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Splinternet, Or How We Broke the Good Old Web

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the zomg-its-the-end-of-the-world dept.

223

StormDriver writes "I don't want to be that scruffy guy with 'The end is nigh' sign and some really bad dental problems, but most industry analysts already noticed that global Internet is coming apart, changing into a cluster of smaller and more closed webs. They have even created a catchy name for this Web 3.0 – the Splinternet.

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223 comments

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/. News Network (3, Insightful)

Even on Slashdot FOE (1870208) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573930)

A blogger claims it's the end of the worl^H^H^H^Hinternet. More information and comparisons with similar claims dating back to 1995 at 11.

Oh noes! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575018)

The Internet is fracturing into interconnected networks!

Re:/. News Network (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575168)

Even further back:

The Empire is still strong and will last forever!
Do dah, do dah!

Constantine the Great AD 337

Re:/. News Network (2)

Byzantine (85549) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576254)

And the Empire didn't finally fall for good until another thousand years later. Hardly "forever," but nothing to sneer at either.

Obligatory TMNT Reference (1)

soloport (312487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575322)

"I have always liked... Cowabunga."

Re:Obligatory TMNT Reference (1)

kaizokuace (1082079) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575994)

Bossanova!

Re:/. News Network (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575398)

Its going to happen anyway, but lets sensationalize it and call it "Web 3.0"! I call dibs on SplinterBook!

Re:/. News Network (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575850)

This is article is trying to sell something (markachitecture - using marketing to describe technical architectures). This article is supposed persuade people to use a product called StormDriver. So expect a decent level of fabrication mixed with some key marketing terms.

Re:/. News Network (1)

dhall (1252) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576172)

It's not true until netcraft confirms.

Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (4, Insightful)

Anrego (830717) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573942)

Disclaimer: can’t read the article (filtered) but have a good guess at what it says

Personally, I put part of the blame on mobile “apps”. You can’t charge someone for access to a website unless you’ve got some really compelling content.. but you sure can sell them an app for their phone that provides the same kind of information for a few dollars.

And yes, there are lots of mobile apps that wouldn’t be practical in website form, but there are just as many that could easily be a website.

As for the large closed sites that’ll change. Everything in tech seems to go through periods of convergence when the current set of technology becomes more refined, and divergence when it’s time for change. I actually don’t long for the days of wading through geocities and lycos and angelfire pages looking for some tidbit of into when these days I plug it into wikipedia, or some other niche wiki.

As for facebook and myspace and twitter, I think they’ve largely replaced the personal website and personal blog site for so many people because they provide all the functionality most people who had a personal site wanted, with none of the flexibility that they didn’t. When people want to start branching out in some way that you can’t do with facebook and friends en-masse.. you’ll see divergence start happening again.

Also, if "Web 3.0" actually becomes a new buzzword at this point in time... someones losing a finger.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (5, Insightful)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574004)

Disclaimer: can’t read the article (filtered)

Ironic.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574886)

How does this get marked 'Insightful'. This is the opposite of ironic. Irony requires juxtapose. The humor here is from the complete lack of juxtapose!

I'd expect this from an editor, but from a commenter...

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575332)

How does this get marked 'Insightful'. This is the opposite of ironic. Irony requires juxtapose. The humor here is from the complete lack of juxtapose!

I'd expect this from an editor, but from a commenter...

Maybe your definition of irony is splintered from that of the rest of the world.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

characterZer0 (138196) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575474)

Or maybe the world's definition of irony has splintered from the dictionaries.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35576040)

Enlighten me then.

You would normally expect to be able to read an article that decries how the web has become closed off. And then you can't.

There's no juxtaposition there?

irony. 5. an outcome of events contrary to what was, or might have been, expected.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Elbereth (58257) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575472)

That's ironic.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Jessified (1150003) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575836)

For example, "Ironic" by Alanis Morissette is aptly named because there is no irony in the song.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575892)

Mod: -1 Picky dipshit

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576074)

It's ironic because it's an article about the internet becoming separated and inaccessible to certain people, and he can't get to the article due to a filter.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

losethisurl (980326) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576138)

It's like rain on your wedding day It's a free ride when you've already paid It's the good advice that you just didn't take Who would've thought... it figures

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

Lennie (16154) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574286)

Many are already building phone apps based on webstandards like HTML5, CSS, JS, SVG(filters). Have a look at things like PhoneGap which gives an webstandards based app access to your device (like the addressbook if you want it to). Also the developer doesn't need to reupload the app to the appstore each time. The developer can just use the HTML5-features to update the HTML/JS/CSS from a website.

So that could be the solution.

Facebook ? I don't know, I don't life in the US where it seems to have had a bigger impact. But I've never seen anything on Facebook which I would like to see in my google searches.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574512)

But there is a lot on FB about me that I don't want others to see in their google searches.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

ddd0004 (1984672) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574378)

Awww come on, if "Web 3.0" or some other catchy moniker doesn't catch on, how will I be able to communcate with my VP or marketing guys?

In the past, I always treated phrases/words like "Web 2.0", "Synergy", "Core competencies", "Go Viral", " as my signal to put my brain on idle for a few minutes and take a little nap with my eyes open.

Surely "Web 3.0" is too predicable to catch on. These sort of things mostly get adopted because some people think they are clever.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574548)

And thats why you're still a bottom feeding grunt. There are plenty of VP/marketing guys who sling phrases like that about without really understanding what they're talking about, but the people who will become tomorrow's millionaires are the people that do pay attention to things like this, and understand where they're going (if anywhere) and how to take advantage of it.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

Dracos (107777) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574762)

There are plenty of VP/marketing guys who sling phrases like that about without really understanding what they're talking about

And by "plenty", you mean all of them. "Web 2.0" was a vapid marketing phrase that had no technical meaning.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575090)

It did. In a nutshell it means "you make the content, I make the money with it".

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575394)

Thanks for proving my point! It certainly did have a meaning, at least to people who knew what they were talking about (ie, not you, or your average VP). It meant social networking, blogs, wikis, anything with community contributed content...enormous markets that are making a lot of less grey-bearded, less uptight people shit tons of money.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574688)

"Synergy" was around for a long time (mainly in Biology) before it got hijacked by the bandwagon brigade.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

gilleain (1310105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575042)

"Syzygy" is the new "Synergy". So what if it means something to do with astrology or mathematics - it's full-on buzzy right now.

smart phones are for... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574380)

idiots (generally found standing in line at a Starbucks)

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574542)

I think sites like facebook are the greatest threat to WWW interconnectedness. It seems to me that the new trend is to congregate on exclusive networks, like facebook. The problem with facebook? Most content is invisible to non-members. Yeah, sure, it's free to register...but what if I don't want to? Is facebook really giving me new informational content (I'm not talking about the social networking aspect) that was not available before in another form on the internet? No. It's just walling off the information from me.

Clubs, cafes, restaurants, theaters...all used to have websites. Informative websites. Websites that used to state things like what was on the menu, or who was DJing on Friday night, or which band was playing on Saturday night, what the dress code is, how much cover is, pictures of what the place looked like, etc.

Then facebook came with its profiles for businesses. Sure, it started off with a mostly empty profile that just pointed to the existing website. But now, in many cases, it's the other way around: now it's the website that is empty - it often contains the establishment's name and address and a link to the facebook group/page/profile. That's it.

Dunno 'bout everyone else, but for me, that really sucks. Information that was once freely available is now behind somebody's registration wall. It's like the early 90s again, with CompuSERVE and AOL. Now I often find that without a facebook profile, it's impossible to figure out what's going on in town tonight using the web - something that was easily doable until very recently.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574706)

Yup. Facebook is the AOL of the interwebs.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575232)

I think sites like facebook are the greatest threat to WWW interconnectedness.

Walled Wide Web?

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575580)

Follow the money; look who benefits from having FB be the guardian for information.

With stuff tied to FB accounts, it gets rid of anonymity, or at least forces uses to keep creating profiles in order to access things. In any case, everything viewed through one FB profile is all tied together, making it easy to follow a breadcrumb trail.

The reason why FB is used over a website is pure laziness -- it is quick and easy to type some stuff, let FB format it, stick some pictures in a decently attractive layout, chuck a few bucks at FB's advertising department to get some eyeballs flying that way, and call it done. I know this, as I am guilty of doing this for some personal stuff myself.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35576308)

You've nailed it sir.
This is exactly the main problem with web 2.0.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (0)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574584)

Let me some up your entire post in 1 word: no.

This has nothing to do with mobile apps. This has everything to do with IANA and other DNS-centric groups, specifically one which is controlled by the US government, and they are using as a tool for censorship.

Thus, the end result is, we cannot rely on the US government, if they are willing to censor and defame (and defile) the internet.

"splinternet" is not at all accurate however, as the web is not "splitting", it's just the underlying DNS controls are being taken away from US government control.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574808)

You didn't read the article.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576258)

the article raises points everyone has before, a million times. This is not new. This as strawman'd in the article, has nothing to do with mobile apps. How many times do I have to say this?

governmental control of IANA and such means a whole fucking lot more than "omg people on mobile apps and HTML5"

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574630)

I had no trouble getting it, so it must be something on your end. Maybe you are at work and your employer is blocking stormdriver.com? If so, maybe they should be blocking slashdot.org, too.

That said, you aren't missing anything.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574816)

Disclaimer: can't read the article (illiterate)

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574840)

Personally, I put part of the blame on mobile “apps”. You can’t charge someone for access to a website unless you’ve got some really compelling content.. but you sure can sell them an app for their phone that provides the same kind of information for a few dollars.

I've sarcastically remarked on more than one occasion that someone should design a killer "app" that replaces the functionality of all those custom apps used to access newspapers, magazines and so on. They could design it so that content was written in a standardised, straightforward format. In fact, there could be numerous independent implementations of this imaginary killer "app", all of which let you access the same content.

If such a wonderful thing existed, they could call it... a "web browser".

But seriously... yeah. Those custom apps are bull****, there's no benefit to them for the user, quite the opposite- their only purpose is to give an excuse to charge for content. Which isn't an entirely unjustified thing in itself- I do have serious concerns about what will happen to journalism if it's reliant on trying to make itself pay through free websites. It just pisses me off when I hear some so-called tech journalist gushing about how x-magazine/newspaper has released its own app. So f*****g what? Obsessing as if that retrograde step- the app- is itself a good thing is missing the true point, which is that "x-magazine/newspaper" is making its content available for a charge over the iPhone (or whatever).

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

CFTM (513264) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575094)

So let me change a few things here, "there's no benefit to them [Me]". That statement should end right there. Free Markets work by letting individuals decide what has value and what does not have value. You rightfully feel there is no value in these apps, thus I am assuming that you do not purchase those apps. But there are many people who derive value from the apps, you do not, which is your prerogative and I am no way in critical of that but don't extrapolate your experience to the experience of others particularly when the market has demonstrated a vastly different opinion on this subject matter than you.

For instance, I do not trust the big banks nor AT&T and Verizon and as such am currently looking in to alternatives to using this institutions. I will lose functionality and accessibility by doing this, but it's how the market allows me to express my displeasure with the ethical lapses perpetrated by the boards of these companies.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

anegg (1390659) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575530)

Individual apps used to access premium content have come about, in large part, because the producers of the content are trying to a) provide for electronic distribution of their content, while still b) making a buck for their efforts.

It was great, in the "good old days" to find a newspaper's content on-line. It could be read electronically (yea!) and it could be read for free (double yea!). Who doesn't like free stuff? The problem was that free Internet content at that time depended on the revenue stream from paid subscribers, who received the hardcopy edition. With a small number of Internet-based readers, and lots of hardcopy readers, the system worked well enough. Unfortunately, "the Internet" has been a big success story when measured by subscriber uptake. Just about everyone (including my 75 year-old technologically illiterate mother) is "on the Internet." And the inevitable drop in paid hardcopy subscriptions for media like newspapers and magazines has been enormous. Even if a particular newspaper's or magazine's content isn't available on-line, subscriber/readership of that newspaper or magazine has probably dropped (I'm not in the business, I don't see the numbers, but I hear the mutterings) because there is so much content available on-line and people have developed a preference for that form of media intake. So publishers have responded with custom apps to maintain the revenue stream necessary to justify their existence.

Frankly, I don't see theses types of individual apps as being the things that are "splintering" the Internet. Why? Because the content to which they provide access wasn't previously available on the Internet. I suspect that there is far more content available on the Internet now than there was ten years ago. However, as *everything* moves to the Internet, not everything becomes freely available just because it is on the Internet. It isn't splintering the Internet to add chunks on to it which are only accessible to some while the bulk of the common areas are still present and active. The folks with that expectation that "on the Internet" should mean "free to me" are trying to eat a free lunch, every day. And as everyone should know, TANSTASFL (There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch).

The custom apps are just a simple way to package and sell content that otherwise wouldn't be on the Internet (at least, not for long). It costs money to provide content, and those providers wouldn't be in the business of providing content if they couldn't at least break even.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

KhabaLox (1906148) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576256)

The problem was that free Internet content at that time depended on the revenue stream from paid subscribers, who received the hardcopy edition. With a small number of Internet-based readers, and lots of hardcopy readers, the system worked well enough.

Actually, most of newspapers' revenue comes from advertising rather than subscriptions.
NY Times 2010 Annual Report (p. 60) [nytco.com] (pdf)
Gannett 2009 Annual Statement (p. 32) [annualreports.com] (pdf)
Granted, the gap between Advertising and Circulation revenue is closing as the newspapers loses subscribers. But there is no reason (in theory) that they can't increase digital advertising revenue, they just have to figure out a way to sell those digital eyes to the advertisers (who don't seem to be willing to pay as much, which doesn't make sense since you get better target digital ads).

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (4, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574870)

No it wont change... the large closed sites get bigger. I am a member of several closed sites and they are going "offline" or off the main path because of all the retardation of suing over dumb things and corporate enforcement of corporate profits and ideals.

I VPN into a node that gives me access to one of the largest Automotive computer and electronics hacking groups out there. It's invite only and it was a major bitch to get an invite into it. All this stuff is closed because of the morons that run automotive companies. Other hardware hacking circles are also going that route, PS3 hacking is starting to close in because of sony's antics. But having access to a dis-assembly of a current GM ECM gives me more options for tuning and performance. Plus I have acces s to "illegal" ECM bin files to learn from or use as a baseline tune. It's not easy to get my hands on a ECM from a Caddilac CTS-V but the bin file and other files allow me to look inside and see what they did. Also trying to retrofit a canbus controlled steering assist system to a car that does not have it allows me to add modern power steering assist to a hotrod instead of letting that hardware get crushed in a junkyard scrap crusher.

It's going to get more and more closed, the good information is getting squirreled away because of corporations.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

Rinnon (1474161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576088)

You know, car analogies are supposed to make your point EASIER to understand. If I didn't know any better, I'd think you were actually just trying to talk about cars there!

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (2)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576272)

It will only get worse, as the squeeze is put on people who dare get in the way of how devices get controlled. For example, I'm sure what happened to Geohot is going to ensure that the next guy who is bright enough to find a break in someone's hardware is not going to publish it, similar to HD satellite where a few people might have a way around it, but breaks in its security will never be divulged to the masses.

I dread to see what lies in store for us 10 years from now. I'm anticipating:

Real time monitoring of devices, so if an iPhone reads from a Cydia site, its IMEI/ESN would immediately be thrown off the cellular network, similar to how a modern IPS will lock a machine from getting out of a subnet if someone starts running nmap.

Healthchecks, and NAT enforced from core routers to home routers, where if someone isn't running a trusted OS with a hardened DRM stack and anti-IP forwarding/proxying measures, it will not get Internet access.

Insta-account locking of people's Apple IDs, Google Marketplace accounts, and such if a rooted/jailbroken device is detected by any of the above with their ID attached.

Games will be locked to consoles. Lose your next gen PS-3 successor, re-buy all your games, just like someone who loses their license dongle with Steinberg products has to re-buy Cubase and their VST plugins. Complain against a game company? They will insta-block all access to all games.

The sad thing is there is -NOTHING- to check the tide of more invasive and less free devices. Another genius that publishes a crack like Geohot will just be racked up on civil/criminal charges, and someone hiding behind a VPN will end up having what happened to the guy who got Palin's password.

Re:Grilled sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575870)

Forget that, tell us more about the sirloin steak!

A story about nothing (5, Informative)

rbanzai (596355) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573946)

It's a self-promotion piece that tries to pull disparate internet issues together and fails.

Re:A story about nothing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574104)

Yup, its an Advert for their software. Nothing to see, move along.

Re:A story about nothing (1)

ArmenTanzarian (210418) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574300)

Self-promotion is being too generous, this is unpaid advertising with points that are basically gibberish.

Re:A story about nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574410)

unpaid

Oh really now.....

It has a catchy name (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35573964)

It must be true

Cool name... (2)

Onuma (947856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573978)

...but what does TMNT have to do with this?

Re:Cool name... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575612)

Splinter was the name of the rat that raised the four mutant turtles and trained them in ninjitsu.

Mod parent down (3, Insightful)

KPU (118762) | more than 3 years ago | (#35573994)

This is an advertisement for some lame web sharing startup and nothing more.

Splinternet started in the Sewers (2)

scourfish (573542) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574016)

There, it saw 4 baby turtlenets crawling in a green ooze...

Re:Splinternet started in the Sewers (1)

ShadoHawk (741112) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574208)

Did it scoop them up into an old coffee can?

Advertisement not story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574056)

RTA

Huh? (2)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574062)

The guy's confusing content with hardware....

OK, content is based on location and user preferences.... Maybe if I'm Japanese I want content in Japanese and not in Swahili? How exactly is this "splintering" the net?

The hardware works just fine, as the upheavals in North Africa have proven.

Catchy name, just made for some pseudo babble in the Sunday papers, but content-free.

Se habla Japañol (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575310)

OK, content is based on location and user preferences.... Maybe if I'm Japanese I want content in Japanese and not in Swahili? How exactly is this "splintering" the net?

If you live in Japan, and you happen to speak Japanese and Spanish [notalwaysright.com] , you don't necessarily want to be locked out of articles in Spanish.

If you are visiting Japan but happen to speak English, you don't necessarily want to be locked out of articles in English.

If you're in Canada and speak English, you don't necessarily want to be locked out of articles and especially videos in English *cough*Hulu*cough*.

WTF? (4, Insightful)

bcmm (768152) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574072)

This seems 100% content-free... First of all, is this about the web or the internet? If they don't know the difference, how did they get on the front page of Slashdot?

Re:WTF? (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574590)

If they don't know the difference, how did they get on the front page of Slashdot?

My best guess, given that I've never been through this process:
1. Write your post on your company's website.
2. Use your own /. account to submit a story that happens to link back to your post. Represent your article as addressing some sort of real controversy, even if it's just an advert for your product.
3. Write a script to vote the thing up in the Firehose like crazy, spoofing IP addresses as needed.
4. Trust that the editors won't actually read your advert through, just check that it vaguely matches what you submitted.
5. Use the artificially increased traffic to convince your investors that there's a market out there for your product.
6. PROFIT!!!

Re:WTF? (1)

fortfive (1582005) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574968)

Yes, this. It's like that cellphone ad that says "The original name of the internet was the world wide web." I cringe every time I hear it.

Spam (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574074)

The article is a 10 graph ad for their social software.

Astroturf story (5, Insightful)

sstamps (39313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574098)

Nothing more than a bogus lead-in story talking about the product that the story's author is "preparing to release someday". Basically, creating a problem for his "solution".

News flash: develop your damn product first, let people try it out, and THEN promote it. Astroturfing vaporware is the epitome of hubris.

I predict EPIC FAIL for this one.

Re:Astroturf story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574992)

News flash: develop your damn product first, let people try it out, and THEN promote it.

On the other hand, if their *real* project is to develop an article-writing AI that can shit out nonsensical garbage with lots of buzzwords then they may have just had a highly-effective demo... ;)

Re:Astroturf story (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575166)

I was thinking the same: Here we have (or will have, Really Soon Now (tm)) a solution in a desperate search for a problem.

Splinternet (3, Funny)

Baseclass (785652) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574118)

FTFA

Back then, the Internet was one - a global web, similar regardless of weather

Well I can attest to the fact that "back then" during stormy weather my internet went down on several occasions.
No phone = no internet.

Re:Splinternet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575312)

Indeed. It's tough to take a guy seriously when he can't master the difference between 'weather' and 'whether'...

INTERnet means... (1)

fortunatus (445210) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574124)

a group of interconnected clusters. With the ability to route between them. The idea of interconnecting clusters is the core idea of the original Internet in the first place... And if that was Day 1 of Internet Genesis, then Day 2 was hosting multiple application spaces. Like Gopher versus WWW versus FTP versus email - nobody has ever claimed it all was one big homogenous lump!

Re:INTERnet means... (1)

ShadoHawk (741112) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574276)

...nobody has ever claimed it all was one big homogenous lump!

Like a failure pile in a sadness bowl? Ref: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfan5MacmsI [youtube.com]

aw c'mon,based mostly on social privacy settings?? (3, Informative)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574126)

Major thrust of article is that "oh noes, the facebook and twitter content of the web is often hidden behind login requirements and privacy settings".

You know what, I don't care if ALL the social networking via the internet is normally inaccessible and un-indexable and unreachable by search engine. Part of the good thing about the internet is that sites, such as my bank's, can protect data from public visibility. That's not splintering. The internet is only splintered if I can't get to my bank's web server when traveling around the globe. So far, I haven't noticed that problem, even from the poorest third world countries the internet cafes with ten year old Hitachi towers pulled from some first world dumpster running pirated windows XP (with latest updates, mind you) work just fine. That's f'ing amazing, I can pay my electric bill and win eBay auction from Laos or Cambodia and have the stuff arriving home at the same time I do.

Then he raises the specter of content filtering, *might* happen and might fracture internet. Well, the web ain't broken yet.

Re:aw c'mon,based mostly on social privacy setting (2)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574794)

I see you have never run into "This content is not available from your area".

Whooosh to everyone in the US. The internet IS splintered. I live in Central America - care to explain to me why a major online retailer keeps insisting - no matter what option I select - on charging me in Pound Sterling? I am entered in Oracle's database since I downloaded MySQL. Despite setting everything as English when I signed up (I am a native English speaker), they insist on sending me email in Spanish. There are countless other examples (like customer service and product returns to a major manufacturer whose equipment was purchased in the US, has never left the US, was billed to my US address (I have a condo in Fla), and yet because my IP is from Central America, they refuse to honor the return. And let's not get into the fact that my country has 8 digit telephone numbers (how many times do I get errors because of this?) and no zip code (00000 doesn't always work).

I wouldn't go so far as to call it Web 3.0, but there are some serious issues being caused by shoddy/lazy programming and erroneous assumptions and these are affecting the usefulness of the internet for a HUGE market.

Re:aw c'mon,based mostly on social privacy setting (3, Informative)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575210)

Whoosh on you, your complaints have nothing to do with "splintering of internet", your packets are getting to and from Oracle.com just fine and to and from the manufacturer just fine. If sites policies and package shipping procedures cause you problems, that's splintering and alienation of their customer base, bad and shame on them, but the internet is doing its job.

Re:aw c'mon,based mostly on social privacy setting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575408)

Those of us in the United States don't get to use Spotify in the UK. Call it even.

Re:aw c'mon,based mostly on social privacy setting (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575130)

To be fair, the problem with the likes of Facebook's closed nature isn't in cases where *your* privacy is being protected. It contains much content of general interest that isn't private per se- quite the opposite, I'm sure that its creators made it "public" within Facebook- but that you have to be signed on and inside- and having your privacy invaded by- their proprietary platform to even know that most of it exists.

Is it really the case that some music venue putting its listings, etc. up on Facebook wants them to remain inaccessible to those outside Facebook? Unlikely- I'm sure that given the choice, and if they thought about it (or cared that much) they'd happily want it accessible to every man and his dog. No reason it shouldn't be.

Vested interests... (2)

owlnation (858981) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574212)

"...most industry analysts already noticed that..."

Most industry analysts make money out of scaremongering such things, and recommending solutions. Many, if not most, of them are snake-oil salesmen. I recommend taking every single thing they say with a pinch of salt.

This article is garbage. Yeah the Internet, like every system, needs good management -- but it's not going anywhere anytime soon.

I don't have a problem with most of this (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574302)

The "internet" is about connectivity, not about web protocols and gadgets. So long as connectivity on the internet is supplied by ISPs in a content neutral manner, I am quite okay with it.

And that's where I get a little bugged though -- when the prospect of network neutrality is broken, I have issues with the grand design getting destroyed.

Make your walled gardens... your paywalls... do whatever you like with your endpoints on the internet. Just leave the public pathways ALONE!

Again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574304)

This is a repeat from 1992 or so.

Re:Again? (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575294)

This is a repeat from 1992 or so.

You mean a year after the web was first invented, when most pages didn't even include graphics, and the crossover point from academia into the man on the street having even heard of it (let alone used it) was still around 18 months away?

Sarcasm aside, when the Internet *did* first start to gain mainstream popularity, circa 1994, I read at least one article which said that- yes, the future might be interconnected, but it wouldn't necessarily be the public Internet that triumphed, but private networks.

It's easier to laugh at that in hindsight, but over the next few years I wouldn't be surprised to see the current Internet morph into something more akin to a series of interconnected, de facto closed networks.

Some devices have flash, other's dont. SO? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574328)

This essay is a mess. For one example, the guy laments that some mobile devices support Adobe Flash while others do not. He argues later that Facebook and twitter are walled gardens which can not be indexed by search engines or stored for prosperity by the Wayback Machine. Well, guess what, those Adobe Flash websites you wish were universally accessible are not indexed by search engines or archived in the Wayback Machine, either!

Who do we have to blame for this? (1)

McTickles (1812316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574334)

Censorship and greedy media corps!

Of course people are going to set up some darknet or VPNs amongst friends/collaborators if they are constantly spied upon!

The public internet is going to become a shopping mall eventually and the real interesting stuff is going to happen on smaller darknets.

Adm. Akbar warning (3, Informative)

himself (66589) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574348)

"It's an ad!"

Longer version: the author describes a problem and then -- wonder of wonders! -- is selling something.

Re:Adm. Akbar warning (3)

Animats (122034) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574494)

Worse, it's an ad for a site which immediately wants you to sign up. I clicked "deny" for its cookie, and now the site won't load at all. Also, "an augmented browsing web app which allows you to see other people visiting the website you're visiting" sounds like a terrible idea from a privacy standpoint.

Re:Adm. Akbar warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575146)

Also, "an augmented browsing web app which allows you to see other people visiting the website you're visiting" sounds like a terrible idea from a privacy standpoint.

It's not even original Gooey [wikipedia.org] was doing it 12 years ago

boo hoo hoo (1)

zhub (1877842) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574404)

i.e. The Internet is becoming less homogeneous than it was when Everyone Who Mattered ran IE6.

Actually, I don't mind the new moniker (Web 3.0) if it means we can confine all the high-bandwidth, AJAX-heavy websites to an ill-reputed package named (Web 2.0) and toss it out the window.

Not Working (1)

dadelbunts (1727498) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574418)

How we broke the good ole article. Maybe someone can write an article about this.

The author seems to suffer from nostalgia (5, Insightful)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574464)

There seems to be a particular psychological disorder, which people apparently get more vulnerable to the older they get, called "Nostalgia". I think it's closely related to "Dementia". Might even just be a type of dementia.

Nostalgia causes people to forget the truth about the past and remember it in a far better light than it actually happened. For example, from the article:

In the beginning, most users browsed the Internet from similar desktop machines. Even if the operating system was different, standardized web protocols and languages made the final experience similar, whether you were using Windows 3.1 machine or your trusty classic Mac.

Did that guy ever USE a version of IE before version 7, or the old Netscape Navigator browsers?

I remember all the time, trying to visit websites, getting messages that the website was designed for some other browser, and either not being able to access the content on the site at all, or having it render terribly glitchy. As a sometimes Linux user, I noticed a lot of problems accessing some websites with the browsers available for Linux (Netscape, Mosaic, etc).

Standards compatibility has come a long, long way since then. I would argue that we have better standards, and better implementations of those standards now than we ever did before. IE9 has greatly improved Microsoft's standards compliance, by most accounts. iPhone/Android/Blackberry/misc cell phones do a pretty decent job rendering most websites - something which could not be said of the early cell phone browsers.

Re:The author seems to suffer from nostalgia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35575178)

You couldn't connect to the internet on Windows 3.1 you needed Trumpet winsock.... Too lazy to look it up but I think it was resolved with Windows WFW 3.11 or Win95...

I believe the network is resiliant (1)

fermion (181285) | more than 3 years ago | (#35574554)

MS tried to splinter the web with IE and proprietary standards. It failed. Many said that Apple would splinter the web with the lack of Flash on iPhone, but major parts of the web away from that proprietary standard. The parts of the web that do not work on mobile browsers tend to have Apps. The next major attempt at splintering will be the proliferation of paywalls. I don't think these wil success either.

free will broken by mass (murder) media, deception (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574594)

there's some chance, as the truth is ignored, that we'll survive/thrive anyway. babys rule. perfect math. no going back from the truth. don't look unless you are ready for real changes. thanks

Scruffy Guy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574748)

Isn't the Scruffy guy is a janitor?

Re:Scruffy Guy (1)

Byzantine (85549) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576320)

+1 FUTURAMA

Web 3.0? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35574774)

I'm confused with Web 3.0.
What happened to the 2.1 series and where are the nightly and RC builds that lead to 3.0 being released? Where the hell is this entire project even being hosted, maintained and discussed? Where the freaking road map?

I heard Infinium got a license deal from the SCO group and will be working on a porting DNF to work with Web 3.0.

Re:Web 3.0? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575202)

Web x.0 is a creation of marketeers, not techies. Else we wouldn't be at x.0, we'd be at 0.x.

Disappointed (1)

RLBrown (889443) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575192)

Upon reading the headline and summary, I went to read the article, expecting to read about governmental fracturing of the Internet, including web, email, and other services, behind national firewalls and censorship. That's a REAL issue. Instead, I found that the article was about (1) the horrors of not having a standard browser with the same extensions for everyone, and (2) the heresy of making people either pay (e.g. NYT) or exchange personal contact information (e.g. Facebook) for certain content. The browser wars are as always has been, but HTML5 is a fine advancement and it is being deployed by market pressure. As to paying or bartering info for content -- well, it is either that or advertising. I am not bothered by it. The young ones (yes, I am an old fart) seem to gleefully offer up access to themselves in exchange for access to similarly minded individual. I got one of them-there Facebook accounts, myself. Not to mention LinkIn, Twitter, MySpace, ... None of the above (paywalls, social networks) can be said to fracturing the web, anymore than the L train fractures the transportation system. It just means sometimes you are asked to pay a fare.

it's a network of networks, duh (1)

Damek (515688) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575298)

"...a cluster of smaller and more closed webs."

It has always been so. Every corporate network is a closed web. Every bulletin board is a closed web. Thus it has always been. The Internet is a network of networks.

Thanks to.... (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 3 years ago | (#35575386)

Thanks to countries like China, and Syria, and Libya and .....the list is endless, of how many of these countries that want to control the flow of information are breaking the internet as we know it....then we will all have splinter factions of the internet running in each country, and 1 main controller giving access to the rest of the outside world....and controlling what you see in your country, I sure hope NA is left out of this.

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