Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Getting Closer To Using Graphene For Electronics

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the better-than-my-plan-to-use-spaghetti dept.

Hardware 35

tgrigsby writes "Students at Georgia Tech have developed a new 'templated growth' technique that allows fabrication of nanoribbons with smooth edges and high conductivity. Predicting the ability to produce features no more than 10 nanometers wide and with extremely low resistance, Yike Hu and John Hankinson may be developing the next generation of processor technology."

cancel ×

35 comments

finally (1)

leaen (987954) | more than 3 years ago | (#35572450)

So now it is just ten years to graphene computers?

Re:finally (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | more than 3 years ago | (#35572520)

It will be here before you know it. Time speeeeeds up I'm sure.

Re:finally (3, Funny)

show me altoids (1183399) | more than 3 years ago | (#35572524)

Is that the one in Atlanta Atlanta?

yup (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35573124)

it buts right up against Interstate 75/85 (ok, not quite redundant)

I went there but now live in the burbs near the Trader Joe's at the intersection of Roswell Road & Johnson Ferry (as opposed to the Trader Joe's at the intersection of Johnson Ferry & the OTHER Roswell Road). the two Roswell Roads actually intersect but I'm afraid to drive through that intersection as I'm convinced there's a singularity in the middle of it...

don't underestimate our ability to be redundant down here!

Re:yup (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574854)

I may have once eaten at that restaurant on Peachtree and Peachtree but time twisted so I'm not sure if I'm still waiting to do that.

Re:finally (1)

BisexualPuppy (914772) | more than 3 years ago | (#35572538)

Did you know it could be used in medicine, aerospace, and military applications ?

Re:finally (2)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573418)

More importantly; it can be used in porn applications.

Re:finally (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574838)

And fusion power plants, home hologram units, flying cars and jet packs.

improved fake weather (cloud) system invented (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35572498)

in qatar, by a muslim. so forget it? until it's 'a $viable$ patentdead (subscription) product, or we get tired of being poisoned/killed by the current non-product?

mynutswon? mentioned product contains graphene (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35572672)

sheesh. we know who the kings of censorship/manipulation are by now? we'll stick to product/baby placement as deemed appropriate. thanks again?

How to overclock? (2)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 3 years ago | (#35572576)

How to overclock?
If the computer chips are made of graphene, will we have to use silicon pencils to do the overclocking trick?

Been hearing about this for years, (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35572626)

Not happening. Meanwhile, life moves on and the propeller heads get to extend their funding while the poor people starve and die from lack of health care.

Re:Been hearing about this for years, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575954)

Exactly! They (all those so called 'smart people', who just look down on the working guy because they had degrees and know stuff) need to stop wasting money on research and such and give to to the banks so they can make this country grate again!

... posted from (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35572632)

the Department of Redundancy Department

Have we delayed the death of Moore's Law? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35572718)

This makes me think of the Michio Kaku "Moore's Law ending" discussion from yesterday.

Have we pushed it farther into the future and averted the collapse of the economy and computers as we know it again?

Re:Have we delayed the death of Moore's Law? (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35572848)

I thought he was referring to the change when we hit quantum computing, and if that is the case then.. no. I didn't RTFA or the comments of course.

The real ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35572908)

OK! The real question is will we be able to run Linux?

Re:The real ? (1)

rgbatduke (1231380) | more than 3 years ago | (#35583936)

No, the real question is -- will anybody still be able to run Windows!

So now will the time line be... (1)

Tideflat (1858480) | more than 3 years ago | (#35572966)

So now will the time line for computers be vacuum tube -> transistors -> integrated circuits -> graphene?

Re:So now will the time line be... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35573154)

Graphene does the same things Silicon does... at much MUCH faster (think >500ghz) clock speeds.

Re:So now will the time line be... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35579902)

vacuum tube -> transistors -> integrated circuits -> graphene

-> new-kle-arr war -> bashing rocks together

Melted Nanoribbons (1)

Punko (784684) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573130)

Oh ho! Another source for Melted Nanoribbons! Can't wait to get them to Jita before the market crashes

Re:Melted Nanoribbons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35573496)

They're only tradeable with avatar BPOs.

Re:Melted Nanoribbons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582492)

Jita IV - Moon 4 - Caldari Navy Assembly Plant Cya there :P

Am I missing something? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35573152)

I thought it was impossible to build a transistor from Graphene since it lacks a band-gap. No band-gap -> no transistor... no transistor -> no computing device.

Re:Am I missing something? (3, Informative)

mycroft822 (822167) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574520)

According to TFA: "We will not be following the model of using standard field-effect transistors (FETs), but will pursue devices that use ballistic conductors and quantum interference. We are headed straight into using the electron wave effects in graphene."

Re:Am I missing something? (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575986)

I've started upgrading my Gravy Gun Drop Rovers to use dissociative wave effects on the damnable University.

Re:Am I missing something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35589900)

Graphene does not normally have a band gap but researchers are working several methods to create one. Theory predicts that narrow graphene ribbons will have a band gap which is inversely proportional to its width due to quantum confinement of the transverse electron modes, but they have to be really narrow (~10nm or even smaller) and have a certain edge orientation so it has been difficult to show experimentally. Also there are many people working on chemical modifications to induce a bandgap and several other ideas of how to potentially create a band gap. In addition to this work there is interest in creating fundamentally new types of transistors based on quantum interference which do not rely on a bandgap and graphene would be well suited for such a device. There is a cool theory paper about a quantum interference effect transistor made using only a 6 atom carbon ring! Unfortunatley at the moment we can't create such a device to test the theory. So while it is true that current graphene field effect transistors have dismal on/off ratios due to the lack of a band gap but there are a lot of smart people working to overcome these challenges so don't count it out yet.

Yike is pronounced "yee kuh", not yike as in Yikes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35573254)

...just in case you were wondering...

Valuable contribution to graphine (1)

planckscale (579258) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573830)

If the US wants to vault ahead of other countries making the next generation of computers we should be taking a damn hard look at graphene and get low cost manufacturing functioning for this, what I believe, is the most exciting prospect in computer technology. I think this is the closest we'll ever get to a superconductor with quantum properties using extremely low power and temperatures and it's really ingenious how the scientists have been inventing technologies to explore graphene. I applaud the strides that have been made by these researchers; in my book they deserve the multi-million dollar contracts. Not the sports stars and celebrities...

Not according to IBM (3, Informative)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574090)

Re:Not according to IBM (3, Informative)

silverpig (814884) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575134)

From the link: "there is an important distinction between the graphene transistors that we demonstrated and the transistors used in a CPU. Unlike silicon, graphene does not have an energy gap, and therefore, graphene cannot be "switched off," resulting in a small on/off ratio." One of the issues with graphene is it doesn't have a band gap. You can create one if you can successfully dope it (unlikely), or if you can put it into a very narrow by relatively long shape (say 2 nm wide by 50 nm long). Once you have a band gap, you can turn it off completely.

Re:Not according to IBM (2)

silverpig (814884) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575244)

Oh also, they say they want to make transistors which use quantum interference to shut them off, not an electric field effect. In this case you don't need a band gap in the same way. You make a ballistic device (on), and then you apply some potential to the edges to mess up the quantum states so they interfere and the thing insulates. "This means that the way we will be doing graphene electronics will be different," he explained. "We will not be following the model of using standard field-effect transistors (FETs), but will pursue devices that use ballistic conductors and quantum interference. We are headed straight into using the electron wave effects in graphene."

Graphene for electronics (2)

tahyk (1447177) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574698)

1st: This story is not new. They have paper out there about this techniques. (2010 Aug) http://www.nature.com/nnano/journal/v5/n10/full/nnano.2010.192.html [nature.com] 2nd: sub-10 nm ribbons have a bandgap due to quantum confinement. Their 4K measurement doesn't really proves it, so something is not kosher. Or at least this is why they say "metallic" nanoribbons. That techinque is not that useful for digital electronics. 3rd: There are other ways for doing sub-10 nm GNRs, which are actually semiconductors. This is what I do for living. I think it is still promising for future electronics. It is just my opinion, while there's no proof, neither con, nor pro. Others (IBM) might have different opinions about it, but this question is not decided yet.

happy to go through this post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577498)

Well, essentially happy to go through this post, I’ve bookmarked your web page and can turn back again to learn your new content.
My site: felgi aluminiowe [opon-market.pl]

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...