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366 comments

That irony can be so ironic sometimes (5, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576926)

The New York Times publishes an article about China's great firewall, and puts it behind a firewall.

[The rest of this post is censored, to make it truly meta]

Don't ya think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35576948)

It's like ten thousand spoons when all you need is a knife.

Re:Don't ya think? (1, Offtopic)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577160)

Some guy the other day told me that irony is actually the use of a term in a way that's the opposite of its literal meaning. Deciding to take the high ground, I retorted by calling him a pussy and spitting on him. I've got tiger blood, you see.

Re:Don't ya think? (2)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577260)

I like the Socratic form of irony, which may be familiar to many Internet trolls: feigning ignorance to provoke an opponent. I also like the Blackadder definition: "It's like goldy or bronzy, only with iron."

Re:Don't ya think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577562)

It's meeting the girl of my dreams, and then meeting her beautiful wife

Re:That irony can be so ironic sometimes (2)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576986)

HBO publishes it's programming schedule, then it puts the programs behind a firewall, what is up with that?

Censoring phone calls while they are underway is not the same as a pay wall.

Re:That irony can be so ironic sometimes (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577014)

OMG!!!! It's true! Having premium content is just the same as a brutal dictatorship attempting to censor and quash dissent!!

Wow, way to be an idiot.

Re:That irony can be so ironic sometimes (2)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577058)

Clearly, in not supporting me, you're worse than Hitler.

Re:That irony can be so ironic sometimes (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577146)

Godwin? Is that you?

Re:That irony can be so ironic sometimes (1)

DigitalSorceress (156609) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577348)

Godwin is worse than a dunptruck full of Hitlers being driven by The Hulk... with Pol Pot riding shotgun. /does I win?

Re:That irony can be so ironic sometimes (5, Funny)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577500)

Never underestimate the bandwidth of a dumptruck full of Hitlers being driven by the Hulk.
Wait, what are we talking about?

hmm (4, Interesting)

rainmouse (1784278) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577616)

A little anecdotal rumouring, a news story does not make. It might as well be talking about werewolves and fairies for all the evidence it provides. I'm not saying it's not true, but if your phone is cut off every time you say the word 'protest' then it's not exactly going to be difficult to reproduce and actually prove.

Though you might want to get used to the sound of knocking on your door if you carry out extensive trials.....

In the USA ... (5, Funny)

jdgeorge (18767) | more than 3 years ago | (#35576990)

... dropping calls in mid-sentence is simply known as "using AT&T wireless service". Zing!

Re:In the USA ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577080)

s/AT&T wireless service/a cell phone/

Re:In the USA ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577138)

s/a cell phone/a cell phone in States

Re:In the USA ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577276)

... dropping calls in mid-sentence is simply known as "using AT&T wireless service". Zing!

No. You're probably holding it wrong!

Re:In the USA ... (0)

C_amiga_fan (1960858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577556)

>>>dropping calls in mid-sentence is simply known as "using AT&T wireless

Since my plan charges by the minute* this saves me a great deal of cash. "Look at it as an opportunity, not a burden." Remember where I told you this comes from.

*
* $0.00 per month and 18 cents/min

Re:In the USA ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577700)

It works for all potentially subversive words, such as `Democrat` or even `free thought`

Re:In the USA ... (1)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577710)

... dropping calls in mid-sentence is simply known as "using AT&T wireless service". Zing!

Remember our morning shortage of Ts [slashdot.org] on /.? People have had to replace 'em with plus signs. Wireless is a poor fix, because even someone using an old modem on a landline operated by A+++
NO CARRIER

Alright guys... (1)

Nrrqshrr (1879148) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577010)

Taking bets, when to see the first riots "A la Tunisia" starting?

Re:Alright guys... (2)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577212)

Stopping that sort of thing was likely the purpose of the censorship. As usual:

Technocratic, autocratic, systematic, hydromatic, grease lightning government - 1.
The people - 0.

The relationship between China and America is like a horse and carriage. The regular Americans are riding in the carriage, unable to see much of what's actually going on outside. The regular Chinese people are the horses. The guy holding the reins is in the CCP.

Re:Alright guys... (2)

RazzleFrog (537054) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577264)

Tunisia - population 10M, size 67K square miles
China - population 1.3B, size 3.7M square miles

It's a lot harder to get a revolution started in a country that size - especially with the communications infrastructure so tightly controlled (far more than Tunisia, Libya, and Eqypt were).

Re:Alright guys... (2)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577686)

Chinese history is full of them though. From the overthrow of the Shang for the Zhou all the way to the establishment of the great Ming (even the Ming/Qing transition could be considered a revolution as much as an occupation considering how weak and ineffective the Ming were at that time and the significant complicity of Hans with the Qing especially in the North) there were many dynastic 'revolutions' and then of course the establishment of the RoC and the PRC that supplanted it.

Revolution in China is fairly common historically, it's just bloody as hell. Over 3 million died in the Chinese Civil War.

Why would tha happen? Entirely different situation (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577298)

People in Tunisia (or Egypt, Libya, etc.) weren't revolting because of their lack of freedom: It certainly angered some people but the situation has been like that for decades and the masses weren't building barricades. Instead, people were revolting due to poor living conditions, lack of food, etc. (which have gotten worse lately as the food prices have been going up). If masses are hungry and they can see how the upper class lives in prosperity, a revolution occurs (As it did in France, Russia, etc.).

Now, there are certainly poor people in China. Hundreds of millions of poor people. But their conditions haven't been gotten worse, quite the opposite: Every day more companies move their operations to China and more money flows to the country. Minium wages have been increased significantly in many large cities. Sure, they're still just a fraction what they are in the western world but the quality of life is going up.

More than that, China has very collectivistic culture and people are much more comfortable with the "Government knows best" than us in the western world. Everyone who has been to China for significant amounts of time seems to say the same: They genuinely don't seem to consider censorship that big of a problem.

Nope, we aren't going to see revolts in that country in the near future.

Re:Alright guys... (1)

techsoldaten (309296) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577362)

Sadly, this will never happen, no matter how much we wish it would occur.

The last time China had protests in support of Democracy, they ran over protestors with tanks. The US response was to award them with most favored trading partner status, and now they make all our tennis shoes.

Re:Alright guys... (2)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577586)

China's Most Favored Trading Partner or as it's known now Permanent normal trade relations was in effect from the mid 1800s until 1951, renewed in 1980, dropped in 1989 and renewed in 2000. It wasn't an "award" its simply a status to allow bilateral trade.

Only two countries don't have NTR with the United States, the DPRK and Cuba.

Re:Alright guys... (2)

Terrasque (796014) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577410)

Taking bets, when to see the first riots "A la Tunisia" starting?

The class was learning about some revolt in which some peasants had wanted to stop being peasants and, since the nobles had won, had stopped being peasants really quickly.

- Terry Pratchett, Soul Music

Re:Alright guys... (1)

AhabTheArab (798575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577434)

It's inevitable. Just as when the printing press was invented, it didn't take long for revolution to spread throughout the world. The Chinese government (and other governments and organizations around the world) knows that it's only hope against revolt is to suppress communication - the spread of information.

Re:Alright guys... (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577580)

Won't happen, not after Tienanmen. But the thing is, it doesn't have to. China has a growing middle class with burgeoning economic clout. And regardless of what Mao thought, power comes from the strings of a purse not the end of a gun. Eventually, the ruling elite are going to have to give up some control or the wealthier Chinese will just start leaving and taking their wealth with them (and in this age of digital currency, good luck trying to stop that).

Re:Alright guys... (3, Interesting)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577642)

The differences between China and Tunisia/Egypt/Yemen/even-Libya are pretty dramatic. If those governments are dominoes toppling each other, China's is a brick.

Provided courtesy of Cisco and IBM (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577012)

For your listening pleasure.

I was going to complain about censorship in China, (2, Funny)

somaTh (1154199) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577030)

but

Re:I was going to complain about censorship in Chi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577116)

Funny thing is people have been doing this for years as the Candlejack meme, who supposedly cuts

Re:I was going to complain about censorship in Chi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577346)

And you are even doing it wrong. Candlejack kidnaps the person during their next line. So it is

Re:I was going to complain about censorship in Chi (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577350)

I prefer the hypnotoad meme, because when peoplALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOTOAD!

Re:I was going to complain about censorship in Chi (1)

somaTh (1154199) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577680)

I'd never heard of the meme and apologize for the apparent unoriginality. I'd say I should get out more, but that might be my problem...

Foolish? (1)

MetalliQaZ (539913) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577078)

A group of minds working together (like a government) should be far more capable than a single mind by itself, but this seems to indicate that the opposite may be true for sufficiently large groups of minds.

I assume that as much as we hear about the "great firewall of China" and the censorship they have there, the average Chinese citizen probably doesn't run up against it very much. Something like this seems so abrupt and obviously intrusive that the general populace must surely take notice. I wonder how the government can expect to retain the respect of the people when this kind of policy is put in place. Wouldn't this backfire?

I'd be willing to bet that only phones that are already under surveillance for "subversive behavior" (activists, journalists, etc.) are subject to this technology. If not, I'd seriously question the wisdom of the government.

As a side note, I'd hate to live under this regime, but I'd have a blast playing with this system if I had access to it. What Sesame Street quotes would set off the filter, etc.

Re:Foolish? (2)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577118)

Bad thing is that the next step up from having the conversation ended is having a knock on the door with the special black van pull up, with the next of kin being notified they owe the Chinese government the cash for the lethal injection chemicals before they get the body back (sans usable organs for transplants, of course.)

Re:Foolish? (2)

tvsjr (242190) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577152)

As a side note, I'd hate to live under this regime, but I'd have a blast playing with this system if I had access to it. What Sesame Street quotes would set off the filter, etc.

Right up until you were "detained" indefinitely (at what I'm sure would be a first-class Chinese prison) for "suspicious activity".

Re:Foolish? (1)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577466)

"I'd be willing to bet that only phones that are already under surveillance for "subversive behavior" (activists, journalists, etc.) are subject to this technology. If not, I'd seriously question the wisdom of the government."

Gotta agree with that one, with only 10,000,000 English speakers in the country; .77%, why would you bother to censor English unless you were interested in censoring that particular group.

I can't help but wonder what the official line on this is. "Government places restrictions on activist puppets of western influences who work to subvert Government." ?

Re:Foolish? (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577600)

Another report on a separate incident said the conversation that was cut off was being done in Chinese, so it's not just the English speakers that are being targeted.

Re:Foolish? (2)

bokane (36382) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577474)

The Great Firewall of China is not that much of an issue for most Chinese internet users because (a) they're not, mostly, looking for sensitive political material online; (b) most people don't speak English, so overseas sites are automatically less attractive, and (c) there are native Chinese equivalents -- okay, clones -- of blocked foreign sites. Facebook is blocked, but there's still Renren and Xiaonei. Twitter is blocked, but there's Sina Weibo - which is in many respects a better product. Youtube is blocked, but there's Youku. Google is around, but Baidu has better results for Chinese bulletin boards. And so on.
People are aware of the censorship, but they tend to identify it with site administrators (who are ultimately the ones responsible for deciding what does or doesn't get posted in discussion forums), hence a habit of sneering at "guanliyuan" ("mods"), but generally not at the government. It's not that people are stupid or unsubtle; it's that there's not much point in getting angry at the government.

Re:Foolish? (0)

C_amiga_fan (1960858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577670)

>>>A group of minds working together (like a government) should be far more capable than a single mind by itself, but this seems to indicate that the opposite may be true for sufficiently large groups of minds.

A large group
also magnifies the inherent evil present in humans
while diminishing individuality (just following orders).
Hence rights violations.

Re:Foolish? (1)

Aighearach (97333) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577712)

A group of minds working together (like a government) should be far more capable than a single mind by itself

Because everybody knows that the best horses are designed by committee.

Use of Chinese Slang increases (1)

xMrFishx (1956084) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577084)

"Meet at Tienanmen Square for big party. Bring lots of fireworks and party poppers. We are going to show the government just how much we like them"

Re:Use of Chinese Slang increases (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577194)

In china protest is already a synonym with "hamburger time". 'Lets meet at Tienanmen Square for another "hamburger time".'

Re:Use of Chinese Slang increases (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577272)

But in keeping with Google China and Baidu's history of swapping results for Tiananmen Square with cute puppies and kittens, this should read:

'Lets meet at cute fluffy animals for another "hamburger time."'

Who cares? (5, Insightful)

sgage (109086) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577100)

90% of our stuff here in the US is from China. It's cheap. That's all that matters. Mass censorship, brutal putdowns of dissent, etc. - none of that matters. Real Konsumerism Politik, don't cha know.

There will be no riots, a la Tunisia. Well, maybe for about 5 minutes. Who cares? As long as we get our cheap stuff from China.

Re:Who cares? (0)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577214)

Well, the system is already crumbling and falling apart. Just wait for a little longer and both, China and "we", will see mass riots.

Why? Because even to buy the cheapest crap you need money. To have money, you have to have a job. And the jobs are in China. You might see the problem this leads to.

Producing in one area of the planet and selling in the other one does not work in the long run.

Re:Who cares? (5, Interesting)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577484)

It does for the Chinese. It strengthens them and weakens the West. There will be a point where they won't need to continue exporting cheap stuff, where they have not just resources and wealth, but technology.

Then, expect to see some really nasty things happen:

First, there is the low hanging fruit, Taiwan. This little island has been a prize just out of reach, and it is only a matter of time before China gets bold enough to annex them. Think the US would start a nuclear conflict over an island? Won't happen. It is only a matter of time before this becomes just as part of China as Hong Kong did.

South Korea is also a prize, and having their puppet to the north start a protracted conflict in order to cripple the Western economy by a thorough shelling of Seoul would be a major military coup. China wouldn't even be faulted if state of the art weaponry (both conventional and nuclear) managed to appear in the DPRK. The US involved in North Korea also means another theater of war that the West has to fight but China doesn't.

It would almost be trivial for China to cripple the Western economy in just 24 hours by a two pronged attack (overrunning Taiwan and getting Kim to shell his southern neighbor), with little to no threat of retaliation from the US. China knows this, and the only thing stopping them from this is because they still have intelligence to gain from Western businesses and a benefit from one-sided trade practices.

Re:Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577696)

Well put.

Re:Who cares? (2)

Terwin (412356) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577488)

Well, the system is already crumbling and falling apart. Just wait for a little longer and both, China and "we", will see mass riots.

Why? Because even to buy the cheapest crap you need money. To have money, you have to have a job. And the jobs are in China. You might see the problem this leads to.

Producing in one area of the planet and selling in the other one does not work in the long run.

[The US economy] has been the world's largest national economy since the 1870s and remains the world's largest manufacturer, representing 19% of the world's manufacturing output.
from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_the_United_States [wikipedia.org]
Additional support: additional http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-top-manufacturing-countries.htm [wisegeek.com]
http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=7881&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=455&cHash=09cad462f0 [unido.org]
http://www.articlealley.com/article_1483022_22.html [articlealley.com]

China may be getting close, but the US is still he world leader in manufacturing

Re:Who cares? (1)

smelch (1988698) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577256)

I like your Ks, makes everything seem more.... classy.

Also, shut up. What are we supposed to do about it? Go over there and tell a billion+ people how to live? Or just not get stuff from China? What does that do exactly, other than leave the poor over there poorer and us with less things? Oh wait, I'm sorry I forgot its so stylish to trash "consumerism" as if it is the cause of every international issue.

Re:Who cares? (4, Interesting)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577430)

Typical ignorant American viewpoint. Here's an idea: why don't you try asking some, you know, actual Chinese people if they want to overthrow their government? The New York Times article linked carefully avoids asking this question, as you'll notice. The article's all about prissy Beijing expats having a hissy fit because they can't get to facebook and twitter any more because their VPNs were blocked. The answer is assumed as the Chinese people want to overthrow their government. It's called "reciting the narrative", and it's a common way that journalists get to make shit up.

Surprise! Chinese people don't want to overthrow their government. *cough* (awkward silence) Things are better now in China than they ever have been in history. Things are only getting better every day. The worst thing that could happen is an attempt to overthrow the government. Nobody knows China's last 150 years of history, which was basically one disaster after another. The nation was divided and without a common language, and Mao united the people under one flag, stopped the wars of province against province, and gave the people the gift of a common language that could unite their diverse cultures.

But no, the only reason that China should keep its government has zippo to do with Chinese, and everything to do with America. Because whatever it is, all over the world, it always comes back to how America thinks. The navel-gazing makes me sick. So fucking parochial and ignorant of outside. +5 Insightful, eh, Slashdot?

Re:Who cares? (0)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577674)

Good summary. Surely you've noticed that with regard to foreign policy, Slashdot is nothing more than a mouth piece of American propaganda. Of course, that does nothing to distinguish it from 99% of the rest of the media in America.

It's always some shit about China this freedom that, nevermind that someone with a degree in computer science today makes the same amount (adjusted for inflation) as someone working in a factory in 1965. As real wages continue to decline, this has got to be an issue on the minds of Slashdot posters.

Re:Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577574)

90% of our stuff here in the US is from China. It's cheap.

That's what they say about our jobs.

code words (2)

MooseTick (895855) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577114)

How hard is it to use different code words. If I were the govt listening on my people, I'd rather listen to them in full without trying to hide it. That seems easier to know who to track and beat down. If you drive the protestors underground, then it makes it harder to tell who is behind the rebellion and quash teh organizers. Lots of people talk, few can organize. Silence the organizers and you are 99% there.

Re:code words (1)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577222)

Depends... if you make people realize that retribution is swift and certain, they are not going to attempt another organized protest chain on a wide scale. Of course, there will be the firebrand or two, but after those are dealt with in a public manner, there won't be many who will step up to the plate.

Harsh regimes do keep control, and keep control for a long time, and China's is definitely not going anywhere.

Good thinking china (1)

vawwyakr (1992390) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577126)

Because cutting off their calls mid-sentence will make them think how much they love and trust their government?

Code Talker time? (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577168)

Talk about chilling, you don't even get a notice on your door the next morning; this means someone is listening realtime.

Do they have to start talking in dynamic codes?

"Yes, I have a nice farm. The grass I planted in the mud is doing just fine. Maybe I will get a horse."

Re:Code Talker time? (1)

Zephyn (415698) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577360)

'Yes, I have a nice farm. The grass I planted in the mud is doing just fine. Maybe I will get a horse.'

"If it hadn't been for my horse, I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

I think we've finally figured out what Lewis Black overheard.

Way ahead of you! (4, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577170)

Our modern western cellphones are way ahead of this. They're able to drop communication mid sentence WITHOUT the need for a certain keyword.

Freaky! (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577172)

I had a dream where the government was doing this the night before last. (But they took it a step further, using speech synthesis to replace censored phrases with less objectionable phrases.)

Isn't it great when your dreams become reality?

Re:Freaky! (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577278)

"Isn't it great when your dreams become reality?"

Did you actually write "I hope my nightmares don't become reality?"

Censorware 1.0 is not irony capable yet.

First-hand testimony: (5, Interesting)

bwayne314 (1854406) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577190)

Chinese grad student sitting next to me: "That happened 5 years ago, this is not news, this is the job my friend has, writing this software, that is what the supercomputer is for"

In the end (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577238)

I believe that ultimately China will prove that censorship does not work in the long run & when overdone will actively encourage a revolt.

You cannot "protect" people from themselves when they did not ask to be "protected".

blarga (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577240)

funny that happens to me on my t-mobile line all the time, in the US.
especially when words like Bradley manning, adrian lamo, hack, or illegal activity. Call gets dropped.
could be a coincidence, but what it it isnt?

My RSS headline said. (1)

lorax (2988) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577304)

Quite apropos that the headline showed up in my rss reader as "China Starts Censoring Phone Calls Mid Sent..." I had to open the story to see if it was intentional.

My Hobby (1, Funny)

ThunderBird89 (1293256) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577312)

Sometimes I randomly announce to empty rooms "I know you're listening...". It only has pros: if I'm wrong, nobody knows, but me; if I'm right, I just freaked someone out real bad.

Re:My Hobby (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577526)

Hi, Randall Munroe!

...http://xkcd.com/525/

Re:My Hobby (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577544)

if I'm wrong, nobody knows

Until now, fruitcake.

Re:My Hobby (ripping off XKCD) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577554)

Sometimes I randomly announce to empty rooms "I know you're listening...". It only has pros: if I'm wrong, nobody knows, but me; if I'm right, I just freaked someone out real bad.

HA HA HA! That's so funny! You should clean up your grammar and punctuation, work on improving your sentence structure and comedic pacing, then start a web comic or something!

http://xkcd.com/525/

Skeptical, as a phone-using China resident (4, Informative)

bokane (36382) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577364)

I'm not so sure about the reports of people's phones cutting out. There's definitely been a radical increase in filtering and censorship here over the past month, but I'm pretty sure I've said "protest" multiple times in both English and Chinese on my (Beijing Mobile) phone without having anything happen. Speech recognition just isn't that good, unless the technology has gotten a lot better in secret -- particularly for dealing with a language like Mandarin, which is much richer in homophones than English is, and also has plenty of regional accents that would be even harder for computers to deal with.

That's not to say it's impossible -- I have no reason to believe the NYT is lying, though their China journalism is not always good -- but if it's happening, my guess is that it's limited to a small number of people whose phones are being monitored by human beings.

This is very interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577370)

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Here we go China bashing Version N (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577396)

In absolute terms, I do disagree with a lot of things the Chinese government does, but in relative terms I would rather have my calls censored than silently recorded like in the US.

We in the US do have a fundamental problem. Whatever shit our Government does, we are OK with it most of the time. It is only
when some foreign Government tries to do what our Government has already perfected, we start mud slinging and name calling. If we did this to our own Government from the start, may be there will less imitations abroad? Just may be, nothing wrong with trying a good thing, or is it wrong?

When are we going to call Manning simply a dissident and not a traitor, to begin with? I wish Nobel committee were as fair to the West as they are to China/Burma/Iran etc and award Nobel piece prize to dissidents like Manning.

China is a Fascist Dictatorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577570)

Nobody censors the word "protest" in America because protesting is totally legal.

Even if you are a retard like Sarah Palin, a mentally handicapped schizophrenic like Glenn Beck, or a communist piece of shit like Chairman Mao, you are allowed to gather and protest in the free world. You can't protest or even say the word protest in China because of the overbaring influence of Big Brother.

Are you allowed to read the book 1984 in China? Is it available in stores? Can you read it on your version of the internet? If you can I suggest you check it out, because it describes modern China perfectly.

You bring up the guy who leaked a ton of classified information. If this was China he would be dead by now, it would be impossible to search the internet for information about him.

And if you mentioned is name on the phone, you would be cut off mid-sentance.

China is a sewer of fascism and a polluted cesspool of mistreated workers.

efeatedDay ithWay igPay atinLay (1)

Loether (769074) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577420)

IvaVay EvelutionRay.

Re:efeatedDay ithWay igPay atinLay (1)

slshwtw (1903272) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577608)

01101111 01110010 00100000 01101010 01110101 01110011 01110100 00100000 01110011 01110000 01100101 01100001 01101011 00100000 01101001 01101110 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001

Sure, sure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577486)

You folks are so paranoid. Watch, I can say prot*&@9 [NO CARRIER]

China Is Merely A Test Before Mid Sentence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577490)

censors bring freedom and democracy to the former former U.S.A.: [youtube.com]

"Hey, Pendejos : Is Libya the Change You Can Believe In?"

changes to:

"Hi, Friend: Thank you for volunteering for Yemen !!!!"

Yours In Moscow,
Kilgore Trout

Your fault (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35577502)

You don't want to pay the cost of your regulations, taxes and union bennies.

So you buy imported stuff from China. China does these things to its keep its labor force cheap and compliant and prevent resistance to unregulated, unsafe industry. This keeps the price of finished goods low for you.

Your fault.

Vote for people that will protect your nation's economy from competition with tyrannical third-world governments and don't cry when you can't afford a new phone every 9 months. Otherwise shut-up, because you caused this.

Poor data connection, or censorship? (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 3 years ago | (#35577558)

When my wife was in Shanghai, I used to always talk to her either with Skype or a VoIP calling card from the US. In both instances, our conversation would disconnect when any one of us spoke in long sentences. Some days were better than others. But, mainly because the broadband infrastructure is poorly maintained and over-subscribed.

Given the quakes that hit Japan, I can only imagine the effects on broadband being even more accentuated.

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