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Nuclear Crisis Stopped Time In Japan

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the now-ramen-twists-the-other-way dept.

Japan 188

angry tapir writes "The problems at Japan's Fukushima-1 nuclear plant have had an unexpected impact on the country's ability to keep time: a transmitter that sends the national time signal to many thousands of clocks and watches has been forced offline making the timepieces a little less reliable than usual."

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Worst headline ever. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664278)

Not only did time not stop, but the clocks didn't even stop. They just aren't being synchronized anymore. Oh no!

Re:Worst headline ever. (4, Insightful)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664672)

Not only did time not stop, but the clocks didn't even stop. They just aren't being synchronized anymore. Oh no!

In Japan, a country that considers a train late if it arrives more than 20 seconds later than scheduled, that's pretty bad.

Re:Worst headline ever. (2, Insightful)

frozentier (1542099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664708)

I have a hunch that their perspective has changed somewhat in the past month or so.

Re:Worst headline ever. (5, Informative)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664872)

I have a hunch that their perspective has changed somewhat in the past month or so.

Perspective on what? Time?

I really doubt it. If anything, the near-perfect organisation of Japan has saved countless lives.

Re:Worst headline ever. (1)

Svartalf (2997) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665682)

I think that they meant that they're just a bit less concerned with trains being 20 seconds behind as "late".

Re:Worst headline ever. (5, Interesting)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666070)

I really doubt it. If anything, the near-perfect organisation of Japan has saved countless lives.

With tens of thousands of suicides a year, I think not. Another example of a modern society self-driven to neurosis.
The WHO even disputes Japan's definition of suicide that makes the reported numbers an estimated three times lower.

Re:Worst headline ever. (3, Interesting)

Ender_Wiggin (180793) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664764)

You mean if I don't synchronize my clock with the atomic clock more than every few days, it will be more than 20 seconds off?

Most wristwatches I've owned have a disclaimer in the manual that they keep time with a margin of error ±15 seconds per month. Those are the cheap Casios. I'm sure TV stations etc. have a better clock than me.

Re:Worst headline ever. (3, Insightful)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664860)

Indeed, due to reception issues it would be highly unwise to rely on a radio time broadcast for accuracy in important situations. You can have a mix of time sources (GPS, NTP, RDS etc.) but basically you need a reasonably accurate clock for when they are unavailable. Fortunately modules with better than 10 seconds/month are extremely cheap.

I got back from Japan on Sunday, there did not seem to be any time related problems. I didn't even know about it until this story.

Re:Worst headline ever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665606)

There used to be hobby standards that relied on the NTSC color subcarrier.

Re:Worst headline ever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665638)

You mean if I don't synchronize my clock with the atomic clock more than every few days, it will be more than 20 seconds off?

Most wristwatches I've owned have a disclaimer in the manual that they keep time with a margin of error ±15 seconds per month. Those are the cheap Casios. I'm sure TV stations etc. have a better clock than me.

Quartz watches are good to that much, but the fancy mechanical watches that have a COSC (e.g., all Rolexes) are only good to about -4/+6 seconds per day:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COSC

The better quartz movements (Citizen A660, Seiko 8Fxx) are good to about ±20 seconds per year (~1.4s/month).

TV stations use computers/NTP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665936)

I doubt even BBC uses radio to sync their clocks anymore

Re:Worst headline ever. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665246)

How racist is that.. imparting any cultural bias to a race, even if positive *is* racist you drunken irish thicko!

Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664286)

Very sorry for being 28 picoseconds late! The radioactive Caesium in the air put out my atomic clock

Re:Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (2, Funny)

vlueboy (1799360) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664344)

Very sorry for being 28 picoseconds late!

Only 28 psecs? Curses! That's still not enough to let us fool your millisecond trading systems.
Igor, it is necessary to calibrate our earthquake generators a second time.
Yes, let us triple the taco fuel!

Re:Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (3, Insightful)

shentino (1139071) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664348)

Actually this is good if it disrupts the microsecond arbitrage in Wall Street.

Re:Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35666028)

You obviously have no idea how HFT works. Funny considering you seem to be against it while at the same time being clueless about what it is. Typical lemming sheep.

Re:Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (2)

asto21 (1797450) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666222)

How was this even modded insightful? It's like saying sports cars in Japan will have slower 0-60 times

Re:Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665848)

Plus traffic on the Kessel run is murder these days.

Re:Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665918)

Plus traffic on the Kessel run is murder these days.

You're thinking parsecs, man.

Re:Caesium clock versus wild Caesium (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666192)

I forgive you, but Seppuku is the only honorable action in this circumstance.

time space math truth all 'suspended' paralyzed? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664298)

as the self-appointed 1% 'majority' takes our time with/from us? less fussing? we must focus on/wait for the images...

Re:time space math truth all 'suspended' paralyzed (2)

jonamous++ (1687704) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664958)

I wish that I could understand that sentence but without becoming insane. Your mind must be a wild and interesting place.

Re:time space math truth all 'suspended' paralyzed (1)

underqualified (1318035) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665044)

that place is probably located under a bridge

Re:time space math truth all 'suspended' paralyzed (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665556)

Nah, it's just him [timecube.com] again.

a French poem about stopping the time, (3, Interesting)

georgesdev (1987622) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664306)

Ô temps ! suspends ton vol...
-- French poem by Lamartine http://astronad.voila.net/Lamartine.htm [voila.net]

And? (3, Insightful)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664310)

Good thing there is still GPS, NTP, etc.

Worst case a few clocks have to fall back to quartz and lose a couple seconds a day, no?

Re:And? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664358)

Correct. In fact I was recently pleased to find how easy Windows Server 2008 R2 makes it to use external time sources.

Re:And? (0)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664494)

That has been easy to do since Windows 2000 was released.

Re:And? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664938)

Microsoft development tools are also second to none. .NET certainly stands head and shoulders above the rest, especially developing for Win Phone 7.

Re:And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665838)

What the hell is with the Microsoft astroturfing on slashdot as of late? Why now?

Couple seconds a day? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664556)

Good mechanical watches would be up to that. Decent quartzs? Couple of seconds a year, maybe even better.

Yearly average is good, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664608)

Over the course of a year quartz can be quite good. But as they are temperature dependent, they will be fast in summer and slow in winter. It averages out nicely.

When I have to set the time twice a year anyway (daylight-saving-time) I find that I'm about three minutes off. And that is on a very cheap watch.

My wall clock at home is synchronised to the time signal from DCF77, so that one corrects itself if it ever would go wrong.

Re:Yearly average is good, but... (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665256)

Your watch really does suck. The casio on my wrist (which is helped by having my arm as a thermal sink & source), is rarely off by more than 10-15 seconds in the 8 (?) months between daylight and standard time. I say that seconds, because I rarely checked the seconds for accuracy, as there is nothing in my life which requires my wristwatch to be more precise than a minute or so.

As for accuracy, it almost exactly 3 minutes fast. That happens to be about how long it takes me to stop what I'm doing and start moving appreciably towards where I need to be at any given time.

Re:And? (3, Interesting)

mcvos (645701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664842)

Good thing there is still GPS, NTP, etc.

That's what I've been wondering. With constant GPS signal all over the place, what do we need land-based atomic clock synchronisation for?

Re:And? (2)

Onuma (947856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664924)

Redundancy.

You put all of your eggs in one basket, and sooner or later that basket is going to be wiped out by a tsunami/quake.

Re:And? (4, Insightful)

LighterShadeOfBlack (1011407) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664982)

That's what I've been wondering. With constant GPS signal all over the place, what do we need land-based atomic clock synchronisation for?

You put all of your eggs in one basket, and sooner or later that basket is going to be wiped out by a tsunami/quake.

If a tsunami or quake takes out GPS satellites in orbit 20km above the surface of the Earth I think accurate time-keeping will be the least of anyone's worries.

Re:And? (1)

iinlane (948356) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665036)

An earthquake may take out the clocks the GPS satellites are synced against.

Re:And? (2)

rakaur (984920) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665068)

GPS satellites have atomic clocks on them. Every one.

Re:And? (1)

AndrewNeo (979708) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665646)

And they're still set by the ground. They drift.

Re:And? (1)

rakaur (984920) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666204)

What's your source for that? As far as I can find, nothing says they're ever set by anything on the ground. They don't drift; they're expensive ($50,000-$100,000) atomic clocks. Not as in they're set by a signal (like your "atomic clock" on the wall), but as in they're the ones that SEND the signal that sets your "atomic clock" on the wall. The only "off" thing about them is that they don't take the earth's rotation into account and thus use "GPS time" instead of "UTC time" and they send the difference between them (currently 15 seconds due to leap seconds) in their signal.

Re:And? (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665468)

If a tsunami or quake takes out GPS satellites in orbit 20km above the surface of the Earth I think accurate time-keeping will be the least of anyone's worries.

- well actually, if that happen I would know what to be mostly suprised about - a 20km tsunami wave or a falling GPS satellite.

Re:And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665720)

I think you meant 20000km (and I was actually surprised they weren't geosynchronous at 36000km).

Re:And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35666110)

That's what I've been wondering. With constant GPS signal all over the place, what do we need land-based atomic clock synchronisation for?

You put all of your eggs in one basket, and sooner or later that basket is going to be wiped out by a tsunami/quake.

If a tsunami or quake takes out GPS satellites in orbit 20km above the surface of the Earth I think accurate time-keeping will be the least of anyone's worries.

Well, we haven't had a major solar flare cycle in a while, so having an independent infrastructure couldn't hurt.

Re:And? (1)

mcvos (645701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664988)

Just launch some extra GPS satelites then. If one of them is taken out by a 20 million meter high tsunami, at least we'll have some backups.

Re:And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665048)

We actually already do. There's two spare GPS satellites in orbit in case any of the others fail.

Re:And? (1)

slapout (93640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665802)

I think you just wrote the script for the next SyFy movie of the week!

Re:And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664984)

You should try blocking the GPS signal in your region for a while and just have a look at how many things stop functioning like in this post [slashdot.org] to know that GPS might not be the wise solution here

Re:And? (1)

necro81 (917438) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665134)

One person mentioned redundancy, and that's the primary reason. Imagine this scenario: the GPS and NTP systems go offline (solar flare, alien invasion, whatever). This would obviously cause many problems, but clock synchronization is unlikely to be one of them. And so, in this hypothetical situation, we could see someone mention on Slashdot:

Good thing there is still atomic-clock synchronization over radio

The other reason why this radio-based synchronization signal is good to keep around is because it is ubiquitous and very cheap to utilize. To get synchronization from GPS you need a GPS transponder in whatever it is you are building. To use NTP you need a network connection to the wide world. To use this radio-based synchronization signal you only need a crude radio receiver tuned to the right frequency and a phase-locked loop circuit, all of which can be packaged in a $0.25 chip.

Legacy kit (1)

DomHawken (1335311) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665330)

There's still a bunch out there. The HF frequencies used for the time signal are also better at going through walls than the near line-of-sight needed for GPS satellites.

GPS needs terrestrial atomic clocks. (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665416)

The GPS satellites use these time signals from these atomic clocks to sych. Your little wrist watch could be off by 10 seconds and you would not even notice. The GPS satellites need to by synched with each other correct to ten billionth of a second. GPS receivers triangulate using the phase difference between the signals transmitted by the satellites. If any one satellite is off by 1.0e-08 sec, the distance calculation will be off by 10 feet.

Re:GPS needs terrestrial atomic clocks. (1)

mcvos (645701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665462)

The GPS satellites use these time signals from these atomic clocks to sych.

GPS satellites each have their own atomic clock. They don't depend on land-based clocks as far as I know.

Re:GPS needs terrestrial atomic clocks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35666046)

The GPS satellites use these time signals from these atomic clocks to sych.

GPS satellites each have their own atomic clock. They don't depend on land-based clocks as far as I know.

The slashtardism has hit a head for me.

Did you not think before you wrote that? Do you think that the "atomic clock" you bought for $20 at Wal-Mart has it's very own atomic clock in it? How and why in god's fucking name do you think they put an "atomic clock" in the satellite? How do they keep all of these synchronized?

It's a cesium atom vibrating at a precisely known frequency. It doesn't just "know" what time it is. The device is the size of an SUV.

Re:GPS needs terrestrial atomic clocks. (1)

mcvos (645701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666526)

Did you not think before you wrote that? Do you think that the "atomic clock" you bought for $20 at Wal-Mart has it's very own atomic clock in it? How and why in god's fucking name do you think they put an "atomic clock" in the satellite?

It might have been worthwhile to read up a bit before you flipped out like that. A GPS satellite does not cost $20 at Walmart, and does contain an atomic clock.

Re:GPS needs terrestrial atomic clocks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35666196)

GPS satellites have four atomic clocks. Cesium clocks for long term accuracy and hydrogen masers for short term. Two of each, for redundancy. Of course, they are also corrected for the relativistic effects of being in geosynchronous orbit!

Re:GPS needs terrestrial atomic clocks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35666212)

And these atomic clocks need to be regularly syncronized. Time passes differently at different locations in a gravitational field.

Re:GPS needs terrestrial atomic clocks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35666396)

The corrections sent to GPS satellites is not about time, it is about position. The Earth is not a perfect sphere, and because of this things in orbit tend to wobble. This is common amongst communications satellites, and even one that are not in geostationary orbits (such as a GPS satellite). There is no problem with the clock on them, as they are all atomic clocks. And in reality they are not updated all that often (unless you count the encrypted messages sent to them). GPS satellites are not used *just* for positioning.

Re:And? (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665474)

I don't have GPS signal in my bedroom. DCF77 [wikipedia.org] on the other hand, is reliable.

Re:And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665836)

Good thing there is still GPS, NTP, etc.

That's what I've been wondering. With constant GPS signal all over the place, what do we need land-based atomic clock synchronisation for?

Radio receivers are cheaper and lower power than the equivalent GPS receivers. The latter matters in a wristwatch or a (kitchen) wall clock that runs on a pair of AA batteries; the former (cost) matters if you only want to spend about $30 for a clock, and not over $100. Trade offs.

It should also be noted that a radio clock is generally under domestic control, while GPS is under foreign control. GPS also is a relatively weak signal, which can be jammed more easily. These reasons may matter to the more paranoid though.

Re:And? (1)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665892)

GPS doesn't reach indoor very well. Hard to sync the kitchen clock that way

This site has really jumped the shark (4, Insightful)

slyborg (524607) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664312)

I know it's late, and I think this may have been intended as humorous, but really, guys? Has it come to this?

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (1)

Coisiche (2000870) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664326)

Ah, the nature of time... I'd have said it was early since I've been a work for a bit more than an hour.

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (0)

Bomazi (1875554) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664364)

Even the shark has jumped the shark.

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (4, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664526)

Even the shark has jumped the shark.

It's sharks all the way up.

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (-1)

M8e (1008767) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664634)

and lasers in between and on top.

and so on.
laser
shark
laser
shark
laser
shark
laser
shark

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (4, Insightful)

discord5 (798235) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664396)

I know it's late

The Japanese currently sure don't... HAR HAR HARHAR

Has it come to this?

Sadly yes. The site does tend to more fluff, slashvertising, idle shit and biased politics articles than anything really interesting. I'm betting that by 2012 we'll have videos of cats on here.

Perhaps the new dysfunctional slashdot design should've clued most of us in that we should be leaving for something new.

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664448)

Sadly yes. The site does tend to more fluff, slashvertising, idle shit and biased politics articles than anything really interesting. I'm betting that by 2012 we'll have videos of cats on here.

Perhaps the new dysfunctional slashdot design should've clued most of us in that we should be leaving for something new.

O hai thar! Welcome to Catdot.org!

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (2)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664522)

I'm betting that by 2012 we'll have videos of cats on here.

So that WILL be the end of the world. I guess the Myans were right.

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (4, Funny)

digitig (1056110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664736)

I'm betting that by 2012 we'll have videos of cats on here.

Or photos of CAT 5s, at least.

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (1)

shish (588640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665576)

That would be way more nerdy than most of the news we get here :-(

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664876)

I'm betting that by 2012 we'll have videos of cats on here.

I understand that you're annoyed, but don't go hatin' on the lovable furballs. =^.^=

Idle already has a couple of cat [slashdot.org] stories [slashdot.org] . Video, culled from YouTube, is the natural evolution.

Let's be honest: you've been here for years, you aren't going anywhere. Embrace your feline overlords.

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (1)

nicholas22 (1945330) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664410)

+1 Stopped the time keeping operations is more appropriate that saying stopped time...

Re:This site has really jumped the shark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664458)

We really need to just make an alternative site which is basically identical, parsing Slashdot's Firehose but replaces one thing.... the idiot editors who write this shit up.

Better theory: (2)

n1hilist (997601) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664318)

It was Hiro!

Re:Better theory: (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666022)

In that case the least he could have done was go back and warn people [xkcd.com] .

Thanks for getting my hopes up... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664328)

"Nuclear Crisis Stopped" is not a good way to lead off a story on Japan.

My short attention span plays horrible games with me.

Re:Thanks for getting my hopes up... (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664372)

Agreed. Especially since it was ultimately the fault of the earthquake.

Re:Thanks for getting my hopes up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664964)

Fault. Earthquake. Yuk.

A man with one watch, knows what the time is (2)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664422)

A man with two watches, is never sure.

I guess a man in Japan with a radio signal watch has no clue right now.

have too many damn things in my apartment to change when daylight saving time hits. The coffee machine, the microwave, the clock on the wall, my stereo system main power supply . . . etc . . .

Re:A man with one watch, knows what the time is (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664732)

It doesn't matter how many watches you have. You never really know the time without a sextant, a spirit level, an almanac, and a clear sky.

Media idiocy (4, Insightful)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664486)

This is about as accurate, realistic, rational and un-hyped a headline as here has yet been regarding the entire nuclear incident...

Re:Media idiocy (1)

BForrester (946915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665596)

Wait until the follow up when they add or subtract the necessary motes of time to re-sync the national time signal. It will be either

Japan time travels to the past
or
Japan returns Back to the Future

Won't somebody think of the censors! (2)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664510)

I suppose this means any Simpsons episodes that don't display the correct time on their clocks will have to be banned.

And don't get me started on those times when the Bart and Lisa are late for school!

Re:Won't somebody think of the censors! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664538)

And don't get me started on those times when the Bart and Lisa are late for school!

Yes! We have to ban every episode showing schools. Many Japanese children don't even have a school anymore!

Bob Marley again... (2, Funny)

dido (9125) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664552)

I thought we should have no fear for atomic energy, mon, cause they could not stop de time!

Re:Bob Marley again... (1)

StuartHankins (1020819) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666404)

Troll? Really? A Bob Marley lyric? I believe it's Redemption Song.

It looks like Bob Marley was wrong... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664584)

"Have no fear of atomic energy, for none of them can stop the time" - Redemption Song

Unanswered questions (3, Insightful)

Pesticidal (1148911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35664598)

So I RTFA and am left wondering why the engineers needed to power down the transmitter just because they were forced to abandon it. I would have presumed it would be controlled by computers and not rely on humans regularly hitting a button LOST-style. Also, I presume the differences in transmission frequency between the two halves of Japan is related to the separate power mains frequencies?

Re:Unanswered questions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35664818)

Depends on how it was designed - it might not be fully automated. And even if it was, you don't want to run a high power transmitter without some sort of access for too long!

If the two transmitters that both cover almost all of Japan with relatively high signal strengths, were on the same frequency, they would interfere with each other. I guess that's why they are on different frequencies. They won't use the mains frequency as time standard (I hope!).

Re:Unanswered questions (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665006)

Probably because of regulatory constraints that require an engineer at the transmitter's control point (where the transmitter can be turned off quickly) in case something goes wrong with the transmitter. It could also be a safety issue, since the transmitter may have high voltage amplifiers that may catch fire if left unattended.

Re:Unanswered questions (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665688)

the transmitter may have high voltage amplifiers that may catch fire if left unattended.

TRANSMITTER: "Is it me or is it getting warm in here/"
ENGINEER: "Cut that out! Don't try that stunt again!"
TRANSMITTER: (Lights dim slightly) "OK, but just you wait!"

Could happen, I suppose.

Someone has to wind the atomic clock daily (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665070)

Those things don't just wind themselves, you know. Keeping all those superstrings under tension is a major job.

This post may have been brought to you by someone whose physics is a bit pre-Newtonian.

Re:Unanswered questions (1)

herojig (1625143) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665146)

Yea, a LOST reference. Much more interesting then the rest of this blather...

Lost... (1)

xororand (860319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665064)

Call Daniel Faraday ASAP!

who cares? Japan is already from the future (1)

WonderingAround (2007742) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665272)

They're pretty much warlocks of an Atlantis like society from the future, time should be irrelevant to them automatically!

Phew... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35665300)

A rare opportunity for the rest of the world to catch up with Japan!

they dont have internet time servers? (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665490)

MS offers the service by default so if u r connected to the internet, your clock self adjusts, or...wait.....that's right....you never use MS for mission critical stuff.....never mind.

hmmm (2)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 3 years ago | (#35665686)

"You Americans have clocks. We have time." - Some random Mexican I asked the time of in Mexico.

Actually, (1)

DFurno2003 (739807) | more than 3 years ago | (#35666520)

Everyone's wristwatches now read: "All Your Base Are Belong To Us"
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