×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

P2P Music Downloads At All-Time Low

CmdrTaco posted about 3 years ago | from the imagine-if-music-were-just-cheaper dept.

Music 369

RedEaredSlider writes "According to research group NPD Group, the shuttering of Limewire's music file sharing service has led to a similar decline in the usage of such services throughout the US. The number has gone from a high of 16 percent in the fourth quarter of 2007 to just nine percent in the fourth quarter of 2010, right after Limewire shut down its file-sharing services due to a court order, when a federal judge sided with the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

369 comments

I smell RIAA trolls today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598526)

And they are reaaaallllly proud that they /finally/ killed music sharing after the cassette tape, CD, and Intarwebs fiascos.

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598568)

nah, it's just that people have finally caught on that Last.fm + recording from sound card = free music

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598608)

youtube + ffmpeg + mp4box ftw.

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598638)

Ugh, both of you ACs, how can you listen to such terrible quality???

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (4, Funny)

thehostiles (1659283) | about 3 years ago | (#35598992)

I'd tell you a joke about audiophiles, but you wouldn't appreciate it as text instead of a 5000 kbps sound file wilth an 8000 dollar stereo.

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35599064)

With the shit audio quality you're used to, you could fit the entire uuencoded album into the space of a sentence of text.

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598920)

Great just give away all the secrets...I was enjoying using Youtube as the new Napster...

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (1)

FeepingCreature (1132265) | about 3 years ago | (#35599162)

last.fm streams are unencrypted MP3. last.fm + wireshark + half hour with any socket-capable programming language = no quality loss from re-encoding.

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 3 years ago | (#35598798)

There's no way this number is true. I bet it was paid for by the RIAA's lawyers so they can say, "See! The lawsuits are working!!!"

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (3, Insightful)

Anthony Mouse (1927662) | about 3 years ago | (#35599030)

There's no way this number is true. I bet it was paid for by the RIAA's lawyers so they can say, "See! The lawsuits are working!!!"

That or they're just measuring it wrong because they're idiots. The article is highly unclear -- 16% of what? If people start using sneakernet and private trackers that they don't have access to measure, did the amount of sharing go down? Or did it go up because downloading 1TB of music from a private tracker once and then passing it around a school or an office on an external hard drive is way more efficient than sucking it through the straw of US broadband a thousand different times?

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (1)

alostpacket (1972110) | about 3 years ago | (#35598922)

They didn't kill mixtape/cd sharing -- it's just uh....errr... all about Bluetooth now! *

Seriously though, it's really hard to tell how much of this is due to other sharing methods like YouTube, or good services like iTunes/Spotify/Pandora/etc. I'd guess both.

I think what they finally realized is that there are definitely people willing to spend money for convinience. And now that they have finally delivered on that convinience, especially to the disposable income demographic, they are seeing the profits. While of course a certain percentage will still 'pirate' (arrr excuse the term matey), these groups overlap -- and sometimes the pirates will buy. And in the places these two groups don't overlap, those are not customers -- they will pirate no matter what.

Here's the problem though... (And this was certainly a problem before and not necessarily caused by piracy). But how well are the indie bands doing? They are likely getting pirated as much as the more well-known artists (percentage-wise), but it's unlikely they have the marketing and popularity to make enough to ignore the losses. They also don't have legal teams filing DMCAs for them. And due to that overlap, there clearly are some lost sales. Not all pirated songs are lost sales, but neither are none of them.

So here's my question, (and I honestly don't even know where I fall on this one), is piracy disproportionally hitting indie bands more than the big corporate labels? Is it equal? It it the reverse? I'm not sure. I'm not even sure how one would measure that.

I guess put simply I'm just saying this: indie bands fight to pay the rent, and lost sales might make the difference. Meanwhile Puffdaddy's lost sales are the difference between renting and owning his own private jet.

*ok sorry shameless plug, please ignore, the rest of my post was srs though

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | about 3 years ago | (#35598990)

It's more likely that this article is a troll, and reveals that limewire represents 7% of P2P music sharing THAT THEY KNOW ABOUT.

Re:I smell RIAA trolls today... (1)

RobDude (1123541) | about 3 years ago | (#35599200)

I believe it.

First, I've already got a large collection of songs downloaded to fill my mp3 player with. Yes, some new stuff comes out, maybe I get it. But I no longer have a backlog of things to download.

Second, streaming music is available in lots of forms. I don't need to download music to bring to work; I just listen to Pandora on my cell phone.

Give me good services (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598546)

Most people I know stopped downloading music after Spotify came a few years ago. It's an awesome service, and I gladly pay the monthly fee for it. Others take the ad supported version. But all in all, it did wonders to stop piracy.

The same can be said about Steam. I currently own over 250 games on Steam and I gladly buy more, as it's easy, fast and just works. Yeah yeah, Steam might go down in 500 years, but you know what, I don't care. It's great for me now and I probably won't be playing those games then, if they even work with that generations systems. And if I really want to play some classic again, there will always be (and even increasingly) services similar to Good Old Games and console stores that sell old games cheaply and modified to work with current systems.

Those two services have come to a point where it's easier and better to buy than pirate. Now just give me the same for movies and TV and I'm set. And I wont be making any stupid comments about how music labels are ripping off hard working artists (while forgetting the artists signed that contract themself) or how some item you buy should still be working 1000 years from now, because frankly I don't care. I just want a good working service where I can throw my money and get the product quickly and easily.

And on a related note, I just bought Crysis 2, Portal 2 and Assassins Creed: Brotherhood from Steam. All great games (AssBro has amazingly fun multiplayer where everyone have targets to kill while also being someone elses target).

Re:Give me good services (2)

cryptographrix (572005) | about 3 years ago | (#35598616)

If the music industry had a simple way to buy rights to songs, etc., people would probably even pay to use that in youtube videos they make, etc. As it stands now, you use one service to find out all 2-5 services you need to get a hold of, then use those 2-5 services to determine all of the fees you have to pay. Ridiculous. The music industry is sometimes as backwards as the Patent and Trademark Office of the US.

Re:Give me good services (3, Insightful)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 3 years ago | (#35598728)

This is also true... have you ever tried to properly license a song for a small product? They ask for thousands of dollars and treat you as if you're going to be making money on the project. They don't even like to call you back unless you're some super-huge corporation.

Just put in a system that allows you to pay $20 to license a song for a personal-use video, youtube, whatever and people will pay that as well. In terms of licensing where someone is using a song for some creative work they generally want to stay within the law but when the only option that someone gives them to license a song is thousands of dollars they *can't* stay within the law without emptying their wallets completely.

Re:Give me good services (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35599034)

iStockJingle?

Re:Give me good services (1)

Kjella (173770) | about 3 years ago | (#35599104)

This is also true... have you ever tried to properly license a song for a small product? They ask for thousands of dollars and treat you as if you're going to be making money on the project. They don't even like to call you back unless you're some super-huge corporation. (...) Just put in a system that allows you to pay $20 to license a song for a personal-use video, youtube, whatever and people will pay that as well.

Well, unless they're set up for volume with a very streamlined process it's probably not worth it. Just the fact that they can't just fire volleys of C&D letters but rather have to check it against a huge DB of licensees, who no doubt will use it in many different ways and places is complicated. Even if they demand to send all works you want to license to them for addition to their hash database even a single bit flip will bring it up as a false positive. Then people start complaining that they do have a license or that they used it in a clip or compilation or similiar video that should be covered by the license. It takes extremely little to for overhead to eat all the profit of a one-time $20 bill.

Re:Give me good services (1)

gknoy (899301) | about 3 years ago | (#35599150)

Find an indie artist and use different music for your youtube videos. You can still be ethical.

Re:Give me good services (3, Insightful)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 3 years ago | (#35598676)

I wish I had mod points because this is so on target.

This is how the music business survived for decades. First of all it was so very expensive to have vinyl pressers (you notice people still did bootlegs though) and then with cassettes the quality loss was so bad it was better to buy new. If you give people a product that is better and easier than using B.T. or Limewire or whatever they WILL pay for it.

All the RIAA innovates on though is how to infuriate and sue people...

Re:Give me good services (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598892)

This is how the music business survived for decades.

You forgot to mention the "third shift" record sales (i.e., the common industry practice of selling goods off book, which was very profitable as then they didn't have to pay royalties).

Re:Give me good services (3, Informative)

mlts (1038732) | about 3 years ago | (#35598984)

Only downside is that Spotify isn't available in the US. Yes, you can proxy, but it takes gymnastics to get it working on your Android or iPhone, especially if you want a subscription.

The only analog of that in the US would be Rhapsody and the Zune Marketplace. After my effort in trying to cancel Rhapsody service (when URGE [1] moved to them), I would hesitate on recommending them.

[1]: MTV/Microsoft's URGE was one of the best subscription music services, although it had a relatively brief lifespan. It actually had decent band articles, showcased new bands and was good at recommending new bands.

Re:Give me good services (3, Insightful)

tom229 (1640685) | about 3 years ago | (#35599060)

I agree. Correlation doesnt equal causation. It seems more likely that the market finally giving people want they want through services like grooveshark and itunes is the cause. Encforcing draconian bullshit on the worst p2p service available is ancillary.

In related news... (2)

Mateo_LeFou (859634) | about 3 years ago | (#35598564)

Editors, can we get a story about the $75 trillion P2P lawsuit soon plz?

Re:In related news... (5, Funny)

Kjella (173770) | about 3 years ago | (#35598736)

I know, it's soooo time for a dupe. The editors have gotten really sloppy about it, nothing like in the good old days.

Crappy Music (5, Insightful)

denshao2 (1515775) | about 3 years ago | (#35598586)

There isn't much left to download.

Re:Crappy Music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598942)

You must have one hell of a lot of storage.

Re:Crappy Music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598968)

Ditto that. Not to mention the jerks who run the entertainment industry. I'd rather just do without than support them financially or break the law to get it for free. If you really wanna hear mass produced junk music there's still this thing called "the radio"...

Re:Crappy Music (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 3 years ago | (#35599066)

Pretty much this.

It simply is this way. Torrents and P2P went up whenever new people found out about it and started downloading their favorite songs. But, ya know, once you have a song on your HD, you don't need to download it again. And sooner or later they have everything they want and their use of P2P dwindles to a fraction of what it was before, simply because, well, how much music does actually appear every year that you'd even remotely want? I'm no mainstream listener and what I want I can often get on the artist's homepage, more and more often even for free or on a pay-what-you-feel-like base.

Why'd I use P2P?

Re:Crappy Music (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 3 years ago | (#35599148)

I was going to say "You're right," but it turns out there has been a decline:

"The average number of music files downloaded from P2P networks also declined from 35 tracks per person in Q4 2007 to just 18 tracks in Q4 2010, although some downloaded just one or two tracks, while others took hundreds. NPD estimates there were 16 million P2P users downloading music in Q4 2010, which is 12 million fewer than in Q4 2007."

Personally I still download tons of music..... from youtube (and with video) that I store on my backup drive.

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-20046136-261.html#ixzz1HX4BRo8j [cnet.com]

And... (5, Insightful)

redemtionboy (890616) | about 3 years ago | (#35598592)

Music sales suddenly skyrocket right? Right?? Oh, they're still abysmal. Never mind then.

Re:And... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 3 years ago | (#35598646)

Yep, I think that the music industry should see at least a few trillion dollars worth of profits for 2010 using the same model they use to claim damages.

Re:And... (1)

WhitetailKitten (866108) | about 3 years ago | (#35598826)

In other news, the RIAA published a press release today requesting tighter anti-P2P laws because P2P music sharing is on the rise and their profit margins may take an infinitesimal hit next quarter. I'm not even putting a sarcasm tag on this; you watch, it'll happen.

Re:And... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598838)

Why? The damage is done. People have their free music, they don't need to go back and by more. It's your logic that is faulty, not their model.
 
And granted, they would never see that money for each download but they would have seen a portion of it if it weren't for file sharing. Let's not be foolish and claim that there were no lost sales due to piracy. I know there were for a fact.

Re:And... (1)

redemtionboy (890616) | about 3 years ago | (#35599042)

And there were also gained sales for increased free marketing. It wasn't a one sided deal, there was plenty of benefit for the music industry.

Re:And... (1)

Anthony Mouse (1927662) | about 3 years ago | (#35599120)

Music sales suddenly skyrocket right? Right?? Oh, they're still abysmal. Never mind then.

You're using logic. This is politics, logic is not accepted.

The point of the anti-P2P pro-DRM campaign is so that the old distributors can maintain control over the distribution channel. It has nothing to do with piracy. It has to do with demonizing P2P as an alternative distribution channel for artists. You mustn't put your own music on the Pirate Bay, even if that means you'll sell more concert tickets, because they're evil! Evil people who are stealing from you, the artist! We must stop them. Also, we must lock all music behind DRM which, incidentally, is patented by us, the recording companies, so that anyone who wants to distribute music has to license it and therefore have our permission.

But they can't just go to Congress and say that, can they? So it's all about piracy.

It was even lower (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598600)

before the interwebs!

Correction (5, Interesting)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | about 3 years ago | (#35598620)

There is a decline in music downloads that NPD Group is able to track.

Think about that one for a second.

Re:Correction (1)

Lazareth (1756336) | about 3 years ago | (#35598674)

Yeah, it is a pretty stupid non-story. Basically saying that after a network shut down, which amounted to x number of downloads they were able to track, they saw a fall of x downloads. OMGWTFBBQ shutting down a network removes the downloads occuring on it! Who would've thought.

In other news, pirates are moving to other less trackable networks or methods.

Re:Correction (1)

DinZy (513280) | about 3 years ago | (#35599008)

Good point. It is just a decline in what they are able to track, because one of the services they were tracking no longer allows for downloads.

shitty statistics (4, Insightful)

fwice (841569) | about 3 years ago | (#35598628)

The number has gone from a high of 16 percent in the fourth quarter of 2007 to just nine percent in the fourth quarter of 2010

16% of what? the article doesn't mention.

16% of the population? 16% of what it used to be?

Re:shitty statistics (3, Insightful)

smelch (1988698) | about 3 years ago | (#35598836)

Yeah I came in here to say the same thing. 16% was the high in 2007, now its down to 9% so it can't be "of what it used to be"... somehow I doubt thats total population in the United States either, I would have expected it to be lower than that with all the old people. Mostly though I feel like any of these statistics have to be bullshit numbers to begin with. They may reflect what they measured, but I don't think anybody could accurately measure all P2P traffic of illegal songs and not snare other kinds of P2P and miss a huge chunk of song sharing as well.

Re:shitty statistics (1)

Spad (470073) | about 3 years ago | (#35598958)

You should never include a scale when you're referencing numbers in a news article, otherwise the statistics might become meaningful.

Re:shitty statistics (5, Funny)

Captain Spam (66120) | about 3 years ago | (#35598980)

The number has gone from a high of 16% in the fourth quarter of 2007 to just $9,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010. This has been going down at a rate of 34W per day, and it can be expected to be down to 18 acres by the end of 2011. Analysts believe, however, that new P2P technology could see that number jump back up by 12kg before settling at 64 degrees Fahrenheit.

Was shutting down Limewire the real cause? (5, Insightful)

Itesh (1901146) | about 3 years ago | (#35598634)

Or are services like Pandora, Spotify, and even iTunes giving the consumers what they want at a price they want and thus helping to drive pirating down?

Re:Was shutting down Limewire the real cause? (4, Insightful)

Gabrosin (1688194) | about 3 years ago | (#35598724)

This. Streaming services make it a lot easier to hear the music you want whenever you want without having to download OR pay for it. I'm partial to Grooveshark myself, but Pandora's pretty good too.

Re:Was shutting down Limewire the real cause? (1)

spagma (514837) | about 3 years ago | (#35598830)

Exactly. I am listening to pandora now. no need to download music.

in case the RIAA has not noticed (1)

FudRucker (866063) | about 3 years ago | (#35598644)

there has been an economic downturn for the last several years that seems to not be recovering or as the spin doctors like to tell it it is a "jobless recovery" so basically less & less people have the money to waste on movies & music and other trivial entertainment media, and things like beans & rice and bread are taking a higher priority than before since there is less money to spread around...

i wonder how much movies, music and video people will be buying during a complete economic depression like what there was during the 1930's

Re:in case the RIAA has not noticed (1)

spiffmastercow (1001386) | about 3 years ago | (#35599078)

there has been an economic downturn for the last several years that seems to not be recovering or as the spin doctors like to tell it it is a "jobless recovery" so basically less & less people have the money to waste on movies & music and other trivial entertainment media, and things like beans & rice and bread are taking a higher priority than before since there is less money to spread around... i wonder how much movies, music and video people will be buying during a complete economic depression like what there was during the 1930's

Though it may seem counter-intuitive, recessions are usually a boon to the entertainment industry.. The reasoning being that people will go to movies to escape their wretched lives for a couple hours. Of course, this depends on pricing being affordable, which it is not, currently..

Why getting trash? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598652)

Since the death of Miles David and Mr. Cash, no good music is produced anymore. Why would you waste precious bandwith on the trash made in Idols, Popstars and all those other not-music-but-profit related shows?

Downloading at an all time low... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598662)

... pop music produced at an all time high. Correlation? positive

Better methods (1)

OopsIDied (1764436) | about 3 years ago | (#35598664)

Part of the reason for this is probably that p2p services have declined in quality with more spam on gnutella than ever and the younger ones who would do the p2p'ing not knowing how to use torrents (i've tried to help people use them often and for some reason they get confused about it) additionally, streaming services cut it for alot of people specially with the advent of apps like pandora. I personally replaced limewire with firefox+media download addon+grooveshark/similar sites. The download speed from such places is often far faster than p2p

Re:Better methods (1)

smelch (1988698) | about 3 years ago | (#35598874)

What is with people not understanding torrents? Peple can browse the web, they can use limewire, but they can't use links on a website to open a program similar to limewire and start downloading? What's the deal? Somebody please explain this to me. What is it about torrents that is "harder" than anything else?

fear, mis(placed)trust, murder, all time high (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598670)

if we check back on our nonclear religious/crusade training, that's how it is supposed to be? music in the air at all times? not yet/here.

How about the fact.... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 3 years ago | (#35598680)

That most music right now utterly sucks?

Honestly I have not bought a song off of itunes for 3 months now because 90% of it is crap and the other 10% is uninteresting.. Lately I have been looking for illegal remixes and mashups. Those guys have some real talent...

Re:How about the fact.... (2)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | about 3 years ago | (#35598924)

So let me get this straight. You say that 100% of music is crap or uninteresting, yet you claim that some other non-musician can take the crap, "remix it," and suddenly turn it into good music? (If they were musicians, they would create their own original music)

I agree with you about modern music, which is basically the equivalent of paint-by-numbers by sound engineers, but your point is absurd.

Re:How about the fact.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35599024)

So let me get this straight. You say that 100% of music is crap or uninteresting, yet you claim that some other non-musician can take the crap, "remix it," and suddenly turn it into good music? (If they were musicians, they would create their own original music)

I agree with you about modern music, which is basically the equivalent of paint-by-numbers by sound engineers, but your point is absurd.

no you dont have it straight, you have it slanted, forgot to take your lithium this morning?

You know nothing about what he is talking about ... the "remixes" are typically old songs.. but then if you had an IQ over 50 you would have known that.

I guess that is what happens when you model your life after charlie sheen, oh and have your doctor up your meds... you need it.

Re:How about the fact.... (4, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 3 years ago | (#35599036)

You don't really want original music. You want music that sounds like something else you like.

There is no reason why a mix of two songs that suck can't be fantastic. I don't like to eat cabbage or lactobacillus but I love sauerkraut. "Fusion cuisine" is usually an excuse for some stupid food concept that is being pushed on you but once in a while it results in nirvana, like the potato, pesto, and garlic pizza at Escape from NY. Potato on a pizza sounds stupid until you eat it. (Of course, the stuff is also a poster child for thisiswhyyourefat...)

Anyway I'm not into Jay-Z and the number of Beatles songs I think are worth a crap can be counted on one hand but DJ Danger Mouse's Grey Album is one of the best things I've ever heard. So basically I think you are being ridiculous.

Re:How about the fact.... (1)

Lazareth (1756336) | about 3 years ago | (#35599068)

He is not saying that 100% of music is crap or uninteresting. He is saying that most music right now utterly suck and I agree with him in the sense that most mainstream music, the current "trends" of music, sucks and is uninteresting.

I find it interesting that you say that somebody who takes music samples and remix it is a non-musician, especially since that statement is utter bullshit. Do you like Daft Punk? Well, if you do I have a newsflash for you: by your definition, they're not real musicians! Ohgawd! (hint: most if not all of their songs are samples of sounds from other songs. Didn't know that, did you?) Many musicians use samples, do covers and remix stuff - not just their own. Some of it is crap, some of it is not, but it is still music produced by a creative mind creating something new. Originality is a sliding scale.

Have you even tried to listen to proper mashups? Do you know who, for example, Dan Mei is? Try listening to this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLC8ndUbMKI [youtube.com]

Re:How about the fact.... (4, Interesting)

mlts (1038732) | about 3 years ago | (#35599096)

I have to disagree about "modern music" being crap.

The difference is that in the past, good bands got the spotlight and were heavily promoted.

These days, what gets the promotion dollars are cookie cutter bands who wouldn't even be able to croak out anything near a melody if it wasn't for Antares's Auto-Tune product. Why do they get promoed? Because it is cheaper to hype some naiive and malleable stars for a few years, then find some new meat when the news stories about their rehab and DUI misadventures hit the press.

There is still good music being made. However, you won't be finding it on the radio (unless you happen to have an independent station). It will be through services like Pandora, last.fm, and other places, not to mention Web forums and word of mouth that one finds bands that don't suck.

Trust me; there are a lot of new bands that are worth the ear; they just don't have the huge money behind them that Justin Beiber and Ke$ha do.

Re:How about the fact.... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 3 years ago | (#35599136)

How's it absurd?

All music is, essentially, the stringing and mixing together of sound waves. Usually of frequencies that we consider "going well together". It's by no means unheard of that someone takes a song, takes a few snippets out of it, mixes it with other snippets, a new base line and creates some other, similar but "better sounding" sound waves.

The music of the 90s was full of it. 99% garbage, but there were some true talents as well. I'll never forget how the Saints used Annie Lennox as an instrument for their "What can you do for me".

Re:How about the fact.... (1)

goose-incarnated (1145029) | about 3 years ago | (#35599178)

I wish I had modpoints - there is always this conception that it takes talent to make remixes and mashups. While, no doubt some of it is certainly worthy of "talent" as a description, the majority, especially the popular ones, are simply devoid and bereft of any talent or skill at all. They (the creators) are no more worthy of being called "musicians" as the dog that howls or the cat that screeches.

Re:How about the fact.... (1)

Illicon (1588477) | about 3 years ago | (#35598938)

Maybe the RIAA is conspiring to gradually lower the quality of music so piracy will decrease. Duh. Winning!

Re:How about the fact.... (4, Interesting)

Hatta (162192) | about 3 years ago | (#35599112)

Right now? Mainstream music has utterly sucked since the late 90s. If you want some quality music over P2P, check out bt.etree.org.

Personally, my downloading is at an all time low because I have everything I want. I pass up free leech at the private trackers I'm on, simply because I wouldn't have the time to use it anyway.

Thank Amazon (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598716)

I don't know about others, but since Amazon started selling unencrypted MP3s, I've stopped turning to illegal sources for music.

Re:Thank Amazon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35598976)

I don't know about others, but since Amazon started selling unencrypted MP3s, I've stopped turning to illegal sources for music.

I like 7digital: it does not require you use any awesome proprietary downloader.
The 7digital store catalog is also available via Ubuntu One, if you are of the linux persuasion.

Unfortunately the music selection is sometimes still a bit lacking in obscure web artists and chiptune mixers... (itunes has everyone and his dog).

Re:Thank Amazon (2)

NewWorldDan (899800) | about 3 years ago | (#35599016)

Pretty much. I've bought more music in the past 6 months than I have in probably the last decade. Cheap, easy, safe, and legal.

However, there's probably more sneakernet trading going on than ever before. If you've got 8 gigs of music on a USB stick, it's really trivial to plug it into your buddies computer and copy the whole thing over. You know the quality is good and there's no risk of getting sued.

Re:Thank Amazon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35599126)

No risk of getting sued....

Knock knock.

Seriously, I'd think again about that. Very soon you will have to prove that you obtained the recording legally sneakernet or not. Keep those receipts me hearties.

Music Streaming (1)

ProbablyJoe (1914672) | about 3 years ago | (#35598720)

I didn't know anyone even still used Limewire in the last few years. Maybe I'm just out of touch, but I assume the amount of people affected by Limewire shutdown was low, and most of them would have just found alternate methods.

I think if anything, any decline in P2P music downloads would be down so streaming services such as Spotify. As always, there will be the minority who will download everything and refuse to ever pay for music, but the majority are those who gladly buy CDs from their favorite artists, but don't want to pay $10+ for every album they might like a song or two on.

Of course, these are also the same sort of people that the RIAA and such count as "lost money", saying they'd have had x millions of dollars if people hadn't downloaded. In reality, these people would probably have never paid full price for most of the music they download illegally. Instead, these people are now giving Spotify money, either through monthly fees or listening to their ads, to listen to those odd songs. I don't really know how Spotify provides the music legally, but I assume they pay the record companies large sums for their music.

Most people never really cared that they were getting music 'illegally', they just wanted to listen to something and services like Limewire provided the quickest way. Now they don't.

Re:Music Streaming (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 years ago | (#35598850)

the majority are those who gladly buy CDs from their favorite artists

Yes, but we don't want to feed the RIAA in the process. Buy from the artist directly would be a grand thing. ( and yes, it does exist for many indi groups, where the real music is anyway )

Do you know why they're down? (1)

alvinrod (889928) | about 3 years ago | (#35598726)

It's one thing to say that they've gone down, but another entirely to claim what's causing it.

I used to download music because it was more convenient than driving to the store and let me sample the music before deciding if I even wanted it. Then companies started offering digital downloads, but most of it was DRM-encumbered so I still stayed away. However, after most stores went DRM-free there was no reason not to use them. Sure I could still get it for free somewhere else, but the music stores made it quicker to find what I wanted.

The only thing that still needs to change is allowing me to listen to an entire album at least once before buying it. Not all songs are done justice by thirty second previews and some albums can't even begun to be appreciated if the only thing you get are half-minute slices.

Based on my own experiences, clamping down on P2P isn't going to do anything. There are still plenty of other ways to get at the content if you want it badly enough. If companies started releasing DRM-free video at reasonable prices I'd probably spent a lot more money on that as well. If you give people a convenient solution they'll gravitate towards it. That means online, no DRM-hassle, and reasonable prices. Now that music meets those criteria I've been buying more than at any other point in my life, even before P2P was an option.

Why download music.... (2)

Simozene (899342) | about 3 years ago | (#35598764)

when Pandora and Grooveshark can satisfy all your music needs through the cloud? A drop in media piracy likely has little to do with copyright enforcement and much more to do with cloud streaming services that offer content for free.

And it means, what, exactly? (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 3 years ago | (#35598770)

Once something goes underground, it's increasingly difficult to get reliable numbers because people are trying not to be seen doing it. Obviously some of them are succeeding.

If you believe this... (1)

mbone (558574) | about 3 years ago | (#35598796)

If you believe this, you qualify for a job at the Libyan Ministry of Information ! I hear they pay well !

Have music sales gone up? (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 3 years ago | (#35598810)

If ever there was a time when might be shown a connection between illegal downloads and sales, this might be it. Has there been an increase in legitimate sales? I'm guessing not. I suspect that as other, legal means of collecting music online have come about, people are simply abandoning the illegal means.

People just want what they want. They aren't "criminal minds" and certainly never needed to be attacked with lawsuits. They just want what they want. When they have an affordable and legal way to get it, that's what they will do. I don't think it's any more complicated than that.

conclusion does not follow from facts presented (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | about 3 years ago | (#35598832)

OK, so we have a high of 16% in fourth quarter of 2007 and a low of 9% in the fourth quarter of 2010. Leaving aside that neither here nor in the linked story does it say precent of what, we still have the question of what happened between 2007 and 2010. The article concludes that it must be because of the shutdown of Limewire in the 3rd quarter of 2010. I might buy that if the high point had been the fourth quarter of 2009 or if they presented numbers showing a large drop between the third quarter of 2010 and the fourth quarter of 2010. Since the large drop they show me is between fourth quarter of 2007 and fourth quarter of 2010, I conclude that if we had the numbers in between we would see a steady downward trend, which would not support the conclusion they wish me to accept.

Because new music sucks? (1)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | about 3 years ago | (#35598974)

Okay, so if P2P is at an all time low and actual record sales are also at an all time low, doesn't that imply that people just don't want new music? Is it hard to replace Limewire? No. But the users need some motivation to go to a new site. It looks like people are less able to justify either their time or money to get new music than ever before.

That is right RIAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35599038)

That is right RIAA, piracy no longer exists. We certainly do not USEtheNET to download anything.

Shocking... NOT! (1)

MobyDisk (75490) | about 3 years ago | (#35599050)

This makes perfect sense. My casual observations note that music piracy has been decreasing steadily for years. There is far less reason reason to pirate any longer. Companies are selling music online, cheaper, more easily, without lock-down, and without DRM -- just like people were asking for.

Similarly, anime piracy is down now that you can watch anime online legally. It was pirated most heavily when a series came out in Japan and took 10 years before it was subtitled and released in the US and Europe. Now that they subtitle them and release them within a week, piracy has decreased.

See! Offering a product at a good value really does work!

The usual beefs (1)

chaboud (231590) | about 3 years ago | (#35599076)

Correlation != causation:
We don't know if the shuttering of Limewire had this effect or not. I'd wager that the availability of for-sale music at Amazon, iTunes, etc. and the availability of ad-supported music at Spotify, Pandora, etc. essentially killed this. We have to, of course, consider the effect of ridiculous lawsuits on the average user (the obvious goal, so "yay RIAA lawyers....?").

Numbers need labels:
16 percent of what?

Where's your causality now?
If this is causal, can we take the causality further in saying that the lack of increased sales in albums demonstrates that LimeWire wasn't hurting album sales nearly as much as the RIAA made them out to be? Granted, that's obvious to anyone with half a brain (or a friend with half a brain), but it's worth pointing out that the theoretical damages presented by the RIAA were always just this side of fantasy land.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...