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The Science of Stout Beer

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the tiny-complex-bubbles dept.

Beer 205

An AC writes "Mathematicians invented a new method to can and bottle stout beers like Guinness while still getting that satisfying head. From the article: '... a crack group of mathematicians from the University of Limerick, led by William Lee, has modeled bubble formation in stout beers in detail. Their work suggests that lining the rims of cans and bottles with a material similar to an ordinary coffee filter would be a simpler, cheaper alternative to the widget. The team’s calculations show that a copious number of bubbles would form from air trapped inside the hollow fibers making up this lining. They have just submitted their work for publication in Physical Review E and are hoping that industry will soon begin testing their proposal.'"

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205 comments

The science of better Guinness (2)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493260)

Now that's science I'll raise my drink to!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

c0mpliant (1516433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493314)

As an Irishman, I don't know how anyone can drink Guinness. I see tourists ordering it with their breakfast sometimes here (granted that will be a breakfast at 12 that looks more like a bucket of greese with a few sausages thrown in) and I feel like getting sick when I see it! Give me a Bulmers any day of the week and no one has formed a better way to store that than in a pint bottle.

Good to see that University of Limerick students are hard at work though!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

destroygbiv (896968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493478)

Who isn't Irish? Guiness is good. Hell, beer is good. They're all good! (Except Leffe..)

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493826)

Leffe is good, but Nigerian Guiness is the best!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

destroygbiv (896968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494126)

I've never tried Nigerian Guiness, but the Leffe we get up here in the exact middle of Canada tastes more like rotten fruit than beer.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Nursie (632944) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494484)

It's not bad, a couple of bottles of that one knocK me for six though. Brewed to about 7 or 8% isn't it?

There's also an export strength version from Dublin I'm quite partial too.

"Foreign Extra" those are the words they use!

Re:The science of better Guinness (2)

khr (708262) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493522)

As an Irishman, I don't know how anyone can drink Guinness.

Though a non Irishman (never mind my Irish first name or my high school sports team being the Waldport Irish) I agree... Guiness is close to one of my last choices in stouts... My preference runs towards some of the Portland, Oregon microbrewery stouts, especially the cask conditioned ones...

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Silentknyght (1042778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494436)

Seconded. Guinness is the Budweiser of stouts. The US craft brewing and homebrewing scene can, and regularly does, do stout beer a lot better service.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Purity Of Essence (1007601) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494514)

Guinness isn't a traditional stout by any means, but it's a tasty beer nonetheless. It's very nearly my favorite beer, but as a stout it probably belongs near the end of the list, or on a list uniquely its own. It's funny that it has this reputation for being the be-all and end-all of stouts -- but then again this is a world where Budweiser is the King of Beers.

Re:The science of better Guinness (2)

DrgnDancer (137700) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493530)

Meh, It's not a bad stout. There are better, in Ireland, England, or the States (probably other places too, but those are the ones I've had stout in ), but it's got the advantage of being both fairly decent and readily available in a lot of places. In the US particularly it's a very common "nod" to better quality beer in places that otherwise have only crap. It and Sam Adams Lager are two beers that one can often find in places that otherwise only serve Budweiser and Miller Macro brew stuff. If I'm in a place that has lots of good beer, Guinness falls pretty low on my list (though its low alcohol content can make it a better choice later in the evening), but if I'm with friends at a less choosy sports bar or something It's often a nice choice.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493628)

As an Irishman, I don't know how anyone can drink Guinness. I see tourists ordering it with their breakfast sometimes here (granted that will be a breakfast at 12 that looks more like a bucket of greese with a few sausages thrown in) and I feel like getting sick when I see it! Give me a Bulmers any day of the week and no one has formed a better way to store that than in a pint bottle.

Well, if tourists..especially Americans...that is about the only Irish beer they know. I mean, in mainstream US, mexican beer is Corona (thankfully changing a bit), and Irish beer is Guiness, Australian beer is Fosters. That's the only taste of it most people get over here.

The scene is changing a bit...many brew pubs and bars specializing in beers are offering other choices, but even then, often small brew US beers are dominating those taps, and with decent reason too..they are local and they are GOOD. Down here in New Orleans, we have a number of local breweries that are putting out some quality beer.

That being said...as a tourist when I'm visiting other countries (less and less these days)...I do try to ask the locals what they prefer and what is good to drink. I find it is a great way to learn, and an easy way to strike up a conversation with the locals and make new friends and find out where to go off the beaten path for restaurants, etc.

Sadly, many of my fellow countrymen travel and stick with fscking McD's or the like...but not me. When in Rome as they say....

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494216)

Well, that's cool, but sometimes you'd be better off drinking stuff that is too expensive for the locals. I mean, there's beer here, but it's all horrible, and I'd never suggest it to anyone, even an Usian tourist. You'd be better off wasting your money on, say, the absolutely insane amount of Belgian beers available (at equally insane prices, but hey, you probably got that kind of money).

Also, what's wrong with Corona? The only other Mexican beer I've tried was Negra Modelo, and that was also pretty good. Oh well, perhaps I've downed too much swill to know the difference between decent and really good.

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494324)

"Usian" is not a word. The demonym for the people who live in the United States is "American". Examples of the correct usage are "American tourists", "stupid Americans", etc. This is definitive information. Memorize it and begin using it immediately.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

gregulator (756993) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494238)

To be fair, a Cadbury Egg McFlurry is a damn good reason to go into a British McDonalds.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493642)

agreed, its not even on my list of choices, but really? tourists ordering Guinness in ireland? thats like going to Italy and ordering Papa Johns pizza

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

WitnessForTheOffense (1669778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493886)

Analogy fail. Guinness is actually from Ireland. Papa Johns pizza isn't from Italy.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493986)

fine its mass produced crap you can get pretty much anywhere, I am not flying thousands of miles to get something that cost a few bucks across the street :p

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494496)

You tell'em, Sparky!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

oldmac31310 (1845668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494502)

Actually, no it tastes quite different in different parts of the world. The best Guiness is found close to the James St. Brewery.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494736)

Well, there's the old myth of Guinness not tasting the quite right anywhere but Dublin. For all I know, it might be true, despite it all being brewed in Dublin and shipped around the world. Naturally, you'd want to taste the only beer Ireland is known for the way it's meant to be when you're visiting Ireland for the first time.

Re:The science of better Guinness (2)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494026)

Originally, perhaps. If you look at a recent bottle (at least the one I have here) it says it was brewed and bottled in Canada. Now days, Guinness = Canadian beer.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

c0mpliant (1516433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494374)

Not the stuff in Ireland, brewed at James Gate in Dublin. Still tastes like piss water to me, but yeah

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | more than 3 years ago | (#35495042)

Originally, perhaps. If you look at a recent bottle (at least the one I have here) it says it was brewed and bottled in Canada. Now days, Guinness = Canadian beer.

Same with many Japanese beers. The big print on a Sapporo or Asahi says "IMPORTED"; the small print says "from Canada". (Kirin doesn't even bother to pretend -- it's brewed by Anheuser-Busch.)

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

b0bby (201198) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494408)

I don't really drink, but in Ireland I tried Guinness in both Galway & Dublin. Even I could tell that it was better in Dublin. They say it doesn't travel well, and from my limited experience I'd agree. So, from now on I only drink Guinness in Dublin.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

oldmac31310 (1845668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494454)

That is a really idiotic comment. I really don't even know what you are trying to express!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494580)

its mass produced garbage you can get anywhere, why go to Ireland and drink crap you can buy at the BP

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493812)

As an Irishman, I don't know how anyone can drink Guinness.

Too light for you? Just because you Irish drink like you're— well, Irish, doesn't mean you have to Harp on the rest of us.

;)

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

harl (84412) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493856)

I don't understand. As an Irishman you are somehow able to tell everyone what is good and what is bad?

Seriously you're judging what other people enjoy? What gives you the right?

Re:The science of better Guinness (2)

Local ID10T (790134) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494742)

As an Irishman you are somehow able to tell everyone what is good and what is bad?

Yes, at least when it comes to beer and whiskey.

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494006)

Sounds to me as if you just don't enjoy beer if you'd prefer a cidar to a pint of Guinness.

Re:The science of better Guinness (2)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494196)

As an Irishman you should know what a beer is at least, why are you comparing Bulmers to Guinness? If I want a beer I would consider a Guinness but I sure as hell won't be ordering a cider!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

JacksonG (82656) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494246)

As a westcountryman I don't know how anyone can drink Bulmers - Give me a Thatchers and keep it coming!

Definately agree with you on the storage in a pint bottle however.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

BagOCrap (980854) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494268)

As an Irishman, I don't know how anyone can drink Guinness. I see tourists ordering it with their breakfast sometimes here (granted that will be a breakfast at 12 that looks more like a bucket of greese with a few sausages thrown in) and I feel like getting sick when I see it! Give me a Bulmers any day of the week and no one has formed a better way to store that than in a pint bottle.

Good to see that University of Limerick students are hard at work though!

Quite correct, and agree wholeheartedly. Guinness is to dry stout as Erdinger is to hefeweizen as carrot is to a car. Or something like that. It's no longer a matter of quality, it's just a brand that's succumbed to its own commercial appeal.

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493438)

Guinness is ok if you like your beer watered down.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

Brewmeister_Z (1246424) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493758)

If Guiness is watered down to you, I would like to hear your opinion of American light beers. Seems like the brewers here are on a race to the bottom by offering beers with less in them. I can hardly wait for Miller to make a beer from the water they use to rinse out their brewing equipment (maybe that is what they serve up now for the low-calorie swill?). Zero-calorie beer will the next abomination (AKA bottled water with a hint of yellow color at twice the price of other overpriced bottled water).

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493924)

If Guiness is watered down to you, I would like to hear your opinion of American light beers. Seems like the brewers here are on a race to the bottom by offering beers with less in them. I can hardly wait for Miller to make a beer from the water they use to rinse out their brewing equipment (maybe that is what they serve up now for the low-calorie swill?). Zero-calorie beer will the next abomination (AKA bottled water with a hint of yellow color at twice the price of other overpriced bottled water).

Come to Oregon, where it's a race to the hop!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493978)

I can hardly wait for Miller to make a beer from the water they use to rinse out their brewing equipment (maybe that is what they serve up now for the low-calorie swill?). Zero-calorie beer will the next abomination (AKA bottled water with a hint of yellow color at twice the price of other overpriced bottled water).

As long as it still has alcohol in it, if it is cheaper I can almost guarantee college students will drink it.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494540)

A coworker of mine took his kid on an ambulance ride because he passed out from alcohol poisoning. Idiot gave his kid Miller, said "this is beer, now you know, so you just sip on one can and nobody bothers you for not drinking" because it was shitty tasting.

Predictable result. Kid hates alcohol, it tastes like shit. Kid gets around party zone, sees alcohol as a mere vehicle to get drunk, drinks a lot. We teach our kids in the US that alcohol is absolutely bad and should never be touched. Stupid.

I told him he needs to teach that kid to drink. Get some $50 bottles of scottish islay whiskey, some good rum, and some Bass Pale Ale or Dogfish Head Shelter Pale Ale. Sit down one day and sip off an ounce of good whiskey... not the kind of shit you want to guzzle down hard and fast, because it's too good to waste. Beer is also very good, and you should expect to be served worthwhile beer.

When someone hands you cheap vodka from a $20 1.5L bottle and you gag on it, you will know: this shit isn't worth drinking. Too much good whiskey or rum will leave you regarding getting drunk as an annoying side effect of taking too much good liquor at once. Same with beer: too much nasty alcohol, not enough good malty flavor, not drinking this shit.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494598)

When someone hands you cheap vodka from a $20 1.5L bottle

Who pays $20 for cheap vodka?!

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494884)

The taxes are $14/L for alcohol in the US I think. At 40%, 1.5L is $8.40 of taxes. Mind you, you're legally required to sell your liquor to a distributor, who sells it to the store, making mark-up at the brewer, distributor, and store level, so somewhere between $8.40 and $20 there's $12.60 of total mark-up, part of which pays for manufacturing, part of which pays for the bottle to put it in, part of which pays for shipping.

Re:The science of better Guinness (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494976)

The cheapest of the cheap vodka at Price Chopper is $10.49 per 1.5L. And it was on sale for under $10 a few weeks ago at the liquor store.

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494184)

How do you think keystone and Natural light are made?

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494754)

Some Stouts I don't consider watered down.

Milk Stout: Left Hand Brewing company CO
Jefferson Stout: Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company MS
Moo Hoo Chocolate Milk Stout: Terrapin Brewing Company GA
Any shout made by: Rogue OR
Hitachino Nest Espresso Stout: Kiuchi Brewery Japan

Re:The science of better Guinness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493868)

Student's t-Distribution also arose from the scientific pursuit of better Guinness.

Anecdotal Research (1)

ghurlag (1913210) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493284)

I'll take a chance for the betterment of mankind. Put me on the list of test subjects :)

The science of liquid bread? (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493320)

The science of liquid bread?

Get me a pilsner, please. It goes well with this pudding.

Re:The science of liquid bread? (1)

Faux_Pseudo (141152) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493366)

tThere is more barley in a pilsner than a stout. Guinness is one of the lightest beers ut there.

Re:The science of liquid bread? (1)

pthisis (27352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493456)

Yep. At 120 calories/12oz, Guinness is much closer to light beers (Bud Light is 110 calories/12oz) than to a standard Bud, Heineken, MGD, Coors, Corona or the like (generally in the 140-160 calories/12oz range).

Re:The science of liquid bread? (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493510)

This seems like the place for people who know their Guinness, so has anyone noticed that the bottles being sold in the last 6 months or so are missing the widgets? I can't say for sure if there's a difference between with and without, but I've wondered what the heck happened to them.

Re:The science of liquid bread? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493594)

I noticed this in the bottles of Draught over the weekend. I still had widgets in my Draught bottles around December though.

Re:The science of liquid bread? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493620)

the cans still have them.

As far as calories go, I found it interesting that a can of Guinness has less calories than the same amount of Mt Dew. The anti-oxidant properties of it make it better for me too.

Re:The science of liquid bread? (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494120)

As far as calories go, I found it interesting that a can of Guinness has less calories than the same amount of Mt Dew.

Just about anything has less calories than sugar-water.

A 12 fl. oz. can of Mountain Dew contains 47 grams of sugar. The specific gravity of Mt. Dew (according to Google) is about 1.046, i.e. it has a density of 1.046 g/cm^3. Do the math and you find that it's 12.66% sugar by weight...

I'm sorry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493338)

I got distracted right about here:
"Mathematicians invented a new method to can and bottle stout beers like Guinness while still getting that satisfying head."

Satisfying head (4, Funny)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493340)

That's appropriate. Canned and bottled beer has always helped me get satisfying head.

Re:Satisfying head (3, Funny)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493506)

We really don't want to know how you get the flavor out of your mouth.

Re:Satisfying head (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493568)

He just told you. You get the nasty beer flavor out of your mouth by giving head.

research (1)

Faux_Pseudo (141152) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493390)

This is the type of science that wins an Ig Noble.

Re:research (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494152)

This is the type of science that wins an Ig Noble.

Nope. It's far too useful. It also connects nerdy mathematicians with the general public, which isn't a bad thing.

A bit too late for this St. Patrick's Day, but maybe next year.

More of a Twisted Thistle man, myself these days.

Dammit, I was so close (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493502)

Dammit, and I was so close too after years of research. "Line the rims of cans and bottles with a material similar to an ordinary coffee filter" was next on my list, right after "Call up ex and ask why she doesn't love me anymore".

My GF gives satisfying head to my stout! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493508)

My GF gives satisfying head to my stout!

Late to the game (3, Interesting)

pthisis (27352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493560)

Their work suggests that lining the rims of cans and bottles with a material similar to an ordinary coffee filter would be a simpler, cheaper alternative to the widget.

The good people at Guinness have already figured out the widgetless bottle; as of early this year, their draught bottles no longer contain a floating widget (at least in the US).

Re:Late to the game (2)

adeft (1805910) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493940)

I've read a few posts from beer snobs on other forums saying it's a travesty of justice and doesn't get the same pour. As an American Irish, I still very much like this beer.

Re:Late to the game (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494438)

Brilliant!

Not the same (4, Informative)

rizzo420 (136707) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493700)

I can only assume the post is talking solely about stouts like Guinness Draught in a nitro-can that has a widget to release nitrogen. There is more to what that widget does than just give the beer a nice creamy head. It gives the entire beer a different mouthfeel, and that's because of the nitrogen, not carbon dioxide (though the beer does already contain carbon dioxide. So, if they want the same effect, you'll still need a widget (or in the case of the bottled Guinness Draught, the proper mix of the gases). However, nitrogen dulls the flavor of the beer. So the effect this story talks about would not leave the beer the same...

I look forward to more research on this subject. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493778)

I look forward to researching this further at about 5pm at
a local neighborhood laboratory.
 

Patented? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493822)

Is this a "public domain" type invention, or "by license" type invention?

(The widget is patented.)

http://home.comcast.net/~tabco/widget.htm

The right way to do it. (2)

bcf (1432081) | more than 3 years ago | (#35493898)

Forget widgets. Here's what you need.

And, of course, a keg of stout from your better supplied liquor outlet.
Stout nirvana awaits.

Re:The right way to do it. (2)

Silentknyght (1042778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494488)

Forget widgets. Here's what you need.

And, of course, a keg of stout from your better supplied liquor outlet.

Stout nirvana awaits.

For the people who prefer Guinness, I think the investment for homebrewed draft stout is a wee heavy.

Re:The right way to do it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494892)

For the people who prefer Guinness, I think the investment for homebrewed draft stout is a wee heavy.

Funny you should say homebrew and wee heavy [northernbrewer.com].

Re:The right way to do it. (1)

bcf (1432081) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494992)

However, this permanently resolves the dilemma of what to do when you have two guests (and yourself), but just one four-pack of Guinness Draught in cans.

THANK YOU GOD!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493930)

this article right here is enfough proff for me that THERE IS A GOD!!!!! CHEERS MATES!!!!!!

Re:THANK YOU GOD!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494064)

this man is a Genius!

"getting that satisfying head" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35493932)

The only head many on here would be getting

Nucleation... (1)

rAiNsT0rm (877553) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494022)

They've "invented" nothing more than the same concept behind the Mentos/Coke thing, nucleation. If you give enough surface area for the bubbles you can vary the amount from the average can/bottle opening to the geyser. A few trial and errors would get you there for something trivial like beer, not complex math and modeling and academic journals.

This is also the reason why super new mugs/glasses can "superheat" water in a microwave for the opposite reason, they are too smooth.

Oh, and Nitrogen is what does the trick for Guinness, not simply some bubbles. And forget what you've been told, drinking your Guinness while it is leveling is where it's at, not letting it sit and topping off. That was done back in the day when people were poorer and felt like they weren't getting a proper pint for their money, the extra ounce is not worth it compared to drinking it as it should be.

Re:Nucleation... (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494822)

Is this why you should never use a non-dairy creamer with the microwave at work? Because the water may become superheated without nucleation, and then when you add a non-dairy creamer to the superheated coffee you suddenly get massive nucleation, a steam explosion, and hot water and superheated steam all over your arms?

Re:Nucleation... (1)

rAiNsT0rm (877553) | more than 3 years ago | (#35495022)

That's exactly it. But honestly it's a bit misguided because anything would have the same effect, dropping in a spoon, some sugar, even just jostling the mug a bit can be enough. The safest bet is to just heat the water for a sane amount of time roughly 2-2.5 min max in a home microwave and 1-1.5 in a commercial one. That is plenty hot for almost anything and almost no chance of danger, I see people put water in for like 4+ minutes... that is asking for trouble.

I once worked for a university and one of the companies handed out free mugs that looked like beakers and made of their lab glass... because they were so super smooth inside people were getting hurt left and right. I'm guessing that was a solid marketing fail. :)

Canned Guinness? No thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494038)

Canned Guinness is an abomination, and bottled Guinness (Extra Stout) is a different product altogether. Worse again is Guinness served outside of Ireland, which is invariably poured wrong and at the wrong temperature. If you haven't had Guinness from a *good* Irish pub you haven't really had Guinness. I learned that the hard way :p

  - Irish AC who likes his Guinness -

Re:Canned Guinness? No thanks (1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494226)

That's the only way i'll probably buy another guinness...
For me, i like Fullers London Porter... stouts taken to 11.

The data on the mig is inaccurate (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494114)

Although the article does say "beers LIKE guinness" there are plenty of other good beer that are nitrogen carbonated. AFAIK that does not include all stout beers like the article implies, nor is notro carbonation limited only to stouts. Not only that but "Guinness stout" is not nitro carbonated, it's "Guinness draft" that's nitro (and perhaps a few others). There are 11 different varieties of Guinness beer. I've only had two, and they're not very similar in my opinion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinness#Varieties [wikipedia.org]

Obligatory Limerick (1)

nowen2dot (1768088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35494194)

Once while lying in bed,
Dr. Lee said, "This stout has no head."
The bottlers made spheres
to foam up the beers,
But Lee's filter will be used instead.

Okay, so I'm not very good at these.

Beer With a Satisfying Head? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35494504)

All head should be satisfying, with or without the beer.

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