I hear we've gotten awfully good at making those. Progress is in improving efficiency, not in making meaningless trade-offs.

Re:Time to solve the problem (-1, Troll)

C_amiga_fan (1960858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466278)

Start with a faulty assumption and you get invalid results.

The article you quote doesn't take into account the 10,000 mile journey of those CFLs from China to the USA, which means CFLs use *more* energy... or assuming best case: Break even. Nor does it take into account the Chinese factories' lack of pollution controls, which generate ~100,000 times more soot and ozone-destroying chemicals than a US or EU factory building the old, standard bulbs.

Re:Time to solve the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466366)

This was rebutted in a recent thread; I won't spend the time to search for it, but the conclusion after factoring in said shipping costs was that it will pay for those costs after approximately 20 hours of use (over an incandescent.)

Socialism/Communism/Fascism (-1)

NuShrike (561140) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465742)

It's not one of those if a Republican "Bush" maintains it, or makes changes to it.

The recent changes have had moot to negative savings from all the reports and analysis vs the "WMD" "major" projections and selling.

Re:Socialism/Communism/Fascism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465842)

I'm just curious....What year do you think it is?

And, what thread do you think you're replying to?

Just asking.

Re:Socialism/Communism/Fascism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466380)

hahahahahahaha

I dont need that to hate DST (1)

Fusselwurm (1033286) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465746)

Concerning TFA: I guess it pushes only those people over the edge that were close to it anyway.

Apart from that: I hate DST.

If they dont want to waste daylight in summer, people should fix their timetables instead of fiddling with everybody's clocks.

Re:I dont need that to hate DST (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465950)

At this point it is the other way 'round, we have about 20 weeks of 'normal' time.

The problem is psychological, not physiological (4, Insightful)

grizdog (1224414) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465756)

The problem with DST is the free lunch mentality that goes with it. It was the first response of Congress to the "energy crisis" of the early 70's, and has remained the solution of choice for similar problems ever since. People genuinely believe they are getting "an extra hour of daylight", and expect other little bonuses to be handed to them just as painlessly. Sorry for the rant, but it's long been a pet peeve of mine.

Mandatory National Twice-Yearly Jet Lag (1)

handy_vandal (606174) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465758)

Goddamn right, Daylight Savings Time is bad for me.

It fucks with my sleep cycle -- messes it up for a week or more -- every six months, like fucking clockwork.

Repeal it, stop it, get rid of it forever.

Re:Mandatory National Twice-Yearly Jet Lag (2)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465992)

If it affects you that strongly, why not try getting up 15 minutes earlier every few days for the couple of weeks preceding it so you'll be eased into it instead of shifting entirely at once?

Re:Mandatory National Twice-Yearly Jet Lag (1)

jrminter (1123885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466312)

You miss the point. The change is a royal pain for all affected and does very little if any good for energy savings. I agree with the others who say pick one and stick with it. Arizona has it right. The rest of the states in the USA should join AZ.

They should have one time zone with dst always (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465760)

No more moving forward and back. Make dst the standard time. And with a single timezone you would always know when it was a decent time to call someone or start drinking alcohol. And you would always know when you could expect a business to be open no matter where in the world you are.

Re:They should have one time zone with dst always (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466008)

Fine, as long as the regular business hours occur while it's light outside where I live...

Right, do you begin to see a problem with this now? Not to mention that some people simply can't handle a nocturnal lifestyle...

I've got another theory... (1)

Superdarion (1286310) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465782)

theorizes that shifts in biologic rhythms could trigger harmful inflammatory or metabolic changes at the cellular level, to which these individuals may be more susceptible."

...OR "Shit shit shit shit I'm late for work I'm gonna be fired again!" gets to you ...

Everytime I read one of these "studies" that "shows" stuff, I can't help but think that the researcher is a press whore or is just trying to get more funding by throwing out a ridiculously convoluted "theory" to explain a simple observation. After all, the "people get stressed out when they're late for work" hypothesis doesn't get you as many grants.

Re:I've got another theory... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465820)

You could always go read the research yourself.

Re:I've got another theory... (2)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465894)

theorizes that shifts in biologic rhythms could trigger harmful inflammatory or metabolic changes at the cellular level, to which these individuals may be more susceptible."

...OR "Shit shit shit shit I'm late for work I'm gonna be fired again!" gets to you ... Everytime I read one of these "studies" that "shows" stuff, I can't help but think that the researcher is a press whore or is just trying to get more funding by throwing out a ridiculously convoluted "theory" to explain a simple observation. After all, the "people get stressed out when they're late for work" hypothesis doesn't get you as many grants.

One fall Saturday night, I jokingly "reminded" my friend to turn his clock forward because of the time change - I said "Remember, fall forward, spring back". I figured his wife would catch the joke and correct him, and move the clock back an hour. Instead, he showed up for the 6AM restaurant opening time at 4 in the morning - which meant he must have gotten up at 2:30 AM ...

So he's sitting in the mall parking lot all by himself, wondering where everyone is, when the police pull up to find out why some black guy is just sitting there in his car in the middle of the night.

Maybe I can apply for a grant for stress caused by being early for work? I could get an ig-nobel [improbable.com] .

Write your Congress critters (1)

pubwvj (1045960) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465808)

Letter to Congressional representatives:

Please get rid of Daylight Savings Time. It is a farce. It does not really help save energy or stimulate the economy. Instead it causes an increase in accidents, suicides, heart attacks and other health problems in addition to the simple inconvenience of the change.

http://healthland.time.com/2011/03/12/is-daylight-saving-time-bad-for-your-health/ [time.com]

"According to experts on circadian rhythms, the hour shift in sleep schedule from Daylight Saving Time can have serious effects on some people's health, particularly in people with certain pre-existing health problems. One study found that men were more likely to commit suicide during the first few weeks of Daylight Saving Time (DST) than at any other time during the year, and another study showed that the number of serious heart attacks jumps 6% to 10% on the first three workdays after DST begins. Dr. Xiaoyong Yang, an assistant professor of comparative medicine and cellular and molecular physiology at Yale University, theorizes that shifts in biologic rhythms could trigger harmful inflammatory or metabolic changes at the cellular level, to which these individuals may be more susceptible."

Re:Write your Congress critters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466230)

Letter to Congressional representatives:

Please get rid of Daylight Savings Time. It is a farce. It does not really help save energy or stimulate the economy. Instead it causes an increase in accidents, suicides, heart attacks and other health problems in addition to the simple inconvenience of the change.

http://healthland.time.com/2011/03/12/is-daylight-saving-time-bad-for-your-health/ [time.com]

"According to experts on circadian rhythms, the hour shift in sleep schedule from Daylight Saving Time can have serious effects on some people's health, particularly in people with certain pre-existing health problems. One study found that men were more likely to commit suicide during the first few weeks of Daylight Saving Time (DST) than at any other time during the year, and another study showed that the number of serious heart attacks jumps 6% to 10% on the first three workdays after DST begins. Dr. Xiaoyong Yang, an assistant professor of comparative medicine and cellular and molecular physiology at Yale University, theorizes that shifts in biologic rhythms could trigger harmful inflammatory or metabolic changes at the cellular level, to which these individuals may be more susceptible."

Phew... I'm glad you told them. They'll be sure to read through Slashdot looking for comments like yours to base their policies on.

I agree (1)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465830)

One more hour of having your wife in bed with you, that would but a strain on my heart.

Turn the clock back 23 hours, instead of one ahead (2)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465844)

Turing the clock one hour ahead is bound to screw people up. So why not just turn the clock back 23 hours? The time will be the same, and we all can take that extra "Daylight Savings Day" as an opportunity to lounge around, doing nothing productive.

genetically altered nazi mutants fear the LIGHT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465866)

so that's good. they can still be defeated. the lights are coming up all over now. darkness, & it's 'shadowy' minions, will be leaving. it would be better if we helped them do LESS damage, as we'll be tasked wit cleaning up the mess. looks daunting so far? see you there, at one of the million babys+ play-dates, georgia done editing(s) etc.... be there or be scared (left in the dark?).

Q;what's with all the spelling etc... mistakes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466208)

the time to waste (nitpicking) is gone. that's why. there's plenty of evidence that history is 'creeping' up on us, & the future may be backing up to fetch us up to date? no black hole for us? see you there. can't avoid it.

wit=with done=stone. ok? thanks

microscopic political motivation (1)

smoothnorman (1670542) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465918)

[states-centric ..apologies] So what political will, or interest, is there in ending DST? Over my too many decades I've heard only "we really don't need this thing anymore" with only very faint and feeble "it's good because...". But since there's no money in getting rid of it (or is there...?) then our politicians get distracted by fighting to stay in power and it never gets addressed ( http://www.boingboing.net/2008/11/21/obama-might-get-rid.html [boingboing.net] )

"People are out of work!" "People are starving!" "We're at WAR!" "The economy sucks!" "Corruption via lobbyists!" "Corruption via Koch brothers" "Tea-party!" "R(o|an)d Paul!" ....all true; and too distracting to worry about a tiny little really annoying slightly costly thing like daylight saving time shifting. -sigh-

Next up: shifting to the metric system.

Re:microscopic political motivation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466014)

[states-centric ..apologies]
So what political will, or interest, is there in ending DST? Over my too many decades I've heard only "we really don't need this thing anymore" with only very faint and feeble "it's good because...". But since there's no money in getting rid of it (or is there...?) then our politicians get distracted by fighting to stay in power and it never gets addressed ( http://www.boingboing.net/2008/11/21/obama-might-get-rid.html [boingboing.net] )

"People are out of work!" "People are starving!" "We're at WAR!" "The economy sucks!" "Corruption via lobbyists!" "Corruption via Koch brothers" "Tea-party!" "R(o|an)d Paul!" ....all true; and too distracting to worry about a tiny little really annoying slightly costly thing like daylight saving time shifting. -sigh-

Next up: shifting to the metric system.

The problem is, there's money in keeping it. Most people will go shopping after work, but not before. So having more daylight hours after working hours benefits retailers, and retailers lobby in favor if it. The disruption actually costs a good bit of money, all told, but the retailers and manufacturers/importers see a benefit.

Re:microscopic political motivation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466184)

The problem is, there's money in keeping it. Most people will go shopping after work, but not before. So having more daylight hours after working hours benefits retailers, and retailers lobby in favor if it. The disruption actually costs a good bit of money, all told, but the retailers and manufacturers/importers see a benefit.

So keep it on summer time all year round. Anecdotally, nobody I know does anything with the morning light we get in winter, and it'd be great to be able to have daylight after work for longer in the year.

Average? (3, Interesting)

MrQuacker (1938262) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465928)

Why don't they average it out to half an hour and just leave it there? Instead of swapping an hour twice a year, swap half an hour one time and don't bother doing it again.

Semi Annual DST rant (4, Informative)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465942)

I think the best part of DST is the opportunity to have this semi-annual anti-DST rant-fest. It's better than sunlight!

Let's keep DST all year round. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465948)

Having an extra hour of daylight in the evening is an even better idea in the winter.

Healthy Stressless Society? (2)

SumterLiving (994634) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465960)

If the government gets rid of DST for the health benefits of a few then they should be required to make new laws for other causes of stress too: How about doing federal taxes, job interviews, coming home to the wife after a sneak trip to a strip club, traffic jams, law suits, the bogyman, XMAS shopping, public speaking, jock itch, earthquakes, tornadoes, ice storms and the list could go on forever. More so for some and less for others. Maybe our government should not try to protect us from all stresses in life?

Pointless (1)

pgpalmer (2015142) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465984)

When DST is active, they "gain" an extra hour of sunlight in the evening. An hour that is likely used in household stuff as people come home from work (read: lights are probably on, anyway).

Why can't we just have it at 1/2 hour and leave it at that?

Re:Pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466070)

Not everyone needs the lights on in their house when it's broad fucking daylight, you know.

Get rid of it and adjust schedules... (2)

zoid.com (311775) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465986)

As someone that has to deal with DST and timezones in the IT world I say we go with straight GMT and get rid of all of the rest. Then let local areas adjust accordingly. So in central time zone areas we go to work @ 14:00 GMT and get off at @ 23:00...

Stopped changing my sleep schedule last year... (2)

Christopher Fritz (1550669) | more than 3 years ago | (#35465996)

...and it's been working out fine thus far.

Back during the last time change (autumn of 2010), I decided to not change my alarm clock's time. My computer and laptop would auto-adjust, and I'd still have to change the times on my DSLR camera, e-reader, and Nintendo DS. But the alarm clock time remains the same. When the alarm clock shows "9:30 PM", I go to bed (even though it's actually 8:30 PM). When the alarm clock shows "4:00 AM" (even though it's actually 3:00 AM), it sounds and I wake up.

The effect is that my day shifts by an hour twice yearly, but I do not. It was strange for the first week or two, having everything around me shifted by an hour (giving me an extra hour in the dark morning, and an hour less after work), but that's much better than the two weeks it would have taken me to even begin to adjust to an altered sleeping schedule.

Soon I'll find if shifting my day back (moving an hour from my morning to my afternoon) will feel as strange as it did in the autumn. One thing I do know for sure, I won't lose an hour of sleep in the transition.

Re:Stopped changing my sleep schedule last year... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466176)

When the alarm clock shows "4:00 AM", it sounds and I wake up

That's all I need to know. You're insane.

Breaking News: DST invented by a jizz guzzler! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35465998)

I always knew everyone in Congress liked smoking poles. Some, like Bahny Fwank, don't even try to hide it any more. Ugh, he's like the Rosy O'Doughnut of fags. If you're gonna be a faggot, you've at least got to be hot so that other people will say to themselves, "He's pretty good-looking. I can see why some dudes might wanna fuck him." But Bahney Fwank isn't even in the ball park when it comes to looks. He's just a fat, bitchy queen.

It's bad for me (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466028)

It's bad for me. Twice a year it causes me severe depression as I'm reminded that I'm living in a country where the people that pass the laws think they can "gain" an hour of daylight by changing the clocks. For fucks sake, just wake up sooner and leave the clocks alone.

In other news, I'm kind of tired of time zones as well. I should disagree with some one on the phone about what time it is. it's the same time every where. What difference does it make if the sun rises at 06:00 or 18:00?

Do the people (0)

McTickles (1812316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466098)

Who mandated this little time changing circus realize that this WILL NOT provide more sun? people who say "oh we'll sleep an hour longer" or "more sun in the evening!" dont realize this changes nothing in the real world, no matter how many times to adjust a clock time still passes at the same rate (well leaving physics notions aside).
As for the energy savings? in a 24h globalized world? what a fucking joke!
I work mostly in the eve and I suffer from SAD and this little ritual is just sily beyond words.
Stay in summer time (that's what we call it where i live) it is better because its fits more closely to actually "sun time"
All this does is show that most people really live rigidly by the human clock and not their natural clock, at the expense, i believe of their mental welbeing.
This little ritual, I think, is to stop next year, I really hope so...

It's logic. It's not bad for you at all (1)

fluor2 (242824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466114)

We have daylight savings to *save daylight*. Because in winter-time, we have less sun.
The human mind is closely connected to the sun. Less sun means less happines. Your health might also be connected to this. E.g. you move less when there is less sun, and you get less excercise.

I also have to point that there seem to be no study that proves that removing DST means less suicides or heart attacks.

What about not having daylight savings time? (1)

louic (1841824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466118)

Be that as it may, not having daylight savings time makes people spend more time in the dark, which may also cause depression.

Hi (4, Interesting)

bmo (77928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466136)

My name is BMO and I live in Rhode Island. We here in the Northeast US are far enough east that during the winter, we go to work in the dark and we come home in the dark. Unless you have windows in your office or stock room or machine shop, or whatever, you never see the sun except on weekends. It's like being divorced and having partial custody - of sunlight.

The Eastern time zone is so wide that it stretches all the way to the Eastern border of Illinois. This is just nuts. When DST finally shows up in March, suddenly the sun sets at a reasonable hour.

New England and NY should secede from the Union and join the Maritime Provinces simply to get a sane time zone.

I'm sorry for ranting, but I'm tired of my Seasonal Affective Disorder and I can't wait for DST to get here. See? My SAD is showing!

--
BMO

Re:Hi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466242)

Exactly. As long-time eastern EST-er, I've always wished I could remain on DST permanently so at least one of my (bicycle) commutes could be in the daylight.

DST has nothing to do with daylight (1)

Autonomous Crowhard (205058) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466138)

DST starts roughly 80 days after the solstice and ends roughly 50 before the soltice. Changing clocks based onthe season rather than the actual amount of daylight or the time of sunrise is wasteful.

Educated stupid?! The solution to DS is simple!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466172)

FREE SPEECH in AMERICA is

"BULL SHIT",

EVIL EDUCATORS

block and suppress

www.timecube.com.

You are educated evil,

and might have to kill

the evil ONE teaching

educators before you

can learn that 4 corner

days actually exist -but

all Cube Truth denied.

time cube [timecube.com]

Why not adujst our clocks gradually ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35466198)

A 1-hour shift is certainly painful when you wake up on the Monday after DST starts. But how about 4x15 or 2x30 minutes ? Where I live, DSTstarts on March 27th this year. so I think I'll try adjusting to it in 20-minute increments (or decrements, rather) on Monday 14th, Monday 21th and Monday 28th. I'm not gonna change my office hours, but I guess I'll use the extra time in the morning to do other stuff, like practicing my piano for a bit.

As long as the law doesn't change, it seems to me like a sensible thing we can do to fend off the jet lag. Takes just a bit of preparation and discipline (no cheating with the snooze button ! ;) )

Simple way to END Daylight Savings Time (1)

JoshDM (741866) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466268)

For those areas affected, for the next DST, just go 30 minutes in the appropriate direction and then STOP CHANGING THE CLOCKS FOREVER AFTER.

Tada, Simple cure and one final gig for the Y2K / DST programmers.

Good for many, bad for some. (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 3 years ago | (#35466346)

DST is good for all those enjoying that extra hour of daylight after work and, like me, don't get up early enough to notice the sun seems to rise an hour later.

Having DST in winter is useless because of that later rise of the sun, around my place it'd mean the sun would only rise around 10 o'clock.

When I hear about the health issues of some it makes me wonder how they cope with a night out in town...

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>