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Google Names Winners For Summer of Code 2011

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the we-salute-those-about-to-goggle dept.

Google 84

akgraner writes "Google has announced the accepted projects list for its 2011 Google Summer of Code (GSOC) Program. Ryan Rix emailed the Fedora announce mailing list to let users know Fedora was one of the projects that had been selected, while Daniel Holbach informed Ubuntu users via his blog that Ubuntu had not been selected."

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Why not? (1)

smileygladhands (1909508) | more than 3 years ago | (#35581944)

Red Hat has a lot more money no?

Re:Why not? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582036)

My guess would be Canonical's copyright assignment requirements for many of their projects. Copyright assignment != free software... or even open source software.

Re:Why not? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582140)

Copyright assignment != free software

Which is why the Free Software Foundation does it?

Re:Why not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582164)

Ok, copyright assignment to a corporation instead of a nonprofit controlled by the developers of free software != free software... is that better mister picky?

Re:Why not? (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584098)

What about your "not even open source" comment? If the source is available to read, it's "open source".

Re:Why not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35584824)

Not. MS Windows source is available to read for governments and academics (e.g. the Xen hypervisor originally virtualised a custom build of Windows). Plenty of commercial software components give you the source but you have no right to use it for anything but debugging. Access to the source is not the same as open source.

Re:Why not? (2)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584922)

You're thinking of Free software [wikipedia.org] , not open source. Open source just means the source is open (to anyone, not just governments..). It doesn't necessarily grant you a license to use that source in any projects that you want to distribute.

Re:Why not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35585604)

Not. If you don't believe me, maybe you'll believe the people who invented the term: "open source doesn't just mean access to the source code" [opensource.org] . You can read the rest of the details there.

Re:Why not? (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35585964)

Hmm. I guess I was thinking of MS's "Shared Source [wikipedia.org] ", which includes 2 OSI certified licenses, but 3 more restrictive licenses. I'd still be wary even of anything that Microsoft has released under an "open source" license..

Re:Why not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35585336)

The FSF request copyright assignment so that they could control the licensing of a project that is under their name. In the case of the FSF, they use that power to ensure that all their relevant projects are licensed to the latest version of the GPL. This would mean that copyright assignment to the FSF would result in free software.

Re:Why not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582292)

I get that viewpoint, but after all the troubles caused by Linux's lack of assignment, why would any modern project not do so? Having a code base owned by thousands of different people is a nightmare.

Re:Why not? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584056)

It's only a problem for projects that use restrictive licenses. For ones that use a permissive license, it's not a problem at all.

Re:Why not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582510)

copyright assignment+code release under OSI license=free software, i really don't see your point

A good varied list... (1)

williamhb (758070) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582014)

There's a great variety of projects in there. Everything from serious academic theorem provers [in.tum.de] to even more serious things like helping people play Monkey Island [scummvm.org]

Re:A good varied list... (2)

NiteMair (309303) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582134)

Haiku [haiku-os.org] and ReactOS [reactos.org] both made it this year!

Two of my favorite alternative OS projects... :D

Re:A good varied list... (1)

kallisti5 (1321143) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582172)

Gooooo Haiku Goooooo! http://haiku-os.org/ [haiku-os.org]

Re:A good varied list... (1)

Cable (99315) | more than 3 years ago | (#35583088)

HaikuOS and ReactOS are great. Don't forget AROS and others as well.

Many people pirate Windows not knowing of alternatives that are free and open source. Why pirate Windows when HaikuOS and ReactOS are available? FreeDOS and Linux are great as well for free and open source alteratives.

Re:A good varied list... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35584436)

I like MikeOS [berlios.de]

Re:A good varied list... (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#35683350)

Scientific projects:

Excellent to see scientific stuff like OPeNDAP get in there. (The stats on Freshmeat show that it's not a particularly well-known project, but it's an important one for distributed data.) Globus (a fascinating package for developing grids) also made it. Climate Code Foundation, Genome Informatics, the Marine Biological Laboratory and CERN have also had projects accepted, boding well for a boost to seriously complex computing. Not only that, but internships on heavy-duty projects may well produce programmers with a far healthier respect for specifications and documentation - often lacking in industry - because even looking at some of these mega-complex projects without specs will cause your brain to explode.

OS projects:

Nice range of OS' - Linux, Plan9, FreeBSD, Haiku and HelenOS amongst others. Hard to tell what the outcome will be, but since OS theory tends to be taught along very narrow lines that all these projects violate profusely and in ways that would shock the prudish, I'd expect that this might get people thinking through problems in new ways

Defeat China's Firewall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582018)

They should write some code to help defeat the Great Firewall of China.

Re:Defeat China's Firewall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582174)

They should write some code to help defeat the Great Firewall of China.

the only reason we do that kind of pussy shit is because they're too big and costly to take on militarily. ugly truth. face it.

besides who gives a fuck about a bunch of chinks anyway? let them author their own destiny. our only mistake is getting so deeply in debt to them.

Re:Defeat China's Firewall (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582256)

besides who gives a fuck about a bunch of chinks anyway?

1/3rd of the world population isn't enough to make you care?

How about that debt the USA owes them like you said? Or maybe the fact that mostly everything cheap we buy is made by them. Or maybe that Asia is general has more technologically advanced cities than any part of the USA. I could go on forever; my point is, they already are a force to care about.

Re:Defeat China's Firewall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582288)

your post is amusing and i will tell you why.

1/3rd of the world population isn't enough to make you care?

sounds like you are saying one shouldn't be so selfish. after all I spoke about US debt to China in terms of why that's bad for Americans.

How about that debt the USA owes them like you said? Or maybe the fact that mostly everything cheap we buy is made by them. Or maybe that Asia is general has more technologically advanced cities than any part of the USA. I could go on forever; my point is, they already are a force to care about.

now you proceed to list "how they could influence me" reasons. Selfish reasons. that's the basis of caring about them, that they are a "force".

you have contradicted yourself. you didn't notice this on your own.

you're welcome.

Re:Defeat China's Firewall (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582316)

Intentional fallacies, misdirected offtopic discussions, and vague posts which try to sound smart but fall flat at the punchline? In my Slashdot?

Re:Defeat China's Firewall (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582738)

"It's more likely than you think."

Gnome (4, Insightful)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582024)

I see Gnome got accepted. Now maybe they can finally afford to add minimize and maximize to the Gnome 3 shell.

Re:Gnome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582692)

Here's a good rule for Gnome's UI "experts". If Apple isn't doing it, then you shouldn't be either.

Re:Gnome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35583128)

If you are following Apple's lead, you're doing it wrong.

Apple's model is to take good ideas and market them better.

Re:Gnome (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35583204)

So the entire interface should work with a one-button mouse?

Re:Gnome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35583636)

Yes?

Re:Gnome (3, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584066)

Yes, absolutely. If it doesn't work with a one-button mouse, then it won't work with resistive touchscreens. Of course, that's no reason not to take advantage of multiple mouse buttons if they exist.

Re:Gnome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35584112)

So lets punish everyone who doesn't have a burning need to be super portable, mousless, or 1980's compatible?

Re:Gnome (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584274)

Wow, I posted two sentences and you only read one. You should probably see a doctor about your ADD...

Re:Gnome (1)

abecede (1097981) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603518)

Futile. He's not able not read your second sentence about consulting a doctor.

Really - two winners? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582058)

169 other open source projects were accepted into the google summer of code 2011. http://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/program/accepted_orgs/google/gsoc2011

what a stupid way to present this. Please may we have a repost which clarifies this???

Re:Really - two winners? (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#35683352)

There are indeed two winners - the users and the developers.

Projects for Android (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582074)

I would like to see projects that would specifically improve the Android experience for users.

As we all might now know, Android 3.0 got the not-so-appealing [unplggd.com] label as one OS that by interpretation, was born a bit early. Projects that could address this prematurity would be welcome for Android.

Re:Projects for Android (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582300)

There are about a dozen of them if you type "android" into the "tags" filter.

Re:Projects for Android (1)

refactorator (856252) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582328)

Not to shamelessly use this for advertisement, but this *is* actually our focus this year - hoping that we can get students interested in model checking/verifying Android applications with Java Pathfinder (see http://babelfish.arc.nasa.gov/trac/jpf/wiki/events/soc2011#android/ [nasa.gov] )

Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (1)

Drake_Casanova (1333347) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582076)

Ubuntu is famous for making Linux xfree86 more like windows which moved Linux progression backwards, attracted a bunch of pseudo techies, and promoted development of clicky-clicky applications. I am glad to see respectable distributions like Debian make the list. FreeBSD is also an excellent operating system.

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582118)

And this attitude is exactly why Linux will never become remotely mainstream. Mucking around with code, recompiling stuff, etc, might inflate your linux ego, but it is going to turn away 90+% of computer users. Making a good OS doesn't have to mean one or the other. It just means building something that works seamlessly on the "clicky-clicky" level while hiding more powerful options in the background, but leaving them in for power users to play with. Ubuntu has done a lot for linux adoption and popularity, despite such snooty opinions of linux geeks such as yourself.

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (1)

Drake_Casanova (1333347) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582246)

It boils down to what your definition of progress is. Creating powerful software which benefits all fields of science and technology or dumbing down software so more people use it. Linux isn't dominating the server software market because Ubuntu hid the console from consumers and made their webcam work instantly.

And this attitude is exactly why Linux will never become remotely mainstream. Mucking around with code, recompiling stuff, etc, might inflate your linux ego, but it is going to turn away 90+% of computer users. Making a good OS doesn't have to mean one or the other. It just means building something that works seamlessly on the "clicky-clicky" level while hiding more powerful options in the background, but leaving them in for power users to play with. Ubuntu has done a lot for linux adoption and popularity, despite such snooty opinions of linux geeks such as yourself.

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582722)

Linux isn't dominating the server software market because Ubuntu hid the console from consumers and made their webcam work instantly.

Linux dominates the server software market because Windows sucked huge nuts for a couple of decades (I gave up on it long before Windows 7, so I can't speak of current Windows technology, but I'm guessing you don't disagree) and Unix vendors charged massive fees and oftentimes would only sell you the OS if you bought their big iron. It was a market ripe for plucking, and Linux did it quite easily. It even took IBM a few years to pick up on the trend, port their profitable software systems to run on it, and all but gave up on future AIX sales to the mid-range business.

Creating powerful software which benefits all fields of science and technology or dumbing down software so more people use it.

When did these become mutually exclusive?

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35583288)

When did these become mutually exclusive?

When it conflicted with his insecurity.

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (1)

TheThiefMaster (992038) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584864)

Linux dominates the server software market because Windows sucked huge nuts for a couple of decades (I gave up on it long before Windows 7, so I can't speak of current Windows technology, but I'm guessing you don't disagree)

The modern Windows Server comes in a "core" version, which only has a command-line shell, no UI. How's that?

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (1)

TheThiefMaster (992038) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584870)

no UI

Damn it I seem to be missing a "G".

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#35683538)

I agree but also disagree.

Trying to emulate Windows will only ever produce a second-rate Windows (because the original will always be ahead of you by definition). That can't really let Linux become mainstream, because nobody is going to want second-rate. The only way Linux can become acceptable on the mainstream is to do things differently. It's why Apple still exists at all - if MacOS or OS/X were mere clones of Windows, Apple would be long-dead. They hold a small but very respectable market share because they solve things differently. They've only lost out in those areas they tried to copy Microsoft - if they'd kept with solving desktop problems distinctly but usably, they'd probably be doing better today.

I agree, however, that you'll only go so far with altering the underlying code. "Mucking about with code" is why there are Linux variants that are FAA-rated and others that are Carrier Grade, demonstrating incredible robustness. I'd consider that a high achievement. Users probably don't care for such certifications, but they certainly do care that their system doesn't crash when they're 5 points off the high score or half-way through a term paper they've stupidly not been saving. What it can NEVER do, and this is - I think - the point you're making, is make the software any more usable, any more learnable or any more efficient for getting things done.

My contention is that the front-end part, the user part, can't be solved by throwing people at it until a genuinely new way of approaching this whole "user interface" problem exists. The desktop metaphor has been done to death by Microsoft and Apple, and most of the recent advances have moved away from that entire concept. If Linux wants to be mainstream, it has to anticipate and get to where GUIs are moving before the mainstream players get there. Have Microsoft play catch-up for a change.

Nobody ever won a race by aiming to be where their opponents were. You win by being where your opponents haven't yet got.

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582538)

Xfree86? 2004 called, they want their Xserver back.

Re:Good. Ubuntu was slowing down progress. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582812)

if 2004 called warn them about THE FUCKING TSUNAMI

Ubuntu (1)

Troll-Under-D'Bridge (1782952) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582092)

Not trying to start a troll war but is there any particular reason why Ubuntu was omitted. There seems to be far too many slots open (not that it's a bad thing), why can't they have squeezed in one more?

Daniel Holbach's blog post [holba.ch] doesn't say much. To be sure, all my favorite apps (!store) are represented, including Blender, Abiword, Scribus, GnuCash, and VLC (as Videolan). Aside from Fedora, other distros represented include Debian, OpenSuSa, Gentoo, FreeBSD, and NetBSD (but not OpenBSD unless my eyes have deceived me).

Re:Ubuntu (1)

rrossman2 (844318) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582106)

My best guess was because debian is in there, and being upstream of ubuntu maybe they figured the improvements would trickle down? (that's my *best* guess)

Re:Ubuntu (1)

Troll-Under-D'Bridge (1782952) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582168)

I doubt Ubuntu would be competing with Debian on the same things since Ubuntu's focus is user-friendliness with projects like the Unity desktop interface while Debian's focus is on building a stable system on more different architectures than any other free software distribution (other than NetBSD).

Re:Ubuntu (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584082)

OpenBSD rarely applies to the GSoC. For it to be worthwhile, the project needs to have some existing contributors who are students. Without that, the mentor ends up spending so much time mentoring that they could have just written the code in the first place (I've mentored three GSoC students, with varying levels of success). I think Owain is the only person regular OpenBSD contributor who might meet this requirement, and he could probably get the funding under the X.org umbrella.

Blender (4, Informative)

LetterRip (30937) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582102)

If you are a talented coder who has an interested in graphics; simulation; animation; painting; video editing; digital compositing; game engines; AI; or just about anything else related to 3D animation; video editing and compositing; or games you might consider applying for Blender.

Here is a preliminary list of ideas, we are open to suggestions (in general only half of the proposals we recieve are items on the list) especially if it is something that you worked on for a school project.

http://wiki.blender.org/index.php?title=Dev:Ref/GoogleSummerOfCode/2011/Ideas [blender.org]

Re:Blender (1)

HNS-I (1119771) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584522)

I would strongly advise against it, that guy is a total ass: he smokes cigars, drinks beer and picks the pockets of other contributers. Also he's known to fork projects and start on his own, with blackjack and hookers.

Re:Blender (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#35683592)

I suggested to the Blender folks that they might want to look at elastons [aps.org] , as animation is a key area for Blender but they didn't have many ideas for how to improve it. Got no response and they didn't update their page, but I still think it'd be a worthy extension that could very well be helpful in their movie series (as rigid models only go so far).

Are these annual "Summers of Code" really useful? (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582104)

As an always sceptical individual, I am inclined to ask whether all past Summers of Code have been fruitful or have produced good helpful outcomes.

To be convinced, I'd like some dude to point me to specific results that past Summers of Code have yielded...My hope is to see useful tangible results. I anxiously await. Thanks.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582126)

Sure I have a link right here -> www.google.com

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

msuarezalvarez (667058) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582352)

Let me introduce to to this thing [wikipedia.org] Tim came up with...

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (4, Informative)

bieber (998013) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582210)

I can't speak for other projects, but I think Rockbox (a digital audio player firmware) got some good work done last year. I built a new parser for their theme language and a graphical theme editor that's got some regular users. Another student successfully ported Rockbox to Android as an app. I'm sure other projects saw success as well.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582222)

Surely some fraction of the participants have been happy with the money that they received.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582252)

There is a list of some past projects that students have worked on, get your hand out of your pants and search for it. GSOC seems like a great experience for students (I wanted to apply this year, but I'll have to wait until next year as I enrolled in some summer classes :( ).

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582338)

Here is what blender got done in 2009.

http://www.blendernation.com/2009/04/21/blender-google-summer-of-code-2009/

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (5, Informative)

refactorator (856252) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582508)

incredibly useful. This is hands down the most easy way for us (JavaPathfinder) to get interns funded, and students are generally very motivated. For example, from GSoC'10 we got an interactive debugger interface for the model checker ala gdb - serious stuff. The most valuable thing for us is to learn about new talent. We even hired some of them subsequently, which was much better to justify on the basis of successful GSoC projects.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35583046)

For some projects, they are very useful. For other projects, not so much. I think Google has gotten better at sussing out which ones will bear fruit, and which ones wont. As for Ubuntu, if anything upstream of Debian gets accepted, then Ubuntu benefits. Fedora primarily benefits only when RedHat puts out code, so they may need it more (but I don't know exact details, I'm not Google and I didn't decide). I'm thinking of at least one project (Blender), and the GSOC projects usually get incorporated, although they may not quite be finished or fully fledged at the end of the summer. Occasionally they will sit and wait, unincorporated into the main code base, until other larger pieces are completed.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35583114)

Yes it is helpful, in our case most of the code produced under the GSoC program is good and welcome, and the program does have other benefits, like the chocolate party at the mentor summit (this is the real reason we get to apply). More eyes on the source code, and in many instances mentors have donated their mentorships (500$) to their own projects, which means GSoC is another venue of income for FOSS projects. For instance, a student has contacted us after the program finished because he wants his GSoC work to be his degree project. We have not been selected this year, but we'll keep on trying in next editions for sure.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (4, Informative)

MostAwesomeDude (980382) | more than 3 years ago | (#35583644)

Specifically, my X.org student last year did some great work in the r300g Gallium driver for Mesa, and is still a developer in the project to this day. There's a single success story. I'm sure the other several thousand success stories will be along shortly.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584130)

Sometimes useful, sometimes not. It really depends on the student. We got a couple of regular Étoilé developers to hack on GNUstep as part of the GNU project's GSoC entry last year. One wrote a DBUS to Distributed Objects bridge, which lets us use DBUS objects as if they were local Objective-C objects (and export objects via DBUS in a couple of lines of code), the other worked on our CoreGraphics implementation. Both produced good results. On the other hand, we've had some complete failures. I had one a couple of years ago who made excuses right up until the halfway point, then vanished completely.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

Xordan (943619) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584532)

The success rates vary from year to year, but last year we (Crystal Space) had 6 successful students, all of whom had their code integrated into trunk development very shortly after GSoC ended.

I don't think you can totally judge success from how the mentoring organisation benefited however. Imo the main point of GSoC is to give students experience in working with/on open source projects. There were a few discussions on this at the GSoC mentor summit last year, I think a lot of people (not really orgs, just people looking in at the program) miss that success should be partly judged by how well the students 'grew' as developers (both technically and in how they interact with other developers), not just by whether they met their project goals and contributed something useful to the organisation.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35584628)

One specific result - Angie Byron is the Drupal 7 co-maintainer. She was a Summer of Code participant - http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/interview-angie-byron-drupal

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35585486)

http://scikit-learn.sourceforge.net/

started as GSoC and has grown into a very active project.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

otakuj462 (1071510) | more than 3 years ago | (#35589676)

Here's the project I worked on for GSoC 2010:

http://commons.apache.org/sandbox/gsoc/2010/scxml-js/ [apache.org]

I haven't done a stable release yet, due to some process overhead with Apache Commons, but the project itself is pretty stable, is becoming more widely known, and I'm continuing to develop it as part of my Master thesis.

This was a project I had thought of several years ago, and the funding from GSoC finally enabled me to properly implement it. So, I think that's a success story.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35590036)

A specific result - See the cover of the April 2011 Linux Journal ( http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/interview-angie-byron-drupal). She was a Summer of Code participant for Drupal and now is the Drupal 7 co-maintainer.

Re:Are these annual "Summers of Code" really usefu (1)

Tacticus.v1 (1102137) | more than 2 years ago | (#35592682)

The modifications made to the forcedeth driver last year as part of the gpxe\etherboot GSOC significantly helped with my workload.

soured 'business' deals with BAD life forms=ww (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582236)

or a ground 'skirmish', which does a mutationally equal to or greater amount of damage/death as all the other previous non-wars/crusades/smelly 'business transactions' combined. taking care of...every day....

To see the contents of this list you should enable (1)

no known priors (1948918) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582344)

What the fuck? "To see the contents of this list you should enable Javascript." Well fuck no! I don't trust you evil Google, and so I don't enable JS for you!

A simple table, or list, and it requires JavaScript? That's fucked up. Progressive enhancement, or graceful degradation (whichever one of these you prefer) is essential to providing an accessible, usable, and useful web. Two different design philosophies, that amount, in this case, to the same thing. If the browser is not JavaScript aware, capable, or has it turned off, the browser should still be able to access the information!

Anyway, from the first link, I can see that AbiWord [abisource.com] , a great, fast, and cross-platform word processor, is on the list. I use it all the time, 'cause it opens up so much faster than OOo.

(On the list, some kind soul [blogspot.com] pasted it too: http://pastebin.com/raw.php?i=tmw4JCFU [pastebin.com] . Though it's in CSV format.)

I can see from the list, that DokuWiki, DragonFly BSD, Freenet, LibreOffice, MoinMoin (another wiki system...) and QEMU also got listed. There are a lot of other good projects there too. I don't use most of the projects, but knowing they are there, is good.

Huh? How come this is here just now? (1)

Pope Raymond Lama (57277) | more than 3 years ago | (#35582374)

Like...is not this last Friday's news?? Is /. slipping into a time-reality offset from our own?

Re:Huh? How come this is here just now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35584394)

Come on now, this is speedy for /.

BSD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582414)

What! no PC-BSD but all the other BSD flavours got in? No fair I say!

Winners? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35582984)

They have winners before even taking in participants?

Website is Google-melange.com, and wants JS? (0)

billstewart (78916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35583178)

The website isn't something.google.com, and it wants you to set Javascript. Is it a trap? (The worms..... the spice....)

Shameless plug for Learning Unlimited (LU) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35583410)

The point of LU is get kids to love learning. I've taught and organized for some LU events in the past, and they are truly awesome, and the people involved are great. Most LU administrators/volunteers are fresh out of college (or still in college), and all are intent on sharing their love of learning with the world.

http://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/org/show/google/gsoc2011/learningu

For background, LU programs started out of MIT and are spreading across the nation. The tech infrastructure they've built allows an incredibly small number of college students to reliably run huge "teach/learn anything" events that inspire hundreds or thousands of younger students.
Helping out with their dev projects will give you a tangible impact on thousands of high school students in the short term, and hopefully a whole generation in the long term if they continue their exponential growth...

need javascript? (1)

edhplus2 (2024210) | more than 3 years ago | (#35584512)

maybe they can pay someone to write code so you don't need javascript to view the whole list.

Debian vs. Ubuntu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35591804)

It is unfair to bring up that Ubuntu was not selected without bringing up that Debian was selected on the 2011 Google Summer of Code program. Most contributions to the Debian project end up also helping Ubuntu. The fact that Ubuntu was not directly selected should not matter.

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