Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Cylindrical Rolltop Laptops

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the why-this-is-a-slow-day dept.

Science 159

akshaynhegde writes "Germany's Orkin Design has proposed this fantastic concept of a futuristic laptop. The rolltop is a 'rolled up' laptop. By using the flexible OLED and touchscreen technologies, the created concept is a cylindrical laptop which can be rolled out when it needs to be used and can be rolled up again when not used." Something tells me it will be a little while before you will be unrolling your laptop on a plane.

cancel ×

159 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Enough is enough (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639540)

Something tells me it will be a little while before you will be unrolling your laptop on a plane.

Enough is enough. I have had it with these motherfucking rollup laptops on this motherfucking plane.

Re:Enough is enough (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639940)

How the fuck did this make the front page of slashdot?
A) There's no new tech, just a stupid concept that's been bounced around dozens of times and we still don't have the ability to actually make it, nor are we any closer
B) This blog post was written by a fucking retard. The last paragraph sums it up nicely:

There are many of such features..... But I just don't like to type those ..:p Also am damn sure not many have read whatever written their and think all those as bullshit..!! All will look for some video or pics....So lets cup the crap n watch the video..:)

Re:Enough is enough (2)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640198)

Dozens? I saw a mockup of a "roll up computing device" at Disneyland at Epcot when they first opened and had a mini "worlds fair"..

1980 called, they want their roll up laptop idea back.

Re:Enough is enough (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640366)

I'm not even sure, aside from a "look at what cool stuff we can do now" promo, why you would want a roll up laptop. Is it easier to carry a fat tube than a thin rectangle? Possibly. Is it going to be just one more hassle rolling and unrolling the damn thing every time you want to use it/carry it around? Definitely.

Re:Enough is enough (2)

Iron Condor (964856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641080)

Is it easier to carry a fat tube than a thin rectangle? Possibly.

No. Definitely not.

Anybody who has ever flown with a laptop (which will fit into any backpack) knows the practicality of that situation - but anybody who has ever tried to fly with any kind of tube, knows how next-to-impossible that is. The overhead bins are made for rectangular items, so is the space underneath the seat in front of you. And where do you put it after you unroll it?

What possible advantage is there to something bulky that cannot be stacked; when we've already figured out how to make it razor-thin and infinitely packagable?

Oblig (1)

.sig (180877) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640732)

http://xkcd.com/875/ [xkcd.com]
Tell younger me I said "Hi".

Re:Enough is enough (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641228)

Indeed. How the fuck did it make front page. Its an extremely old concept.

Re:Enough is enough (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640588)

As have the FAA and TSA, who have pre-emptively banned these devices on all flights pending approval.

Caprica e-paper anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639548)

Come on, this has been proposed many times before, but the most recent/mainstream place was in the show Caprica. They all had their little rolls of epaper that they would take with them and use as a laptop.

Re:Caprica e-paper anyone? (1)

eln (21727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640042)

Sure, but nobody takes these things seriously until they're featured in some college student's blog.

Rollup monitor, not computer (1)

algaeman (600564) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639556)

I don't think we will see rollup laptops, but rather just rollup monitors and keyboards. By the time these come out, your computer will be in your pocket, you will just want a larger screen and keyboard to do your real work.

Re:Rollup monitor, not computer (2)

bemymonkey (1244086) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640052)

No thanks. Roll-up keyboards are already available, and they suck.

Re:Rollup monitor, not computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640220)

Roll-up keyboards are already available, and they suck.

And therefore always will? Get with the 21st century, grandad!

Re:Rollup monitor, not computer (1)

bemymonkey (1244086) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640330)

And therefore always will, yes.

*hugs Thinkpad*

Re:Rollup monitor, not computer (1, Funny)

by (1706743) (1706744) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640460)

I, uh, don't think that was a hug [xkcd.com] . Also, get a room...

Re:Rollup monitor, not computer (1)

pyrosine (1787666) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640436)

Well they wont be changing, there is fundamentally no change you can make - the whole reason they are terrible is because the keys are flat, and they have to be quite simply if you want to roll it up.
Only solution is perhaps keys that expand when it has rolled out, but to me that is a 1 time usage thing (automatic deflation would be more difficult and slow)... Although having said that, a material that responds by changing molecular structure when subjected to an electrical current would be effective for this (im not 100% if this is an existing material or concept, but I seem to recall it from somewhere)

Re:Rollup monitor, not computer (1)

AJH16 (940784) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641926)

But... But... the iPad..er... touch screen keyboards are the future, didn't you hear??? Agreed that roll up keyboards suck, but I'd prefer them to a touch screen keyboard anyday. Technology doesn't have to be practical to sell en masse unfortunately, just trendy.

It's not a newspaper (4, Insightful)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639588)

And even if it was, do you know how god damn annoying it is to read a paper after it's been rolled up?

Look, laptops do it right. The hinge? That's a crease, a fold line, and allows this thing that otherwise should not be bent to use space more efficiently. A cylinder is will have that big empty volume in the middle. Well, it will until the slightest bit of pressure to the sides squeezes it flat.

Re:It's not a newspaper (4, Insightful)

shadowfaxcrx (1736978) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639730)

This. Just because you can make something doesn't mean anyone is going to want it. There's a reason we upgraded from scrolls to books. Rolled up things are an inefficient use of space.

Re:It's not a newspaper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639880)

Well, making these things into a framed elastic display surface would make it better, but also be considerably harder. I do remember a sci-fi show (don't remember which one) in which the portable computers were held in one hand by a handle on the bottom and the top part could be any real shape, but it had a screen that could be rolled out of the side of the device while the device itself had the buttons for using it. Could do something like this without the need of touchscreen tech.

Re:It's not a newspaper (2, Insightful)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640024)

There's a reason we upgraded from scrolls to books. Rolled up things are an inefficient use of space.

Could it be that we went to books because of the invention of the printing press, which was not able to print continuously on a long scroll (contrary to the more modern printers, starting with the matrix printer)?
In the fluids / beverage industry, cylindrical containers are very common. Volumes range from a few milliliters to thousands of tons. Nobody ever complained about the volume taken up by the space between the bottles or tanks.
In fact, cylindrical containers tend to be very strong, and that's a major plus.

This. Just because you can make something doesn't mean anyone is going to want it.

Just because it's not what you're used to doesn't mean it's a bad idea :-)

And anyway, just because it's new, there are plenty of people who will want to buy it. Especially if it has an Apple logo.

Re:It's not a newspaper (4, Funny)

kevinNCSU (1531307) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640352)

I think there are some pretty clear advantages to bounded books over scrolls especially considering they started hand-writing them long before the printing press. For example, have you ever tried reading your scroll with one hand and a drink in the other while lounging by the pool? And God help you if you drop it, that's when everything REALLY starts to unravel.

Re:It's not a newspaper (1, Funny)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641266)

I advocate a return to the scrolls. Drinking while reading should be a crime.

Re:It's not a newspaper (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35641678)

Scrolls are sequential access documents, while books are random access. The advantages of a book over a scroll are completely unrelated to their uses as a computer screen form factor.

Re:It's not a newspaper (3, Informative)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640356)

Could it be that we went to books because of the invention of the printing press, which was not able to print continuously on a long scroll (contrary to the more modern printers, starting with the matrix printer)?

No. The change from scroll to book happened centuries before the invention of the printing press.

Re:It's not a newspaper (3, Informative)

Inner_Child (946194) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640404)

Nope, we went to books before the printing press, but nice try.

Also, while cylindrical containers are strong, they also don't repel bears very well (which has about as much to do with which is more efficient for the printed word as your beverage example).

Re:It's not a newspaper (4, Insightful)

Splab (574204) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640446)

They aren't using cylindical forms because they want to, but they have to to contain the pressure. Trust me, they complain a lot about the space lost due to cylindical containers.

Re:It's not a newspaper (2)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640696)

Could it be that we went to books because of the invention of the printing press, which was not able to print continuously on a long scroll (contrary to the more modern printers, starting with the matrix printer)?

Rotary press 1843 vs offset press 1903 vs Dot matrix printer 1964

Pretty much everything printed on a modern press for about a century before the dot matrix printer was invented was printed on "scrolls". Newspapers etc are not printed on precut sheets. Other than modern desktop laser printers, pretty much everything for the last century has been printed on "scrolls" that are later chopped into pages. I am not counting artsy craftsy stuff like silk screening tee shirts here, rather the million times larger paper printing industry.

If you want some fun you can troll printers (people who run printing presses, not inanimate objects) regarding the offset press from 1903 vs the rotary press from 1843. There's not a heck of a lot of difference but some argumentative personalities love to argue how they're obviously separate different inventions vs obviously the offset is a minor modification of the rotary scarely even worth commenting on.

Re:It's not a newspaper (1)

badran (973386) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641336)

Cylinders have less weak spots.

Re:It's not a newspaper (2)

redherring728 (1927764) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641754)

Just because it's not what you're used to doesn't mean it's a bad idea :-)

Am I the only one that's sick and tired of seeing this nonsense argument? At what point did he say "It's a bad idea because it's not what I'm used to"? Your reply is completely irrelevant. I could just as easily say "Just because it's not what you're used to doesn't mean it's a good idea."

Re:It's not a newspaper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640026)

This. Just because you can make something doesn't mean anyone is going to want it.

That statement seems to be entirely the opposite of the concept of Apple today. "Make useless shit and instruct people that they want it" is pretty well their corporate philosophy.

Re:It's not a newspaper (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641056)

This. Just because you can make something doesn't mean anyone is going to want it.

That statement seems to be entirely the opposite of the concept of Apple today. "Make useless shit and instruct people that they want it" is pretty well their corporate philosophy.

Heh. "Apple makes useless products and just tells people to buy them. I know this because people tell me this all the time."

Re:It's not a newspaper (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641896)

Lets be fair now. I am all for pointing out Apples many shortcomings, but saying that the stuff they make is useless is a bit unfair. I may prefer my Android phone over the iPhone that work provided, but if Android didn't exist, I would heavily use the iPhone. Just because there are better options that are less expensive doesn't mean that Apple products are useless.

(Was that some awesome trolling or what?)

Re:It's not a newspaper (3, Interesting)

capnkr (1153623) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640568)

Rolled up things are an inefficient use of space.

Not necessarily. Next time you pack for a trip where luggage space is at a premium, try rolling up your clothing instead of packing it folded flat in your suitcase/seabag. When crammed full, not only will the result produce less wrinkles in the clothing (if care is taken with the rolling), but it is easier to go through the entire contents of the luggage container to find a specific item, and then remove it without 'upsetting' other items. Just sayin'...

Re:It's not a newspaper (3, Funny)

idontgno (624372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640710)

I believe Dilbert [dilbert.com] discussed this.

Re:It's not a newspaper (1)

PRMan (959735) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640672)

I believe you mean we went from scrolls to codices (plural of codex). Both are books.

Re:It's not a newspaper (4, Informative)

Whalou (721698) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639812)

From what I saw, the 'big empty volume' in the middle is used for the cylinder that appears to hold the actual computer. The rolled up part is just a screen that you hook up to the base.

Re:It's not a newspaper (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640044)

And the central part is also the speaker and has the power socket.

Re: rolled up paper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640076)

And even if it was, do you know how god damn annoying it is to read a paper after it's been rolled up?

Remember snap bracelets?
http://www.google.com/images?q=snap+bracelet [google.com]

Those didn't seem to have much of an issue with having been rolled up.

There are other methods of straightening out rolled-up works as well. The same principle as a scissor lift, for example. In multiple stages, they can be either expanded for sturdiness, or folded together and have a minimal profile that could be included in the roll-up.

I'm not sure if this sort of thing has benefits for notebooks. However, for handheld devices, I can definitely see that working quite well. Think iPhone with 10" screen, yet rolls up to a size optionally smaller than current iPhones* and be less prone to damage.

* Personally I wouldn't make it roll up into a cylinder per se. More of a rounded-box. That way the faces of the box can still function as normal displays, much like current-generation mobiles, and if you want the bigger screen you can roll it out entirely - without the edges that would be created by separate screens with hinges.

Re:It's not a newspaper (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640230)

Now now, dont bring reality and physics into it.

the roll up laptop will be built with unobtanium that will not have any material memory and will roll up easily and then unroll to be perfectly flat instantly..

Re:It's not a newspaper (2)

AlecC (512609) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640596)

Look, laptops do it right. The hinge? That's a crease, a fold line, and allows this thing that otherwise should not be bent to use space more efficiently. A cylinder is will have that big empty volume in the middle.

According to TFA, the hole in the middle contains USB ports, power connectors, speakers, webcam - basically all the PC except the keyboard/screen.

Re:It's not a newspaper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640968)

Anyone remember Earth: Final Conflict.

Roll up computers with video screens. It was the first thing I thought if when I saw the original video of the OLED screens. This "design" is about as innovative as most of shite turned out by Apple... ie... ideas stolen from cleverer, more original people. So they aren't even unoriginal... they are copying unoriginal people.

Why roll-up? (1)

pz (113803) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639592)

I fail to understand the entire roll-up computation field. What's the appeal? Why would I want to carry around a cylinder of material that is easy to crush (and therefore crease, likely destroying in the process) when the same item can be made flat, rigid, and slide easily into my briefcase along with other flat things that I need to carry around? Floppy items are no fun to type on. Curly things are no fun to read.

Can someone explain, please?

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

Sonny Yatsen (603655) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639646)

I think everyone remembers too fondly Captain Picard's girlfriend's rollup piano.

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640360)

There was such a thing on the market at one point.

(It had a big plastic lump at one end and I'm sure that the feel sucked and it doesn't have the magic sound implied on the TV show, but rollup piano keyboards, they have been produced)

Re:Why roll-up? (2)

Twinbee (767046) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639718)

A rolled up laptop essentially decreases a dimension of space you need to worry about. Therefore it'll take up less space and/or allow for larger screens.

Since the material is flexible, it's also less likely to break when dropped etc.

When it's uncurled it should be as flat to read as a normal laptop if the implementation is decent.

Re:Why roll-up? (2)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639738)

Exactly. Instead of roll-up, why not try and come up with a way that allows you to fold a laptop multiple times. If you can make a laptop thin and flexible enough to roll up like a newspaper, why not just try to make one that can fold up to the size of a paperback or small hardcover book? Hell, I'd be happy with a full-size laptop that can fold up to be the size of a closed netbook. Seems like that would be a lot more efficient and economical in terms of storage than rolling one up.

Re:Why roll-up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640260)

I think a roll-up screen would be a lot easier to manufacture than a folding screen that hides the crease.
Imagine a cylinder about an inch across containing the brains of the unit, with a flexible screen wrapped around it. Keyboard could be laser on to the desktop, or simply track hand movements for proficient typists.

Re:Why roll-up? (2)

Zerth (26112) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640876)

Existing flexible displays don't tolerate hard creases well. Making it a cylinder reduces the angle necessary to flex.

Now if you were willing to put up with some lines, a screen could be made of several 7" displays arranged much like a 2x2 desktop monitor array. But it would be very thick when folded and the keyboard would probably suck more than the usual laptop keyboard.

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641112)

Exactly. Instead of roll-up, why not try and come up with a way that allows you to fold a laptop multiple times.

Because it'll break.

Re:Why roll-up? (2)

teslafreak (684543) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639742)

Exactly! Packs are all made to store many layers of flat material, a cylinder would actually waste space. I just don't get it.

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640132)

If you WTFV you'll see that the central part holds the gubbins, like speakers and power and processors etc...

Re:Why roll-up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639756)

Read Papillon. In particular, notice the importance of his "charger". Then ask yourself, "how would I store a flat rigid sheet in my ass?".

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639760)

I agree. Floppy clyinders are no fun. Sliding rigid things into cases satisfies my manly urges.

Re:Why roll-up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639926)

really? maybe your manyly urges are different from mine, but there's little joy in daintily sliding a 1500 dollar laptop (the smallest i could afford) into a neoprene rubber sheath, wiggling it around as little as possible, avoiding moisture and sudden impacts, and wet-napping my fingers before handling it. in fact, there is nothing less manly than laptops.

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640382)

You need a cheap netbook with an SSD my friend. You can bang that thing as hard as you want without fear of any damage resulting from your manly ways. I sometimes use mine for entertainment while having a shower, and the warm moist atmosphere hasn't caused any problems so far.

"Pen"-size form factor (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639786)

Anywhere you can carry a pen, you could carry a computer. Also the screen would be larger than a watch-size or cell-size when expanded.

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639816)

Simple: A rolled up screen can be much larger than the keyboard it's attached to...

(A useful rolled up screen would have a lot less diameter than the one the "visionary" in the article is proposing)

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640110)

I fail to understand the entire fire concept! Why would I want to go to the bother of creating fire when I can digest raw meat and berries, scare of animals with a big nasty stick and keep warm by huddling together in a corner? Can someone explain, please?

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640274)

Based on today's CIS students.... it's a desire to at the end of the day, unroll your laptop, fill it with your favorite herb, roll it back up and smoke it.

Re:Why roll-up? (1)

Hotawa Hawk-eye (976755) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640326)

I fail to understand the entire roll-up computation field. What's the appeal? Why would I want to carry around a cylinder of material that is easy to crush (and therefore crease, likely destroying in the process) when the same item can be made flat, rigid, and slide easily into my briefcase along with other flat things that I need to carry around? Floppy items are no fun to type on. Curly things are no fun to read.

Can someone explain, please?

You don't carry around the cylinder on its own. The cylinder rolls up into a holder device, similar to the communicators on Earth: Final Conflict [photobucket.com] . The screen unrolls when you want to use it. Marry that with some tubes of electrorheological fluid [wikipedia.org] and you could get a flexible screen that becomes a flat, hard surface when unrolled and current flows through it.

I've seen these in several scifi shows (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639634)

One was the movie Mission To Mars. Another was a scifi TV series about a decade ago produced by Majel Roddenberry I think was called Earth Final Conflict. User had pen-like devices they could pull out a computer screen.

On a plane?! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639668)

Who let these ^%*$# roll up laptops on this ^&*#)@ plane!

Yawn (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639676)

Post about it when it is built.

'new' way to dispose of the unproven fatalities (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35639678)

flatten 'em out, & roll 'em up. an unexpectdead oasis forms?

They'll call it... (1)

kc9jud (1863822) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639690)

They'll call it the iScroll...

I can't wait! (1)

Bobfrankly1 (1043848) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639698)

I bet the Apple Rollup will taste the best. Either that or it won't but many people will insist in forums and chat rooms that it is.

Re:I can't wait! (1)

Skywolfblue (1944674) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639810)

Speaking of which, what does a "Google" taste like anyways? Grape? Kiwi? Orange?

Sci Fi staple (1)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639724)

Red Planet, Caprica, Killing Star, others.

Re:Sci Fi staple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640378)

Earth: Final Conflict...

Seen this before... (2)

khr (708262) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639764)

News?

I'm sure someone sent me a link to a video around two years or more ago that looked almost exactly like that. Same shape, same blue shoulder strap, everything...

Same speculation that it's coming right away...

Not in our life time. (1)

tom229 (1640685) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639834)

This reminds me of stuff like the nokia morph concept [nokia.com] . It took 10 years for me to be able to properly view a webpage on my phone. The monopolized 'slow roll' of our technology wont allow this stuff to happen in our life time.

displays are terrible keyboards (2)

mschaffer (97223) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639892)

When are designers going to get it into their heads that touch displays make terrible keyboards!!!
I will gladly keep my rigid keyboard in lieu of the roll-up display.

Besides, I saw sketches of something similar years ago. This isn't new.

Re:displays are terrible keyboards (1)

sammyF70 (1154563) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640700)

You do know what kind of answers you are going to get, right?

[ tablet fanboy mode ] if it's not for you, then don't buy one. there are people out there who just do not need a keyboard! It's all about mobility, man! Think of all the space you can save with such a device, space you can then fill with a bluetooth keyboard, bluetooth mouse, bluetooth usb adapter, and other peripherals and ports that are standard on any basic notebook[ /tablet fanboy mode ]

Re:displays are terrible keyboards (1)

PRMan (959735) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640708)

As long as iPhones and iPads keep selling like hotcakes, never.

Re:displays are terrible keyboards (1)

immakiku (777365) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640916)

(disregarding sammyF70's joke about tablet fanboys)

You know, there are people out there who just do not need a keyboard. The keyboard is optimized to construct words in an alphabetic language. Chinese users have struggled since the beginning of computing to figure out a good method to construct words on the keyboard. The most optimal solution now is a combination of some typing shorthand + auto-completion. Chinese is a language best written by hand. For that, a touch interface is actually superior.

Re:displays are terrible keyboards (1)

sammyF70 (1154563) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641268)

from my limited experience with japanese and kanji, I can see where you're coming from, although a good grafic tablet would probably be even better than a touch interface (but I'm no expert, so ...). I was obviously speaking about latin alphabet based text of course.

Re:displays are terrible keyboards (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641192)

When are designers going to get it into their heads that touch displays make terrible keyboards!!!

When people stop buying them by the 10's of millions.

Huh? (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639906)

What's so new about that? Concept ideas along those lines have been around for years, long before OLED screens became mainstream.

Old News, Yet Still Doesn't Exist (1)

Rary (566291) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639922)

The video in the linked site, which has been around since at least 2009 [gigaom.com] , is entirely animated. It's a neat idea, but show me a physical device.

This is an old idea (1)

pubwvj (1045960) | more than 3 years ago | (#35639972)

This idea has been around for a long time.

They see me rollin' (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640018)

They see me rollin'
my laptop
I know they're all thinking
I'm so white'n'nerdy

moveable parts (1)

hellfire (86129) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640170)

So that's a lot of moveable parts. Technically the screen is flexible but the other side appears hinged. What happens when one of those hinges bust?

One of the selling points is that the rolltop fits in any bag, but if my livelihood depends on a reliable machine that won't physically break in the airport right before I get on the plane, I'll gladly get a specialized bag for it, it's not that big a deal.

Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640200)

Since the Internet is a series of tubes, a cylindrical laptop makes perfect sense!

Re:Makes sense (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640428)

Has this been verified by Al Gore???

Paging William Gibson - (1)

Darth Snowshoe (1434515) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640304)

Seems like he wrote about this several years ago, now -

Only makes sense if you have a roll already (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640448)

It only makes sense to use a rollable anything if you have something else already that rolls up that cannot reasonably be made to take up less space in some other way. For instance in my camping kit I have a big thermarest pad which rolls up so it only makes sense that I should carry around other stuff that rolls up, then it can all go down the center of my pack and end up pretty well-balanced with other stuff packed around it. So I pack clothes into those gigantic zip-lock bags and wrap them around it. Anything that is highly breakable and fairly elongated can go in the middle in a Ziploc(tm) or in a screw-top container, etc. If I were to have unlimited funds or if I were arriving at Fry's in my flying car I might buy one for a couple hundred bucks.

Old Concept (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640458)

is Old

Would someone please QA the Slashdot editors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640524)

This blog post is so full of grammar and spelling errors that I'm amazed it's worthy of a front-page link. I almost want it to get Slashdotted just so people won't have to parse such broken prose. Even the quote contains a typo.

Fix Button (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640552)

Great it comes with a "Fix Button" for when it breaks! :P

So don't piss off your better half (1)

cdpage (1172729) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640654)

A rolled up newspaper over your head is one thing...

awful video / article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640742)

Virtual chicks carrying a rolltop around should move their ass in more better ways.

WTF is this whole article + video ?

Is this an early april fool ?

As much as the concept could be nice I can't figure out a worse way to "promote it"...

First the portal gun .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640788)

I'm glad to see Aperture Science is coming out with new products.

Yeah, sort of nice (1)

Thraxy (1782662) | more than 3 years ago | (#35640800)

It looks nice and kinda cool. Good concept. I see designers and hipsters as a good target group for this. For us that use the computer for a lot of typing, I don't think a touch keyboard will do the job. I also imagine the horror of that speaker/power-supply entangled in the cable mess under my table. Overall I think it's a fun concept, I wouldn't buy it, but I know people who would.

Here is the rub: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640890)

The one thing that tends to break first on a conventional laptop is the foil connecting screen to keyboard. That's nowhere near the stress level a rollup screen would have, contains no active components, far fewer connections and is decade-old mature technology.

It also bends in a controlled and designed manner without direct access of the user.

Now go figure.

Forgotten old... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640898)

I am still waiting for my roll out mobile phone from 2004.

Re (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35640908)

Excuse me while I whip this out...

Rewarding imagination? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35641122)

Why is this even being slashdotted? Nothing has been made. No new technology has been put forth, it's just a 3d-render of what someone thinks the future will look like, with absolutely no scientific merit behind it. I could fire up 3ds max right now and make a similar design, and submit it for slashdot, will I get a feature?

curling (1)

CoderFool (1366191) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641420)

So how long before the keyboard and screen start curling up and not laying flat anymore? And I guess you won't be able to put it on your lap anymore.

How about projecting when space is a premium? (1)

aix tom (902140) | more than 3 years ago | (#35641512)

Have a small cube or brick that projects a keyboard (like http://www.thinkgeek.com/computing/8193/ [thinkgeek.com] ) on the table, and a screen on the wall or on a roll-up screen. The "screen" could even be "touch" enabled via the same sensing technology the projected keyboard uses. For "Laptop" use there could be two dishwasher resistant plastic boards, which could also double as breakfast plates while commuting. ;-P

Definitely nothing I would want to write a book or code software on, but good enough for weak-point presentations or use on a plane.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?