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Samsung Plants Keyloggers On Laptops

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the terrible-marketing-ideas dept.

Privacy 515

Saint Aardvark writes "Mohammed Hassan writes in Network World that he found a keylogger program installed on his brand-new laptop — not once, but twice. After initial denials, Samsung has admitted they did this, saying it was to 'monitor the performance of the machine and to find out how it is being used.' As Hassan says, 'In other words, Samsung wanted to gather usage data without obtaining consent from laptop owners.' Three PR officers from Samsung have so far refused comment."

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WTF? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35671970)

Worst idea since Sony's rootkit. They should be prosecuted over crap like this.

Not once, but twice (1, Interesting)

HomelessInLaJolla (1026842) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672024)

The public exposure of this software keylogger which could be somewhat easily discovered by a general user is the decoy for the hundreds and thousands of idiosyncratic hardware exploits which are available on nearly all systems.

Those who designed the room sized adding machines knew the exploits and limitations of those. When room sized adding machines became room sized programmatic machines those who oversaw the development and migration knew the limitations and exploits of those. When room sized programmatic machines began to approach table sized microcomputers those who oversaw the development and migration knew the limitations and exploits of those. When table sized microcomputers developed external storage devices then those who oversaw the development and integration knew the limitations and exploits in those.

The obvious has escaped the notice of the overall computing community.

Re:Not once, but twice (3, Insightful)

desdinova 216 (2000908) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672042)

What?

Re:Not once, but twice (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672074)

I think he's trying to ask for more Peyote.

Re:Not once, but twice (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672288)

He's saying this is this is lame. the real shiza is in the chip.

Re:Not once, but twice (0, Offtopic)

strack (1051390) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672268)

your comment is like elephant shit. everyone can spot that its a shit from far far away. cause its so large. and then bear grylls squeezes it for moisture. the analogy breaks down a bit there, but its still mostly good.

Re:Not once, but twice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672284)

The public exposure of this software keylogger which could be somewhat easily discovered by a general user is the decoy for the hundreds and thousands of idiosyncratic hardware exploits which are available on nearly all systems.

Prove it with hard evidence, or admit that you're lying to get attention. Those are your only possible choices.

Re:Not once, but twice (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672476)

The obvious has escaped the notice of the overall computing community.

I'm pretty sure the obvious fact that you're a douchebag troll has certainly NOT escaped anyone.

Re:WTF? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672034)

Yes they should, it is a felony after all.

Re:WTF? (5, Informative)

FlatEric521 (1164027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672048)

They should be prosecuted over crap like this.

They will be. Sony got hit with tons of lawsuits, and they weren't using software that could steal your password. This just took corporate big brother behavior to a whole new level of invasive.

Re:WTF? (3, Interesting)

lgw (121541) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672314)

Sony paid over half a billion to settle their FTC lawsuit, and who knows how muchmore for other lawsuits. And that was the little stuff. Because Sony's rootkit made it onto many government-owned computers, the DoJ got pissed with them , and basically said "we're giving you the benefit of the doubt this once that you didn't intend to extract sensitive information from government computers, but keep in mind that penalties for doing so could include a ban on sales of all Sony products in America, and siezure of all Sony assets in America". You'd think that would get everyone's attention.

Re:WTF? (2)

matt_gaia (228110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672052)

Probably worse idea, since, IIRC the Sony rootkit didn't collect all of the data that this keylogger could. Whatever the case is though, still an extremely douchey move, Samsung, and hopefully one they'll be sued to hell over.

Re:WTF? (4, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672058)

Worse than Sony's rootkit. Both programs attempt to do something to your property without your consent, but only this one also takes the opportunity to spy on you. They won't be prosecuted, though. At the very worst, some sacrificial lamb from marketing will be fired. American corporate CEOs are above the law.

Re:WTF? (4, Informative)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672120)

Samsung's CEO is Korean. Samsung is Korean company, you know.

Re:WTF? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672198)

Shh, it's better to trash "American CEO's" and "American Coporations" Stop with your facts

Re:WTF? (-1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672400)

Samsung and Samsung America are two separate entities.

Re:WTF? (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672246)

Sony and Samsung are not American companies.

Re:WTF? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672308)

Sony America and Samsung America are actually separate financial entities. They can be sued in one area and not another for example they can be sued in the U.S. but the same suit may not apply to the EU.

I wonder if they are doing this with their phones also?

Re:WTF? (2)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672334)

Sorry, typed that wrong. Meant "In America, corporate CEOs are above the law." Applies to any and all CEOs, if the company is big enough. Have any banksters, from any country, been prosecuted in America for any crime relating to the recent depression?

Re:WTF? (3, Informative)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672408)

Umm, yea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Madoff [wikipedia.org]

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-30/ex-taylor-bean-official-ragland-to-enter-plea-in-1-9-billion-fraud-case.html [bloomberg.com]

And this dude is in court right now

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raj_Rajaratnam [wikipedia.org]

Theres alot of cases going on, have ended in pleas if you just google.

Re:WTF? (5, Interesting)

lgw (121541) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672380)

If you make a habit of punishing "the CEO", then "the CEO" will be a fall guy hired by whoever actually runs the company. Sony's rootkit got Sony threatened with ending the presence of Sony in America - while America may let corporations slide on many issues, actual espianage involving a foreign corporation and sensitive government data won't be ignored.

Samsung should be very thankful that the US Government in general avoids foreign-built computers out of a strange fear that there might be keyloggoers or similar installed on them at the factory: an idea that many /.ers once dismissed as crazy paranoia, back when Thinkpad shifted to Lenovo.

Re:WTF? (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672086)

Welcome to my shitlist, Samsung. I believe you already know Sony. I'm not sure if you've met Belkin. I'm sure you'll all become friends.

Re:WTF? (1)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672156)

What's Belkin's deal?

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672186)

AFAIR, Belkin payed off bloggers/reviewers to post good reviews of their products...

Re:WTF? (2)

sqlrob (173498) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672328)

Inserting ads into http streams in their routers.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672510)

Forgive the A/C post. Can you toss up a link to that http ad stream, I'd never heard of it.

FWIW, I also have dlink on my shit list for their NTP vandalism and threats

http://people.freebsd.org/~phk/dlink/

You'll have to go to archive.org to see..the...version where the guy didn't get threatened with a massive lawsuit and settle. Let me put it this way...they were anything *BUT* good corporate or net citizens.

Re:WTF? (1)

GeeBee (104073) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672342)

And don't forget this:

Help! my Belkin router is spamming me
Nagware promotes censorware

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/11/07/help_my_belkin_router/ [theregister.co.uk]

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672390)

Friends don't let friends buy Belkin products. They are all crap.

Re:WTF? (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672128)

Yes they should. This is why I wipe machines when I get them (with Linux these days as I'm not impressed with the information that a default Windows install phones home with). Is it going to take jail terms before these companies realize that the machines and software we're buying are ours, not theirs to do with as they please?

Re:WTF? (3, Interesting)

Just because I'm an (847583) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672144)

I often wondered whether as with food where there is a legal requirement to list the ingredients there should be a similar requirement for PC vendors to list all the bloat/crap/ad-ware they include on their products. Of course people may still not know what they're in for but at least there's a chance you can stop yourself getting affected by a keylogger if you bothered to check it was there. Also if this was a legal requirement then a failure to disclose its presence would lead to a relatively strightforward penalty. I know most of the readers here would probably install the system themselves and likely not even Windows but for the bulk of the consumers it might be useful to at least know what's coming and be able to make a choice *before* the purchase is made.
-

I'd like to see Samsung get into big trouble over this because it is inherently wrong, at least that's my position, but I am less sure if they have broken any actual laws. Maybe some digital eavesdropping provisions that are only allowed to be done by governments have been breached but I can see Samsung weaselling out of that one. There's probably a disclaimer in 5point font 100 pages into the agreement that the buyer agrees to by opening the box.... of course that's wrong too. Oh where to start...

Jail time, not just a fine... (1)

traindirector (1001483) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672162)

Whoever approved this needs some jail time. Merely a fine for the "corporate person" guilty of this would just mean this sort of thing will continue if there's a chance of profitability.

Get Ready (1)

vldragon (981127) | more than 3 years ago | (#35671986)

Samsung's legal and PR departments need to get ready for the shitstorm that is sure to come...

Re:Get Ready (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672070)

Samsung's legal and PR departments need to get ready for the shitstorm that is sure to come...

Yeah like Samsung just joining my avoid at all cost list. I just hope the rest of the media picks up on this and they don't get beat down by their departments that sell commercial time. That's generally where stories like this get killed. Can't piss off the nice corporation that has tens of millions to spend on advertising.

First post! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35671990)

But Samsung logged it :(

I'm sure there's a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672000)

...reasonable explanation.

Right?

Hello?

--
Sent from my Samsung laptop

Re:I'm sure there's a... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672028)

hello

I would like to state that I have quite found a reasonable explaination for said matter and would like to praise Samsung Inc. for their bravery and courage as well as their quality product line. I can not wait to buy another Samsung product, it fills me with a great pride to own such a quality hardware.

--
Sent from my Samsung laptop

Without obtaining consent? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672010)

I bet there's a cryptic line somewhere in the EULA or whatever legalese they bundle with computers these days that "authorized" it.

I'm sure they think they're smart when they cipher such idiocies into the EULAs, but in the end it will do little difference for Samsung.

It must be INFORMED consent (2)

realxmp (518717) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672090)

If this is true then in the United Kingdom at least this is a criminal offence. It's a violation of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act and possibly the Computer Misuse Act. The fact that it's hidden deep in some EULA wouldn't fly, unless they made a deliberate effort to ensure users were aware.

Re:Without obtaining consent? (4, Informative)

v1 (525388) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672100)

They can put anything they darn well please into the EULA, it doesn't guarantee it to be binding or legally enforceable.

They could sneak a line in somewhere in the middle of page 28 of 45 that says by using this software you're required to send them a check for $500. It would be very hard to enforce.

The practice of installing hidden software like that already has been condemned by the FTC. (from TFA: In the words of the of former FTC chairman Deborah Platt Majoras, "Installations of secret software that create security risks are intrusive and unlawful." (FTC, 2007).) So they're probably going to get hammered on this. And rightfully so.

Usually when their legal department refuses to reply when you're requesting comments before someone goes public, it's because they're busy batoning down the hatches and polishing up their resumes.

Re:Without obtaining consent? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672292)

batoning down the hatches

It's "battening down the hatches" [thefreedictionary.com] , though you might legitimately feel the urge to baton Samsung right now.

Re:Without obtaining consent? (1)

node 3 (115640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672388)

Consent implies the person giving consent is aware of what they are agreeing to. If I mumble, "if you ask me 'what?', you agree to immediately pay me a million dollars", and you ask me, "what?", that does not mean you actually agreed to pay me a million dollars.

Even more embarrassing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672018)

Was their complete failure in the previous attempts at installing keyloggers on Sumsung TVs.

Oh say it isn't so... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672046)

...a company does something illegal, immoral and intrusive, deceives its customers in an effort to pad their bottom line? Next you'll be telling me they'll get away with it!

If an event occurs daily, is it really "news" anymore?

Oh, and here's how the rest of this plays out: PR spins the case as "few defective machines", general public is mollified (as they don't know about the source image from which the whole laptop series is initialized), promises more stringent controls. Company hires better spy software vendor, updates its spyware. Researcher discovers new spyware in a (few) years. Repeat.

Stop it (5, Insightful)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672116)

If you don't get outraged when outrageous stuff happens, then don't be surprised when more outrageous things happen. It's your own damn fault for not standing up for what's right.

Re:Stop it (3, Insightful)

CrazyDuke (529195) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672266)

...not to claim him, you, or myself more right or righteous. But, I often find when I stand up for the rights of myself and others, I usually end up standing alone. ...with a few shoe prints and knife blades in my backside for good measure.

Did you ever get the feeling that the reason the things in life that suck are allowed to continue is because so many people want it that way?

Re:Oh say it isn't so... (5, Insightful)

node 3 (115640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672426)

"Meh, corruption isn't news, stfu" == "give me more corruption", in the end.

If you don't get upset over these sort of things, you just invite more. Sure, making a fuss won't necessarily stop it from happening again, but remaining silent certainly won't.

Yet another example (1, Informative)

milbournosphere (1273186) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672050)

of why one should ALWAYS wipe the hard drive of a new machine and install a clean copy of Windows (or Linux).

And we do this how? (5, Insightful)

jeko (179919) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672192)

How do you recommend we install a clean copy of Windows, short of buying your own copy for $189.00? PC manufacturers don't even include a "recovery disk" any more, let alone a copy of the OS you just bought and paid for. Not that I disagree with you at all, but the average consumer isn't going to buy their PC for $500-1200, and then cough up $200 for a clean copy of the OS, and then another couple hundred to find someone to wipe and install it for them.

Re:And we do this how? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672228)

I never would recommend an installation of Windows, but if you are going to do it a retail copy would be the way to go.

Otherwise don't be surprised to find all kinds of crummy software and maybe even crap like this installed.

Re:And we do this how? (1)

node 3 (115640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672454)

I never would recommend an installation of Windows, but if you are going to do it a retail copy would be the way to go.

Otherwise don't be surprised to find all kinds of crummy software and maybe even crap like this installed.

No, I think it's appropriate to be surprised that a major corporation like Samsung includes a keylogger with their computers. Crapware/bloatware is one thing, but a keylogger goes far beyond reason. In fact, it's not just unreasonable, but is quite likely criminal.

Re:And we do this how? (1)

Nos. (179609) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672250)

They do however, come with the product key. Acquire an install disc and do the install yourself.

Re:And we do this how? (2, Insightful)

Tigger's Pet (130655) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672272)

Well, in my case it's simple as I use Linux for everything nowadays - I do still have a Win XP partition on this laptop, as it makes it easier to support my Dad when he gets problems, but I never use it.
If I was buying a new laptop and needed Windows on it then I'd 'obtain' one. It isn't software piracy as I already own the license through buying the hardware with the COA on it, so it's not illegal. The only problem is that you would still need to download the hardware-specific drivers from Samsung's website - and who can say that they don't bury the keylogger software inside one of them? Then you're shit out of luck I guess, unless you're ready to reverse-engineer the downloaded code.

Re:And we do this how? (1)

RLiegh (247921) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672310)

*reads post*
*looks at my 2008 dell laptop*
*looks at the bundled vista installaiton cd [not os image, actual installation cd]*
*reads posts*
*shakes head and keeps reading*

Re:And we do this how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672364)

<-- whoosh
you

Re:And we do this how? (2)

mgiuca (1040724) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672502)

Dell is pretty good. I got mine in 2008 as well with installation media. I would hope they still do that. I don't think many other vendors include it.

Honestly, we are in such a huge scam. When buying a computer, we are forced to pay Microsoft for an operating system we may not want (good luck purchasing a blank PC*), and even after having purchased it, we often don't get the actual CD so we just paid for a one-time OS that needs to be re-purchased to install a "clean" copy.

Of course, Windows is included in the price of the PC, so most people don't even realise they've paid for it.

*Yes, you can buy PC parts and build it yourself, but it's pretty hard to do with a laptop.

Re:And we do this how? (2)

chrisj_0 (825246) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672372)

Download it and use the OEM key on the bottom of your laptop.

Re:And we do this how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672498)

Take it to a Microsoft Store nearby and they will install a clean copy of Windows as long as your machine has the license code that it shipped with

Re:Yet another example (1)

ebcdic (39948) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672326)

There's no such thing as a clean copy of Windows.

Boycott (4, Insightful)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672068)

Let them know their behavior isn't appropriate. Don't buy their product, and let everyone you know why you don't recommend buying their product.

Re:Boycott (1)

DreamArcher (1690064) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672106)

Embargo on. I'm in the market to buy a laptop for my son's graduation gift. Samsung just removed them self from my list.

Re:Boycott (1)

Quinn_Inuit (760445) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672138)

They just lost two customers here, probably for life. My wife's not particularly tech-savvy, but she just saw the post over my shoulder and there's no way she'd buy a Samsung now. And I'll definitely pay extra (if necessary) to know I'm not being monitored with a keylogger. So the price is immaterial...I don't think either of us would take a Samsung computer of any sort for free at this point. (I know I could theoretically wipe it and start fresh, but if it's the manufacturer doing it, who knows what kind of backups they might have built straight into the BIOS or somewhere else on the motherboard?)

Re:Boycott (1)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672140)

A boycott is incredibly inadequate. The computers have already sold. The market didn't have this information at time of sale. And it doesn't have this information about any other product.

The answer is criminal charges for wiretapping, amplified by the number of units shipped. Throw the CEO and their corporate council in jail, and I suspect it won't happen again.

Re:Boycott (1)

krazytekn0 (1069802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672242)

Criminal charges where? Korea?

Re:Boycott (2)

publiclurker (952615) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672386)

North if possible.

False dichotomy (1)

jbn-o (555068) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672522)

There's no need to choose between boycotting the manufacturer and criminal prosecution. Both are available to all of us and both should be used.

"The computers have already sold" makes it sound like future sales with keyloggers are impossible. Samsung is not the only organization who can do this either.

Re:Boycott (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672196)

Samsung:

Net income US$ 13.8 billion (2009)

Unless you know a few billion people, its not really going to work.

There are no words to describe it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672092)

Is it possible that someone's done something so simply stupid that it's impossible to write an insightful comment about it?

Re:There are no words to describe it. (1)

Tailhook (98486) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672508)

I'll try.

Does Samsung have some sort of mass key-logger analysis software that can correlate keystrokes with arbitrary activity? How else would they make use of thousands or potentially millions of key-logger streams? If so, from whom did they get it? The most plausible source of a key-logger analysis system is either a criminal outfit or an "intelligence" organization (assuming you draw distinction between the two.)

Is it possible that the tech support guy just made up this 'monitor the performance of the machine and to find out how it is being used' stuff because they routinely use that excuse for other things, it sounds plausible and might seem to him to be less heinous than 'we shipped an infected operating system'?

Given Sony you have to discount the latter.

Default Software (1, Insightful)

quorn_is_fungus (1076101) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672096)

I'm surprised that Mr Hassan, having no fewer than 13 letters' worth of titles and certifications after his name, doesn't do what many informed users do immediately upon purchasing a Windows laptop: immediately format the HD and do a fresh installation of the OS. His discovery of a keylogger is yet more evidence of the necessity of doing so.

Re:Default Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672130)

Exactly. Who on earth uses the default OS installation these days? They're filled with crapware and even if not, are completely untrustable.

On any new machine, you have to scrub the disk down and reinstall your own OS from scratch. I thought that was kinda computer-101 stuff these days.

Re:Default Software (2)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672274)

Macs don't come with a lot of crapware, they work just fine with the default OS instillation.

Re:Default Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672316)

If you consider industry-standard programs crashing all the time on OSX "working just fine", sure.

Re:Default Software (1)

Wovel (964431) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672410)

If you are trying to make an argument that poorly written proprietary Adobe software is an industry standard, the industry is in worse shape then we thought.

Re:Default Software (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672432)

Macs don't come with a lot of crapware

...what about the Mac app store that they pushed out as part of an OS update?

What? I get to choose whether I want a security patched OS with Apple's crapware or whether to live with a machine that has unpatched vulns? Great.

Re:Default Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672300)

Exactly. Who on earth uses the default OS installation these days? They're filled with crapware and even if not, are completely untrustable.

On any new machine, you have to scrub the disk down and reinstall your own OS from scratch. I thought that was kinda computer-101 stuff these days.

Yup, mom & dad just log onto The Google over dialup and learn how to format their harddive and install a new OS.

Free Disaster Recovery (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672098)

I had a longer comment, but my machine crashed before I was able to submit. Just read it back at http://logger.samsung.com/mhassan/20110330log.txt

Only one case? (5, Insightful)

demonbug (309515) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672118)

A quick search didn't turn up any other reports of this besides discussion pointing back to the linked Network World article. Considering it seems very easy to detect (an SL folder in the main windows directory, accompanied by an automatic uninstall program?) it seems like people wouldn't have any trouble finding it if it is there. Anyone have any confirmation? Anyone besides Mr. Hassan finding this on their new Samsung?

Re:Only one case? (3, Informative)

echucker (570962) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672166)

Some of the comments on the article reach the same conclusion. One even suggests it was someone at the store where they were purchased that installed the logger. Problem is, Samsung's tech support guy already admitted to it.

Re:Only one case? (4, Interesting)

cobrausn (1915176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672172)

I was actually wondering the same thing myself. The article links to another discussion [sunbeltsoftware.com] where a user's root kit scan caused a 'total freeze' on a samsung netbook, but this seems like something that needs verification before we grab the torches and pitchforks.

Re:Only one case? (1)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672222)

If only this could get posted to a forum full of thousands of angry nerds. Oh wait! Slashdot: get on this, please.

Re:Only one case? (1)

Andrevan (621897) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672420)

I have a Samsung RF510-S02 and I can't find the SL folder in my Windows directory.

If ever there was ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672142)

... A reason to build my own machine, then this is it. Do all the name brand sycophants out there even realize what it takes to get rid of all the bullshit that most PC makers put on those machines? I was so upset about buying HP, Dell, Compaq, etc., and having to uninstall all the "internet services" provided, that I was literally going to shit my balls. Yes, I'm being facetious - but not entirely.

I have a question, if anyone is willing to oblige - does HP or Dell put AOL and MS on their servers?

Just lost my $$ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672154)

... and I was literally about to head out from work to buy a 46" Samsung LED-LCD.

I guess another company of, at best, dubious reputation will luck out and get my hard earned cash.

"Goat pr0n" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672180)

Hello samsung!

Re:"Goat pr0n" (0)

makubesu (1910402) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672232)

Murder samsung ceo's family.

Re:"Goat pr0n" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672330)

Murder samsung ceo's family.

Err no... Get some perspective -- even for jokes. The first person to type "goat pr0n" on his laptop wins!

North v South (1)

xkr (786629) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672200)

Is Samsung now a NORTH Korean company?

Nothing new here. (1)

Hotweed Music (2017854) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672204)

Re:Nothing new here. (1)

egranlund (1827406) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672384)

What? I don't understand this guy's story - every laptop I've disassembled from 1990 on has a ribbon cable going from the keyboard to the mobo not full on insulated cables - not to mention most laptops are packed so tight that a device like that wouldn't fit. I mean, if they really wanted to hide a keylogger they'd put it on the mobo somewhere. It'd be way harder to find than the pictures of the device he has.

WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672208)

TFA starts off with, and spends more of the time bashing Sony's rootkit from 6 years ago. Yeah that sucked, but that's old news and not really relevant to what Samsung is doing now.

(yes I actually read TFA. Both of them).

little bit early? (1)

mug funky (910186) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672212)

i looked at the date... March 31st. so close.

so now i'm not sure whether to believe this or not.

i'm'a gonna watch and see if anybody else in the world of Samsung laptops finds the same thing. i'm sure many are searching for it now.

Re:little bit early? (1)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672240)

If this is a joke, it is begging for a libel suit. I mean, financial damages much? And it's not very funny. I'm waiting for confirmation, but it doesn't look good.

Now I feel justified (1)

vlueboy (1799360) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672286)

I get the feeling that my disabling all those update services that my HP and Toshiba laptops are bundled with can be justified better now. It's not just a performance issue anymore, but a security one. How much longer till others come forward and admit they've been doing the same?

I've never fresh installed a new laptop on purchase day unless other than for business purposes, but this is getting scary.

Re:Now I feel justified (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672336)

You have to justify deleting those services? Try to justify why they're there in the first place.

Re:Now I feel justified (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672394)

I get the feeling that my disabling all those update services that my HP and Toshiba laptops are bundled with can be justified better now.

You need a justification for configuring your own computer the way you like it?

BP's lost laptop (1)

olsmeister (1488789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672302)

Maybe the laptop the BP lost with personal information from thousands of people who've filed claims related to the Deepwater Horizon disaster was a Samsung. Just wait for someone to connect it to the internet.... voila. See? It's a FEATURE.

verified? (1)

Jeek Elemental (976426) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672344)

any other sources on this, it seems an incredibly stupid thing to do for a non-microsoft company.

what happened to you Samsung (1)

Klobbersaurus (796024) | more than 3 years ago | (#35672352)

what the fuck samsung, you used to be cool

It's not your hardware! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35672382)

How many times do companies have to beat it in to your head? You don't *own* the hardware you buy. Therefore they don't need your permission, and any attempt to circumvent it is illegal!

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