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Texas Site Pushes Back Known Settlement Date For North America

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the everything's-older-in-texas dept.

Science 149

Velcroman1 writes "The discovery of ancient stone tools at an archaeological dig in Texas could push back the presence of humans in North America, perhaps by as much as 2,500 years. The find was located 5 feet below materials left by the well-known Clovis culture, which was once thought to have been the first American settlers around 13,000 years ago. It was 'like finding the Holy Grail,' Waters said in a telephone interview. To find what appears to be a large open-air campsite 'is really gratifying. Lucky and gratifying.'"

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Too bad (2, Insightful)

spiffmastercow (1001386) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602524)

Too bad the Texas text books state that this is 7000 years before God created the Earth.

Re:Too bad (3, Funny)

jovius (974690) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602568)

Perhaps they found the tools of GOD?!

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603378)

So GCC stands for "God's Compiler Collection"?

Re:Too bad (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603438)

Perhaps they found the tools of GOD?!

More like BP

Texas 13000BC, South India 1.5M BC! (4, Interesting)

billstewart (78916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603734)

The Texas find is interesting, because it's dealing with settlement of North America, but to me the India find in the same article was much more interesting. Acheulian stone tool designs in India at 1.5 million years BC, saying humans migrated out of Africa at least 100,000 years earlier than we thought! That difference is a lot longer than the time modern Cro-Magnons have been around.

Re:Texas 13000BC, South India 1.5M BC! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604558)

That would explain the 200,000 year old evidence at site mesa verde in south america. It just isn't being released as yet as the scientific community would bury it.

Re:Texas 13000BC, South India 1.5M BC! (2)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604622)

Those humans would have been Homo Erectus, not Homo Sapiens.

Re:Too bad (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604804)

Nah they found the tools of the people who created god

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602578)

Are you sure God didn't just pitch a tent to test our faith? Oh wait, that was my priest, nvm...

Re:Too bad (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602666)

Frankly, if the Texas Democratic Party can't take the buffoonery of the Texas Republican Party and make votes out of it, then they deserve what they get.

Re:Too bad (3, Funny)

spiffmastercow (1001386) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602820)

Frankly, if the Texas Democratic Party can't take the buffoonery of the Texas Republican Party and make votes out of it, then they deserve what they get.

They have Democrats in Texas??

Re:Too bad (3, Funny)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602880)

People live in Austin, yes.

Re:Too bad (1)

brian1078 (230523) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603344)

People live in Austin, yes.

you call that living?

Re:Too bad (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603800)

People live in Austin, yes.

you call that living?

outstanding living, as a matter of fact.

actually, it's the only place in Texas worth living.

Re:Too bad (3, Interesting)

Remloc (1165839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603520)

Many parts of Dallas swing Democrat as well. (I live there).

Of course, most TX Democrats would be considered Independents anywhere but TX or UT.

Re:Too bad (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604076)

mini-San Fran is home to many "star children" of Texas.

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602892)

Just like they have republicans in Massachusetts...

Re:Too bad (1)

Pawnn (1708484) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603268)

Denny Crane at your service!

*Western* Massachusetts (1)

billstewart (78916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603752)

The state doesn't all resemble Boston.

Re:Too bad (1)

bpfinn (557273) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602916)

I think I'm the only one. Every election is like a Washington Generals game.

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603284)

There's 2 of us. I hate living in a "winner take all" state. Argh.

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603120)

Yes, but they are all Conservative Democrats.

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604526)

Yes, but they are all Conservative Democrats.

But you repeat yourself.

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602878)

Well, they are outnumbered by more than 2-1 in the legislature...of a state that elected that very baffoonery in the first place. That's a steep slope to climb

Re:Too bad (1)

hondo77 (324058) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603174)

Aren't you forgetting about the buffoonery of the elecorate?

Re:Too bad (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604616)

But that's a defining characteristic of electorates. It's why the word "idiot" has the etymology it does.

Re:Too bad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603248)

Frankly, if the Texas Democratic Party can't take the buffoonery of the Texas Republican Party and make votes out of it, then they deserve what they get.

Sounds logical, except for the following chain of events:

  • Texas Republican Party are buffoons.
  • They use this buffoonery to appeal to the voters.
  • The voters overwhelmingly vote for them.
  • Ergo, the voters are buffoons.
  • Thus, they are represented by the Texas Republican Party.
  • Therefore, calling out the party on this means you are calling out those voters for being buffoons.
  • This is a very bad political move in any case.
  • This is an even worse political move when the voters in question are buffoons.
  • This is an even more worse political move when those buffoons feel a sense of entitlement and empowerment because their people in power are also buffoons, thus indirectly supporting their buffoonery.

That would be political suicide for not only the Texas Democratic Party, but any of even the barest sense of rational thought in their political discourse (yes, har har, smart guy, even worse than the rest of the US/world). To be perfectly honest, the only sensible course of action is to evacuate Austin to nearby states, let Texas secede, and review the situation in a few years to see if they've rebooted properly.

Re:Too bad (1)

zixxt (1547061) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602730)

I for one like Texas text books at least the Texas history books are not racist anymore by way of exclusion. They made American History books include more early and essential Black and Native leaders and figureheads than in past textbooks.

Re:Too bad (-1, Flamebait)

spiffmastercow (1001386) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602780)

I for one like Texas text books at least the Texas history books are not racist anymore by way of exclusion. They made American History books include more early and essential Black and Native leaders and figureheads than in past textbooks.

Oh, I'm sure the Texas text books find lots of new ways to be racist..

Re:Too bad (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602850)

"If Kunte receives five lashes on Monday and two lashes on Wednesday, how many thanks does he give to his master?"

Re:Too bad (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602904)

"If Kunte receives five lashes on Monday and two lashes on Wednesday, how many thanks does he give to his master?"

His name is "Toby"!

Re:Too bad (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603770)

Ah shucks, teacher, that's a trick question. Kunte thanks him *every* day of the week.

Re:Too bad (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603756)

at least the Texas history books are not racist anymore by way of exclusion

Yep, now they include both kinds of music: country *and* western.

Re:Too bad (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602806)

Also, it never ceases to amaze me that there are links to the fox news site for science-related articles. Yeah, the same fox news that panders to those who are most hostile to science/scientific discovery. Though, in Velcroman1's defense, peraps there weren't any other news outlets covering the story....

http://tamunews.tamu.edu/2011/03/24/texas-am-led-study-shows-earliest-american-residents-came-at-least-15500-years-ago/
http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2011-03/ancient-portable-tool-kit-shows-humans-settled-north-america-much-earlier-scientists-thought
http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/03/clovis-culture-may-not-have-been-the-first-in-the-americas.ars
http://www.nature.com/news/2011/110324/full/news.2011.185.html
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jS7j-m7_04PE5fOAuHy9dlAtvOhg?docId=86c69261c5d0400a8e2101b8d22df5aa
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/texas-dig-solidifies-evidence-that-the-first-americans-were-here-15000-years-ago/2011/03/24/ABgKi4PB_story.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/25/science/25archeo.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

yeah, mods, smell the sarcasm and go ahead and mod me into -1 hell

Re:Too bad (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603498)

Also, it never ceases to amaze me that there are links to the fox news site for science-related articles. Yeah, the same fox news that panders to those who are most hostile to science/scientific discovery.

The obvious conclusion to this apparent paradox is that your assumption is wrong.

I doubt you'll admit it, however. :P

Re:Too bad (0)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602816)

They will state that God created man out of the clay and dust found right here in Texas, which turns out to have been partially prefab.

Also, "Tornadoes"? Or Breath of life!

Re:Too bad (1)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603358)

Is there an actual Earth science textbook that puts forth a young Earth creationism theory? (ISBN please?)

Re:Too bad (3, Insightful)

OakDragon (885217) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603460)

Too bad the Texas text books state that this is 7000 years before God created the Earth.

Cite?

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604770)

He can't ....yet. Texas hasn't finalized the textbooks. They're still deciding between a 6000, or 7000 yr. old timescale.

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603738)

It depends on your concept of a year. A galactic year [wikipedia.org] is about 250M years, so those who think we've been here for 5000 years of that type would think that the universe was 1.25Tn Earth years old. According to Science, Earth is less than 20 years old, so there! :P

Re:Too bad (1)

nopainogain (1091795) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603834)

this is me clicking LIKE on your comment spiff. I was kinda hoping to be the first person to broach that one.

But how can that be? (-1, Redundant)

jameskojiro (705701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602538)

People couldn't be here 13,000 years ago if the world is only 6,000 years old? /sarc

originals? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602542)

they better not open the Pandorica or the Daleks will really invade this time around.

The real tragedy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602576)

is that Texas culture has regressed since then.

Science in Texas? (-1, Troll)

watermark (913726) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602580)

Does anyone in Texas still believe in science?

Re:Science in Texas? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602992)

Does anyone in Texas still believe in science?

Lots of people in Texas believe in science.

It's the ones who don't believe in science who make the front page on Slashdot.

Re:Science in Texas? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603412)

Yep.

As a Texan that believes in science I can say that, yes, there are a few of us here.

Re:Science in Texas? (0)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603384)

Does anyone in Texas still believe in science?

Presumably some of those people in Mission Control still do...

Well, that's sad. (1, Insightful)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602594)

I sign on to make a wise-ass comment about creationism and Texas and find two others beat me too it.

Either /. commenter creativity has hit a new low, or Texas's reputation is so overpowering that such jokes are inevitable.

Re:Well, that's sad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602682)

I am voting for option one.

Re:Well, that's sad. (3, Funny)

Rinnon (1474161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602712)

Either /. commenter creativity has hit a new low, or Texas's reputation is so overpowering that such jokes are inevitable.

A little from column A, a little from column B.

Re:Well, that's sad. (2)

H0p313ss (811249) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602856)

Either /. commenter creativity has hit a new low, or Texas's reputation is so overpowering that such jokes are inevitable.

A little from column A, a little from column B.

But does it run Linux?

Re:Well, that's sad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602720)

yes

Re:Well, that's sad. (1)

morgaen (1896818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602894)

That, my friend, is called an inverse whoosh.

Re:Well, that's sad. (1)

desdinova 216 (2000908) | more than 3 years ago | (#35605464)

Wouldn't an inverse woosh be a thud?

Re:Well, that's sad. (0)

kehren77 (814078) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603368)

I sign on to make a wise-ass comment about creationism and Texas and find two others beat me too it.

Either /. commenter creativity has hit a new low, or Texas's reputation is so overpowering that such jokes are inevitable.

Don't mess with Texas. It's not nice to pick on the mentally challenged.

Re:Well, that's sad. (1)

AdamThor (995520) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604178)

Headline: Post Pushes Back Known Wise-Ass Comments About Texas Date For Slashdot Story

Re:Well, that's sad. (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#35605236)

Its like trying to get first post but finding that someone has beat you to it. With an "In Soviet Russia..." line to boot.

Clovis humor (4, Funny)

snsh (968808) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602614)

The Clovis kids were probably just playing a practical joke 10,000 years ago, burying pottery five feet under, to confuse the archaeologists.

Science is illegal in Texas (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35602616)

Or so I have been lead to believe by recent news - why are they practicing such an obviously satanic and corrupting religion like science in a proper Christian state like Texas???

captcha: convert

Indiana Korg and the Charred Stick (2)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602634)

So the Clovis culture was one day's easy digging away from being the first archaeologists?

Until the next discovery (-1, Troll)

theunixbomber (2023818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602706)

Of course it is 2,500 years earlier. Grants to come to archaeologist who discover the same thing that someone else discovered 5 years ago. I'm sure the next site will show evidence of people being around 20,000 years ago.

Re:Until the next discovery (4, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602792)

Are you charging the archaeologists with falsifying data? Because it sure sounds like that's what you're doing, and if so, you'd better contact the Texas A&M ethics board with your allegations. If you're not willing to do that, and provide evidence, you should probably just STFU.

Re:Until the next discovery (0)

theunixbomber (2023818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603024)

Wow!! Mental note to walk on egg shells when ever Daniel Dvorkin is around.

I'm just saying that I find it odd that every single discovery, and not just in the realm of archaelogy, seems to push the dates and times and distances out further and further then the last discovery. I'll admit to having a fair amount of cynicism. I'm not saying that they're being dishonest, I just find it odd is all.

Re:Until the next discovery (2)

compro01 (777531) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603134)

Well it's kinda impossible for new findings to push it forward. Any new findings will either be the same age or newer (and thus don't make the news) or they're older and push the date back.

Re:Until the next discovery (3, Insightful)

rotide (1015173) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603176)

Just throwing this out there, but archaeologists are probably making discoveries _all_the_time_. You just hear about the ones that news sources pick up as, well, news worthy. Kinda like ones that show us we were here thousands of years before we previously thought. Nothing odd about that, in my opinion.

Re:Until the next discovery (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603188)

I'm certainly not one to begrudge someone their cynicism, but I fail to understand what you're finding "interesting" about that. Of course the discoveries that make the news are the ones that set the date back further.

Finding tools from 1000BC might (or might not. IANAA) be a valuable find, but it's not news because we already KNOW there were people around earlier than that.

Re:Until the next discovery (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603208)

Wow!! Mental note to walk on egg shells when ever Daniel Dvorkin is around.

Or better yet, as with any debate, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. As the claimant, the burden of proof is on you to show that a professional is falsifying data. If you're unable to do so, withdraw your claims.

I'm just saying that [logical fallacy]...

What are your credentials and what professional experience do you have as an archaeologist that you're able to make informed observations on the age of the artifacts that are uncovered?

Re:Until the next discovery (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603432)

someonegottold.exe

Re:Until the next discovery (1)

Nikker (749551) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603910)

Click, click.

Re:Until the next discovery (1)

theunixbomber (2023818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603436)

These are all fair and probably correct statements. True that nobody reports on the the guy who discovered a previously unknown settlement from 9K years ago when the last discovery was from 10k. And no... I'm obviously not in the field. The only bases I have for my comments are my observations of the new stories that I see combined with my observations of human behavior through out the years.

Re:Until the next discovery (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603586)

in other words, you're a big faggot.

Re:Until the next discovery (2)

theunixbomber (2023818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603724)

See.... observations on human behavior.

In the name of open and honest discussion I just admitted that my view might need some adjustment. Not sure how the makes me a "faggot".

Re:Until the next discovery (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604180)

Nevermind GP. If he had in his posession the "evidence" necessary to backup his claims and didn't feel the need to bring them to light, not only would that make him a homosexual, but it would also mean he's too stingy to seed his volumes of gay porn to the rest of the world.

Lets not even touch how he feels he's capable of providing a "professional" opinion on the matter...

Settlements (5, Insightful)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602794)

It's nice to read about a settlement that has nothing to do with a lawsuit.

Re:Settlements (2)

EkriirkE (1075937) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603250)

With Texas in the same sentence, no less. I was trying to wrap my head around a publicized patent suit so famous it didn't need to be named in the headline.

Re:Settlements (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604022)

Yeah, I was trying to figure out what web-site in Texas would have the power to push back the legal settlement date of something that affected the entirety of North America.

God, I am really starting to hate living in this world of lawsuits.

Re:Settlements (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35605276)

Or the West Bank.

Interesting story, terrible headline (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35602800)

"Known settlement date"? What the hell does that even mean? Perhaps "date of first known settlement", but come on. Even if the story is filled with grammatical problems, at LEAST check the headlines before you hit submit.

Re:Interesting story, terrible headline (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603448)

"Known settlement date"? What the hell does that even mean? Perhaps "date of first known settlement", but come on. Even if the story is filled with grammatical problems, at LEAST check the headlines before you hit submit.

Some site in Texas sued all of North America, and North America is settling. However, the settlement date is being pushed back from the known value.

Re:Interesting story, terrible headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604278)

1. the act or state of settling or the state of being settled.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/settlement [reference.com] the first listed definition.

In the context of settlement as an action, the headlines grammar is fine.

Re:Interesting story, terrible headline (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604294)

I suppose you're right, the grammar is fine. But that doesn't mean it makes sense.

Misleading headline (1)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603012)

I expected an article about some Texas-based website pushing back the settlement date for some kind of copyright violation class action lawsuit affecting North American users only (at least the known ones).

In other news.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603318)

Texas has made another recent addition to textbooks:

"Scientists discover 'ancient stone tools' placed in the ground by the Devil"

Fox News is source??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603404)

In search of a creditable source for this (a bit of internet archaeology), just below the layer of detritus of modern society, I stumbled upon this: http://www.livescience.com/13398-americans-predate-clovis-110324.html

Clovis people as oldest culture in Americas? (1)

serbanp (139486) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603484)

That theory has been long ago discredited. It's amazing that it still decorates US history books - is it because almost no one teaching this subject and the kids learning about it don't care at all?

Anyway, this finding helps debunking the mantra...

Re:Clovis people as oldest culture in Americas? (2)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604310)

Yes, didn't some Europeans boat along the edge of the Atlantic pack ice during the last ice age (pre-Bering strait land bridge) and land in Eastern North America? I thought the found some ceremonial spear points somewhere that matched ones in France, but predated the land bridge migration.

Re:Clovis people as oldest culture in Americas? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35604902)

a little common sense will tell you that people didn't just appear in texas, they had to migrate there from somewhere else in north america first.

Not a big breakthrough (4, Informative)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603546)

This is getting a lot more hype than it should: Several other sites, as well as genetic studies, have pointed to the existence of pre-Clovis human habitation in North America, and it had long been a working hypothesis for a lot of archaeologists who had been studying early American habitation.

The only really interesting question is what these tools most resemble: If they look like they're related to a culture not from Siberia, that would be a much bigger deal, since it would suggest migration from Africa or Europe or Polynesia.

Re:Not a big breakthrough (3, Informative)

Michael Woodhams (112247) | more than 3 years ago | (#35605368)

If you proved they'd come from Polynesia, that really would be a big breakthrough - pushing back Polynesian settlement by more than 10,000 years. Easter Island and Hawai'i were settled within the last 2000 years.

Good lord... (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603662)

They found ol' Dinosaur Dan!

"When y'all gonna let me outta here?"

Re:Good lord... (1)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 3 years ago | (#35605044)

+1 for reference to such an old cartoon.

Only problem is (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 3 years ago | (#35603778)

The tools are stamped "Made in China"

Re:Only problem is (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604216)

Funny you should mention that. During the last Ice Age, humans did cross the land-bridge from Asia through Alaska back down through Canada, North and South America. I'm sure many Native American's mitochondrial DNA could be traced back to ancient Chinese decedents.

Re:Only problem is (1)

IrquiM (471313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35605474)

Funny you should mention that - maybe he was making a joke, based on exactly that information and the fact that a lot of the tools currently being used are also made in China?

In Texas... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35603812)

...the Earth is only 6000 years old.

Texas A&M is not known for its digging efforts (3, Funny)

517714 (762276) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604362)

Bryan/College Station's worst disaster occurred when a small two-seater Cessna 150 plane, piloted by two Texas A&M students, crashed into a cemetery earlier today. Texas A&M volunteers have recovered 300 bodies so far and expect the number to climb as digging continues into the evening. The pilot and copilot survived and are helping in the recovery efforts.

I know it's old, but it never fails to get the goat of my Aggie buddies.

The world's most trusted science reporting source! (0, Flamebait)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35604586)

Note that this article was on Fox, along with news of a Bigfoot video from North Carolina and a story on an El Chupacabra found in Kentucky. You know that Rupert Murdock, he checks, rechecks, and checks again to make sure his stories are accurate!

Dating methods? (1)

Shaiku (1045292) | more than 3 years ago | (#35605084)

I wish they'd post more information on how they dated the tools. It's not that I doubt the science, but the article makes it sounds like they dug 5 feet deeper and found tools, so they must be thousands of years older. I can almost hear Ray Comfort now saying "The Clovis people dug a 5-foot hole and buried their old tools. All these scientists found was an ancient landfill. Now look at this banana..."

Why does the quality of news articles always have to be so low? Off-topic now but: It's an online publication for cryin' out loud! A few extra words won't cost anything and grammar/spell check is just a friggin' button.

Website pushing back settlement date? (1)

michelcolman (1208008) | more than 3 years ago | (#35605096)

For a minute I thought this was about some official Texas educational website changing the dates of historical events. And my first reaction was "o, those idiots, are they at it again?".
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